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Eastern Wyoming College 2011-12 Catalog
 

Eastern Wyoming College 2011-12 Catalog

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Eastern Wyoming College 2011-12 Catalog

Eastern Wyoming College 2011-12 Catalog

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    Eastern Wyoming College 2011-12 Catalog Eastern Wyoming College 2011-12 Catalog Document Transcript

    • Table of Contents 3 President’s Message 5 Campus Map 7 Calendar 10 General Information 14 Campus Life 20 Admissions 29 Financial Aid 36 Academic Procedures 44 Academic Regulations 59 Support Services 63 Programs of Instruction 115 Courses of Instruction 172 Community Education,Outreach and Workforce Development 176 Transferring 179 Administration, Faculty and Staff 187 Index 1
    • Student Philosophy Statement (Approved by Curriculum and Learning Committee July 2010)Eastern Wyoming College is committed to providing a student experience that promotes academic success in a challenging and supportive environment, facilitates the transition to college for first time students, and helps all students identify and achieve their individual goals. EWC’s student experience is designed to foster personal growth by increasing independence, promoting ethical behaviors and personal responsibility for learning, and affording opportunities for student involvement in campus activities to enhance social development. 2
    • Welcome,If you are unfamiliar with our college, I want to welcome you as a full partner in learning. Eastern provides a safe, secure environment wrapped around the concept that you count. We promise to take you seriously and support you every step of the way. That has been and will continue to be our hallmark; we invite you into the family. “Quality is never an accident; it is always the result of high intention, sincere effort, intelligent direction and skillful execution; it represents the wise choice of many alternatives.” William Foster.This applies to you. It applies to the friends you will meet here: students, faculty, and staff. Working hard will pay off in dollars; learning will excite and invigorate you. You and your family will experience a quality of life that is richer and more rewarding. Investing time now will provide you with more choices and will allow you greater freedom. So, if you’re asking, “Will this really pay off?” It will. “Is now the right time?” It is.I have utilized this “Quality” quote for the year to frame both identified and emerging challenges for Eastern Wyoming College and the communities we serve. Those of us in position to make a difference (and that means all of us) must commit to creating a future-focused learning environment dedicated to a climate of acceptance and meaningful innovation, productive questioning, and authentic cooperation.Whatever you’re after, we have good places to start that will equip you to go anywhere: Workforce training to meet customized needs. Short and long-term certificates that improve your current situation, qualify you for specific jobs, or advancement in your current area. A solid general education core of classes to prepare you for transfer to a four year college or university. A further appreciation of science, math, art, business, accounting, technology, literature, language, history, social sciences—friends, teachers, education professionals, family.Believe in yourself—others do. Give yourself the permission to explore and succeed. Grow with us at Eastern Wyoming College.Looking forward to meeting you,Tom Armstrong, PhDPresident Eastern Wyoming College • 3200 West C Street • Torrington, WY 82240 • (307) 532.8200 • (307) 532.8329 Fax (866) EASTWYO • ewc.wy.edu 3
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    • C K B G I H G J N L N F M O A E D5 P Campus Map Legend A. Cosmetology G. Tebbet Classroom Building M. Veterinary Technology Q B. Torrington Learning Center H. Library N. Mechanical Arts C. Lancer Hall I. Student Services O. Com Training Center (CTC) D. Eastern Hall J. Student Center/Cafeteria P. Softball Field E. Fine Arts Center K. Activities Center Q. Large Animal Complex F. Faculty Link L. Fitness Center
