Preparing Learners for Future Experiences using Game-Based Learning

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Presented at the INACSL 2011 Copyright 2011 E.B. Bauman and D. Thompson all rights reserved.

Presented at the INACSL 2011 Copyright 2011 E.B. Bauman and D. Thompson all rights reserved.

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  • 1. 10th  Annual  InternaKonal  Nursing  SimulaKon/Learning     Resources  Centers  Conference  June  15-­‐18,  2011   Preparing  Learners  for  Future   Experiences  using  Game-­‐Based   Learning   Eric  B.  Bauman,  PhD,  RN   David  Thompson,  BScN,  MN,  RN   ©Bauman  &  Thompson  2011   All  Rights  Reserved   .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .              
  • 2. Bauman:  Professional  AffiliaKons  &    Disclosures/Conflict  of  Interest    InternaKonal  Nursing  Assoc.  for  Clinical  Learning  and  SimulaKon  (INACSL)   •  Member   •  Consultant  –  Website  CommiYee  Games+Learning+Society   •  Affiliate  Society  for  SimulaKon  in  Healthcare  (SSH)   •  Chair  –  Website  CommiYee   •  Co-­‐Chair    –  Serious  Games  and  Virtual  Environments  Special   Interest  Group    Member  -­‐  Wisconsin  EMS  AssociaKon  (WEMSA)  Member  -­‐  NaKonal  Registry  of  EMTS  (NREMT)  Managing  Member  –  Clinical  Playground,  LLC  Managing  Member  –  Forensic  AnalyKcs,  LLC  Associate  –  Obritec/Hypercosm  METI  Inc.  –  Adjunct  Faculty  
  • 3. Thompson:  Professional  AffiliaKons  &    Disclosures/Conflict  of  Interest    •  Northern  Ontario  School  of  Medicine   –  Faculty  Lecturer   –  Interprofessional  EducaKon  Lead  •  Grant  MacEwan  University     –  Course  Writer    
  • 4. ObjecKves  •  Describe  how  game-­‐based  learning  can  prepare   students  for  future  simulaKon  and  inter-­‐professional   collaboraKons    •  Experience  a  game-­‐based  learning  acKvity    •  Experience  an  approach  to  debriefing  a  Game-­‐Based   learning  acKvity  •  Discuss  how  to  plan  and  implement  a  game-­‐based   learning  experience  for  students    
  • 5. Ludology   “We  are  entering  the  Ludic  Century…  …  we  will  use  games  to  shape  the  future  of  educaKon”     Eric  Zimmerman,  NYU  Games  Center   6/15/2011  at  GLS7   www.ericzimmerman.com/   hYp://gamecenter.nyu.edu/tag/eric-­‐zimmerman  
  • 6.  How  can  game-­‐based  learning  prepare  students  for  future   simulaKon  and  inter-­‐professional  collaboraKon     Ludology…   Is  a  relaKvely  new  term  that  relates  to  the  study  of   games  and  other  forms  of  play…   …let’s  think  about  how  games  are  related  to   simulaKon…    …and  how  they  can  be  leveraged  for    inter-­‐ professional  collaboraKon  in  ways  that  prepare   students  for  simulaKon-­‐based  learning….   …and  later  actual  clinical  pracKce  
  • 7. Games  +  SimulaKon  •  Goal  Oriented    •  Rule  Based  •  Sense  of  Consequence  •  ImitaKon  of  something  real  (AuthenKcity)  •  Accurate  representaKon  of  system(s)  and   related  processes   .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .               ©Bauman  2011  Rights  Reserved  
  • 8. Games  +  SimulaKon   ©Bauman  2011  Rights  Reserved  
  • 9. “Helium  SKck”  Experience  a  game-­‐based  learning  acKvity    
  • 10. Blinded  Leader  
  • 11. Experience  an  approach  to  debriefing     a  Game-­‐Based  learning  acKvity   Plus  (+)                      Delta  (        )   +Things that went Things you mightwell want to change
