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Enabling DITA to support the future of content delivery
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Enabling DITA to support the future of content delivery

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DITA solved a fundamental publishing problem: multiple output formats from a single source, especially PDF and Help. DITA’s full potential lies in its ability to support web content delivery. DITA ...

DITA solved a fundamental publishing problem: multiple output formats from a single source, especially PDF and Help. DITA’s full potential lies in its ability to support web content delivery. DITA is perfectly suited for dynamically-presented, componentized, web-searchable, socially-enabled, personalized content.
What will DITA ‘publishing’ look like in several years? In this presentation we share the emerging vision for DITA publishing and collaboration that we are hearing from real DITA users:

- Cloud-based tools will enable authoring, collaboration, and reuse to reach beyond technical publications into marketing, support, suppliers, and ultimately customers.
- Centralized DITA repositories will become searchable by internet and enterprise search engines.
- On the web, book-style navigation will be replaced by world-class search applications that provide faceted search, suggest related content, connect users and experts, and integrate search results from multiple sources, all through high-quality metadata.
- Presentation of DITA content in purpose-built knowledge portals will become the primary publishing channel.
- Information developers will evolve into managers of content-centric communities, and will curate more content than they write.
- On-demand, personalized deliverables will be easily assembled by non-technical authors to meet their unique needs.

This presentation includes real-world examples of next generation publishing concepts, and identifies key areas of change for DITA and related standards.

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  • DITA was developed to address the needs of technical publishingDITA is first and foremost a single-source formatPublishing outputs were the publication formats commonly used for technical documentationDITA Open Toolkit was a “parallel” open source project to address publishing needs, but outside the scope of the specificationSemantics were included in DITA to encourage best practices for information development
  • To enable Dynamic Delivery of DITA source content, presentation systems and component CMSs will need to represent and exchange metadata about DITA documents that includes but isn’t limited to the following:Collaboration MetadataContent Analytics MetadataClassification Metadata and Knowledge Models
  • To enable Dynamic Delivery of DITA source content, presentation systems and component CMSs will need to represent and exchange metadata about DITA documents that includes but isn’t limited to the following:Collaboration MetadataContent Analytics MetadataClassification Metadata and Knowledge Models
  • To enable Dynamic Delivery of DITA source content, presentation systems and component CMSs will need to represent and exchange metadata about DITA documents that includes but isn’t limited to the following:Collaboration MetadataContent Analytics MetadataClassification Metadata and Knowledge Models
  • To enable Dynamic Delivery of DITA source content, presentation systems and component CMSs will need to represent and exchange metadata about DITA documents that includes but isn’t limited to the following:Collaboration MetadataContent Analytics MetadataClassification Metadata and Knowledge Models
  • To enable Dynamic Delivery of DITA source content, presentation systems and component CMSs will need to represent and exchange metadata about DITA documents that includes but isn’t limited to the following:Collaboration MetadataContent Analytics MetadataClassification Metadata and Knowledge Models
  • Collaboration Metadata: Authors, reviewers, SMEs, and end users iteratively develop DITA content using web-based collaboration tools. They make proposed edits and have threaded discussions around these. DITA can be extended to represent annotations and social content, and relate them to DITA source content.
  • Collaboration Metadata: Authors, reviewers, SMEs, and end users iteratively develop DITA content using web-based collaboration tools. They make proposed edits and have threaded discussions around these. DITA can be extended to represent annotations and social content, and relate them to DITA source content.
  • Content Analytics Metadata: End users view content in delivery systems and provide ratings (e.g. thumbs up/down). Presentation and analytics systems aggregate these and compile statistics on utility and views. DITA can be extended to represent analytical metadata and relate them to DITA source content.
  • Classification Metadata and Knowledge Models: Content created in DITA can be delivered in search-based portals, which require granular content with rich metadata. DITA can be positioned as a universal format for delivering semantically rich unstructured content to enterprise IT systems, but needs to reflect accepted standards for representing and interchanging administrative and descriptive metadata, and representing knowledge domains.