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    • 2011 - 2012 Tentative CalendarFall SemesterAugust 28 (Sunday) Residence Halls Open at 12 NoonAugust 29 (Monday) New Student Orientation & RegistrationAugust 30 (Tuesday) Regular Semester Classes Begin First Half Block Classes BeginSeptember 5 (Monday) Labor Day / No ClassesSeptember 6 (Tuesday) Classes Resume Late Registration Ends at 4 pmOctober 12 (Wednesday) Last Day to Drop First Half Block Classes at 4 pmOctober 20 (Thursday) Midterm End of First Half Block Classes Fall Break Begins / No ClassesOctober 24 (Monday) Fall Break Ends / Classes Resume Second Half Block Classes BeginNovember 23 (Wednesday) Thanksgiving Break Begins / No ClassesNovember 28 (Monday) Thanksgiving Break Ends / Classes ResumeDecember 1 (Thursday) Last Day to Drop Regular Semester Classes at 4 pmDecember 8 (Thursday) Last Day to Drop Second Half Block Classes at 4 pmDecember 13 (Tuesday) Finals Week BeginsDecember 16 (Friday) Finals Week Ends Semester Ends at 6 pm Residence Halls Close at 6 pm 7
    • 2011 - 2012 Tentative CalendarSpring SemesterJanuary 15 (Sunday) Residence Halls Open at 12 NoonJanuary 16 (Monday) RegistrationJanuary 17 (Tuesday) Regular Semester Classes Begin First Half Block Classes BeginJanuary 24 (Tuesday) Late Registration Ends at 4 pm February 16 (Thursday) Winter Break Begins / No ClassesFebruary 20 (Monday) Winter Break Ends / Classes ResumeMarch 8 (Thursday) Last Day to Drop First Half Block Classes at 4 pmMarch 15 (Thursday) Midterm End of First Half Block ClassesMarch 16 (Friday) Second Half Block Classes Begin Spring Break Begins at 4 pmMarch 26 (Monday) Spring Break Ends / Classes ResumeApril 6 (Friday) Easter Break Begins / No ClassesApril 10 (Tuesday) Easter Break Ends / Classes ResumeApril 26 (Thursday) Last Day to Drop Regular Semester Classes at 4 pmMay 3 (Thursday) Last Day to Drop Second Half Block Classes at 4 pmMay 8 (Tuesday) Finals Week BeginsMay 11 (Friday) Finals Week Ends Semester Ends at 6 pm Graduation at 7 pmMay 12 (Saturday) Residence Halls Close at Noon 8
    • 2011 - 2012 Tentative CalendarSummer SemesterJune 4 (Monday) Summer Session BeginsJuly 4 (Wednesday) EWC Observed Holiday (Fourth of July)July 13 (Friday) Summer Session EndsJuly 27 (Friday) Summer Session Flexible End DateSummer classes vary in length. Please consult the most current class schedule on the EWC web page at ewc.wy.edu.The EWC Administration reserves the right to make changes without notice.Eastern Wyoming College does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, marital status, sexual preference, sex, religion, political belief, veteran status, age, or disability in admission or access to, or treatment or employment in, its educational programs or activities. Inquiries concerning Title VII, Title IX, and Section 504, and Americans with Disabilities Act, may be referred to the Director of Human Resources, Eastern Wyoming College, Torrington, WY 82240, or phone (307) 532.8330, or the Wyoming Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights Coordinator, 2nd Floor, Hathaway Building, Cheyenne, WY 82002-0050, or (307) 777.6218.Eastern Wyoming College is an equal opportunity institution. 9
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    • General Information Development of College Mission and Strategic Directions Eastern Wyoming College College Mission - Adopted June 10, 2008Eastern Wyoming College was established in Eastern Wyoming College is a student-centered,September 1948 as the Southeast University comprehensive community college that respondsCenter, an extension of the University of to the educational, cultural, social, and economicWyoming and a part of the Torrington School needs of its communities with quality, affordableDistrict 3. From 1948 – 1956, the College educational opportunities for dynamic lifelongstruggled for existence on a very limited budget learning.which necessarily limited the faculty, curriculum,and student enrollment. At one time during this Strategic Directions - Adopted June 10, 2008period, the College enrolled only 16 full-timestudents taught by two full-time instructors, and Strategic Direction #1- Thoughtfully prepare ourwas offering only a dozen classes. organization and our people for changing and dynamic times.In June of 1956, the citizens of the TorringtonPublic School District voted to organize the Strategic Direction #2- Promote high quality,Goshen County Community College District accessible learning experiences throughas an independent political subdivision of the responsive programs of distinction aligned withstate with its own board of control. Although current and future opportunities.this initial action in the formation of a separatecollege district encompassed the same territorial - Embrace and invest in Strategic Direction #3boundaries as that of the Torrington Public School technology and modern facilities.District, it was possible to enlarge the districtby election to annex additional public school Strategic Direction #4 - Enhance the quality of thedistricts to the College District. During the fall life of individuals, families, the community andof 1956, District 1 and District 10 elected to