  • 12. Discuss  how  to  plan  and  implement  a  game-­‐based  learning   experience  for  students    •  Pick  your  objecKves  first…  then  look  for  a  game  that  is  going  to  support  those  objecKves   –  Introducing  the  students  to  each  other  (Icebreakers)  –  Geography  Game   –  Teamwork  –  Helium  SKck   –  InformaKon    Processing  and  DiscriminaKon  –  The  Nail  Game  •  Just  like  SimulaKon  –  Debriefing  is  essenKal  to  maximize  the  potenKal  for  experienKal   learning.   –  Kolb’s  Learning  Cycle   –  Benner:  Thinking-­‐in-­‐acKon   –  Schön  :  Thinking-­‐on-­‐acKon  •  While  games  are  fun…  with  learners,  parKcularly  adult  learners  incorporaKng  games  into   your  curriculum  should  make  sense   –  They  should  be  situated   –  They  should  not  be  senseless  filler   –  They  should  be  well  rehearsed    
  • 13. What  to  do  when  things  go  sideways  •  Challenging  Student(s)  •  No  “Buy  In”  •  The  Game  Just  is  not  Working   –  They  don’t  get  it   –  They  cannot  figure  it  out   –  They  get  frustrated    
  • 14. Selected  References  Bauman,  E.  (2007).  High  fidelity  simulaKon  in  healthcare.  Ph.D.  dissertaKon,  The  University  of  Wisconsin-­‐Madison,  United  States.  DissertaKons  &  Thesis  @  CIC   InsKtuKons  database.  (PublicaKon  no.  AAT  3294196)    Bauman,  E.  (2010).  Virtual  reality  and  game-­‐based  clinical  educaKon.  In  Gaberson,  K.B.,  &  Oermann,  M.H.  (Eds)  Clinical  teaching  strategies  in  nursing   educa2on  (3rd  ed).New  York,  Springer  Publishing  Company.  Bauman,  E.B.  and  Games,  I.A.  (2011).  Contemporary  theory  for  immersive  worlds:  Addressing  engagement,  culture,  and  diversity.  In  Cheney,  A.  and  Sanders,   R.  (Eds)  Teaching  and  Learning  in  3D  Immersive  Worlds:  Pedagogical  models  and  construc2vist  approaches.  IGI  Global.    Games,  I.  and  Bauman,  E.  (2011)  Virtual  worlds:  An  environment  for  cultural  sensiKvity  educaKon  in  the  health  sciences.    Interna2onal  Journal  of  Web  Based   Communi2es  7(2).    Gee,  J.P.  (2003)  What  Videogames  Have  to  Teach  Us  About  Learning  and  Literacy.  New  York,  NY:  Palgrave-­‐McMillan.  Kolb,  D.  (1984).  ExperienKal  learning:  Experience  as  the  source  of  learning  and  development.    Upper  Saddle  River,  NJ:  PrenKce  Hall.  Leape,  L.  L.  (2000).  Errors  in  medicine.  Clinica  Chimica  Acta,  404(1),  2-­‐5.  Prensky,  M.  (2001).  Digital  naKves,  digital  immegrants,  part  1.  On  the  Horizon  9(5).  Taekman  J.M.,  Segall  N.,  Hobbs  G.,  and  Wright,  M.C.  (2007).  3DiTeams:  Healthcare  team  training  in  a  virtual  environment.  Anesthesiology.  2007:  107:  A2145.  Schön,  D.  A.  (1983).  The  reflec2ve  prac22oner:  How  professionals  think  in  ac2on.  New  York:    Basic  Books.  Skiba,  D.  J.  (2009).  Nursing  educaKon  2.0:  A  second  look  at  Second  Life.  Nursing  Educa2on  Perspec2ves,  30,  129-­‐131.  Squire,  K.  (2006).    From  content  to  context:  Videogames  as  designed  experience.    EducaKonal  Researcher.    35(8),  19-­‐29.    Squire,  K.,  GiovaneYo,  L.,  DeVane,  B,.  &  Durga,  S.  (2005).  From  users  to  designers:  Building  a  self-­‐organizing  game-­‐based  learning  environment.  Technology   Trends,  49(5),  34-­‐42.  Thiagarajan,  S.  (1992).  Using  games  for  debriefing.  Simula2on  and  Gaming,  23(2),  161-­‐173.    Turkle,  S.  (1995)  Life  on  the  screen.  Iden2ty  in  the  age  of  the  Internet.  New  York:  Touchstone.  
  • 15. Contact  InformaKon   Eric  B.  Bauman,  PhD,  RN   ebauman@clinicalplayground.com  hYp://www.linkedin.com/in/ericbbauman   hYp://www.slideshare.net/ebauman   David  Thompson,  BScN,  MN,  RN   dthompson@nosm.ca