  • Classification Metadata and Knowledge Models: Content created in DITA can be delivered in search-based portals, which require granular content with rich metadata. DITA can be positioned as a universal format for delivering semantically rich unstructured content to enterprise IT systems, but needs to reflect accepted standards for representing and interchanging administrative and descriptive metadata, and representing knowledge domains.

Enabling DITA to support the future of content delivery Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Enabling DITA to Supportthe Future of Content DeliveryConsiderations for Next Generation MetadataPaul WlodarczykCEO, Jorsek LLC4/23/2012
  • 2. Agenda • A look back: • Next Generation DITA’s Roots in DITA Metadata Document – Collaboration Publishing Metadata • Current State of – Content Analytics Metadata DITA Metadata – Classification • Looking Metadata forward: • Potential Dynamic Standards Delivery of DITA Activities for DITA Content Metadata 4/23/2012 © Jorsek, LLC. All Rights Reserved. 2
  • 3. DITA Origins The DITA standard was developed and has evolved in the context of static document publishing to meet the needs of the technical communications community. 4/23/2012 © Jorsek, LLC. All Rights Reserved. 3
  • 4. Current State of DITA Metadata: Publishing Because of DITA’s origins as a publishing format, DITA metadata focuses on publishing and publications. Common metadata elements The following metadata elements occur in both maps and topic prologs. Many of the DITA metadata elements map to Dublin Core metadata (http://dublincore.org/), with the exception of Dublin Core elements such as title, which maps to the DITA <title> element. • Publication metadata elements: These elements provide standard information about the topic as a publication. • Management metadata elements: These elements provide a basis for managing the publication process for topics. • Metadata qualification elements: These elements can be used to provide additional information about a topic, and may be used in conjunction with conditional processing attributes to provide more information about the attribute values. Source: OASIS DITA 1.1 Architectural Specification - OASIS Standard, 1 August 2007 4/23/2012 © Jorsek, LLC. All Rights Reserved. 4
  • 5. Current State of DITA Metadata: Classification DITA 1.2 added mechanisms for classification metadata: Classification elements Classification elements support managing metadata. Those in the Subject Scheme map are used to define controlled values, and to bind them to DITA attributes as enumerations. Those declared in the classification domain are used in other maps to classify content according to the scheme. Subject scheme maps A subject scheme map is used to define sets of controlled values for use in classifying content. Sets of controlled values can be bound to DITA attributes. This allows DITA users to share the controlled values for an information set without having to modify a DTD or XML schema. The list of available values can be modified quickly to adapt to new situations, without the need to manage updates to a document type. In addition, DITA users can define relationships between controlled values and extend a set of controlled values maintained by another team or organization. The list of defined values are not validated by basic XML parsers. Instead, the defined values should be validated by DITA processors. Source: Overview of the DITA 1.2 Specification, OASIS DITA Technical Committee,19 January 2010 More info: http://www.slideshare.net/IntelligentContent/dita-classificationandsubjectschemej-gelb 4/23/2012 © Jorsek, LLC. All Rights Reserved. 5
  • 6. Current State of DITA Metadata: Issues Today it can be challenging to harmonize DITA metadata (in the prolog, profiling attributes, or subject scheme maps) with CMS metadata. Here is a good illustrative example: “The relation between a topic and product components can be established via topic prolog metadata, internal CMS system metadata or using an external classification system such as for example the new subject scheme feature in DITA 1.2. … Today, a product component is most often scattered across a CMS as folder names, system metadata, DITA XML metadata, condition values for filtering, etc..” Source: Jonatan Lundin, “Is uncertainty making release management difficult?”, dita.xml.org Blog Post 2011-12-28 http://dita.xml.org/blog/is-uncertainty-making-release-management-difficult 4/23/2012 © Jorsek, LLC. All Rights Reserved. 6
