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Powerpoint here Presentation Transcript

  • 1. COM 125 GAMING Presentation Presented by: Cheon Ee Lin Lim Yen-Yi Andrea Liyana Zainal Ng Yi-Xin Sabrina Rosalyn Wee Tan Cai Ying, Jasmine Class B
  • 2. Evolution of games
    • Video from:
    • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Y6db6yQEw0
  • 3. Game genres
    • Action
    • Fighting
    • Role-playing
    • Massively multi-player online games
    • Platform game
    • Simulations game
    • (flight, military, space, city-building)
    • Sports (racing)
    • Strategy
    • Educational
    • Music
  • 4. Online Games
    • Online Games
      • Online role-playing games
      • Online shooters
      • Online Third-person
      • shooters/Third-person action
      • Online browser-based
  • 5. Current Generation of MMORPGs
    • World of Warcraft
    • (WoW)
    • One of the most played
    • games in North America
    • Most played MMORPG
    • worldwide
    • Over 8 million players
  • 6. Current Generation of MMORPGs
    • Development of raid group quest (“raid”)
    • Use of instant dungeons
    • “ Player-driven” gameplay
    • Production of movie “tie-in” games
    • Competition leads to potential profits among free-to-play MMORPGs
  • 7. Mobile gaming
    • Take advantage of unique strengths of mobiles rather than simply relying on basic idea or porting popular franchises
    • Javier Ferreira, Boss of EA Mobile
    • Phone is essential to uniting
    • communities of players
    • and the home consoles
    • they currently play
    http://www.gamesindustry.biz/content_page.php?aid=23501
  • 8. Mobile gaming
    • Types
    • Multi-player
    • Content-based
    • High-impact visual games
    • Categories
    • Embedded games
    • SMS games
    • Browser games
    http://www.developer.com/java/j2me/article.php/3502741
  • 9. In-game advertising
    • In-game advertising (IGA) 
    • use of computer and video games as a medium to deliver advertising
    • 2005 in-game advertising spending  USD$56 million (estimated to grow to $1.8 billion by 2010)
    • In-game advertising  offers new and promising revenue stream, allowing developers to offset growing development costs and take more risks in gameplay
    • Bring extra $1 to $2 of profit per game unit sold towards publishers (significant increase over the current $5 to $6 profit per unit.)
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In-game_advertising
  • 10. Future of Gaming: Characteristics of the Game Platform of the Future (1) Arouse all 5 senses
    • Game developers will eventually capitalize on pain, sight, hear, taste and smell
    • For example:
    • Instead of hearing the sound of an explosion and seeing its effects, a future gamer will feel the shock waves as well
    • Digiscents
    •  developed iSmell device:
    • utilize the sense of smell in future games
  • 11. Future of Gaming: Characteristics of the Game Platform of the Future (2) Educational
    • Noel Falstein,
    • - gaming industry veteran
    • When educational support is integrated with gaming, the didactic power of games will be realized
    • Yield far-reaching social and educational benefits
  • 12. Educational (Con’t)
    • Serious games: medical know-how,
    • current affairs, national history
    • For example:
    • Doom, Remission  educate players on types of treatments available for a disease and importance of adhering to the prescribed therapy
    • U.S.  A Force More Powerful – teach players non-violent ways of resolving conflicts
    • Chicago  using computer graphics and gaming to help promote education and physical activity in youth.
  • 13. Educational (Con’t)
    • Dr. Michael Nelson, IBM’s director of Internet Technology and Strategy
    • Video gaming offers a unique opportunity to reinforce importance of math and science education
    • Kids love gaming, and math and science make games possible
    http://www-03.ibm.com/press/us/en/pressrelease/20674.wss
  • 14. Educational (Con’t)
    • Robin Willner, vice president of IBM Global Community Initiatives
    • Gaming is opening many new and exciting options
    • Gaming technology is fun and helps us demonstrate that science and technology careers are fun and full of opportunities
    • Taking gaming technology to students is the perfect next step in IBM’s work to encourage students to stick with their math and science studies
    http://www-03.ibm.com/press/us/en/pressrelease/20674.wss
  • 15. Educational (Con’t) Singapore
    • In 2007, at least 2 schools are expected to introduce students, teachers, principals to the world of online gaming as part of the curriculum
    • First country in the world planning to use Granado Espada (a fantasy role-playing game allowing players to explore countries as they solve puzzles and hunt for treasure) as a learning tool
  • 16. Educational (Con’t) Singapore
    • Prof Muhammad Faishal,
    • Assistant Professor
    • sees gaming as a new and broadened platform for learning
    • making it interesting to students will help motivate them to learn new skills like decision making and problem-solving
  • 17. Gaming prospect
    • For example:
    • Graduates of DigiPen Institute of Technology, recruited by Electronic Arts, Microsoft, Nintendo and Sony, earned up to US$50,000 (S$76,000) developing games
    • The computer animation and programming school is setting up its Asian campus in Singapore – its first and only campus outside U.S.
