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Morrisoneb  Human Life Cycle
 

Morrisoneb Human Life Cycle

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    Morrisoneb  Human Life Cycle Morrisoneb Human Life Cycle Presentation Transcript

    • Human Life Cycle Questions Create a Chart Assignment Vocabulary Longevity Game Vocabulary Check Bill Nye Videos KWL Chart Music Videos Lifetime Changes Click here. permission granted by Abhay for animated human gif goals and standards
    • go back Click on a picture to get information about each stage . pictures of life stage s
    • Birth is the first stage of the life cycle.   Before birth, a person begins as a single cell, the tiniest building block of life. As the human cells duplicate and specialize into specific body parts, they prepare for the birth of an infant, weighing five to ten pounds.  This takes about 40 weeks from the time that the first cell starts growing. Newborn babies have more bones in their bodies than adults do - as they grow their bones fuse together. Birth
    • Infancy is the second stage of the life cycle.   From birth through the first year of life, a person is called an infant. Babies can't do much for themselves. They are only just learning to recognize their surroundings, to walk and to talk. They are dependent on parents for everything - for food, changing, bathing and movement from place to place. Infancy and Toddler
    • Childhood is the third stage of the life cycle.   This lasts for about ten years, from 3 to 12 years old. For the first two years after infancy, the child is called a toddler. Toddlers learn how to walk, talk, and become more independent. They can feed and dress themselves. Toddlers grow into children, and they go to school where they learn to read and write. They gain more freedom and responsibility as they learn about themselves for the rest of their childhood. Childhood
    • Adolescence is the fourth stage of the life cycle. This lasts from about age 12 to 18 years. Teenagers are quite independent, but they still need their parents to house and feed them, and pay their bills. Adolescents learn more in school. They may learn to drive and have an after-school job. In this stage, starting with puberty, boys change and become men, and girls become women. This can be a very confusing time for a young person, trying to cope with so many changes. Teenage boys grow in spurts, but not just upwards - growth occurs first in the hands and feet, then the legs and arms, the body, and finally the head. These different phases of growth mean that teenage boys often look long and lanky. Teenage girls often mature a few years before boys. This is the time that an adolescent prepares for adulthood, growing to his/her maximum size, and is physically able to reproduce. Adolescence
    • Adulthood is the fifth stage of the life cycle. This lasts from the end of adolescence, usually age 18 to 20, to old age. Adulthood is the time that people take on different kinds of responsibilities. All of the things that our parents once provided, adults must now provide for themselves. The life cycle usually starts over again during this stage, when, through reproduction, adults give birth to their own children. Once a person’s children are grown up and are having children of their own, an adult can enter a more relaxing time of life, with freedom to pursue hobbies and travel. Though the body begins to break down during this stage, an adult may live to an average age of 76 or even longer.  The human life cycle repeats the same cycle of stages, from one generation to the next. Adulthood
    • KWL Chart
      • Before you begin to study the human life cycle, make a KWL chart.
      • Here are some questions to help you get started.
      • • What changes will you go through in your life as you grow up?
      • • When does a person begin to walk, talk and become more independent?
      • • What do you think it means when someone is said to have reached puberty?
      • • At what age do you become an adult?
      • Download the chart and type your answers on the form. Be sure to save your work in your folder. Discuss your answers with your team.
      • Remember to complete the chart by adding what you learned after you complete this study. Discuss what you learned with your team.
    • Create a Life Cycle Chart
      • Think about the stages you have already passed, what did you learn at each stage.
      • Think about goals you have for your present stage and future stages of your life cycle.
      • Download the chart and type your answers on the form.
      • Remember to label each stage and complete the chart by adding what you learned after you complete this study. Share your chart with your team.
      • Be sure to save your work in your folder.
    • Bill Nye Videos
      • It's Bill Nye the Science Guy!
      • In these episodes, Bill explores the science of life cycles.
