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Mental Illness and Criminal Violence

Mental Illness and Criminal Violence

Published in Health & Medicine
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  • Title Page
  • Many people believe that people that suffer from mental illness are prone to commit crime and violent acts against others. My research discussed the relationship between the two, the factors that lead believe to such beliefs and the stereotypes that are associated with the two.
  • In my review, I attempted to answer these four questions in order to help others get a better understanding of crime as it relates to mentally ill patients.
  • During my review, I discovered that most mentally ill persons that commit crime also suffer from a drug or alcohol problem as well. Other problems that they may suffer from are also included in this slide.
  • Some more interesting facts about the relationship between mental illness and crime.

Transcript

  • 1. By Ebonie McAfee
    Psyc 492
    Mary Viventi
    Mental Illness and the Correlation to Criminal and Violent Behaviors
  • 2. Criminal violence has increased over recent years as well as the diagnosis of mental disorders and illnesses. This paper will review whether one has anything to do with the other, if so, what other factors that may cause the relationship between the two, and what factors may lead people to believe that mental illness necessarily leads to crime and violence. Ultimately, the goal of this paper is to help dispel some of the stereotypes associated with persons with mental illnesses as it relates to crime and violence.
    ABSTRACT
  • 3. What is the relationship between mental illness and criminal behavior, if any?
    How? What other factors contribute to this relationship?
    Why does society correlate mental illness to violence and criminal behavior?
    How can stereotypes regarding the two be combated?
    HYPOTHESIS
  • 4. FACTS
    • Most crimes committed by mentally ill persons are usually a result of a mental illness and a substance abuse problem, also known as a dual diagnosis.
    Other factors may include:
    • Lower socio-economic status
    • 5. Lower education levels
    • 6. Lack of treatment options
    • 7. Individuals who receive inadequate treatment are more likely to engage in violence acts than those who receive treatment
  • Most mentally ill persons are more often the VICTIMS of crimes, NOT the perpetrators?
    Most people with mental disorders are NOT violent?
    People with mental illnesses are more likely to be victims of physical assaults, rapes, and robbery?
    As a result of the above-mentioned, mentally ill persons continue to become victims with negative labels and stigmas.
    DID YOU KNOW?
  • 8. DO NOT PERPETUATE THE MYTH THAT MENTALLY ILL PEOPLE ARE CRIMINALS AND ARE MORE SUBJECT TO COMMITTING VIOLENCE THAN OTHERS!
    QUESTION THE MEDIA. ALL INFORMATION IS NOT GOOD INFORMATION AND SOMETIMES CERTAIN GROUPS OF PEOPLE ARE DEPICTED NEGATIVELY AND STEREOTYPICALLY!
    PUT YOURSELF IN SOMEONE ELSES SHOES!
    WHAT YOU CAN DO…
  • 9.   American Psychologist (1991) Mental Disorder and Violent Behavior. April 1991.
    Enotes.com (2011). Dual Diagnosis. Retrieved online on August 8, 2011 from http://www.enotes.com/mental-disorders-encyclopedia/dual-diagnosis
    Forsyth-Stephens, A. (2007). Misconceptions About Mental Illness and Violence. 23 April 2007.  
    Friedman, Richard A. (2008) Media and Madness. The American Prospect19, 7: 2-4.
    REFERENCES
  • 10. Harvard Mental Health Letter (2011). Mental illness and violence: Multiple interacting factors contribute to violent behavior. Harvard School of Medicine, Vol. 27, 7.  
    Link, Stueve. (1998) New Evidence on the Violence Risk Posed by People With Mental Illness On the Importance of Specifying the Timing and the Targets of Violence. Archives of General Psychiatry. 1998, 55:403-404.  
    US Fed News Service (2008). People With Severe Mental Illness More Likely To Be Victims Than Perpetrators of Violence. Washington DC 
    REFERENCES