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Tapio varis avi2009 v
Tapio varis avi2009 v
Tapio varis avi2009 v
Tapio varis avi2009 v
Tapio varis avi2009 v
Tapio varis avi2009 v
Tapio varis avi2009 v
Tapio varis avi2009 v
Tapio varis avi2009 v
Tapio varis avi2009 v
Tapio varis avi2009 v
Tapio varis avi2009 v
Tapio varis avi2009 v
Tapio varis avi2009 v
Tapio varis avi2009 v
Tapio varis avi2009 v
Tapio varis avi2009 v
Tapio varis avi2009 v
Tapio varis avi2009 v
Tapio varis avi2009 v
Tapio varis avi2009 v
Tapio varis avi2009 v
Tapio varis avi2009 v
Tapio varis avi2009 v
Tapio varis avi2009 v
Tapio varis avi2009 v
Tapio varis avi2009 v
Tapio varis avi2009 v
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Tapio varis avi2009 v

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  • 1. MEDIA EDUCATION. POLICY, AND CURRICULA III EAVI International Concerence Palacio del Senado, Madrid, España, 26 November 2009 <ul><li>Professor Tapio VARIS, University of Tampere & UNESCO Chair in Global eLearning </li></ul>
  • 2. Current Trends and Approaches to Media Literacy in Europe (withJose Manuel Perez Tornero, et al, Universitat Autonoma de  Barcelona 2007)  http:// ec.europa.eu/avpolicy/media_literacy/studies/index_en.htm
  • 3. Applications: evaluation <ul><li>Who evaluates? </li></ul><ul><li>How to decide when the learner is media literate? </li></ul><ul><li>What to evaluate? Knowledge? Skills? Behaviour? Attitudes? Values? </li></ul>
  • 4. Study on Assessment Criteria for Media Literacy Levels Media Literacy European Commission Expert Group Brussels 3 March 2009 EAVI Consortium - Paolo Celot (EAVI), José Manuel Tornero (UAB)
  • 5. APPROACHES TO MEDIA LITERACY AND eLEARNING Professor Tapio Varis, Finland European Commission Workshop ”Image Education and Media Literacy” November 16th, 2000, Brussels
  • 6. Media critique and skills <ul><li>Media literacy is about understanding the sources and technologies of communication, the codes that are used, the messages that are produced, and the selection, interpretation, and impact of those messages </li></ul>
  • 7. The Question of Definition <ul><li>Media literacy is the objective of media education </li></ul><ul><li>There is no single, agreed definition of media literacy </li></ul><ul><li>It is an umbrella term covering a set of personal skills, knowledge and understanding of media and communications </li></ul>
  • 8. Practical questions <ul><li>Can we teach media literacy? </li></ul><ul><li>What would be the discipline and contents? </li></ul><ul><li>What are the elements of media literacy and competence? </li></ul><ul><li>How to evaluate them? </li></ul>
  • 9. What is the goal? <ul><li>To prepare people to communicate with the traditional and new media, especially multimedia using the combination of human senses </li></ul><ul><li>The analysis, critique and skills are not limited to the mass media but include the Internet, computers and networks </li></ul><ul><li>Media competence </li></ul>
  • 10. Applications: the curriculum <ul><li>Curriculum (K-12): The objective? Integration to other programmes? What principles and elements should be taught? </li></ul><ul><li>Should we give special skills (expected by the working life) or general preparedness for society? </li></ul>
  • 11. Applications: teaching <ul><li>Democratic and non-hierarchial teaching approach </li></ul><ul><li>Diverse ways of learning, collaborative learning </li></ul>
  • 12. Background <ul><li>Digital literacy : e-Learning, ICT, e-Skills, digital industry </li></ul><ul><li>Media literacy : image education, media education </li></ul><ul><li>EU : ”a more competitive knowledge economy and a more inclusive knowledge society” </li></ul><ul><li>UNESCO : Open Educational Resources (OER) </li></ul><ul><li>cultural diversity </li></ul>
  • 13. Global Education 2010 Publications of the Finnish Ministry of Education 2007:12 Citizenship is membership in a civilised community working on shared norms and commonly agreed principles. World citizenship is a commitment to building a world order that offers a real opportunity to fully realise the whole dimension of humanity, irrespective of state borders and cultural boundaries.