    • First institution in Singapore to offer specialized
    • degree-level courses for game development
    http://www.rsi.sg/english/singaporescene/view/2005120817388/1/.html
  • 18. Gaming prospect (Con’t)
    • Institute opening for Fall 2007
    • in an area in Singapore called
    • “ Fusionpolis”, an ambitious
    • live-work project that connects
    • information technology,
    • communication, and media industries.
    • Courses:
    • * Bachelor of Science in Real-Time Interactive Simulation (154 credits) - Fall 2007
    • * Bachelor of Fine Arts in Production Animation (144 credits) - Fall 2008
    http://singapore.digipen.edu/
  • 19. Virtual Worlds
    • Definition:
    • Computer moderated, persistent environments through and with which multiple individuals may interact simultaneously
    • Often an illusion that encourages the acceptance of familiar concepts such as place, inhabitant and object
    • Allow characters within virtual worls to buy and sell virtual goods
    • More people accept an illusion, the more real it becomes
    Pitfalls of Virtual Property
  • 20. Virtual Property
    • Major Categories
      • Objects
        • Weapons, armour, jewelry
      • Characters
      • Currency
        • gold pieces, platinum pieces, pyreals
    • Minor Categories
      • Real estate
        • Houses, shops, building plots
      • Accounts
      • Other
        • Permissions, memberships, maps
  • 21. The Virtual Gaming Economy
    • Definition: Emergent economy existing in a virtual persistent world, usually in the context of an Internet game (Wikipedia, 2007)
    • Usually found in MMORPGS: Everquest, Ultima Online, WOW,
    • Simulation: The Sims Online, Second Life
    • Browser Based Internet Games: Neopets, Tokenzone
    • Via  Gold Farming, Power Leveling
  • 22. The Virtual Gaming Economy
    • Why Does this Economy Exist?
      • Persistence
      • Scarcity
      • Specialization
      • Trade
      • Property Rights
      • “ Supply & Demand” Rule
    Wikipedia
  • 23. The Virtual Gaming Economy
    • Largest Virtual Economy Presently
      • Lineage (South Korea)
        • 17 million users out of Korea’s population of 48 million
    • In-game Currency
      • Wow (Gold)
      • Second Life (Linden Dollars)
      • Maplestory (Mesos)
          • Eg. One million mesos = S$2
      • Everquest (PP: Platinum Piece)
          • Eg. 1PP = US 1 cent
    • Trading:
    • - People trade items with real currency
      • Auction Sites
        • Ebay, PlayerAuctions, ItemBay
  • 24. The Virtual Gaming Economy
    • Virtual Companies
      • Tropical in Second Life
        • Create buildings and designs spaces for other Residents
          • Swimming pool, shopping malls, nightclubs
      • Crayon, Adidas, Toyota Motor, Pontiac, Reuters Group, General Motors, Dell, Cisco Systems, Sun Microsystems
  • 25. The Virtual Gaming Economy
    • Mudflation
      • A portmanteau of mud and inflation
      • In MMORPGs
      • Occurs when a more recently acquired or introduced item makes an existing item lose significant value
    • Implications to our real economy
    • - Exchange rate between real and virtual currencies based on purchasing power parity
  • 26. Hall of Fame: Top 5 Most Addictive Games
    • 5: Mildly Addictive Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas
    • 4: Highly Addictive Sims
    • 3: Scarily Addictive Championship Manager 2006
    • 2: Seriously Addictive Counter Strike
    • 1: Life-Threateningly Addictive World of Warcraft
    (Source: http://www.fyrne.com/Article_pages/Give_up_your_day_job.html)
  • 27. 10 Most Important Video Games of all time
    • Spacewar! (1962)
    • Star Raiders (1979)
    • Zork (1980)
    • Tetris (1985)
    • SimCity (1989)
    • Super Mario Brothers 3 (1990)
    • Civilization I/II (1991)
    • Doom (1993)
    • Warcraft series (From 1994)
    • Sensible World of Soccer (1994)
    • (Source: http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/12/arts/design/12vide.html?_r=1&oref=slogin)
  • 28. US Top 5 Game Sales
    • PC
    • The Sims 2 Console
    • WoW: The Burning Crusade
    • WoW