region, and positively influence the economy.become a part of the College District. In thespring of 1958, District 7 voted to become a part Strategic Direction #5 - Recognize and extend ourof the College District also. In the fall of 1965 global reach.all public school districts within Goshen Countyvoted to become a part of the College District.The name of the college was changed from the College Vision for the FutureGoshen County Community College District toEastern Wyoming Community College District Adopted June 10, 2008on December 20, 1968. Eastern Wyoming College will be a dynamic center for education, acting as a catalyst forAfter the reorganization in 1956, the enrollment individual growth, community engagement, andincreased to 62 full-time students with 4 full- global impact.time instructors offering approximately 30classes during each term of the school year.Growth of the institution continued steadily.Today the College serves over 1500 students incredit courses and over 8000 students in non-credit activities. The College sponsors outreachprograms in Converse, Crook, Niobrara, Platte,and Weston counties. 11
    • General Information Government AccreditationEastern Wyoming College is a public institution Eastern Wyoming College is accredited by theestablished under the provisions of the State following professional organizations:Legislature’s 1951 Community College Actfor the purpose of providing instruction in *Accredited:the first two years of college work, and for The Higher Learning Commission of the Northoffering related services to the people of eastern Central Association of Colleges & SchoolsWyoming. The college is a tax-supported, 230 South LaSalle Street, Suite 7-500co-educational institution under the control of Chicago, IL 60604an elected board, the members of which are Telephone: 800.621.7440/312.263.0456residents of the College District. The College is Fax: 312.263.7462operated by the Eastern Wyoming Community info@hlcommission.orgCollege District. Internet: www.ncahlc.orgThe Eastern Wyoming College Board consistsof seven members elected to four year terms *American Veterinary Medical Association(beginning with the general election in 1988), by 1931 N. Meacham Road, Suite 100the eligible voters within the College District. Schaumburg, IL 60173-4360The terms are to be determined by the Board of Telephone: (847) 925.8070Trustees, with never more than a simple majority Fax: (847) 925.1329being elected at one time. Internet: www.avma.orgRegular meetings of the Board are held on thesecond Tuesday of each month. Special meetings *American Welding Societyare called by the President of the Board to 550 NW LeJeune Roadconduct business as required. Miami, FL 33126 Telephone: (800) 443.9353 Board of Trustees Internet: www.aws.orgFirst TermElected Expires2000 2012 Carl Rupp, President2000 2012 Sherri Lovercheck, Vice President2006 2014 George Nash, Secretary2008 2012 Mike Varney, Treasurer2008 2012 Julene Asmus2010 2014 Angela Babcock2010 2014 John Patrick 12
    • General Information Memberships AFFIRMATIVE ACTION/EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITYAmerican Association of Collegiate Registrars and POLICY STATEMENTAdmissions Officers Eastern Wyoming College is dedicated toAmerican Association of Community Colleges providing opportunities and recognizing the talent of all people at our institution. The collegeAmerican Volleyball Coaches Association is committed to a policy of equal employment opportunity for all persons on the basis of meritAssociation of Community College Trustees without regard to race, color, national origin, marital status, sexual preference, sex, religion,Association of Intermountain Housing Officers political belief, veteran status, age, or disability. In accordance with the policy, Eastern WyomingLeague for Innovation in the Community College College affirms its commitment to non- discrimination in its employment practices as theyMountain States Association of Community relate to recruitment, hiring, selection, screening,Colleges testing, compensation, promotion, employment benefits, educational opportunities, access toNAFSA: Association of International Educators programs, work assignments, application of discipline, access to grievance procedures, andNational Association of Student Financial Aid any and all other conditions of employmentAdministrators which are provided by Eastern Wyoming College policy, regulation, rule or practice.National Community Education Association All administrators, faculty and staff committeesNational Intercollegiate Rodeo Association and others involved in employment decisions are directed to comply with this policy. TheNational Junior College Athletic Association Director of Human Resources is responsible for administering and coordinating the College’sThe Higher Learning Commission; Affirmative Action/Equal EmploymentMember: North Central Association Opportunity Program.Western Undergraduate Exchange Name, office location and telephone number are: Tom McDowellWestern Interstate Commission for Higher Director of Human ResourcesEducation Affirmative Action Officer Tebbet Building, 234Wyoming Association of Community College Eastern Wyoming CollegeTrustees 3200 West C Street Torrington, WY 82240Wyoming Community College Athletic (307) 532-8330ConferenceWyoming Distance Education Consortium(WyDec) 13