      •  
      • Bill Nye The Science Guy – 86: Life Cycle 1/3 (video)
      • Bill Nye The Science Guy – 86: Life Cycle 2/3 (video)
      • Bill Nye The Science Guy – 86: Life Cycle 3/3 (video)
    • Music Videos
      • Bill Nye the Science Guy
      • “ Everything Has a Life Cycle” (music video)
      •  
      • Tony Wilson - The wriggling song Human life cycle
      • "When I was a baby"
    • Assignment
      • Draw a picture of your family and include each person's name and stage of development (newborn, toddler, child, teenager, adult).
      • Or
      • Take a digital photo of your family members and create a collage.
      • Or
      • Using a digital video camera, take a short video of your family and narrate for the viewers.
      • Make a podcast for the class Wiki about your project then share it with your team.
    • Vocabulary
      • cycle — A series of events or stages that happen one after another that lead back to a starting point, as in a circle; for example, the cycle of the seasons or the cycle of night and day.
      • human life cycle — The stages of growth and development throughout a person’s life, spanning the time from birth to death.
      • cells — The tiny, microscopic, building blocks of life, from which all living things are made; humans begin life as one cell and grow as one cell divides into trillions.
      • birth — The first stage of the human life cycle, when the newborn infant comes out of its mother’s body.
      • infancy — The second stage of the human life cycle, lasting about one year, when a person is almost totally helpless, but through the five senses, learns a lot about their environment.
      • childhood — The third stage of the human life cycle, lasting about ten years to age 11 or 12.
      • toddler stage — The earliest part of childhood, lasting from ages 1 to 3, during which time the child learns to become more independent, more active and to begin to learn the difference between right and wrong.
      • adolescence — The fourth stage of the human life cycle, lasting from about age 12 to 18; a confusing time when a person undergoes many physical, emotional and intellectual changes, and is preparing for adulthood.
      • puberty — The earliest part of adolescence, when boys and girls are physically able to reproduce and begin to show the adult characteristics of their gender.
      • adulthood — The fifth stage of the human life cycle, lasting from the end of adolescence through old age, when people must assume many responsibilities, become more independent, and may start their own family.
      • old age — The last part of adulthood
      You may want to print a copy of the vocabulary for your notebook. Cut and paste the words to a document, then save to your folder. Study the vocabulary with a partner.
    • Vocabulary Check Human Life Cycle - Flashcards Use the flashcard link or test yourself by clicking on the words in the table. You may work with a partner. cycle birth toddler adulthood human life cycle infancy adolescence old age cells childhood puberty
    • Questions
      • 1. What is a cycle? Give an example.
      • 2. Using a plant as an example, explain what happens over the cycle of the four seasons.
      • 3. Name the stages of the human life cycle.
      • 4. How long does the human stage of infancy last? What is it like?
      • 5. What happens during the toddler stage of childhood? How long does it last?
      • 6. What changes did you go through in your life as you grew from a toddler into a child?
      • 7. During the eight to ten years of the childhood stage, what is happening?
      • 8. What do you think you should know and be able to do by the end of your present stage?
      • 9. What happens to humans during puberty?
      • 10. What physical, emotional and mental things are supposed to happen during adolescence?
      • 11. Why do you think that adolescence is known as a confusing time for a person?
      • 12. Why do we say that adulthood starts the cycle all over again?
      • 13. What qualities and traits do adults have that children do not usually have?
      • 14. Old age can last a long time. Why can this be both a happy time and a difficult time?
      • 15. What is the typical human life span?
      You may want to print a copy of the questions for your notebook. Copy and paste them to a document and save them to your folder. Discuss and answer the questions with your team.
    • Lifetime Changes
      • This collection of images captures six stages of human development, giving you a glimpse of the striking transformation that occurs between birth and death.
      •  
      •  
      • from Teacher's Domain http://www.teachersdomain.org/resource/tdc02.sci.life.cyc.growingup/
      The developmental changes a human undergoes throughout life are remarkable, especially compared to those of other organisms.
    • cycle
      • 1. The tiny, building blocks of life, from which all living things are made.
      •  
      • 2. A series of stages that happen one after another that lead back to a
      • starting point, as in a circle.
      •  
      • 3. The stages of growth and development from birth to death.
      Click on your answer choice below.  