    • The Sims 2
    • The Sims 2: Pets
    • Console
    • Wii Play
    • Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon Advanced Warfighter 2
    • Major League Baseball 2K7
    • Resistance: Fall of Man
    • Madden NFL 07
    (Source: http://www.gamespot.com/news/index.html )
  • 29. Extremes that Gamers Go To: The Common Ones
    • Guilds
    • Online Auctions
      • Ebay
      • IGE.com
    • Earning through gaming
      • By selling their virtual game assets
        • Characters
        • Magical swords and shields
      • E.g. Maplestory
    • Websites/blogs/fan art sites
    • Online game forums
    • Purchasing Game Books
    • Researching game tips/hacks
    • Gold Farming
  • 30. The Very Extreme Ones
    • World of Warcraft
      • Funeral
      • In game Protest march
        • Naked gnomes
    • Sky diving while playing Super Mario
    • Gold Farmers as a Job
      • 12 hour shifts
      • Play computer games by killing onscreen monsters and winning battles, harvesting artificial gold coins and other virtual goods for real cash
      • Have quotas to reach
  • 31. Gaming Events
    • EA Play 07 at SIM
    • Games Convention Asia 2007 (September 2007)
    • Versus League (Fighting to Survive, Digital Life)
      • At Virtualand arcade, Bugis Junction
      • 80 gamers “fighting” to score league points in their respective games
      • Tekken 5: Dark Resurrection, Guilty Gear XX Slash, The King of Fighters XI, Capcom vs SNK2, Soul Calibur III
      • Bring in more business for the arcades, due to competition from MMORPGs
      • www.tkaworld.com
  • 32. Usefulness of Gaming
    • According to Janet H. Murray of M.I.T. , “Games, like active learning and education, teach.”
      • E.g Using Second Life to conduct classes.
    • People learn more and retain that knowledge longer over time
    • Makes lessons interesting
    • Build a bigger social network
      • E.g. Using the ‘chat’ function that is available in Second Life to know new friends
    Source: http://www.elearnmag.org/subpage.cfm?section=opinion&article=49-1
  • 33. Usefulness of Gaming
    • Use of simulations to help us model activities and interactions
      • E.g. Using SimCity to teach children about the factors that can impact on the success or failure a city and how these factors interact
    Source: http://www.fi.edu/fellows/fellow3/apr99/simcity2000/why.htm
  • 34. Usefulness of Gaming
      • - E.g. Using SOCOM 3: U.S. Navy SEALS to teach the U.S. Military the following:
        • proper use of sensitive and expensive equipment
        • military doctrine
        • art of strategy
        • teamwork and team training
        • master complex process of military logistics
        • how not to fight when helping maintain peace (A. Karrer, et al.)
    Source: http://www.elearnmag.org/subpage.cfm?section=opinion&article=49-1
  • 35. Usefulness of Gaming
    • Help people lose weight
      • E.g. Use of equipments, such as threadmills, that are hooked up to a screen to play game
    Source: http://www.americaninventorspot.com/video_games_that_help_you_lose_weight
  • 36. Usefulness of Gaming
    • Help stroke patients improve their condition
    • Help surgeons perform better in keyhole and laparoscopic surgery
    • Help educate kids about cancer
      • E.g. Use of Re-Mission to reinforce the importance of keeping up with the treatment
      • http:// www.youtube.com/watch?v =Of9ooFdXyus
    Source: http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2005/05/13/health/main695065.shtml http://www.usnews.com/usnews/health/articles/060806/14video.htm http://www.eurogamer.net/article.php?article_id=73220
  • 37. Usefulness of Gaming
    • Help children with acute burn injuries control the pain they are experiencing
      • In a research conducted by Das D. A., et al. (2005); they concluded that there are “strong evidence supporting Virtual Reality based games in providing analgesia (painkiller) with minimal side effects and little impact on the physical hospital environment, as well as its reusability and versatility, suggesting another option in the management of children's acute pain.”
