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  • 1. Treasury of Truth The Dhammapada - Text Version Ven. Weragoda Sarada Thero E-mail: bdea@buddhanet.net Web site: www.buddhanet.net Buddha Dharma Education Association Inc.
  • 2. reasury of ruth Illustrated Dhammapada
  • 3. Man who achieved a great victory One of the first scholars to begin the work of translating the Pali Literature into English, was the son of a well-known clergyman. His object in undertaking the work was to prove the superiority of Christianity over Buddhism. He failed in this task but he achieved a greater victory than he expected. He became a Buddhist. We must never forget the happy chance which prompted him to undertake this work and thereby make the precious Dhamma available to thousands in the West. The name of this great scholar was Dr. Rhys Davids. Ven. A. Mahinda, “Blueprint of Happiness”
  • 4. Table of Contents Man who achieved a great victory ................................................ 3 Table of Contents ...................................................................... 5 The Pali Alphabet .................................................................... 43 Pronunciation of Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Acknowledgement .................................................................... 44 Dedication .............................................................................. 50 Introduction ........................................................................... 52 Foreword ............................................................................... 54 Kàlàma Sutta (Pàli) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Kàlàma Sutta (Translation) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Chapter 1 Yamaka Vagga Twin Verses Suffering Follows The Evil-Doer 1 (1) The Story of the Monk Cakkhupàla (Verse 1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Happiness Follows The Doer Of Good 1 (2) The Story of Maññakuõdali (Verse 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Uncontrolled Hatred Leads To Harm Overcoming Anger 1 (3) (4) The Story of Monk Tissa (Verses 3 & 4) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 5
  • 5. Hatred Is Overcome Only By Non-Hatred 1 (4) The Story of Kàliyakkhinã (Verse 5) .................................... 70 Recollection Of Death Brings Peace 1 (5) The Story of K osambi Monks (Verse 6) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Sloth Defeats Spirituality Spiritual Strength Is Undefeatable 1 (6) The Story of Monk Mahàkàla (Verses 7 & 8) ........................ 76 Those Who Do Not Deserve The Stained Robe The Virtuous Deserve The Stained Robe 1 (7) The Story of Devadatta (Verses 9 & 10) .............................. 82 False Values Bar Spiritual Progress Truth Enlightens 1 (8) The Story of Monk Sàriputta (Verses 11 & 12) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Lust Penetrates Untrained Mind The Disciplined Mind Keeps Lust Away 1 (9) The Story of Monk Nanda (Verses 13 & 14) .......................... 93 Sorrow Springs From Evil Deeds 1 (10) The Story of Cundasåkarika (Verse 15) .............................. 99 Good Deeds Bring Happiness 1 (11) The Story of Dhammika Upàsaka (Verse 16) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 Evil Action Leads To Torment 1 (12) The Story of Devadatta (Verse 17) .................................. 105 Virtuous Deeds Make One Rejoice 1 (13) The Story of Sumanàdevi (Verse 18) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 6
  • 6. Fruits Of Religious Life Through Practice Practice Ensures Fulfilment 1 (14) The Story of Two Friends (Verses 19 & 20) ....................... 111 Chapter 2 Appamàda Vagga Heedfulness Freedom Is Difficult 2 (1) The Story of Sàmàvati (Verses 21, 22 & 23) ........................ 117 Glory Of The Mindful Increases 2 (2) The Story of Kumbhagh osaka, the Banker (Verse 24) ........... 125 Island Against Floods 2 (3) The Story of Cålapanthaka (Verse 25) ............................... 128 Treasured Mindfulness Meditation Leads To Bliss 2 (4) The Story of Bàla Nakkhatta Festival (Verses 26 & 27) . . . . . . . 131 The Sorrowless View The World 2 (5) The Story of Monk Mahàkassapa (Verse 28) ....................... 137 The Mindful One Is Way Ahead Of Others 2 (6) The Story of the Two Companion Monks (Verse 29) .............. 140 Mindfulness Made Him Chief Of Gods 2 (7) The Story of Magha (Verse 30) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143 The Heedful Advance 2 (8) The Story of a Certain Monk (Verse 31) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146 7
  • 7. The Heedful Advances To Nibbàna 2 (9) The Story of Monk Nigàma Vàsi Tissa (Verse 32) ................. 149 Chapter 3 Citta Vagga Mind The Wise Person Straightens The Mind The Fluttering Mind 3 (1) The Story of Venerable Meghiya (Verses 33 & 34) ............... 153 Restrained Mind Leads To Happiness 3 (2) The Story of a Certain Monk (Verse 35) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158 Protected Mind Leads To Happiness 3 (3) The Story of a Certain Disgruntled Monk (Verse 36) ........... 161 Death’s Snare Can Be Broken By Tamed Mind 3 (4) The Story of Monk Saïgharakkhita (Verse 37) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164 Wisdom Does Not Grow If Mind Wavers The Wide-Awake Is Unfrightened 3 (5) The Story of Monk Cittahattha (Verses 38 & 39) ................ 167 Weapons To Defeat Death 3 (6) The Story of Five Hundred Monks (Verse 40) ...................... 173 Without The Mind Body Is Worthless 3 (7) The Story of Tissa, the Monk with a Stinking Body (Verse 41) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176 8
  • 8. All Wrongs Issue Out Of Evil Minds 3 (8) The Story of Nanda, the Herdsman (Verse 42) ..................... 179 Well-Trained Mind Excels People 3 (9) The Story of S oreyya (Verse 43) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181 Chapter 4 Puppha Vagga Flowers The Garland-Maker The Seeker Understands 4 (1) The Story of Five Hundred Monks (Verses 44 & 45) ............. 185 Who Conquers Death? 4 (2) The Story of the Monk who Contemplates The Body as a Mirage (Verse 46) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191 Pleasure Seeker Is Swept Away 4 (3) The Story of Vióåóabha (Verse 47) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194 Attachment To Senses Is Folly 4 (4) The Story of Patipåjikà Kumàri (Verse 48) .......................... 197 The Monk In The Village 4 (5) The Story of K osiya, the Miserly Rich Man (Verse 49) ......... 200 Look Inward And Not At Others 4 (6) The Story of the Ascetic Pàveyya (Verse 50) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203 Good Words Attract Only Those Who Practise Good Words Profit Only Those Who Practise 4 (7 ) The Story of Chattapàni, a Lay Disciple (Verses 51 & 52) . . . . . 206 9
  • 9. Those Born Into This World Must Acquire Much Merit 4 (8) The Story of Visàkhà (Verse 53) ....................................... 211 Fragrance Of Virtue Spreads Everywhere Fragrance Of Virtue Is The Sweetest Smell 4 (9) The Story of the Question Raised by the Venerable ânanda (Verses 54 & 55) ........................... 214 Fragrance Of Virtue Wafts To Heaven 4 (10) The Story of Monk Mahàkassapa (Verse 56) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220 Death Cannot Trace The Path Of Arahats 4 (11) The Story of Venerable G odhika (Verse 57) ...................... 223 Lotus Is Attractive Though In A Garbage Heap Arahats Shine Wherever They Are 4 (12) The Story of Garahadinna (Verses 58 & 59) ...................... 226 Chapter 5 Bàla Vagga Fools Saüsàra Is Long To The Ignorant 5 (1) The Story of a Certain Person (Verse 60) ........................... 232 Do Not Associate With The Ignorant 5 (2) The Story of a Resident Pupil of Venerable Mahàkassapa (Verse 61) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 235 10