    • human life cycle
      • 1. The tiny, building blocks of life, from which all living things are made.
      •  
      • 2. A series of stages that happen one after another that lead back to a
      • starting point, as in a circle.
      •  
      • 3. The stages of growth and development from birth to death.
      Click on your answer choice below.  
    • cells
      • 1. The tiny, building blocks of life, from which all living things are made.
      •  
      • 2. A series of stages that happen one after another that lead back to a
      • starting point, as in a circle.
      •  
      • 3. The stages of growth and development from birth to death.
      Click on your answer choice below.  
    • birth
      • 1. The stage when the newborn infant comes out of its mother's body.
      •  
      • 2. The stage lasting about ten years to age 11 or 12.
      •  
      • 3. The stage lasting about one year, when a person is almost totally
      • helpless, but learns a lot through the five senses.
      Click on your answer choice below.  
    • infancy
      • 1. The stage when the newborn infant comes out of its mother's body.
      •  
      • 2. The stage lasting about ten years to age 11 or 12.
      •  
      • 3. The stage lasting about one year, when a person is almost totally
      • helpless, but learns a lot through the five senses.
      Click on your answer choice below.  
    • childhood
      • 1. The stage when the newborn infant comes out of its mother's body.
      •  
      • 2. The stage lasting about ten years to age 11 or 12.
      •  
      • 3. The stage lasting about one year, when a person is almost totally
      • helpless, but learns a lot through the five senses.
      Click on your answer choice below.  
    • toddler
      • 1. The earliest part of childhood, lasting from ages 1 to 3, during which the
      • child learns to become more independent, more active and to begin to
      • learn the difference between right and wrong.  
      •  
      • 2. The stage lasting from about age 12 to 18; a confusing time when a
      • person undergoes many physical, emotional and intellectual changes, and
      • is preparing for adulthood.
      •  
      • 3. The earliest part of adolescence, when boys and girls are physically able
      • to reproduce and begin to show the adult characteristics of their gender. 
      Click on your answer choice below.  
    • adolescence
      • 1. The earliest part of childhood, lasting from ages 1 to 3, during which the
      • child learns to become more independent, more active and to begin to
      • learn the difference between right and wrong.  
      •  
      • 2. The stage lasting from about age 12 to 18; a confusing time when a
      • person undergoes many physical, emotional and intellectual changes, and
      • is preparing for adulthood.
      •  
      • 3. The earliest part of adolescence, when boys and girls are physically able
      • to reproduce and begin to show the adult characteristics of their gender. 
      Click on your answer choice below.  
    • puberty
      • 1. The earliest part of childhood, lasting from ages 1 to 3, during which the
      • child learns to become more independent, more active and to begin to
      • learn the difference between right and wrong. 
      •  
      • 2. The stage lasting from about age 12 to 18; a confusing time when a
      • person undergoes many physical, emotional and intellectual changes, and
      • is preparing for adulthood.
      •  
      • 3. The earliest part of adolescence, when boys and girls are physically able
      • to reproduce and begin to show the adult characteristics of their gender. 
      Click on your answer choice below.  
    • adulthood
      • 1. The last part of adulthood.  
      •  
      • 2. The stage lasting from the end of adolescence through old age, when
      • people must assume many responsibilities, become more
      • independent, and may start their own family.  
      •  
      • 3. The earliest part of adolescence, when boys and girls are physically
      • able to reproduce and begin to show the adult characteristics of their
      • gender.
      Click on your answer choice below.  
    • old age
      • 1. The last part of adulthood.  
      •  
      • 2. The stage lasting from the end of adolescence through old age, when
      • people must assume many responsibilities, become more
      • independent, and ay start their own family. 
      •  
      • 3. The earliest part of adolescence, when boys and girls are physically
      • able to reproduce and begin to show the adult characteristics of their
      • gender.
      Click on your answer choice below.  
    • YES
      • Awesome!
      • Way to go!
      Go back cycle
    • NO
      • Try again.
      Go back cycle
    • YES
      • Awesome!
      • Way to go!
      Go back human life cycle
    • NO
      • Try again.