    Source: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2431/5/1
  • 38. What is Sandbox Game?
    • It is open-ended
      • Does not have a specific, predefined ending, or set of endings
    • It is a mode of gameplay within a game that is more often played in a goal-directed manner
    • Users are free to explore
    • Users can play in whichever way they like
    Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sandbox_(video_games)
  • 39. The Level Design of Sandbox Game
    • Major sections of the game are locked at the beginning of the game
    • Different sections of the map are controlled differently
    • A great deal of hidden items
    Source: http://www.xbox.com/en-US/games/tips/noviceguides/sandbox.htm
  • 40. Features of sandbox games
    • Never-ending gameplay
    • Freedom to experiment
    • Non-linear or nonexistent plot
    Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sandbox_%28video_games%29#Common_features_of_sandbox-style_video_gaming
  • 41. Some Examples of Sandbox games
    • The Sims
    • SimCity
    • Second Life
    • Civilization series
    • Grand Theft Auto series
    Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sandbox_%28video_games%29#Notable_sandbox_style_video_games
  • 42. Media Violence and Video Games : Are Video Games Teaching Kids to Kill?
    • With copycat phenomenon , the media have caused some children to imitate the actions of the characters in the game
    • Through desensitization , the media have taught children to associate violence and killing with pleasure
      • E.g. In a first-person shooter game, the player is equipped with a gun to kill their enemy/opponent
    Source: Glenn G. Sparks. (2006) Media Effects Research A Basic Overview: Effects of Media Violence. Pp. 81, 95-96
  • 43. Are Video Games Teaching Kids to Kill?
    • With Albert Bandura’s Social Learning Theory, a child will view violence as acceptable if the character receives rewards for being aggressive and hence imitate those actions
    • Game developers make use of improved graphic technology to create realistic-looking scenarios
    Source: Glenn G. Sparks. (2006) Media Effects Research A Basic Overview: Effects of Media Violence. Pp. 81, 94-96
  • 44. Are Video Games Teaching Kids to Kill?
    • Games seems to be teaching the kids more than virtual killing
      • E.g. Killings at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado, in 1999
        • Classmates and teachers of Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold were attacked
        • They were apparently rather into Doom
        • However, one can say that there is no direct linkage between Doom and the Columbine incident since there are no other mass killing that is related to playing Doom.
    Source: Glenn G. Sparks. (2006) Media Effects Research A Basic Overview: Effects of Media Violence. Pp. 95-96
  • 45. Why people game: Achievement
    • Progress/advancement
    • Seduction of achievement
    • Goal-driven
    • Power brings recognition
    • Competition
    • Self-sufficiency
    • Optimization
    http://www.nickyee.com/deadalus/motivations.pdf
  • 46.
    • Ultimate chatroom
    • Forming Relationships
    • A Helping Hand
    • Playing with Friends/Family
    • the Guild
    • Teamwork
    Why people game: Socialize http://www.nickyee.com/deadalus/motivations.pdf
  • 47.
    • Quests
    • Role-playing / character building
    • Identity Exploration
    • Exploration
    • Discovery
    • Knowledge
    • Fantasy
    • Escapism
    Immersion http://www.nickyee.com/deadalus/motivations.pdf
  • 48. Why people game?