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    • Campus Life On-Campus Housing Campus Activities and OrganizationsOn-campus housing provides students with an There are several student organizationsopportunity to easily meet individuals from a on campus and, as interest increases, newvariety of backgrounds, to establish lifetime organizations may be formed. Student extra-friendships, and participate in a variety of social curricular involvement develops leadership,and educational activities. This experience cooperative and service skills, rounds outin community living can be both enjoyable one’s education, and provides a much neededand rewarding for students, as well as being constructive diversion from academic stresses.convenient and economical. Every student is urged to become an active member of the student body. Faculty and staffEastern Wyoming College has two residence advisors are assigned to each college-sponsoredhalls on campus; Eastern Hall and Lancer Hall. club or activity.Eastern Hall has double occupancy rooms withcommunity bathrooms for men and women ADULT STUDENT PEER COUNSELORS: This groupon separate floors, as well as 2 bedroom (four- assists in the successful transition and studentstudent) suites which share a bathroom. Lancer development of adults returning to school.Hall has 2 bedroom (four-student) suites which Special educational programming, monthlyshare a bathroom. Basic cable television and support groups, and special activities gearedInternet service is provided in each living toward adult students are provided. All newlyspace as is local telephone service. (Telephone entering/returning students are eligible andinstruments are NOT provided.) Free use of encouraged to participate in these activities.washers and dryers is available in each building.In addition, Eastern Hall has a lounge with a ART CLUB: The EWC Art Club is an organizationtelevision, DVD, Wii, refrigerator and microwave for students who love the visual arts, whetheron each floor, and a game room in the basement. they have professional or amateur interests. TheLancer Hall has lounges and study rooms in each club works together to engage in and organizewing and a kitchen in the Atkins Commons area. more extensive and intensive experiences in the visual arts. This group organizes enrichingHousing staff resides in each residence hall. activities including field trips to museums andProfessional and student staff members are art communities, workshops, visiting artists,trained to assist students with concerns relating and collaboration with other creative disciplines.to their total college experience. There will be no priority established based on style, content, media, or individual interests inTo enable the college to offer students the best art; all interested students are welcome.food service possible at reasonable costs, EWCrequires all students who reside on campus to BLOCK AND BRIDLE CLUB: Block and Bridle Clubparticipate in a meal plan. Food Services offers is a nationally recognized organization offereda full meal plan of 17 meals per week along with at numerous junior colleges and universities.two other plans that offer 14 meals per week Many of the members are involved in animalor 10 meals per week; the last two have Munch science studies, but all students involved withMoney that can be used in the Cafeteria or agriculture are encouraged to join. The clubStudent Center. The housing and food service participates in events with other Block and Bridlecharges are included under a single contract. Chapters, sponsors social activities, and travels toExceptions to the meal plan such as work conflict, educational seminars such as The Range Beef Cowreligious reasons, class conflicts, vegetarian, Symposium. One advantage of joining Block andweight loss, or health-related diets are not made. Bridle is that your membership transfers to anyFor further information concerning student other school that you attend that participates inhousing, contact the Director of Residence Life at Block and Bridle.307.532.8336. 15