  • 10. Ignorance Brings Suffering 5 (3) The Story of ânanda, the Rich Man (Verse 62) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 238 Know Reality – Be Wise 5 (4) The Story of Two Pick-pockets (Verse 63) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241 The Ignorant Cannot Benefit From The Wise 5 (5) The Story of Venerable Udàyi (Verse 64) ........................... 244 Profit From The Wise 5 (6) The Story of Thirty Monks from Pàñheyyaka (Verse 65) ....... 247 A Sinner Is One’s Own Foe 5 (7) The Story of Suppabuddha, the Leper (Verse 66) .................. 250 Do What Brings Happiness 5 (8) The Story of a Farmer (Verse 67) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253 Happiness Results From Good Deeds 5 (9) The Story of Sumana, the Florist (Verse 68) ....................... 256 Sin Yields Bitter Results 5 (10) The Story of Nun Uppalavaõõà (Verse 69) ........................ 259 The Unconditioned Is The Highest Achievement 5 (11) The Story of Monk Jambuka (Verse 70) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262 Sin Is Like Sparks Of Fire Hidden In Ashes 5 (12) The Story of Snake-Ghost (Verse 71) ............................... 265 The Knowledge Of The Wicked Splits His Head 5 (13) The Story of Saññhikåña-Peta (Verse 72) .......................... 268 11
  • 11. Desire For Pre-Eminence The Ignorant Are Ego-Centred 5 (14) The Story of Citta the Householder (Verses 73 & 74) ......... 271 Path To Liberation 5 (15) The Story of Novice Monk Tissa of the Forest Monastery (Verse 75) ................................. 276 Chapter 6 Paõóita Vagga The Wise Treasure The Advice Of The Wise 6 (1) The Story of Venerable Ràdha (Verse 76) .......................... 280 The Virtuous Cherish Good Advice 6 (2) The Story of Venerables Assaji and Punabbasuka (Verse 77) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283 In The Company Of The Virtuous 6 (3) The Story of Venerable Channa (Verse 78) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 286 Living Happily In The Dhamma 6 (4) The Story of Venerable Mahàkappina (Verse 79) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 289 The Wise Control Themselves 6 (5) The Story of Novice Monk Paõóita (Verse 80) ..................... 292 The Wise Are Steadfast 6 (6) The Story of Venerable Lakunñaka Bhaddiya (Verse 81) . . . . . . . 295 12
  • 12. The Wise Are Happy 6 (7) The Story of Kànamàtà (Verse 82) .................................... 298 The Wise Are Tranquil 6 (8) The Story of the Five Hundred Monks (Verse 83) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301 The Wise Live Correctly 6 (9) The Story of Venerable Dhammika (Verse 84) ..................... 303 A Few Reach The Other Shore Those Who Follow The Dhamma Are Liberated 6 (10) The Story of Dhamma Listeners (Verses 85 & 86) ............... 305 Liberation Through Discipline Purify Your Mind Arahats Are Beyond Worldliness 6 (11) The Story of Five Hundred Visiting Monks (Verses 87, 88 & 89) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 312 Chapter 7 Arahanta Vagga The Saints Passion’s Fever Gone 7 (1) The Story of the Question Asked by Jãvaka (Verse 90) .......... 322 Saints Are Non-Attached 7 (2) The Story of Venerable Mahàkassapa (Verse 91) ................. 325 Blameless Is The Nature Of Saints 7 (3) The Story of Venerable Bellaññhisãsa (Verse 92) ................. 328 13
  • 13. Arahat’s State Cannot Be Traced 7 (4) The Story of Venerable Anuruddha (Verse 93) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 331 Gods Adore Arahats 7 (5) The Story of Venerable Mahàkaccàyana (Verse 94) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 334 Arahats Are Noble 7 (6) The Story of Venerable Sàriputta (Verse 95) ...................... 337 The Tranquility Of The Saints 7 (7) The Story of a Novice Monk from K osambi (Verse 96) .......... 340 Exalted Are The Unblemished 7 (8) The Story of Venerable Sàriputta (Verse 97) ...................... 343 Dwelling Of The Unblemished Is Alluring 7 (9) The Story of Venerable Revata, (Verse 98) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 346 The Passionless Delight In Forests 7 (10) The Story of a Woman (Verse 99) .................................... 349 Chapter 8 Sahassa Vagga Thousands One Pacifying Word Is Noble 8 (1) The Story of Tambadàñhika (Verse 100) ............................. 352 One Useful Verse Is Better Than A Thousand Useless Verses 8 (2) The Story of Bàhiyadàrucãriya (Verse 101) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 355 14
  • 14. A Dhamma-Word Is Noble Self-Conquest Is The Highest Victory 8 (3) The Story of Nun Kunóalakesã (Verses 102 & 103) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 358 Victory Over Oneself Is Unequalled Victory Over Self Cannot Be Undone 8 (4) The Story of the Bràhmin Anatthapucchaka (Verses 104 & 105) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 364 The Greatest Offering 8 (5) The Story of Venerable Sàriputta’s Uncle (Verse 106) ......... 370 Even Brief Adoration Of Arahat Fruitful 8 (6) The Story of Venerable Sàriputta’s Nephew (Verse 107) ....... 372 Worshipping An Unblemished Individual Is Noble 8 (7) The Story of Venerable Sàriputta’s Friend (Verse 108) . . . . . . . . . 374 Saluting Venerables Yields Four Benefits 8 (8) The Story of âyuvaóóhanakumàra (Verse 109) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 377 Virtuous Life Is Noble 8 (9) The Story of Novice Monk Saükicca (Verse 110) ................. 380 A Wise One’s Life Is Great 8 (10) The Story of Khànu-Koõda¤¤a (Verse 111) ....................... 383 The Person Of Effort Is Worthy 8 (11) The Story of Venerable Sappadàsa (Verse 112) .................. 386 Who Knows Reality Is Great 8 (12) The Story of Nun Patàcàrà (Verse 113) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 389 15
  • 15. The Seer Of The Deathless Is A Worthy One 8 (13) The Story of Nun Kisàg otami (Verse 114) ......................... 392 Life Of One Who Knows The Teaching Is Noble 8 (14) The Story of Nun Bahåputtika (Verse 115) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 395 Chapter 9 Pàpa Vagga Evil Never Hesitate To Do Good 9 (1) The Story of Culla Ekasàñaka (Verse 116) ........................ 399 Do No Evil Again And Again 9 (2) The Story of Venerable Seyyasaka (Verse 117) ................... 402 Accumulated Merit Leads To Happiness 9 (3) The Story of Goddess Làjà (Verse 118) .............................. 405 Evil Seems Sweet Until It Ripens Good May Seem Bad Until Good Matures 9 (4) The Story of Anàthapiõóika (Verses 119 & 120) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408 Take Not Evil Lightly 9 (5) The Story of a Careless Monk (Verse 121) ......................... 414 Merit Grows Little By Little 9 (7) The Story of Bilàlapàdaka (Verse 122) .............................. 417 Shun Evil As Poison 9 (7) The Story of Mahàdhana (Verse 123) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 420 16