    • Enjoyable, stimulating and provides decent entertainment
    • Games are powerful with their stories, action, graphical features, sound effects and originality
    • Escape from stress and gruesome reality
    • Do the impossible
    • Do things beyond their imagination
    • New level of excitement when people compete with each other
  • 49. Positive Effects of Gaming
    • Gaming for ADHD
    • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9LaCX0oz_G4
    • Game helps Iraq vets
    • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yh8C_Uligqs
  • 50. Positive Effects of Gaming
    • Videogame therapy
    • - training and rehabilitation aid
    • - people with attentional difficulties
    • - traumatic brain injury
    • - physiotherapy for arm injuries
    • - occupational therapy
    • - train movements
    • - respiratory muscles training
  • 51. Positive Effects of Gaming
    • Educate Players
    • - role-playing
    • - teach humanities
    • - calculation
    • Social activities
    • As a fun hobby
    • - enjoyment
    • - play to relax and have a good time
    • Stimulate imagination
    • Cheap entertainment
    http://everything2.com/index.pl?node_id=1232666
  • 52. Positive Effects of Gaming
    • Sharpen mental faculties
    • Improves hand-eye co-ordination
    • Improve skills
    • Mimic social structure
    • Other areas
    http://onlyagame.typepad.com/only_a_game/2005/07/the_positive_ef.html http://www.units.muohio.edu/psybersite/cyberspace/onlinegames/video.shtml#positive
  • 53. How many of you played computer games in schools? Were they for educational purposes? But parents are afraid that their children might get game addiction when playing these games in school
  • 54. Negative Effect of Gaming : Game Addiction Video
    • World of Warcraft Addict
    • http:// www.youtube.com/watch?v =K8hfK3RQs2g
  • 55. Online Gaming Addiction
    • Research by Brian D. Ng & Peter Wiemer-Hastings
    • MMORPGs (eg. Everquest, Ultima Online)
    • - “heroinware”
    • - run continuously in real time
    • - endless because of system of goals & achievments
    • - social interaction highly essential
    Ng, B.D., & Weimer-Hastings, P., (2005). Addiction to the Internet and online gaming. Cyberpsychology & Behavior 8:110-113
  • 56. Eg: Everquest
    • - Received most press & most blame for MMORPG addiction
    • - Recovering player: “The game almost ruined my life, it was my life. I ceased being me; I became Madrid, the Great Shaman of the North…” (News.com, 2002)
    • - Another player: “…the most addictive part for me was definitely the gain of power and status…” (News.com, 2002)
    Ng, B.D., & Weimer-Hastings, P., (2005). Addiction to the Internet and online gaming. Cyberpsychology & Behavior 8:110-113
  • 57. Specific Applications
    • Fantasy role-playing games (MUDS)
    • Anonymity – users create own social identities => raise self-esteem (Griffiths, M.D., 1998)
    • Substitute for real-life interaction => escape from reality (Young, K., 1996)
    Ng, B.D., & Weimer-Hastings, P., (2005). Addiction to the Internet and online gaming. Cyberpsychology & Behavior 8:110-113
  • 58. Research Findings
    • 91 respondents
    • Playing for 8 hours continuously
    • Sleep loss
    • Been told they spent too much time playing
    • Would rather spend time in game than with friends
    • More fun with in-game friends
    • Easier to converse with people while in-game
    • Social relationships not as important
    • Happier while in-game
    Ng, B.D., & Weimer-Hastings, P., (2005). Addiction to the Internet and online gaming. Cyberpsychology & Behavior 8:110-113
  • 59. Research Findings (cont’)
    • Games not a diversion from loneliness
    • Not to gain self-confidence
    • No monetary issues associated with gaming
    • Biggest draw: Social aspects of games
    Ng, B.D., & Weimer-Hastings, P., (2005). Addiction to the Internet and online gaming. Cyberpsychology & Behavior 8:110-113
  • 60. Why are games addictive?
    • Games are not addictive, it’s the gamers who gets addicted (just like drugs)
    • People play too much, therefore they get addicted
    • People cannot get out of the need to play
    • People cannot control themselves, incontrollable craving
  • 61. Closer to home…
    • 2001: Institute of Mental Health (IMH) admitted 1 patient under age of 19
    • 2006: IMH admitted 12 young patients
    • 2004 report by research firm IDC: more than 1 million gamers in Singapore
    Tan, H.Y. & Chua H.H., 17 Jan 2007, Is there a gaming addict in your home?. The Straits Times. Singapore Press Holdings Limited.
  • 62. Symptoms of Addiction
    • Depression
    • Nervousness
    • Fear
    • Panic
    • Agitation
    • Unwillingness to interact
  • 63. Real case scenario 1:
    • Secondary school boy turned to gaming to get to know people
    • Eventually got hooked; >12 hrs/day playing “MapleStory”
    • Once an extrovert, the boy turned moody, grades slipped, played truant.