    • Campus LifeCAMPUS ACTIVITIES BOARD: This is a formal living. The basic functions of the Housing Councilgroup of interested students who assist the are to:Coordinator of Intramurals and Student Activities 1. Advise and implement, with approval of thein the selection, promotion, and follow-through Director of Residence Life, Vice Presidentof activities for all Torrington-based students. for Student Services, and the CollegeInterested students are invited to join this board Board of Trustees, policies, regulations, andby contacting the Coordinator. procedures for the improvement of residence hall living.CAMPUS MINISTRY: The Campus Ministry 2. Coordinate housing activities.Program provides and supports a ministry service 3. Maintain close two-way communicationto the Eastern Wyoming College community. between the student residents and theThis community includes the students, faculty, College.staff, and community volunteers. The program 4. Provide opportunities for the residents toattempts to provide a ministry that is flexible in participate in residence hall government.the attitude and approach it takes, and provides an 5. Evaluate environmental factors whichatmosphere of unconditional acceptance. Campus influence the general welfare of residents.Ministry seeks to be a ministry of pastoral care,education, social concern, and ecumenical INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS: Easternrelations, and is led by community leaders and Wyoming College belongs to the Wyominglocal churches. Community College Athletic Conference and team championships are declared in women’sCOSMETOLOGY CLUB: The Cosmetology Club volleyball, men’s and women’s basketball and golf. The College belongs to the National Junioris designed for the student who is outgoing and College Athletic Association and is a member ofcreative. The club encourages leadership, unity, Region IX. EWC is also a member of the Nationaland advanced education. All Cosmetology Club Intercollegiate Rodeo Association - Centralmembers must maintain a minimum GPA of 2.0. Rocky Mountain Region. The intercollegiateAs a club, students attend regional hair shows athletic program for men consists of basketball,and educational field trips. The club is active golf, and rodeo. The intercollegiate athleticin community services such as sponsoring food program for women consists of volleyball,drives for the local food pantry. basketball, and rodeo. Activity grants are available in all of these sports.CRIMINAL JUSTICE CLUB: Beta Upsilon Deltais a member of the American Criminal Justice INTERCOLLEGIATE HORSE SHOWING CLUB: ThisAssociation. The club’s main goal is to create a club is a member of the Intercollegiate Horsepositive interaction with local, state, and federal Showing Association (IHSA). Any EWC studentagencies. Membership is composed of students in is welcome to join our club. Members who wishall areas of the criminal justice field, instructors, to compete at an approved IHSA show must beand local police officers. The club participates a full-time undergraduate student and must bein competitions on a regional and national level. in good academic standing at the time of theIn the past decade this club has won numerous competition. The main activity of the club isregional and national team and individual honors. to allow team members to compete at IHSA shows at other colleges. Events competed in areGEAR-UP CLUB: The GEAR-UP Club is open western and hunt seat equitation as well as reiningto students who were previously involved in and jumping. Members are evaluated based ontheir former high school’s GEAR-UP program. riding ability and placed in the appropriate ridingClub goals include enriching the academic and class. Riders of all skill levels are welcomed!social experience of college students, mentoring Other club activities include fundraising eventsincoming GEAR-UP students, and conducting to help with IHSA membership, travel, and showcommunity service projects. expenses. As a community service the club is dedicated to helping the local youth with theirHOUSING COUNCIL: The Housing Council is an horsemanship skills.informal group of on-campus residents who areinterested in improving the quality of on-campus 16
