Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
E-Comm. Business Models
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

E-Comm. Business Models

1,050
views

Published on


0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,050
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
31
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Comp2513 E-Commerce Business Models Daniel L. Silver, Ph.D.
  • 2. Outline
    • Three fundamental categories of E-Commerce business models
      • B2C, B2B and C2C
    • A B2C Scenario
      • Window Shopping
      • Step into the store (registration)
      • Filling the shopping cart
      • On to the checkout
      • Paying for the items
      • Fulfillment and shipment tracking
  • 3. Three Fundamental Categories of E-Commerce Business Models
    • B2C – Business to Consumer
      • What most people typically think of when they think E-Commerce
    • C2C – Consumer to Consumer
      • Auctions, Bartering models
    • B2B – Business to Business
      • The original E-Commerce models – Why?
  • 4. B2C – Business to Consumer
    • Storefront Model
      • The best known form of E-Commerce
      • Displays products (catalogs), takes orders, accepts payment, fulfills order, manage customer data
      • Click and Mortar versus Internet Only
      • Amazon.com, eToys.com, CDnow.com, Chapters.ca
  • 5. B2C – Business to Consumer
    • Online Shopping Mall Model
      • Present wider selection of products and services
      • Searching and shopping convenience
      • Common shopping cart, payment and shipping method
      • Takes advantage of economies of scale
      • Merchants are charged in various ways
      • Mall.com, Canadashop.com, Shoptheshops.com
  • 6. B2C – Business to Consumer
    • Portal Models
      • Horizontal portals – general search engines
        • Broad range of topics, shallow depth
        • Links to various malls, stores, auctions, sources
        • Altavista.com, Hotbot.com, Yahoo.com, Google
      • Vertical portals – specialist
        • Narrow range of topics, in-depth information
        • See http:// www.verticalportals.com /
      • Help users collect information and purchase
      • Charge merchants for advertisememts
  • 7. B2C – Business to Consumer
    • Innovative/Dynamic Pricing Models
      • Name-your-price – Priceline.com
      • Comparison pricing – Bottomdollar.com
      • Bulk-buy pricing – mercata.com, mobshop.com
      • Rebating – eBates.com. eCentives.com
      • Free products and services – iWon.com, Freemerchant.com – free hosting, free store building, free traffic logs, free auction tools, etc
      • Most would not be possible without the Internet
  • 8. C2C – Consumer to Consumer
    • Auction Model
      • Internet forum for sellers and bidders
      • Various auctions (reserve-price, reverse, Dutch)
      • eBay.com (1995, Pez dispenser collector)
      • 4M simultaneous auctions, 450K new items/day
      • $3.8B spent in online auctions in 2000 (Forrester)
    • Bartering Model
      • Offering one item in exchange for another
      • Ubarter.com
  • 9. B2B – Business to Business
    • Businesses have long done E-Commerce with each other
      • EFT – Electronic Funds Transfer (banks)
      • EDI – Electronic Data Interchange (suppliers)
    • Traditional EDI uses a VAN (value-added network)
      • Closed networks, manufactures and suppliers
      • Purchase orders and invoices exchanged daily
      • Standards vary, VANs are costly, closed nets
    • Moving to the Internet, Web technology and XML (upgrade of EDI)
  • 10. B2B – Business to Business
    • B2B Internet exchanges provide standard methods of buying, selling, bartering and partnering
    • 2003: US$403 B
    • 2004 projection:
      • US$2.77 trillion
        • (eMarketer)
      • US$7.29 trillion
        • (Gardner Group)
    • B2B auctions:
      • US$52 billion 2002
  • 11. The Traditional B2C Commerce Scenario
    • Buyer and seller meet
    • Buyer chooses product and places order
    • Seller delivers product
    • Buyer pays for product
  • 12. The E-Commerce B2C Scenario
    • Consumer Perspective
    • Search the Internet
    • Choose the right product
    • Place the order and shipping info.
    • Enter payment info.
    • Receive product via Internet or ground shipment
    • Business Perspective
    • Advertising
    • Inventory (product) Management
    • Order Processing (shopping cart)
    • Payment Mgmt
    • Fulfillment and Shipping
    • Profile Management
  • 13. A B2C Scenario
    • I would like to buy some hands-free technology to work with my cellular phone for my consulting business.
    • Criteria:
      • It must be reliable
      • Inexpensive as possible
      • Light-weight
      • Small (able to fit into my pocket)
  • 14. Typical B2C Shopping Trip View Homepage Registration Address Book Shopping Cart Product Advisor Search Receive Ack. Submit Order Enter Payment Info. Enter Shipping Info. Select Products Navigate
  • 15. A B2C Scenario Technology Questions
    • How does a browser connect to a server?
    • How does a search engine work?
    • What is a cookie?
    • How do those banner adds work?
    • Are there web pages for every item?
    • What is all that gobbledygook in the page address?
    • What is a shopping cart? How long does it exist?
    • How does a web sites know who I am on return?
    • Should I register?
  • 16. A B2C Scenario Technology Questions
    • How does it find my password?
    • How does it automatically send me emails?
    • What are the messages concerning insecure submissions all about?
    • What is authentication, certificate, encryption?
    • How do they know my credit card is good?
    • How do they know there is credit left?
    • How is software I have purchased downloaded?
    • How do they track my shipment?
  • 17. B2C Levels of Automation
    • Front-End
    • Static Web content
    • Dynamic Web content
    • Secure ordering
    • Shopping cart
    • Persistent customer Data
    • Personalization of Content
    • Back-End
    • Manual
    • Non-integrated computer
    • Automatic entry
    • Total Web integration
  • 18. Business Evolution on the Web Publishing Time or Maturity Functionality Interactivity Transactions Processes Static web pages Dynamic web pages Web-enabled applicatons
  • 19. THE END [email_address]