  • 16. Evil Results From Bad Intention 9 (8) The Story of Kukkuñamitta (Verse 124) ............................. 423 Wrong Done To Others Returns To Doer 9 (9) The Story of K oka the Huntsman (Verse 125) ..................... 426 Those Who Pass Away 9 (10) The Story of Venerable Tissa (Verse 126) ......................... 428 Shelter Against Death 9 (11) The Story of Three Groups of Persons (Verse 127) ............. 431 No Escape From Death 9 (12) The Story of King Suppabuddha (Verse 128) ...................... 434 Chapter 10 Daõóa Vagga Punishment Of Others Think Of As Your Own Self 10 (1) The Story of a Group of Six Monks (Verse 129) ................. 438 To All Life Is Dear 10 (2) The Story of a Group of Six Monks (Verse 130) ................. 441 Those Who Do Not Receive Happiness 10 (3) The Story of Many Youths (Verses 131 & 132) .................. 445 Retaliation Brings Unhappiness Tranquility Should Be Preserved 10 (4) The Story of Venerable Kunóadhàna (Verses 133 & 134) .... 451 17
  • 17. Decay And Death Terminate Life 10 (5) The Story of Some Ladies Observing the Moral Precepts (Verse 135) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 457 Results Of Evil Torment The Ignorant 10 (6) The Story of the Boa Constrictor Peta-Ghost (Verse 136) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 461 The Evil Results Of Hurting The Pious Evil Results Of Hurting Harmless Saints Harming The Holy Is Disastrous Woeful States In The Wake Of Evil Doing 10 (7) The Story of Venerable Mahà Moggallàna (Verses 137 – 140) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 464 Practices That Will Not Lead To Purity 10 (8) The Story of Venerable Bahåbhànóika (Verse 141) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 475 Costumes Do Not Mar Virtue 10 (9) The Story of Santati the Minister (Verse 142) ................... 478 Avoid Evil Through Shame Effort Is Necessary To Avoid Suffering 10 (10) The Story of Venerable Pil otikatissa (Verses 143 & 144) .. 481 Those Who Restrain Their Own Mind 10 (11) The Story of Novice Monk Sukha (Verse 145) .................. 487 18
  • 18. Chapter 11 Jarà Vagga Old Age One Pacifying Word Is Noble 11 (1) The Story of the Companions of Visàkhà (Verse 146) . . . . . . . . . . . 491 Behold The True Nature Of The Body 11 (2) The Story of Sirimà (Verse 147) ...................................... 494 Life Ends In Death 11 (3) The Story of Nun Uttarà (Verse 148) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 497 A Sight That Stops Desire 11 (4) The Story of Adhimànika Monks (Verse 149) ..................... 500 The Body Is A City Of Bones 11 (5) The Story of Nun Råpanandà (Janapadakalyàni) (Verse 150) ........................................ 503 Buddha’s Teaching Never Decays 11 (6) The Story of Queen Mallikà (Verse 151) .......................... 506 Body Fattens – Mind Does Not 11 (7) The Story of Venerable Kàludàyi (Verse 152) ................... 509 Seeing The Builder Of The House Thy Building Material Is Broken 11 (8) Venerable ânanda’s Stanzas (Verses 153 & 154) ............... 512 Regrets In Old Age Nostalgia For Past Glory 11 (9) The Story of Mahàdhana the Treasurer’s Son (Verses 155 & 156) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 516 19
  • 19. Chapter 12 Atta Vagga Self Safeguard Your Own Self 12 (1) The Story of B odhiràjakumàra (Verse 157) ....................... 523 Give Advice While Being Virtuous Yourself 12 (2) The Story of Venerable Upananda Sàkyaputta (Verse 158) ................................... 526 Discipline Yourself Before You Do Others 12 (3) The Story of Venerable Padhànikatissa (Verse 159) . . . . . . . . . . . . 529 One Is One’s Best Saviour 12 (4) The Story of the Mother of Kumàrakassapa (Verse 160) ........................................ 532 The Unwise Person Comes To Grief On His Own 12 (5) The Story of Mahàkàla Upàsaka (Verse 161) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 535 Evil Action Crushes The Doer 12 (6) The Story of Devadatta (Verse 162) ................................ 538 Doing Good Unto One’s Own Self Is Difficult 12 (7) The Story of Schism in the Sangha (Verse 163) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 541 The Wicked Are Self-Destructive 12 (8) The Story of Venerable Kàla (Verse 164) ......................... 544 Purity, Impurity Self-Created 12 (9) The Story of Cålakàla Upàsaka (Verse 165) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 547 20
  • 20. Help Others – But Promote One’s Own Good 12 (10) The Story of Venerable Attadattha (Verse 166) .............. 550 Chapter 13 L oka Vagga World Do Not Cultivate The Worldly 13 (1) The Story of a Young Monk (Verse 167) ........................... 554 The Righteous Are Happy – Here And Hereafter Behave According To The Teaching 13 (2) The Story of King Suddh odana (Verses 168 & 169) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 557 Observe The Impermanence Of Life 13 (3) The Story of Many Monks (Verse 170) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 563 The Disciplined Are Not Attached To The Body 13 (4) The Story of Prince Abhaya (Verse 171) ........................... 565 The Diligent Illumine The World 13 (5) The Story of Venerable Sammu¤janã (Verse 172) ................ 568 Evil Is Overcome By Good 13 (6) The Story of Venerable Angulimàla (Verse 173) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 571 Without Eye Of Wisdom, This World Is Blind 13 (7) The Story of the Weaver-Girl (Verse 174) ........................ 574 The Wise Travel Beyond The Worldly 13 (8) The Story of Thirty Monks (Verse 175) ............................ 577 21
  • 21. A Liar Can Commit Any Crime 13 (9) The Story of Cincàmànavikà (Verse 176) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 580 Happiness Through Partaking In Good Deeds 13 (10) The Story of the Unrivalled Alms-Giving (Verse 177) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 583 Being Stream-Winner Is Supreme 13 (11) The Story of Kàla, son of Anàthapiõóika (Verse 178) ........ 586 Chapter 14 Buddha Vagga The Buddha The Buddha Cannot Be Tempted The Buddha Cannot Be Brought Under Sway 14 (1) The Story of the Three Daughters of Màra (Verses 179 & 180) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 590 Gods And Men Adore The Buddha 14 (2) The Story of the Buddha’s Return from the Tàvatiüsa Deva World (Verse 181) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 595 Four Rare Opportunities 14 (3) The Story of Erakapatta the Nàga King (Verse 182) . . . . . . . . . . 598 The Instruction Of The Buddhas Patience Is A Great Ascetic Virtue and Noble Guidelines 14 (4) The Story of the Question Raised by Venerable ânanda (Verses 183 – 185) .............................. 601 22
  • 22. Sensual Pleasures Never Satiated Shun Worldly Pleasures 14 (5) The Story of a Discontented Young Monk (Verses 186 & 187) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 610 Fear Stricken Masses Those Refuges Do Not Offer Help Seeing Four Noble Truths The Noble Path The Refuge That Ends All Sufferings 14 (6) The Story of Aggidatta (Verses 188 – 192) ....................... 616 Rare Indeed Is Buddha’s Arising 14 (7) The Story of the Question Raised by Venerable ânanda (Verse 193) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 628 Four Factors Of Happiness 14 (8) The Story of Many Monks (Verse 194) ............................. 631 Worship Those Who Deserve Adoration Worship Brings Limitless Merit 14 (9) The Story of the Golden Ståpa of Kassapa Buddha (Verses 195 & 196) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 634 Chapter 15 Sukha Vagga Happiness Sukha Vagga (Happiness) Without Sickness Among The Sick Not Anxious Among The Anxious 15 (1) The Story of the Pacification of the Relatives of the Buddha (Verses 197 – 199) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 641 23