  • 7. DITA for Dynamic Content Delivery DITA is lean, granular, semantic, and fluid, therefore well suited as a content delivery format for dynamic information delivery systems: Portal
  • 8. DITA for Dynamic Content Delivery DITA is lean, granular, semantic, and fluid, therefore well suited as a content delivery format for dynamic information delivery systems: Enterprise Information System
  • 9. DITA for Dynamic Content Delivery DITA is lean, granular, semantic, and fluid, therefore well suited as a content delivery format for dynamic information delivery systems: IETM
  • 10. DITA for Dynamic Content Delivery DITA is lean, granular, semantic, and fluid, therefore well suited as a content delivery format for dynamic information delivery systems: Customer Self-Service
  • 11. DITA for Dynamic Content Delivery DITA is lean, granular, semantic, and fluid, therefore well suited as a content delivery format for dynamic information delivery systems: Dynamically Assembled Publications
  • 12. We see the potential for DITA to evolve from its origins as apublication format to a new role as a content delivery format forcontent-centric information systems and applications.4/23/2012 © Jorsek, LLC. All Rights Reserved. 12
  • 13. What DITA is Not DITA needs to evolve so that DITA can meet the dynamic delivery needs of information developers in the near and not so near future. With the current state of DITA metadata, however, DITA is NOT • a content delivery standard • a data interchange standard • a metadata standard • a master data standard • a web standard ? 4/23/2012 © Jorsek, LLC. All Rights Reserved. 13
  • 14. DITA for Dynamic Delivery Dynamic Delivery of DITA content requires standard models for • Metadata for collaboration 4/23/2012 © Jorsek, LLC. All Rights Reserved. 14
  • 15. DITA for Dynamic Delivery Dynamic Delivery of DITA content requires standard models for • Metadata for classification 4/23/2012 © Jorsek, LLC. All Rights Reserved. 15
  • 16. DITA for Dynamic Delivery Dynamic Delivery of DITA content requires standard models for • Metadata for content analytics 4/23/2012 © Jorsek, LLC. All Rights Reserved. 16
  • 17. DITA for Dynamic Delivery Dynamic Delivery of DITA content requires standard models for • Knowledge representation, i.e. Ontologies 4/23/2012 © Jorsek, LLC. All Rights Reserved. 17
  • 18. DITA for Dynamic Delivery Dynamic Delivery of DITA content requires standard models for • Content delivery and interchange known issue new issue Support Case Base Support DITA Web Self Phone Support Help Support Email / Chat DITA Knowledge Base Support SME Workflow social content DITA Collaborative DITA Authoring CMS of Topics FAQs DITA OT Procedures Specs Best Practices Tutorials publications Customers Info Dev DITA 4/23/2012 © Jorsek, LLC. All Rights Reserved. 18
  • 19. DITA for Dynamic Delivery To enable Dynamic Delivery of DITA source content, presentation systems and component CMSs will need to represent and exchange metadata about DITA documents that includes but isn’t limited to the following: • Collaboration Metadata • Content Analytics Metadata • Classification Metadata and Knowledge Models Currently these metadata capabilities are gaps, because they are either: • Not addressed by the DITA specification, • Addressed by DITA, but in turn are either – Redundant with other standards – Require systems to be DITA-aware – Or both 4/23/2012 © Jorsek, LLC. All Rights Reserved. 19
  • 20. Collaboration Metadata • Use Cases – Co-authors, SMEs, Reviewers, and End Users provide comments and proposed revisions to content. – Authors accept/reject changes – CMSs track change history • Examples: – Arbortext, easyDITA, FrameMaker, MindTouch, XMetaL 4/23/2012 © Jorsek, LLC. All Rights Reserved. 20
  • 21. Collaboration Metadata • Pros and Cons of Current Methods – Proprietary PIs, e.g.: <?ezd-review-start 1330729595965:comment:johnadamturnbull@gmail.com?>blah blah blah <?ezd-review-end 1330729595965?> • Pros: Can span elements. Works. Used by XMetaL, Arbortext, FrameMaker, easyDITA • Cons: Can’t be validated by document schema. Non-standard, barrier to interoperability. – Draft Comments: • Pros: In DITA spec • Cons: Doesn’t comprehend edits – only comments. Use for revisions conflicts with intended use. Applies to Documents vs. elements. Can’t span elements. • Need for a Standard – Standard means of representing proposed edits / annotations to enable document schema validation, and interoperability between DITA editors, DITA CMSs, collaboration tools, socially-enabled presentation systems – DITA Technical Communication SC is actively discussing this topic 4/23/2012 © Jorsek, LLC. All Rights Reserved. 21