    Tan, H.Y. & Chua H.H., 17 Jan 2007, Is there a gaming addict in your home?. The Straits Times. Singapore Press Holdings Limited.
  • 64. Real Case Scenario 2:
    • Benjamin Toh – active in school until addiction to “Maple Story”.
    • Spent hours playing, neglected studies, had to stay back in Sec 3.
    • Rushed home from school to lock himself in room to play until midnight.
    • Over 10 hrs a day, taking only toilet or food breaks
    11 Feb 2007. Confessions of an ex-gaming junkie. The Straits Times. Singapore Press Holdings Limited
  • 65. Real Case Scenario 2 (cont’):
    • During school holidays: played up to 24 hrs straight.
    • >$600 on Maple Story prepaid cards
    • Skipped meals to save up
    • Lost social life – turned down hanging out with friends to play
    11 Feb 2007. Confessions of an ex-gaming junkie. The Straits Times. Singapore Press Holdings Limited
  • 66. Real Case Scenario 3:
    • Tan Yeow Sien’s post-gaming symptoms:
    • - gaming into wee hours
    • - nauseous & grouchy the next morning
    • - constantly preoccupied with wanting to move to next level
    • Damage done to his students:
    • - Pale faces, ghoulish red eyes, disdainful lack of attention in class
    Tan, Y.S., 3 February 2007. Gaming addiction: it’s real, trust me. Today. MediaCorp Press Ltd.
  • 67. Real Case Scenario 4:
    • Kelly Ong: 17-year-old games addict quits school
    • >16 hrs a day playing
    • Started as soon as she reached home till it was time for school; falling asleep in class
    • Continued playing during O-level exam period
    • Failed to turn up for an O-level paper because sick from lack of sleep
    Lim, J., 28 January 2007. School can wait, I’d rather play PC games. The New Paper. Singapore Press Holdings Limited.
  • 68. Real Case Scenario 4 (cont’):
    • Goal: to claim a place in top 5 in international gaming competitions
    • Came in 3 rd in the Electronic Sport World Cup competition (national qualifiers category)
    • Kelly: “Sometimes I can still hear the loading of guns in my mind even though I am not playing. I am constantly thinking of which weapons to use for my next attack”.
    Lim, J., 28 January 2007. School can wait, I’d rather play PC games. The New Paper. Singapore Press Holdings Limited.
  • 69. Real Case Scenario 5:
    • Garyl Tan Jia Luo, 17: found guilty of tapping into someone else’s unsecured wireless network to play
    • Sentenced to 9 months at Bukit Batok Hostel, 80 hrs community service, banned from using the Internet for 18 months
    Lim, J., 28 January 2007. School can wait, I’d rather play PC games. The New Paper. Singapore Press Holdings Limited.
  • 70. Warning Signs:
    • Withdrawal from social activity
    • Not doing homework / worsening grades
    • Restlessness when away from computer
    • Irritability & annoyance when unable to play
    • Errant behavior (eg. Lying, truancy)
    • Playing longer than intended (>30 hours/week)
    Source 1: Tan, H.Y. & Chua H.H., 17 Jan 2007, Is there a gaming addict in your home?. The Straits Times. Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Source 2: Gambling & Gaming Addictions in Adolescence, (2002)
  • 71. Health Consequences:
    • Auditory hallucinations
    • Wrist pain
    • Neck pain
    • Elbow pain
    • Obesity (due to lack of exercise)
    • Photo-sensitive epilepsy
    • Increased risk of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia
    • Enuresis
    • Encopresis
    • Tenosynovitis
    • Peripheral neuropathy
    Source 1: Gambling & Gaming Addictions in Adolescence, (2002)
  • 72. Checklist:
    • Do you play almost everyday?
    • Do you often play for long periods (over 3 hours at a time?)
    • Do you play for excitement?
    • Do you get restless and irritable if unable to play?
    • Do you sacrifice social and sporting activities to play?
    • Do you play instead of doing assignments / studying?
    • Do you try to cut down but can’t?