  • 23. Happily They Live – Undefiled 15 (2) The Story of Màra (Verse 200) ....................................... 650 Happy Above Both Victory And Defeat 15 (3) The Story of the Defeat of the King of K osala (Verse 201) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 652 Happiness Tranquilizes 15 (4) The Story of a Young Bride (Verse 202) ........................... 655 Worst Diseases And Greatest Happiness 15 (5) The Story of a Lay-Disciple (Verse 203) ........................... 658 Four Supreme Acquisitions 15 (6) The Story of King Pasenadi of K osala (Verse 204) ............. 661 The Free Are The Purest 15 (7) The Story of Venerable Tissa (Verse 205) ......................... 664 Pleasant Meetings Happy Company The Good And The Wise 15 (8) The Story of Sakka (Verses 206 – 208) ............................. 668 Chapter 16 Piya Vagga Affection Admiration Of Self-Seekers Not Seeing The Liked And Seeing The Unliked Are Both Painful Not Bound By Ties Of Defilements 16 (1) The Story of Three Ascetics (Verses 209 – 211) ................. 678 24
  • 24. The Outcome Of Endearment 16 (2) The Story of a Rich Householder (Verse 212) .................... 685 Sorrow And Fear Arise Due To Loved Ones 16 (3) The Story of Visàkhà (Verse 213) .................................... 688 The Outcome Of Passion 16 (4) The Story of Licchavi Princes (Verse 214) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 691 The Outcome Of Lust 16 (5) The Story of Anitthigandha Kumàra (Verse 215) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 694 Sorrow And Fear Arise Due To Miserliness 16 (6) The Story of a Bràhmin (Verse 216) ................................. 697 Beloved Of The Masses 16 (7) The Story of Five Hundred Boys (Verse 217) ..................... 700 The Person With Higher Urges 16 (8) The Story of an Anàgàmi Venerable (Verse 218) ................ 703 The Fruits Of Good Action Good Actions Lead To Good Results 16 (9) The Story of Nandiya (Verses 219 & 220) ......................... 706 Chapter 17 K odha Vagga Anger He Who Is Not Assaulted By Sorrow 17 (1) The Story of Princess R ohini (Verse 221) .......................... 713 25
  • 25. The Efficient Charioteer 17 (2) The Story of a Monk (Verse 222) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 716 Four Forms Of Victories 17 (3) The Story of Uttarà the Lay-Disciple (Verse 223) .............. 719 Three Factors Leading To Heaven 17 (4) The Story of the Question Raised by Venerable Mahà Moggallàna (Verse 224) ........................ 722 Those Harmless Ones Reach The Deathless 17 (5) The Story of the Bràhmin who had been the ‘Father of the Buddha’ (Verse 225) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 725 Yearning For Nibbàna 17 (6) The Story of Puõõà the Slave Girl (Verse 226) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 728 There Is No One Who Is Not Blamed No One Is Exclusively Blamed Or Praised Person Who Is Always Praise-Worthy Person Who Is Like Solid Gold 17 (7) The Story of Atula the Lay Disciple (Verses 227 – 230) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 731 The Person Of Bodily Discipline Virtuous Verbal Behaviour Discipline Your Mind Safeguard The Three Doors 17 (8) The Story of A Group of Six Monks (Verses 231 – 234) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 739 26
  • 26. Chapter 18 Mala Vagga Impurities Man At The Door Of Death Get Immediate Help In The Presence Of The King Of Death Avoid The Cycle Of Existence 18 (1) The Story of the Son of a Butcher (Verses 235 – 238) ......... 750 Purify Yourself Gradually 18 (2) The Story of a Bràhmin (Verse 239) ................................. 761 One’s Evil Ruins One’s Own Self 18 (3) The Story of Venerable Tissa (Verse 240) ......................... 764 Causes Of Stain 18 (4) The Story of Kàludàyi (Verse 241) .................................. 767 Taints Are Evil Things – Ignorance Is The Greatest Taint Ignorance The Worst Taint 18 (5) The Story of a Man Whose Wife Committed Adultery (Verses 242 & 243) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770 Shameless Life Is Easy For A Modest Person Life Is Hard 18 (6) The Story of Culla Sàrã (Verses 244 & 245) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 776 Wrong Deeds To Avoid Precepts The Layman Should Follow These Precepts Prevent Suffering 18 (7) The Story of Five Hundred Lay Disciples (Verses 246 – 248) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 782 27
  • 27. The Envious Are Not At Peace The Unenvious Are At Peace 18 (8) The Story of Tissa (Verses 249 & 250) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 788 Craving Is The Worst Flood 18 (9) The Story of Five Lay-Disciples (Verse 251) ...................... 793 Easy To See Are The Faults Of Others 18 (10) The Story of Meõdaka the Rich Man (Verse 252) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 796 Seeing Others’ faults 18 (11) The Story of Venerable Ujjhànasa¤¤ã (Verse 253) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 799 Nothing Is Eternal Other Than Nibbàna The Buddha Has No Anxiety 18 (12) The Story of Subhadda the Wandering Ascetic (Verses 254 & 255) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 802 Chapter 19 Dhammaññha Vagga Established in Dhamma The Just And The Impartial Are The Best Judges Firmly Rooted In The Law 19 (1) The Story of the Judge (Verses 256 & 257) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 808 Who Speaks A Lot Is Not Necessarily Wise 19 (2) The Story of a Group of Six Monks (Verse 258) ................. 814 Those Who Know Speak Little 19 (3) The Story of Kådàna the Arahat (Verse 259) .................... 817 28
  • 28. Grey Hair Alone Does Not Make An Elder The Person Full Of Effort Is The True Elder 19 (4) The Story of Venerable Lakunñaka Bhaddiya (Verses 260 & 261) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 820 Who Gives Up Jealousy Is Good-Natured Who Uproots Evil Is The Virtuous One 19 (5) The Story of Some Monks (Verses 262 & 263) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 825 Shaven Head Alone Does Not Make A Monk Who Gives Up Evil Is True Monk 19 (6) The Story of Venerable Hatthaka (Verses 264 & 265) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 829 One Is Not A Monk Merely By Begging Alms Food Holy Life Makes A Monk 19 (7) The Story of a Bràhmin (Verses 266 & 267) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 834 Silence Alone Does Not Make A Sage Only True Wisdom Makes A Sage 19 (8) The Story of the Followers of Non-Buddhist Doctrines (Verses 268 & 269) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 840 True Ariyas Are Harmless 19 (9) The Story of a Fisherman Named Ariya (Verse 270) ............ 844 A Monk Should Destroy All Passions Blemishes Should Be Given Up To Reach Release 19 (10) The Story of Some Monks (Verses 271 & 272) .................. 846 29