    • Campus LifeINTRAMURALS: The intramural program Students who have attained a minimum 3.5is available to enrolled EWC students and cumulative GPA in twelve or more credit hoursall students are encouraged to participate. in a degree program are eligible for membership.Intramurals at Eastern Wyoming College are Phi Theta Kappa is the recognized academic honorset up on team, dual, and individual basis. society for community colleges in the UnitedActivities include basketball, racquetball, softball, States and has approximately 800 chapters. Thevolleyball, and wallyball. EWC chapter began in 1989 and initiates new members in the Fall and Spring semesters.JOURNALISM CLUB: The Journalism Club (along RANGE AND WILDLIFE CLUB: The Range andwith the Publications Production class) produces Wildlife Club was established in January, 2003The Lancer Post, a newspaper for Eastern Wyoming with the intent of fostering a sense of comraderyCollege students. The purpose of The Lancer with other students in biological fields, and toPost is to inform and entertain readers while assist local biologists with data collection andalso offering a forum for readers via letters to other duties. Students seeking degrees in Biology,the editor and guest editorials. Students may Environmental Sciences, Wildlife and Fisheriesparticipate in any or all of the following areas: Biology and Management, and pre-professionalwriting, taking photographs, working on layout, areas are eligible for membership. Activitiesproduction and/or distribution, and advertising include guest speakers, a wild game feast, andsales. The newspaper’s function is to keep trips to the National Bighorn Sheep Center inits readers informed of campus happenings, Dubois and the National Elk Refuge in Jackson.special events and activities, club/organizationalnews; Student Senate decisions; dances, music/ RODEO CLUB: The Rodeo Club is designedentertainment; sports; features about students or to promote intercollegiate rodeo at EasternEWC staff; workshops; financial aid news; health Wyoming College. It supports an increasedissues; and any other news that affects students. interest in rodeos and other Western activities,Students may also write columns on topics of and helps establish a closer relationship amongtheir choice. Students may participate in annual students interested in this activity. The rodeomeetings with the Wyoming Press Association team is a member of the National Intercollegiatewhich includes a variety of workshops. Rodeo Association.LIVESTOCK JUDGING CLUB: The mission of SHOOTING SPORTS CLUB: The purpose of thisthe club is to provide educational activities to organization is to create an environment thatinterested EWC students through livestock teaches and capitalizes on the joys of the shootingjudging. Objectives include development of the sports, specifically trapshooting, to developfollowing skills: leadership skills as Club officers, intercollegiate competition, and to promote andcommunication skills through oral reasons uphold gun safety in the shooting sports. Cluband fundraising activities, social skills as club members will successfully complete a Hunter’smembers, and decision-making skills through Safety Course or must prove the successfuljudging practices and contests. Club members completion of such a course at a previous site.must be enrolled in ANSC 1210 & ANSC 2470.In order to participate in trips, club members SkillsUSA: The SkillsUSA professional chaptermust actively participate in club fundraising is an organization for students in technical,activities. National contests like the American skilled, and service occupations including healthRoyal and National Western preset the number occupations. It focuses on leadership, citizenship,of participating team members. Team members and character development. The club offersmust be full-time students with a minimum Eastern Wyoming College students special2.0 GPA and be currently passing all classes. opportunities to further enhance their schoolingTeam selection will be based upon ability and and skill development through activities, trips,participation. and competitions at the local, state, and national level.PHI THETA KAPPA: Phi Theta Kappa is anacademic honor society that recognizes andpromotes scholarship, leadership, and service. 17
    • Campus LifeSkillsUSA / WELDING & MACHINE TOOL DIVISION: minimum 2.5 cumulative GPA. These studentsEWC SkillsUSA / Welding and Machine Tool are ambassadors of the College and represent it atDivision provides students who are welding many social and recruitment/retention functions.and machine tooling majors the opportunity to Students interested should contact the Associateparticipate in an “industrial-oriented” student Director for Enrollment Management.organization. Students may participate inindustry related field trips, develop leadership STUDENT SENATE: The Student Senate isskills, attend club sponsored forums, compete the governing agency of the EWC studentat state competitions/leadership activities, and body. Membership includes every segmentsocial events. Activities are planned to enhance