      Go back human life cycle
    • YES
      • Awesome!
      • Way to go!
      Go back cells
    • NO
      • Try again.
      Go back cells
    • YES
      • Awesome!
      • Way to go!
      Go back birth
    • NO
      • Try again.
      Go back birth
    • YES
      • Awesome!
      • Way to go!
      Go back infancy
    • NO
      • Try again.
      Go back infancy
    • YES
      • Awesome!
      • Way to go!
      Go back childhood
    • NO
      • Try again.
      Go back childhood
    • YES
      • Awesome!
      • Way to go!
      Go back toddler
    • NO
      • Try again.
      Go back toddler
    • YES
      • Awesome!
      • Way to go!
      Go back adolescence
    • NO
      • Try again.
      Go back adolescence
    • YES
      • Awesome!
      • Way to go!
      Go back puberty
    • NO
      • Try again.
      Go back puberty
    • YES
      • Awesome!
      • Way to go!
      Go back adulthood
    • NO
      • Try again.
      Go back adulthood
    • YES
      • Awesome!
      • Way to go!
      Go back old age
    • NO
      • Try again.
      Go back old age
    • NC Goals and Standards North Carolina SCOS Curriculum Standards by Grade Level Grade: K (3) 1.01.b - Growth 1.01.c - Changes 1.05.b - Growth and change Grade: 2 COMPETENCY GOAL 1: The learner will conduct investigations and build an understanding of animal life cycles. 1.01 Describe the life cycle of animals including: • Birth. • Developing into an adult. • Reproducing. • Aging and death 1.02 Observe that insects need food, air, and space to grow. 1.03 Observe the different stages of an insect life cycle. 1.04 Compare and contrast life cycles of other animals such as mealworms, ladybugs, crickets, guppies or frogs. BIOLOGY COMPETENCY GOAL 4: The learner will develop an understanding of the unity and diversity of life. 4.03 Assess, describe and explain adaptations affecting survival and reproductive success.• Structural adaptations in plants and animals (form to function). 4.05 Analyze the broad patterns of animal behaviors as adaptations to the environment. • Innate behavior. • Learned behavior. • Social behavior. COMPETENCY GOAL 5: The learner will conduct investigations and utilize appropriate technologies and information systems to build an understanding of heredity and genetics. 5.06 Evaluate evidence that human characteristics are a product of: • Inheritance. • Lifestyle choices. HEALTH COMPETENCY GOAL 4: The learner will conduct investigations, use models, simulations, and appropriate technologies and information systems to build an understanding of the complementary nature of the human body system. 4.06 Describe growth and development of the human organism. 4.07 Explain the effects of environmental influences on human embryo development and human health including:• Smoking. • Alcohol. • Drugs. • Diet. 4.08 Explain how understanding human body systems can help make informed decisions regarding health. ISTE Standards
    • ISTE Standards for Students
      • Creativity and Innovation   Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology. Students:
      •   a. apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes.
      • b. create original works as a means of personal or group expression.
      • 2. Communication and Collaboration   Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others. Students:
      •   a. interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts, or others employing a variety of digital environments and media.
      • b. communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats.
      • d. contribute to project teams to produce original works or solve problems.
      • 3. Research and Information Fluency   Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information. Students:
      •   a. plan strategies to guide inquiry.
      • b. locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media.
      • c. evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness to specific tasks.
      • d. process data and report results.
      • 4. Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, and Decision Making   Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources. Students:
      • b. plan and manage activities to develop a solution or complete a project.
      • 5. Digital Citizenship   Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior. Students:  
      • advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.
      • exhibit a positive attitude toward using technology that supports collaboration, learning, and productivity.
      • 6. Technology Operations and Concepts   Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems, and operations. Students:  
      • a. understand and use technology systems.
      • b. select and use applications effectively and productively.
      • c. troubleshoot systems and applications.
      • d. transfer current knowledge to learning of new technologies.
      • National Educational Technology Standards for Students, Second Edition, © 2007, ISTE® (International Society for Technology in Education), www.iste.org. All rights reserved.
      • (reprinted and abridged by permission)