Using gaming and simulation for provider & patient education By Eric B. Bauman. PhD, RN
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Using gaming and simulation for provider & patient education By Eric B. Bauman. PhD, RN

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Bauman, E.B. (2012, Febuary). Using Gaming and Simulation in the Dialysis Setting: Today and Tomorrow. Presentation at the 32nd Annual Dialysis Conference San Antonio, TX.

Bauman, E.B. (2012, Febuary). Using Gaming and Simulation in the Dialysis Setting: Today and Tomorrow. Presentation at the 32nd Annual Dialysis Conference San Antonio, TX.

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    Using gaming and simulation for provider & patient education By Eric B. Bauman. PhD, RN Using gaming and simulation for provider & patient education By Eric B. Bauman. PhD, RN Presentation Transcript

    • 32nd  Annual  Dialysis  Conference   February  26-­‐28,  2012   San  Antonio,  Texas  Using  Gaming  and  Simula.on  for   Provider  and  Pa.ent  Educa.on   Eric  B.  Bauman,  PhD,  RN   ©Bauman  2012   All  Rights  Reserved   .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .              
    • Bauman:  Professional  Affilia.ons  &    Disclosures/Conflict  of  Interest     ©Bauman  2012  Rights  Reserved  Interna.onal  Nursing  Assoc.  for  Clinical  Learning  and  Simula.on  (INACSL)   •  Member  Games+Learning+Society   •  Affiliate  Society  for  Simula.on  in  Healthcare  (SSH)   •  Chair  –  Website  CommiUee   •  Co-­‐Chair    –  Serious  Games  and  Virtual  Environments  Special  Interest  Group    Member  -­‐  Wisconsin  EMS  Associa.on  (WEMSA)  Member  -­‐  Na.onal  Registry  of  EMTS  (NREMT)  Managing  Member  –  Clinical  Playground,  LLC  Managing  Member  –  Forensic  Analy.cs,  LLC  Associate  –  Obritec/Hypercosm  CAE  Inc.  –  Adjunct  Faculty  Springer  Publishing  Company   •  Bauman,  E.  B.  (In  Press).  Game-­‐based  Teaching  and  Simula3on  in  Nursing  &   Healthcare.  New  York,  NY:  Springer  Publishing  Company      
    • Objec.ves   ©Bauman  2012  Rights  Reserved  •  Par.cipants  will  learn  the  role  of  situated   learning  in  the  context  of  simula.on  and   game-­‐based  learning  •  Par.cipants  will  be  able  to  iden.fy  and  discuss   the  poten.al  that  game-­‐based  learning  and   simula.on  holds  for  clinical  educa3on  •  Par.cipants  will  be  able  to  iden.fy  and  discuss   the  poten.al  that  game-­‐based  learning  and   simula.on  holds  for  pa3ent  educa3on  
    • Wait,  Wait,  Wait!!!!   Hold  on  a  minute…  What  sort  of  technology  is   this  guy  talking  about?  hUp://nintendo.wikia.com     .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .               ©Bauman  2011  Rights  Reserved  
    • OK…  A  bit  of  Background   Rela.onship  between  Learning  and  Play  hUp://nintendo.wikia.com    hUp://www.thehealingblade.com     .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .               ©Bauman  2012  Rights  Reserved  
    • Play.me!   ©Bauman  2012  Rights  Reserved  The  ac.vity  of  play,  par.cularly  when  engaging  a  new   game  always  represents  a  learning  process  
    • M.  Presky,  2001   ©Bauman  2012  Rights  Reserved  Digital  NaBves  People  who  were  born  with  (contemporary)  digital  technologies    already  in  existence.  Digital  Immigrants  Those  who  were  born  prior  to  (contemporary)  digital  technologies  and  migrated  into  the  digital  realm  adop.ng  the  technology  later  in  life.  
    • Ludology   ©Bauman  2012  Rights  Reserved   “We  are  entering  the  Ludic  Century…  …  we  will  use  games  to  shape  the  future  of  educa.on”     Eric  Zimmerman,  NYU  Games  Center   6/15/2011  at  GLS7   www.ericzimmerman.com/   hUp://gamecenter.nyu.edu/tag/eric-­‐zimmerman  
    • What’s  Ludology   ©Bauman  2012  Rights  Reserved   Ludology   A  rela.vely  new  term  that  relates  to  the  study  of  games   and  other  forms  of  play…   Why  is  it  important   Games  include  facets  of  Engagement     Leader  Board  Narra.ve   System  of  Rewards  High  Scores     Interac.vity  
    • Situated  Learning   ©Bauman  2012  Rights  Reserved  Socially  Situated  CogniBon  Refers  to  learning  theory  that  is  situated  within  a  material,  social,  and  cultural  world.    Learning  that  is  situated  takes  place  in  contextually  specific  and  authen.c  environments  with  a  host  of  values  and  expecta.ons     Gee,1991,1993  Ecology  of  Culturally  Competent  Design  Addresses  the  rigors  and  challenges  of  accurately  situa.ng  culture  within  virtual  environments  using  a  four-­‐element  model  that  emphasizes  the  importance  of  ac3vi3es,  contexts,  narra3ves,  and  characters. Bauman,  2010,  Bauman  &  Games  2011,  Games  &  Bauman  2011  