of the student body as defined by the Senateknowledge and awareness for all students Constitution. Student Senators are providedinvolved. opportunities for leadership, service, enhanced education, and involvement. Officers for theSkillsUSA / BUSINESS DIVISION: EWC succeeding academic year are elected each SpringSkillsUSA/Business Division provides students semester with other representation selected earlywho are business, computer science, and non- in the Fall. The mission of the Senate is to providebusiness majors the opportunity to participate an active, equitable, and welcoming atmospherein a “business-oriented” student organization. for Eastern Wyoming College students. TheStudents may participate in business/industry Senate membership is involved in disbursement ofrelated field trips, develop leadership skills, student activity funds. All students are welcomeattend club sponsored forums, compete at to attend weekly Senate meetings.state competitions/leadership activities, andsocial events. Activities are planned to enhance VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY CLUB: The Veterinaryknowledge and awareness for all students Technology Club is designed to promote interestinvolved. in the vocation of Veterinary Technology. Fundraising activities include operating theSOCIETY FOR CREATIVE ANACHRONISM concession facility at EWC athletic events andThe Society for Creative Anachronism (SCA) sponsoring pet washes, and raffles. Recreationalis a club dedicated to exploring Medieval and and academic activities include barbecues,Renaissance history by reenactment. Members picnics, and field trips. Field trips have includedof the SCA study and take part in a variety the National Western Stock Show and Rodeo,of activities, including combat (armoured the Denver Zoo, the Denver Museum of Naturaland fencing), archery, equestrian activities, History, and veterinary technician seminars.costuming, cooking, metalwork, woodworking, Membership is open to all students who have anmusic, dance, calligraphy, fiber arts, and much interest in Veterinary Technology.more. If it was done in the Middle Ages orRenaissance, odds are you’ll find someone in the Motor Vehicle InformationSCA interested in recreating it. Registration: At the beginning of each semesterWhat makes the SCA different from a Humanities101 class is the active participation in the learning all students must register motor vehicles whichprocess. To learn about the clothing of the period, they own or operate. Students are allowed oneyou research it, then sew and wear it yourself. To week after a change in the registration to reportlearn about combat, you put on armour (which the information—such as different car, changeyou may have built yourself) and participate in of license number, etc. to the Student Servicestournaments or large scale battles with other Office.chapters. All interested students are welcome. TRAFFIC/PARKING: Students are subject to allSTUDENT AMBASSADORS: The Student Torrington traffic rules and regulations. ViolationsAmbassadors are a select group of students within the College area will be reported to thechosen for their positive attitudes, varying Torrington Police Department for whatevergeographical residences, majors, and extra- penalties may be imposed. Please remember thatcurricular involvement. They must maintain a pedestrians have the right of way. 18
    • Campus LifeResidence hall students are required to leave theirvehicles in the residence hall parking lots and notin the main campus parking lots. No parking isallowed in front of the main building along thedrive. Parking spaces are marked and studentsmay be ticketed if they park across the lines.Large vehicles and trailers must be parked behindthe welding shop or in marked parking lanes onWest C Street.The Torrington Police Department (TPD)will ticket violators who illegally park in spotsreserved on campus for those individuals withproper handicapped permits on their vehicles.The TPD will also issue tickets to thoseindividuals who park in the fire lanes on campus.If necessary, the TPD may also have the illegallyparked vehicles towed in addition to ticketing. 19