  • 29. Chapter 20 Magga Vagga The Path Eight-Fold Path Is The Best Only Path To Purity Path To End Suffering Buddha Only Shows The Way 20 (1) The Story of Five Hundred Monks (Verses 273 – 276) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 853 Conditioned Things Are Transient All Component Things Are Sorrow Everything Is Soul-less 20 (2) The Story of Five Hundred Monks (Verses 277 – 279) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 862 The Slothful Miss The Path 20 (5) The Story of Venerable Tissa the Idle One (Verse 280) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 869 Purify Your Thoughts, Words And Deeds 20 (6) The Story of a Pig Spirit (Verse 281) ................................ 871 Way To Increase Wisdom 20 (7) The Story of Venerable P oñhila (Verse 282) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 874 Shun Passion Attachment To Women 20 (8) The Story of Five Old Monks (Verses 283 & 284) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877 Path To Peace 20 (9) The Story of a Venerable who had been a Goldsmith (Verse 285) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 882 30
  • 30. The Fear Of Death 20 (10) The Story of Mahàdhana, a Merchant (Verse 286) . . . . . . . . . . . . 885 Death Takes Away The Attached 20 (11) The Story of Kisàgotamã (Verse 287) .............................. 888 No Protection When Needed The Path To The Deathless 20 (12) The Story of Pañàcàrà (Verses 288 & 289) ...................... 891 Chapter 21 Pakiõõaka Vagga Miscellaneous Give Up A Little, Achieve Much 21 (1) The Story of the Buddha’s Former Deeds (Verse 290) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 899 When Anger Does Not Abate 21 (2) The Story of the Woman Who ate up the Eggs of a Hen (Verse 291) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 902 How Blemishes Increase Mindfulness Of Physical Reality 21 (3) The Story of the Venerables of Bhaddiya (Verses 292 & 293) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 904 The Destroyer Who Reaches Nibbàna The ‘killer’ who Goes Free 21 (4) The Story of Venerable Bhaddiya (Verses 294 & 295) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 909 31
  • 31. Meditation On The Virtues Of The Buddha Meditation On The Virtues Of The Dhamma Meditation On The Virtues Of Saïgha Meditation On The Real Nature Of The Body Meditation On Harmlessness The Mind That Takes Delight In Meditation 21 (5) The Story of a Wood Cutter’s Son (Verses 296 – 301) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 914 Saüsàra – Journey 21 (6) The Story of the Monk from the Country of the Vajjis (Verse 302) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 930 He Is Honoured Everywhere 21 (7) The Story of Citta the Householder (Verse 303) ................ 933 The Virtuous Are Seen 21 (8) The Story of Cålasubhaddà (Verse 304) ........................... 936 Discipline Yourself In Solitude 21 (9) The Story of the Monk Who Stayed Alone (Verse 305) ....... 939 Chapter 22 Niraya Vagga Hell Liars Suffer Tortures Of Hell 22 (1) The Story of Sundarã the Wandering Female Ascetic (Verse 306) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 942 32
  • 32. Bad Men Get Born In Bad States 22 (2) The Story of Those Who Suffered for Their Evil Deeds (Verse 307) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 945 Food Fit For Sinners 22 (3) The Monks Who Lived on the Bank of the Vaggumudà River (Verse 308) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 947 The Man Who Covets Another’s Wife Shun Adultery 22 (4) The Story of Khema the Guild Leader (Verse 309 & 310) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 950 Wrong Monastic Life Leads To Bad States Three Things That Will Not Yield Good Results Do Merit With Commitment 22 (5) The Story of the Obstinate Monk (Verses 311 – 313) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 955 Good Deeds Never Make You Repent 22 (6) The Story of a Woman of Jealous Disposition (Verse 314) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 963 Guard The Mind 22 (7) The Story of Many Monks (Verse 315) ............................. 965 False Beliefs Lead To Hell Fear And Fearlessness In Wrong Places 22 (8) The Story of A Group of Bad Ascetics (Verses 316 & 317) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 968 Right And Wrong 22 (9) The Story of the Disciples of Non-Buddhist Teachers (Verses 318 & 319) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 973 33
  • 33. Chapter 23 Nàga Vagga The Great Buddha’s Endurance The Disciplined Animal The Most Disciplined Animal 23 (1) On Subduing Oneself (Verses 320, 321 & 322) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 981 The Right Vehicle To Nibbàna 23 (2) The Story of the Monk Who Had Been A Trainer of Elephants (Verse 323) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 988 The Bound Elephant 23 (3) The Story of an Old Bràhmin (Verse 324) ......................... 991 The Slothful, Greedy Sleeper Returns To Saüsàra, Over And Over 23 (4) The Story of King Pasenadi of K osala (Verse 325) ............. 994 Restrain Mind As A Mahout An Elephant In Rut 23 (5) The Story of Sàmanera Sànu (Verse 326) .......................... 997 The Elephant Mired 23 (6) The Story of the Elephant Called Pàveyyaka (Verse 327) ...................................... 1000 Cherish The Company Of Good The Lonely Recluse For The Solitary The Needs Are Few 23 (7) Admonition to Five Hundred Monks (Verses 328 – 330) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1002 34
  • 34. The Bliss & Blessing To Be An Arahat Four Forms Of Blessing 23 (12) The Story of Màra (Verses 331 – 333) .......................... 1009 Chapter 24 Taõhà Vagga Craving The Increase Of Craving How Craving Increases Escaping Craving & Uprooting Craving 24 (1) The Story of the Past: The Insolent Monk. The Bandits The Story of the Present: The Fishermen, and The Fish with Stinking Breath (Verses 334 – 337) 1017 Craving Uneradicated Brings Suffering Over And Over Caught In The Current Of Craving The Creeper Of Craving Bliss Does Not Come Through Craving Bonds That Entrap Men Nibbàna By Shunning Craving 24 (2) The Young Sow (Verses 338 – 343) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1026 Freed From Craving Runs Back To Craving 24 (3) The Story of a Monk who Disrobed (Verse 344) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1041 Bonds Of Attachments Bonds Are Strong, But The Wise Get Rid Of Them 24 (4) The Prison-House (Verses 345 & 346) ............................. 1043 Spider Web Of Passion 24 (5) The Story of Theri Khemà (Verse 347) ............................ 1047 Reaching The Further Shore 24 (6) The Story of Uggasena (Verse 348) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1049 35
  • 35. Craving Tightens Bonds He Cuts Off Bonds Of Màra 24 (7) Young Archer the Wise (Verses 349 & 350) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1052 The Person Who Has Reached The Goal The Man Of Great Wisdom 24 (8) Màra seeks in vain to frighten Ràhula (Verses 351 & 352) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1057 Buddha Is Teacherless 24 (9) The Story of Upaka (Verse 353) .................................... 1062 The Conquests Of All Suffering 24 (10) The Story of the Questions Raised by Sakka (Verse 354) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1064 Wealth Destroys The Ignorant 24 (11) The Story of a Childless Rich Man (Verse 355) .............. 1066 Those Without The Bane Of Passion Those Without The Bane Of Ill-Will Those Without The Bane Of Illusion Those Without The Bane Of Greed 24 (12) The Greater and the Lesser Gift (Verses 356 – 359) ........ 1069 Chapter 25 Bhikkhu Vagga The Monk Sense Discipline & Suffering Ends With All-Round Discipline 25 (1) The Story of Five Monks in Sàvatthi (Verses 360 & 361) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1079 36