  • 14. Global Education as a concept <ul><li>means activity that guides towards the ethic of a world citizen, which in turn is founded on fairness and respect for human rights </li></ul><ul><li>supports growth into a critical and media-critical citizen with the knowledge and skills to succesfully act as a member of one's own community in a globalising world </li></ul>
  • 15. European Framework for Key Competences: Digital Competence <ul><li>” Digital competence involves the confident and critical use of Information Society Technology for work, leisure and communication. It is underpinned by basic skills in ICT: the use of computers to retrieve, access, store, produce, present and exchange information, and to communicate and participate in collaborative networks via Internet” </li></ul><ul><li>COM (2005) 450 </li></ul>
  • 16. Digital literacy is key to: <ul><li>Learning to learn (lifelong learning) </li></ul><ul><li>Learning to work </li></ul><ul><li>Facilitating job opportunities </li></ul><ul><li>Providing each citizen with skills and knowledge to live and work </li></ul><ul><li>Providing the confident use of new tools for assessing and using knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Promoting active citizenship, democracy </li></ul>
  • 17. From Industrial Age to Knowledge Age <ul><li>Digital literacy is a complicated process that consists of acquiring a new tekne, ability of art or craft </li></ul><ul><li>Creativity and culture become essential base for the knowledge economy </li></ul><ul><li>Cultural values </li></ul><ul><li>Cultural diversity </li></ul>
  • 18. The Evolution of Digital Literacy in Europe <ul><li>Phase 1: Access and connectivity </li></ul><ul><li>Phase 2: Basic internet use and more sophisticated and sustainable digital competences </li></ul><ul><li>Phase 3: Critical thinking, trust, confidence and multiplatform use </li></ul><ul><li>- community building (social web) </li></ul>
  • 19. C. Teaching and learning <ul><li>Recommendations </li></ul><ul><li>Teaching and learning strategy should be a key element of proposed programmes, and should be relevant to the context and nature of the activity and the groups involved; </li></ul><ul><li>Make full use of informal as well as formal learning within digital literacy programmes; </li></ul><ul><li>Make full use of intermediaries in motivating target groups and delivering initiatives; </li></ul><ul><li>Make full use of e-learning and online platforms in delivering initiatives; </li></ul><ul><li>Enable target groups and individuals to generate content and create online communities; </li></ul><ul><li>Interact with relevant formal educational and related structures. </li></ul>
  • 20. Example: The e-START Digital Literacy Network <ul><li>To build and offer a range of sustainable and high-quality information and other services on the concept, the status and the development of Digital Literacy in Primary and Lower Secondary (K-9) Education (e.g. European Observatory, analysis and review services, advisory and consultation services, etc). </li></ul><ul><li>To build consensus towards a &quot;common&quot; curriculum framework for Digital Literacy in Primary and Lower Secondary Education (K-9) across Europe. </li></ul><ul><li>To provide a discussion and policy advice/consultative forum on Teachers’ Training needs (both initial/pre-service and continuous/inservice) in order to meet the Digital Literacy challenge. </li></ul>
  • 21. D. Content, Services and usability <ul><li>Recommendation </li></ul><ul><li>Support the development of content and services for all users who, for whatever reason, are marginalised or under-represented and monitor effectiveness in terms of uptake; </li></ul><ul><li>Support multi-platform modes of access and participation, with particular regard for the inclusion of persons requiring assistive technologies; </li></ul><ul><li>Improve information and visual design values and standards/benchmarks for content and services to take account of expected capabilities and prior experience of the target user group. </li></ul>
  • 22. E. Critical Skills <ul><li>Recommendation </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on the development of users' critical, cultural and creative skills, so that they may productively and engage with content and services in the digital world; </li></ul><ul><li>Broaden the understanding of 'digital literacy' and align it with  an existing framework for 'media literacy', e.g., the Euro Media Literacy Charter www.euromedialiteracy.eu </li></ul><ul><li>Develop strategies to promote 'quality of use'; </li></ul><ul><li>Broaden the measurements and evaluation of digital literacy beyond operational skills to critical thinking. </li></ul>
  • 23.  
  • 24. <ul><li>ETHICAL / MORAL VALUE CHOICES </li></ul><ul><li>communicative competence </li></ul><ul><li>nethics and netiquette </li></ul><ul><li>COMPREHENSION AND INTERPRETATION </li></ul><ul><li>creative interpretative skills </li></ul><ul><li>analysis and argumentation = media critique </li></ul><ul><li>PRODUCTION/PUBLICATION SKILLS </li></ul><ul><li>writing, illustration, design, literary devices </li></ul><ul><li>RECEPTION SKILLS </li></ul><ul><li>recognition of different genres </li></ul><ul><li>sign systems: images, words, sounds, icons, graphs; or multimedia literacy </li></ul><ul><li>MOTIVATION </li></ul><ul><li>intellectual curiosity and basic skills in abstract thinking </li></ul><ul><li>basic traditional literacy </li></ul><ul><li>basic technical and access skills </li></ul>MEDIA LITERACY staircase <ul><li>SOCIO-CULTURAL ABILITIES </li></ul><ul><li>intercultural dialogue </li></ul>
  • 25. PL5 - Digital Literacy: an essential life skill <ul><li>First, it must be critical, so that users can ask questions like who creates the media and its content, for what purpose, and how it works. </li></ul><ul><li>Second, digital literacy must be creative, thus include being able to contribute content as well as simply being a consumer of others’ content. </li></ul><ul><li>Third, it should be cultural and recognise the importance of entertainment, play, gaming, sharing videos, building identities, etc </li></ul>
  • 26. Forms of Participatory Culture Henry Jenkins 2007 <ul><li>Affiliations (memberships, formal and informal) </li></ul><ul><li>Expressions (producing new creative forms) </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborative Problem-solving (working together in teams, formal and informal, to complete tasks and develop new knowledge) </li></ul><ul><li>Circulations (shaping the flow of media) </li></ul>
  • 27. Need for Policy and Pedagogical Interventions <ul><li>The participation gap (unequal access, experiences, skills, knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>The Transparency Problem (learning to see the ways that media shape perceptions of the world) </li></ul><ul><li>The Ethics Challenge (the breakdown of traditional forms of professional training and socialization) </li></ul>
  • 28. New Renaissance Education (www.layers.fi) <ul><li>The study of complexity has brought science closer than ever to art </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge has gone through a cycle from non-specialism to specialism, and now back to interdisciplinarity, even transdisciplinarity </li></ul><ul><li>Art deals with the sensual world (media as the extension of senses) and the holistic concept of human being </li></ul>

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