  • 22. Content Analytics Metadata • Use Cases – Analytics systems and social channels compile statistics on usage (e.g. page views / search “hits”) and ratings (stars, thumbs up/down) on content (analytics metadata) that need to be related to the source content – Authoring tools and CMSs recognize metadata attached to a component and be able to render it / act on it (e.g. route, notify) – Authors view statistics on a component to assess content quality / utility / relevance • Examples: – MindTouch, SuiteShare, SharePoint, WordPress, Facebook, Google, etc. 4/23/2012 © Jorsek, LLC. All Rights Reserved. 22
  • 23. Content Analytics Metadata • Pros and Cons of Current Methods – Proprietary schema is mapped to CMS metadata • Pros: gets it done. • Cons: Non-standard relationship to DITA component, so creates a barrier to interoperability. DITA tools need to be aware of proprietary schema. • Need for a Standard – Standard means of representing content analytics to enable interoperability between content analytics platforms, DITA CMSs, and social / collaboration tools. – Need a standard means for attaching metadata with anything ID’d in DITA, and a standard format (CMIS does this at a resource level, but is generic and not DITA-aware). – Less about DITA being metadata-aware, more about non-DITA tools being DITA-aware (i.e., how to attach metadata to a DITA component – like CMIS does for a resource) 4/23/2012 © Jorsek, LLC. All Rights Reserved. 23
  • 24. Classification Metadata • Use Cases – Content authors and publishers and classification tools associate classification metadata with DITA components – DITA components can be indexed, searched, retrieved, and assembled via associated metadata. • Examples – Suite Solutions SuiteShare; Smartlogic plus SharePoint / FAST / Google / Lucene 4/23/2012 © Jorsek, LLC. All Rights Reserved. 24
  • 25. Classification Metadata • Pros and Cons of Current Methods – Subject Scheme Maps and reltables • Pros: gets it done. • Cons: Not widely used, non- conventional method for classification and knowledge model representation (as compared to OWL or RDF, for example) so not consumed by search engines. Requires other tools to be DITA- aware. • Need for a Standard – Standard means of representing / associating component-level metadata to enable search effectiveness and interoperability between DITA CMSs, classification tools, and search tools. 4/23/2012 © Jorsek, LLC. All Rights Reserved. 25
  • 26. Potential DITA Standards Activities • DITA Metadata Framework – Much like CMIS does, develop a standard framework for associating metadata with DITA components . This would provide a mechanism for systems that do not process DITA to associate classification, analytics, and collaboration metadata with DITA content. – Within the scope of current activities of the DITA Web Subcommittee and DiCE (now inactive) • Classification Metadata Spec – Leverage existing work on Subject Scheme Maps to harmonize it with industry approaches for document metadata (e.g. RDF and Microformats) and knowledge representation (e.g. OWL) – Either other systems need to become DITA-aware to consume Classification Maps, or other conventional approaches like RDF need to be comprehended by the DITA spec – Within the scope of current activities of the DITA Web Subcommittee 4/23/2012 © Jorsek, LLC. All Rights Reserved. 26
  • 27. Potential DITA Standards Activities • Collaboration Metadata Spec – Develop a spec within DITA for annotations, either as metadata associated via a framework or as inline markup – Within the scope of current activities of the DITA Technical Communication Subcommittee • Content Analytics Metadata Spec – Develop a spec within a DITA metadata framework for analytics – Recommend exploration by the DITA Technical Communication Subcommittee • Content Interchange Standard – Advocacy and adoption effort to get DITA recognized as a semantically rich content interchange format, and to make non-DITA tools like enterprise systems “DITA- aware” to enable attaching and processing metadata associated with DITA content components – Was DiCE but needs a home…. 4/23/2012 © Jorsek, LLC. All Rights Reserved. 27
  • 28. Questions? Thank you! Please visit our booth at the expo. paul@easydita.com easyDITA.com (877) 492-2960 4/23/2012 © Jorsek, LLC. All Rights Reserved. 28