  • 36. The True Monk 25 (2) The Story of a Monk Who Killed a Swan (Haüsa) (Verse 362) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1084 The Ideal Monk 25 (3) The Story of Monk K okàlika (Verse 363) ....................... 1087 The Monk Abides In Dhamma 25 (4) The Story of Venerable Dhammàràma (Verse 364) . . . . . . . . . . . . 1090 Accept What One Receives Gods Adore Virtuous Monks 25 (5) The Story of the Traitor Monk (Verses 365 & 366) .......... 1093 He Is A Monk Who Has No Attachment 25 (6) The Story Of The Bràhmin Who Offered Alms Food To The Buddha (Verse 367) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1098 The Monk Who Radiates Loving-Kindness Radiates Peace Give Up Lust And Hatred Flood-Crosser Is One Who Has Given Up The Fetters Meditate Earnestly There Is No Wisdom In Those Who Do Not Think He Who Is Calm Experiences Transcendental Joy He Is Happy Who Reflects On Rise And Fall A Wise Monk Must Possess His Cardinal Virtues A Monk Should Be Cordial In All His Ways 25 (7) The Story of a Devout Lady and the Thieves (Verses 368 – 376) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1101 Cast Off Lust And Hatred 25 (8) The Story of Meditation on Jasmine Flowers (Verse 377) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1121 37
  • 37. He Is Peaceful Who Is Free From All Worldly Things 25 (9) The Story of Venerable Santakàya (Verse 378) ............... 1123 He Who Guards Himself Lives Happily You Are Your Own Saviour 25 (10) The Story of Venerable Na¤gala Kula (Attachment to Old Clothes) (Verses 379 & 380) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1126 With Joy And Faith Try To Win Your Goal 25 (11) The Story of Monk Vakkali (Verse 381) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1130 Even A Young Monk, If Devout, Can Illumine The Whole World 25 (12) The Story of the Novice Monk Sumana who Performed a Miracle (Verse 382) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1133 Chapter 26 Bràhmaõa Vagga The Bràhmaõa Be A Knower Of The Deathless 26 (1) The Story of the Bràhmin who had Great Faith (Verse 383) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1136 Cultivate Concentration 26 (2) The Story of Thirty Monks (Verse 384) .......................... 1138 The Unfettered Person Is A Bràhmaõa 26 (3) The Story of Màra (Verse 385) ..................................... 1142 Who Is Contemplative And Pure Is A Bràhmin 26 (4) The Story of a Certain Bràhmin (Verse 386) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1144 38
  • 38. The Buddha Shines Day And Night 26 (5) The Story of Venerable ânanda (Verse 387) ................... 1146 He Who Had Discarded All Evil Is Holy 26 (6) The Story of a Bràhmin Recluse (Verse 388) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1149 Harm Not An Arahat An Arahat Does Not Retaliate 26 (7) The Story of Venerable Sàriputta (Verses 389 & 390) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1152 The Well-Restrained Is Truly A Bràhmin 26 (8) The Story of Venerable Nun Mahàpajàpatã G otamã (Verse 391) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1158 Honour To Whom Honour Is Due 26 (9) The Story of Venerable Sàriputta (Verse 392) ................. 1161 One Does Not Become A Bràhmin Merely By Birth 26 (10) The Story of Jañila the Bràhmin (Verse 393) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1164 Be Pure Within 26 (11) The Story of the Trickster Bràhmin (Verse 394) ............. 1166 Who Meditates Alone In The Forest Is A Bràhmaõa 26 (12 ) The Story of Kisà G otamã, Wearer of Refuse-Rags (Verse 395) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1169 The Non-Possessive And The Non-Attached Person Is A Bràhmaõa 26 (13) What is a Bràhman? (Verse 396) .................................. 1172 A Bràhmaõa Is He Who Has Destroyed All Fetters 26 (14) The Story of Uggasena the Acrobat (Verse 397) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1174 39
  • 39. A Bràhmaõa Is He Who Has No Hatred 26 (15) The Story of a Tug of War (Verse 398) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1176 A Bràhmaõa Is He Who Is Patient 26 (16) The Story of the Patient Subduing the Insolent (Verse 399) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1178 A Bràhmaõa Is He Who Is Not Wrathful 26 (17) The Story of Sàriputta being Reviled by His Mother (Verse 400) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1181 He Is A Bràhmaõa Who Clings Not To Sensual Pleasures 26 (18) The Story of Nun Uppalavaõõà (Verse 401) ................... 1184 A Bràhmaõa Is He Who Has Laid The Burden Aside 26 (19) The Story of a Slave who Laid Down His Burden (Verse 402) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1187 A Bràhmaõa Is He Who Has Reached His Ultimate Goal 26 (20) Khemà the Wise (Verse 403) ........................................ 1190 A Bràhmaõa Is He Who Has No Intimacy With Any 26 (21) The Story of The Monk and the Goddess (Verse 404) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1192 A Bràhmaõa Is He Who Is Absolutely Harmless 26 (22) The Story of the Monk and the Woman (Verse 405) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1195 A Bràhmaõa Is He Who Is Friendly Amongst The Hostile 26 (23) The Story of The Four Novices (Verse 406) ................... 1198 40
  • 40. A Bràhmaõa Is He Who Has Discarded All Passions 26 (24) The Story of Venerable Mahà Panthaka (Verse 407) . . . . . . . 1201 A Bràhmaõa Is He Who Gives Offence To None 26 (25) The Story of Venerable Piliõdavaccha (Verse 408) ......... 1204 A Bràhmaõa Is He Who Steals Not 26 (26) The Story of the Monk who was accused of Theft (Verse 409) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1207 A Bràhmaõa Is He Who Is Desireless 26 (27) The Story of Sàriputta being misunderstood (Verse 410) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1210 In Whom There Is No Clinging 26 (28) The Story of Venerable Mahà Moggallàna (Verse 411) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1213 Above Both Good And Evil 26 (29) Renounce both Good and Evil (Verse 412) ..................... 1215 Learning The Charm 26 (30) The story of Venerable Moonlight (Verse 413) .............. 1217 The Tranquil Person 26 (31) Seven Years in the Womb (Verse 414) ........................... 1220 Freed From Temptation 26 (32) A Courtesan tempts a Monk (Sundara Samudda) (Verse 415) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1223 The Miracle Rings 26 (34) Ajàtasattu attacks Jotika’s Palace (Verse 416) ............. 1226 41
  • 41. Beyond All Bonds 26 (35) The Story of the Monk who was once a Mime (Verse 417) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1229 Person Whose Mind Is Cool 26 (36) The Story of the Monk who was once a Mime (Verse 418) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1232 Diviner Of Rebirth Destroy Unknown 26 (37) The Story of the Skull-Tapper (Verses 419 & 420) . . . . . . . . . . 1234 He Yearns For Nothing 26 (38) The Story of a Husband and Wife (Verse 421) ................ 1239 He Who Is Rid Of Defilements 26 (39) The Story of Angulimàla the Fearless (Verse 422) ......... 1242 The Giver and Receiver of Alms 26 (40) It is the Giver who makes the Gift (Verse 423) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1245 About the Author ................................................................ 1248 42