    • Situated  Learning   ©Bauman  2012  Rights  Reserved  Designed  Experience  …is  engineered  to  include  structured  ac.vi.es  targeted  to  facilitate  interac.ons  that  drive  an.cipated  experiences.    These  ac.vi.es  are  created  to  embody  par.cipant  experience  as  performance.     Squire,  2006  Created  Environment  An  environment  that  has  been  engineered  to  replicate  a  real-­‐world  space,  producing  sufficient  authen.city  and  fidelity  to  allow  for  the  suspension  of  disbelief.  Simulated  environments,  whether  fixed  in  the  case  of  mannikin-­‐based  simula.on  laboratories  or  exis.ng  in  virtual  reality,  as  in  a  game-­‐based  environments  are  created  environments.   Bauman,  2007  
    • Clinical  Educa.on   ©Bauman  2012  Rights  Reserved  BeUer  Prepara.on  =    Prac.ce  Prac.ce  =  BeUer  Pa.ent  Outcome  
    • This  and  That   ©Bauman  2012  Rights  Reserved  
    • Pa.ent  Educa.on   ©Bauman  2012  Rights  Reserved  Situated  Experience  =    More  Engagement  =  BeUer  Pa.ent  Outcome   ©Bauman  2012  Rights  Reserved  
    • This  vs.  That   ©Bauman  2012  Rights  Reserved  
    • Demos/Examples   ©Bauman  2012  Rights  Reserved  
    • Recap  and  Conclusions   ©Bauman  2012  Rights  Reserved  Situa.ng  learning  provides  context  and  meaning  and  includes  facets  like:   Context   Performance   Reward  &  Consequence   Narra.ve  Game-­‐Based  Learning  allows  us  to  situate  clinician  and  pa3ent  educa.on  to:   Engage  learners   Provide  situated  meaning  –  “ The  So  What”   Customize  content   Assess  rela.onships  between  interven.on  and  outcome  
    • Ques.ons?   ©Bauman  2011  Rights  Reserved  R.  Kyle  
    • Contact  Informa.on   Eric  B.  Bauman,  PhD   ebauman@clinicalplayground.com   www.clinicalplaground.com  hUp://www.linkedin.com/in/ericbbauman   hUp://www.slideshare.net/ebauman   @bauman1967  
    • Selected  References   ©Bauman  2011  Rights  Reserved  Bauman,  E.  (2007).  High  fidelity  simula.on  in  healthcare.  Ph.D.  disserta.on,  The  University  of  Wisconsin-­‐Madison,  United  States.  Disserta.ons  &  Thesis  @  CIC  Ins.tu.ons  database.  (Publica.on   no.  AAT  3294196)    Bauman,  E.  (2010).  Virtual  reality  and  game-­‐based  clinical  educa.on.  In  Gaberson,  K.B.,  &  Oermann,  M.H.  (Eds)  Clinical  teaching  strategies  in  nursing  educa3on  (3rd  ed).New  York,  Springer   Publishing  Company.  Bauman,  E.B.  and  Games,  I.A.  (2011).  Contemporary  theory  for  immersive  worlds:  Addressing  engagement,  culture,  and  diversity.  In  Cheney,  A.  and  Sanders,  R.  (Eds)  Teaching  and  Learning  in  3D   Immersive  Worlds:  Pedagogical  models  and  construc3vist  approaches.  IGI  Global.    Benner,  P.  (1984).  From  novice  to  expert:  Excellence  and  power  in  clinical  nursing  prac3ce.  Menlo  Park,  CA:  Addison-­‐Wesley.  Games,  I.  and  Bauman,  E.  (2011)  Virtual  worlds:  An  environment  for  cultural  sensi.vity  educa.on  in  the  health  sciences.    Interna3onal  Journal  of  Web  Based  Communi3es  7(2).    Gee,  J.P.  (2003)  What  Videogames  Have  to  Teach  Us  About  Learning  and  Literacy.  New  York,  NY:  Palgrave-­‐McMillan.  Kolb,  D.  (1984).  Experien.al  learning:  Experience  as  the  source  of  learning  and  development.    Upper  Saddle  River,  NJ:  Pren.ce  Hall.  Prensky,  M.  (2001).  Digital  na.ves,  digital  immegrants,  part  1.  On  the  Horizon  9(5).  Prensky,  M.  (2010).  Teaching  digital  na3ves:  Partnering  for  real  learning.  Corwin  Press.  Popkewitz,  T.  (2007).  Cosmopoli.anism  and  the  age  of  school  reform:  science,  educa.on  and  making  a  society  by  making  the  child.  Routledge.  Taekman  J.M.,  Segall  N.,  Hobbs  G.,  and  Wright,  M.C.  (2007).  3DiTeams:  Healthcare  team  training  in  a  virtual  environment.  Anesthesiology.  2007:  107:  A2145.  Schön,  D.  A.  (1983).  The  reflec3ve  prac33oner:  How  professionals  think  in  ac3on.  New  York:    Basic  Books.  Skiba,  D.  J.  (2009).  Nursing  educa.on  2.0:  A  second  look  at  Second  Life.  Nursing  Educa3on  Perspec3ves,  30,  129-­‐131.  Squire,  K.  (2006).    From  content  to  context:  Videogames  as  designed  experience.    Educa.onal  Researcher.    35(8),  19-­‐29.    Squire,  K.,  GiovaneUo,  L.,  DeVane,  B,.  &  Durga,  S.  (2005).  From  users  to  designers:  Building  a  self-­‐organizing  game-­‐based  learning  environment.  Technology  Trends,  49(5),  34-­‐42.  Taekman  J.M.,  Segall  N.,  Hobbs  G.,  and  Wright,  M.C.  (2007).  3DiTeams:  Healthcare  team  training  in  a  virtual  environment.  Anesthesiology.  2007:  107:  A2145.  Turkle,  S.  (1995)  Life  on  the  screen.  Iden3ty  in  the  age  of  the  Internet.  New  York:  Touchstone.