Fence 2009
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Fence 2009

on

  • 542 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
542
Views on SlideShare
539
Embed Views
3

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

2 Embeds 3

http://www.linkedin.com 2
http://www.slideshare.net 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Fence 2009 Fence 2009 Presentation Transcript

  • This is the Enemy! Hera & Zeus Don’t say “how cute.” They are the reason for this story. Labrador‐Australian  shepherd mix with a penchant for garden destruction. I recommended having  them listen to a band called “Youth in Asia” but Terrye would not hear of it.
  • The Aftermath You will have to use your imagination. There used to be a garden here. We have  pictures, but are too tired to find them. Fruits, veggies and other garden fare were  once happily farmed here. This is after THEY arrived…
  • Previous fences that did not pass the  “your fence is still weak”  Labrador test. Revenge would be ours!
  • The Marauders tore  through every planter  box, pulling up and eating  everything they could  find.   (including watermelons  and chili peppers) Then they left us plenty of  “doggie nuggets” to show  that the area was  properly theirs.  War was declared, but  first the dead had to be  buried.
  • Just a moment of silence… For those plants that did not make it. Nearly three years  without a garden! On the up side, we did have a bumper  crop of weeds. We took care of that. The horror…
  • There were survivors… We planted four trees and used chicken wire and metallic posts that were  bordered with wood that survived the onslaught and were never penetrated  by the dogs. This planted the idea that it could be done. It would just require  a bigger, better fence than anything we had done to date. The dream of the  Uber‐fence had begun…
  • Phase One: Dig Holes This is a one‐man auger. That is a lie. One man,  if he is really burly, fresh from the joint, with  extra “yard muscle,” might be able to use this  alone. We don’t recommend that. We don’t  recommend this particular tool at all. We  suffered with it because we needed to get  close to the fence and the two man auger  would not work. Bruises for all my friends! It  took two of us to use it in the deadly clay soil  of our backyard. We dug ten holes with this beast. Our  blisters had blisters at the end of the day.  The holes were on the average of 21 ‐23  inches deep and 8 inches wide.
  • Phase Two: Put down redwood 4x4 fence posts We did not use concrete to fill those post holes, (seeing how we spent a few  days before, removing concrete blocks buried two feet deep out of the yard  from a previous foundation.)  Our enlightened method is to use road base. Dig hole, fill with road base,  plant post, crush base into hole, use water, and fill hole to finish. Sets well  and provides good support without the horror of mixing your own concrete.  Terrye learned this from her work with Habitat for Humanity.
  • A long view  of the yard From this angle it is about forty  feet to the corner post. It took  about 8 hours to drop all 10 posts.  There was another hole that was  hand dug at the last moment due  to a tree root that was in the way. I  recommended removing the tree,  but was over‐ruled. If you look carefully, you can see  our next fence project boarded up  awaiting repair.
  • So many posts!
  • Phase Three: Crossbeams Douglas fir. A bit soft but relatively easy to use. The objective was to create a frame to mount a strong wire mesh. The upper and  lower bars were 2x4s and a wire mesh would be stretched and stapled between the  posts. Then a second 1x2 would be screwed down over it to ensure the stability of the  mesh. Our Labradors can detect any weakness, so there must be none. (All that debris  on that deck was stuff we dug out of the yard before we could dig the post holes.)
  • Problem Corner: Tree in the way This corner presented several problems. The distance between this corner and the  fence was over 10 feet. No other span was greater than 7.9 feet. This made the  distance between the posts and the strengths of the crossbeams to be questionable. So we dug, by hand, an extra hole near the tree and reduced the distance between  the corner and the fence. The hole was filled with a concrete pier support and the  redwood post was screwed into the top of the support. We decided to use some  redwood lattice to help support this corner.
  • Anchoring in soft soil We had to dig a much larger hole since we had to sink a concrete pier into the hole.  After digging a 18 inch deep hole that was over 12 inches wide, we placed road base  at the bottom of the hole for drainage and filled around the block for stability. We  then anchored the redwood post to the top of the pier with multiple screws. Since this  corner was weaker than the others we thought we would support it with lattice work  and extra wood if necessary. To make this more challenging there was a tool shed next  to the tree and the soil was very soft and loamy providing very little support.
  • The secret weapon was a sandwich of wire mesh  Strong Wire Mesh between a 1x2 bound to each post and to each  crossbar. This would allow no weak spots  anywhere along the fence line. Each 1x2 was  anchored by a 2.5 or 3 inch plastic‐coated screw.  We know that this mesh would work because we  have used it successfully around our fruit trees  using a makeshift post arrangement.
  • The extra wire is cut away with wire cutters across the top and the sides but leaves tiny  spurs at every cut point that will need to be filed away due to its amazing levels of  flesh‐rending sharpness. I suspect it will require a power tool to deal with the problem.
  • Phase four: Creating the Gates Each gate is custom made. There are two gates, one on the short leg of the garden,  the other on the long leg. Each gate provides access to the garden closest to it. Each  gate is 44” wide. The longer leg will likely be used to allow access to wheel barrels and  other support tools. One gate is using 45 degree corners, the other uses a box cut. We  experimented with each to see which would be stronger over time. Each gate uses  three hinges and a simple latch to keep it closed. The gate can also be locked with a  padlock. With the addition of the gates the doggie apocalypse draws near.
  • Quality tools make the difference Adjustable Miter Box Saw Squeezable C Clamps (4) Two power drills (one for drilling, the  Plastic Coated Deck Screws – 2”,  other for driving screws, rotary saw for  2.5”, 3” 3.5” lattice cutting, long extension cords (3)
  • The Final Product
  • Be Amazed!
  • Marvel at the 8th wonder of the world
  • A Herculean Effort!
  • Beauty and Strength in a finely varnished package! This fence project took approximately 1week and  1 day to complete. The solid construction with  reinforcing wood overlays and wire mesh  screening has successfully repelled repeated  attempts by the dogs to enter the garden. It  should be able to resist any further attempts at  entry and we will build 2‐4 additional planter  boxes and see what we can grow this summer.