  • 42. The Pali Alphabet Pronunciation of Letters a as u in bu t n as gn in Signor a " a " a rt t " t " not i " i " pi n d " d " hid i " i " machine n " n " hin t u " u " pu t p " p " lip u " u " rule b " b " rib e " e " ten m " m " him e " a " fate y " y " y ard o " o " hot r " r " rat o " o " note l " l " sell k " k " key v " v " v ile g " g " get s " s " sit n " ng " ring h " h " h ut c " ch " rich l " l " fel t j " j " j ug ü " ng " sing The vowels “e” and “o” are always long, except when followed by a double consonant, e.g., ettha, oñña. But, to make reading the Pali text easier, long “e” and long “o” are indicated thus: “ē” and “ō”. We adopted this non-conventional method, to make for easier reading. There is no difference between the pronunciation of “n” and “ü”. The former never stands at the end, but is always followed by a consonant of its group. The dentals “ñ” and “ó” are pronounced with the tip of the tongue placed against the front upper teeth. The aspirates “kh”, “gh”, “ñh”, “óh”, “th”, “dh”, “ph”, “bh” are pronounced with “h” sound immediately following, as in block- head, pighead, cathead, loghead, etc. where the “h” in each is com- bined with the preceding consonant in pronunciation. 43
  • 43. Acknowledgement In the religious literature of the world that pre-eminently repre- sents man’s continued urge towards the spiritual, The Dhammapada occupies a place of high distinction. Its sacred contents have unceasingly influenced human thought, holding aloft the torch of knowledge to light the path of men in their quest for truth and inner solace. In the current global context, The Dhammapada has evolved into the stature of an outstand- ing treasure of the common human heritage, transcending man- made borders and boundaries and rising above limitations imposed by time. The Dhammapada, in short, is among the handful of gems of sacred literature esteemed by people all over the globe, irrespective of cleavages of creed, faith and variegated religious professions. The primary purpose of the present English rendering of The Dhammapada, under the title The Treasury of Truth is to take the word of the Buddha further afield, in a verbal and visual id- iom that will have greater appeal to the modern mind. The eter- nal wisdom embodied in the verses of The Dhammapada holds within it the potential to bring tranquility to men and women troubled by the stresses and conflicts of life as it is being lived by a good majority of the people in today’s world of dis- harmony and distress. In spite of the deeply felt need of the contemporary world, to yearn for peace, solace and tranquility, the word of the Buddha has not generally been presented in a frequency that throbs to the rhythm of the modern mind-set. The rationale of the present translation, therefore, is to bring The Dhammapada closer to generations who are being brought 44
  • 44. up right round the globe on a staple fare of visual messages emanating in multiple colour, from the world’s visual primary media – both of electronic and print categories. In consequence, The Treasury of Truth has, as its most promi- nent core feature a series of 423 specially commissioned illus- trations, at the rate of one per stanza in The Dhammapada. This veritable gallery of Dhammapada illustrations is the creation of artist P. Wickramanayaka, a well-known Sri Lankan profes- sional. He was assisted by artist K. Wi-Jayakeerthi. The illus- trations bear witness to the wisdom encapsulated in the Chinese proverb, ‘One picture is worth ten thousand words’. An illustration occupies the left-hand side page of the book. On the opposing page the original story, out of which the verses stem, is recounted. To reinforce the impressions created by the illustration and the verbal narration, ample exegetical material is added. In the section entitled ‘Explanatory Translation’, the Pàli stanzas are given in their prose-order. The Pàli words are explained and a translation of each verse is presented in an eas- ily assimilable style. Over and above all these, there is a commentary. In this seg- ment of the book, words, phrases, concepts and expressions that need further elucidation are accommodated. The structure of the total work is determined wholly and totally by our per- ception of the need to make the word of the Buddha lucidly and clearly available to all users of this translation of the Dhammapada. With this in mind, we have provided a caption for each illustration which sums up clearly and vividly the con- tent of each verse, while providing a guide to the understand- ing of the significance of the illustration relating to the verse. 45
  • 45. On the illustration page we have a transliteration of the Pàli stanza in Roman characters. The diacritical marks indicate the proper pronunciation of the Pàli words in the stanza. Right in front of the transliteration we have a poetic English rendering of the significance of the Pàli verse. This English version has been produced by Buddhist Bhikkhu Ven. Khantipalo and Sister Susanna. Together, all these elements make it a unique work, that will ensure the enlightened Dhammapada-understanding not only of the contemporary world, but also of generations to come. The over-riding and consistent measure of this noble publishing endeavour has invariably been the quality and quantum of understanding it will engender in the reader. Each segment of the work is calculated to bring about an escalation of the reader’s awareness of what the Buddha said. In effect, the total work strives to approach as close as is possible to the concept the Buddha originally communicated through these timeless stanzas. It may even sound cliché to aver that a monumental work of this scope and magnitude could be anything other than the re- sult of sustained team-work. As the author of this publication, I must record here that I have had the unmitigated good fortune of being blessed by the continued availability of a dedicated team of sponsors, assistants, supporters and co-workers. Pages of the work were sponsored by devotees and well-wishers. Their names appear at the bottom of the pages. I offer my blessings to all those sponsors and trust that like sponsorship will be forthcoming in the future as well. I deem it my initial duty to extend my grateful thanks to a team within the Dhammapada team. This team is made up of Mr. 46