    Source: Gambling & Gaming Addictions in Adolescence, (2002)
  • 73. Prevention from Harmful effects of Gaming Addiction: MDA
    • MDA ’s outreach programme
    • Protect and Empower young users against the undesirable effects of new media
    • Cyber Wellness
    • Understand the risks of harmful online behavior
    • Awareness of how to protect oneself and other Internet users from such behavior
    MDA Supports Industry and Community Initiatives In Promoting Online Safety
  • 74. Policy Makers/ Educators
    • National Internet Advisory Council (NIAC)
    • “ Education-system-wide cyber wellness initiative” in 2006
    Chua H. H. (2007, February 6). Schools to teach Net safety lessons. Straits Times, Copyright 2007 Singapore Press Holdings Limited.
  • 75. Volunteer Welfare Organizations (VWOs)
    • Hired by schools to conduct cyber-wellness programs
    • In August 2006 to help youngsters limit their gaming habits. It also conducts workshops, seminars, and counseling sessions for children, and their parents
    Chua H. H. (2007, February 6). Schools to teach Net safety lessons. Straits Times, Copyright 2007 Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Lim, J. (2007, January 28). School can wait, I'd rather play PC games. The New Paper, Copyright 2007, Singapore Press Holding Limited.
  • 76. Action taken by Schools
    • Curriculum to Teach children to reduce their total amount gaming time/ screen time and games
    • “ Navigate cyberspace safely and watch out for dangers like cyber-predators this year
      • “ Cyber-wellness and Internet Safety” program is part of their Civics and Moral Education during Primary 1, 2, and Sec 1, 2
    Video Games. (2004, June 8). Violent Video Games - Psychologists Help Protect Children from Harmful Effects. American Psychological Association Online. Retrieved February 13, 2007, from http://psychologymatters.org/videogames.html Chua H. H. (2007, February 6). Schools to teach Net safety lessons. Straits Times, Copyright 2007 Singapore Press Holdings Limited.
  • 77. Therapy for Online Gaming: Ministry of Education (MOE)
    • Training counselors.
    • Plan to have counselors in every school
    • To help students with internet-related problems and online addiction
    Chua H. H. (2007, February 6). Schools to teach Net safety lessons. Straits Times, Copyright 2007 Singapore Press Holdings Limited.
  • 78. Internet Addiction Clinics
    • China saw growing problem - 20 million online gamers in 2005
    • China saw growing problem
    • Opened clinic for “internet addiction” in 2005
    • Treat teens and young adults for depression, nervousness, fear, unwillingness to interact with others, panic, agitation, sleep disorders, shakes, numbness in their hands, weight loss
    • Therapy sessions include medication, acupuncture, athletic activities, and electrical shocks to pressure points.
    “ China imposes online gaming curbs”. (2005, August). BBC News International. Retrieved on March 20, 2007, from http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/4183340.stm Thorsen, T. (2005, July 07). China opens game addiction clinic. Copyright 2007, CNET Networks, Inc. Retrieved on March 20, 2007, from http://www.cnet.com.au/games/0.239029232.240055783.00.htm
  • 79. Online Therapy: Online Gamers Anonymous
    • People share their experience, and give support to others.
    • Added Benefit of not revealing who they really are.
    • Past addicts, current addicts, or professionals
  • 80. Dealing with Addiction: Guidance and Supervision
    • “ Research studies suggested that active parental involvement in children’s media usage can reduce the impact of media violence on children and youth.”
    Video Games. (2004, June 8). Violent Video Games - Psychologists Help Protect Children from Harmful Effects. American Psychological Association Online. Retrieved February 13, 2007, from http://psychologymatters.org/videogames.html
  • 81. Identifying a Gaming Addict
    • Neglects usual activities
    • Spends a whole lot of time on playing games
    • No social life
    • Thinking about gaming 24/7
    • Lying to friends/ family to conceal gaming
    • Feel irritable when not gaming
    http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2006/06/09/health/main1696705.shtml http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2006/07/03/health/webmd/main1773956.shtml
  • 82. Friends/ Parents should NOT CONDEMN but should:
    • Engage them
    • Set limits and boundaries e.g. technical prevention
    • Take a firm stand
    • Encourage them/ Motivate
    Griffiths, M. D. (2002). Gambling and Gaming Addictions in Adolescence. Nottingham: Blackwell Publishing. Preventing play from turning into pain. (2007, January 26). Straits Times. Copyright 2007, Singapore Press Holdings Limited.