  • 46. Sito Woon Chee and his wife Ms. Ang Lian Swee. The latter is known to the Dhammapada team by the name Sãtà. They dis- played an admirable capacity for sustained effort which was maintained without fluctuations. Their sense of dedication and commitment continued without any relaxation. This two- person team is my best hope for the success of the future projects we will undertake. I must record my cordial thanks to Mr. Edwin Ariyadasa of Sri Lanka who edited this work. He was associated with this Dhammapada project from its early pioneering steps to its final stage of completion. As author, I consider it my duty and privilege to register my deep-felt gratitude to a prestigious team of scholars who pro- vided invaluable editorial support at various levels of this Dhammapada publication. Ven. Dr Dhammavihari Thero of Sri Lanka provided directions which contributed vastly towards the escalation of the quality of this work. A special word of thanks is due to Ven. Madawela Punnaji Maha Thero whose observations, comments and interpretations infused wholesome new thinking to the work. The erudition and the vast patience of Ven. Hawovita Deepananda Thero illuminated the editorial work of this book, with his quiet and restrained scholarship. We have drawn lavishly upon his deep erudition and vast expe- rience. Professor David Blundell, presently of Taiwan, as- sessed the work with a keen critical eye. The appealing typo- graphical presence of this work owes substantially to Professor Blundell who went to work undaunted by the relentless impera- tive of time. Armed with rare enthusiasm and impressive learn- ing, Mr. Lim Bock Chwee and Mrs. Keerthi Mendis scrutinized the final draft of the work. They have my grateful thanks. 47
  • 47. It is a formidable task, indeed, to attempt to offer my thanks and gratitude to all those who, at one time or another, assisted me in this work in a variety of ways. Upali Ananda Peiris spent strenuous hours initiating the computer utilization for this work. As the work progressed Mr. Ong Hua Siong shouldered the responsibility of providing computer support. Mr. J.A. Sirisena was associated with this aspect of the Dhammapada work. I cannot help but mention with a poignant sense of gratitude, the devotion displayed by Ms. Jade Wong (Metta), Ms. Diamond Wong Swee Leng (Mudita), Ms. Annie Cheok Seok Lay (Karuna), Ms. Tan Kim Chan (Mrs. Loh) and Ms. Tan Gim Hong (Mrs. Yeo). They all gave of their best towards the suc- cess of this publication. It is quite appropriate that I should take this opportunity to record my grateful thanks to Mr. Ee Fook Choy who has al- ways been a tower of strength to me personally and to the sbmc in general. His assistance is readily and unfailingly made avail- able to me on all occasions in all my efforts to propagate the word of the Buddha. I extend an identical sense of gratitude to Mr. Upul Rodrigo and Mr. Daya Satarasinghe whose deep con- cern for the success of our project can, in no way, go un- recorded. The persons who assisted me in this project are numerous. It is not at all a practicable task to adequately list them all here however much I wished to do so. While thanking them pro- fusely, I must make it quite clear that I alone am responsible for any errors that may appear in this work. 48
  • 48. Before I conclude I deem it my duty to record my grateful thanks to a few special persons; my first English teacher Mrs. K.S. Wijenayake who taught me the English alphabet, Mr. Piyaratna Hewabattage, the outstanding graphic art ex- pert of Sri Lanka, Ven. H. Kondanna, Ven. K. Somananda, Mr. Dennis Wang Khee Pong, Mr. & Mrs. Ang Chee Soon, and Miss. Chandra Dasanayaka whose dynamic support enli- vened the total project. And also Mr. Sumith Meegama, Miss. Nanda Dharmalata, and Ven. V. Nanda. My thanks are also due to Mr. Saman Siriwardene, Mr. Nandana and Mrs. Kumudini Hewabattage, members of the Heritage House. They collectively determined, by and large, the typographic personality of this noble publication. I am happy to share with all, the sense of profound joy I experi- ence in being able to present this Treasury of Perennial Transcendental Wisdom to the world. May this work prove a constant companion to all, guiding them along the path of righteousness and virtue towards the ultimate goal of Total Bliss. Ven. Weragoda Sarada Maha Thero author – Chief Monk, sbmc, Singapore 27th November, 1993 49
  • 49. Dedication In a world, largely bewildered and rendered very much helpless by Man's seemingly unceasing unkindness to Man, the well-springs of love, compassion and affection have begun to dry up into a weak trickle in almost every theatre of human existence. This unprecedented anthology of the Buddha's Word, in text and copious illustration is dedicated to humanity, with the unswerving aim of guiding its destiny towards an Era of Peace, Harmony and wholesome Co-existence. Ven. Weragoda Sarada Thero – author 27th November, 1993 50
  • 50. Late Ven. Paõóita Yatalamatte Vgjira¤ana Maha Nayaka Thero, Incumbent of Jayanthi Vihara, Weragoda, Meetiyagoda my Venerable Teacher is the sole source and inspiration of the service I render to the world by spreading the word of the Buddha worldwide through my publica- tion programme spanning so far a period of more than 25 years. With un- diminished gratitude I transfer all the merit I have acquired by pursuing these meritorious activities to the ever-living memory of my late Teacher. 51
  • 51. Introduction By Ven. Balangoda Ananda Maitreya Maha Nayaka Thero The Eternal Truth revealed by the Exalted Buddha, could be summed up under the four headings: Dukkha (unsatisfactoriness), its cause, the cessation of Dukkha and the way thereto. The Ex- alted Buddha expounded the Doctrine of these four Great Truths, illustrating and communicating it to suit the mentality of his hearers of wide ranging backgrounds. All his teachings have been grouped into three collections – or three Baskets (Tripitakas). The three Pitakas are Vinaya, Abhidhamma and Sutta. The present work, Dhammapada, is the second book of the Minor Collection (Khuddakàgama) of the Sutta Pitaka (The Basket of Discourses). It consists of 423 stanzas arranged in 26 Vaggas or Chapters. By reading Dhammapada, one could learn the fundamentals of the Buddhist way of life. It leads its reader not only to a happy and useful life here and hereafter but also to the achievement of life’s purpose “Summum Bonum” the Goal Supreme. Mr. Albert J. Edmonds – author of one of the best English trans- lations of Dhammapada says: “If ever an immortal classic was produced upon the continent of Asia – it is the Dhammapada”. In the western world, the Dhammapada was first translated into Latin by Prof. Fausball of Copenhagen. The first English trans- lation was by Prof. Max Muller. Since then many English ver- sions have appeared. 52
  • 52. Of all these translations, the present version entitled “Treasury of Truth” has several claims to uniqueness. It is in this version that all of the 423 stanzas have been illustrated. Each of the 423 stanzas has its own especially commissioned illustration. The author of this work – Ven. Weragoda Sarada Maha Thero, is widely known for his efforts to spread the word of the Buddha worldwide. Ven. Sarada – a Buddhist Bhikkhu of inde- fatigable zeal – has brought out 69 publications on Buddhist themes, to his credit. His recent work “Life of the Buddha in Pictures” has acquired worldwide acclaim. The present work is a monumental publication. The structure of the Treasury of Truth, is highly impressive. Here, each stanza is transliterated in Roman characters. The prose order of Pali stanzas is given and the significance of the Pali words is conveyed. The original story – out of which a given stanza stems – is also narrated. Popular translations, exegetical material and a commentary are provided to guide the user. I have the greatest pleasure in describing this work as a great contribution to the world literature of Buddhism and related issues. Not only the contemporary world but even generations to come will profit from this work. Ven. Weragoda Sarada Maha Thero deserves