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    • Admissions Admissions English Placement Exam Students wishing to enroll in English 0620, 0630,All correspondence regarding admissions and 0640, 1010 must first take a placement test whichother information should be addressed to: will determine the appropriate course for their Admissions Office indicated level of proficiency. The placement Eastern Wyoming College system is designed to work in the student’s best 3200 West C Street interest so he/she does not enroll in a course that Torrington, WY 82240 is too advanced or too basic. or call 307.532.8237 Mathematics Placement Exam Admissions Policies Students who wish to enroll in any mathematics course or in certain chemistry, computer science,Eastern Wyoming College is open to all students business, or physics courses must either showwho meet the admission policies without regard prior college credit in mathematics or take ato race, color, national origin, marital status, placement examination to meet a prerequisite.sexual preference, sex, religion, political belief, Those wishing to take their first mathematicsveteran status, age, or disability. course at Eastern Wyoming College must also take the placement exam to determine theEastern Wyoming College will admit any high appropriate course for her/his indicated levelschool graduate or anyone who, in the judgment of proficiency. The exam is designed to placeof the College, can benefit from one of its students in a course that is neither above norprograms. Enrollment in academic areas for below their abilities. Students who questiondegree purposes is normally limited to those their placement score will be allowed one retest.with a high school diploma or the equivalent. Exam results are valid for only one year, so it isIndividuals without a high school diploma or best that a mathematics class be taken within thatGED who are mature enough to benefit will be year to avoid having to retake the test.accepted on a provisional basis and assisted inselecting an appropriate program. For Financial Reading Requirement and Placement ExaminationAid eligibility requirements, please see the Students must take a reading test to determineFinancial Aid section. vocabulary and reading comprehension levels. It is important for all college students to possessIt is strongly recommended that applicants or acquire the reading skills relevant to theirprovide the Admissions Office with an official program of study. The reading requirementtranscript of their secondary school record, applies to students seeking degrees or certificates,GED certificate, and/or transcripts from or students enrolled in 12 or more hours whosecolleges previously attended. These credentials placement scores indicate the necessity for aare important for purposes of applying for reading course. If the placement exam indicatesscholarships, academic advisement, and efficient a reading course is necessary, the student musttransfer of credit hours from previously attended successfully complete a reading course withinstitutions. a grade of “C” or better to satisfy the reading requirement. The course must be taken within Entrance Placement Testing the first two semesters of enrollment at EWC.All associate degree-seeking students must takeplacement exams in English, math, and reading Please refer to the following course placementprior to registration to aid in proper class guide for additional information:placement and maximize academic success. Allcertificate and non degree-seeking students musttake the placement exams prior to enrolling incertain English or math courses. Placement testsare administered in the Testing Center for a $15initial fee. Students with appropriate ACT scores(MATH - 21 or above; English - 18 or above;Reading - 21 or above) may not need to take theplacement exam. 21
    • Admissions COMPASS and ACT Course Placement Guide Pre-Algebra TrigonometryCOMPASS Score: 0-23 COMPASS Score: 0-60 or ACT Score: 25You are referred to: You are eligible for:The Adult Basic Education (ABE) department to work on your MATH 1405 Pre-Calculous Trigonometrymathematical skills.You will be eligible to enroll in MATH 0900Pre-Algebra Arithmetic once your COMPASS score improves COMPASS Score: 0-60 or ACT Score: 26enough to meet the course entrance requirements. You are eligible for: MATH 2350 Business CalculusCOMPASS Score: 24-44You are eligible for: COMPASS Score: 61-100 or ACT Score: 27MATH 0900 Pre-Algebra Arithmetic You are eligible for: MATH 2200 Calculus ICOMPASS Score: 45-100You are eligible for:MATH 0920 Elementary Algebra Reading *MATH 1515 Applied Technical MathematicsBADM 1005 Business Mathematics COMPASS Score: 0-25VTTK 1751 Pharmaceutical Calculations (or ACT Score: 21) You are referred to: The Adult Basic Education (ABE) department to work on your reading skills.You will be eligible to enroll in HMDV 0510 Algebra Fundamentals of Reading I once your reading score improves enough to meet the course requirements.COMPASS Score: 0-39You are eligible for: COMPASS Score: 26-50MATH 0920 Elementary Algebra You are required to enroll in:MATH 1515 Applied Technical Mathematics HMDV 0510 Fundamentals of Reading IBADM 1005 Business MathematicsVTTK 1751 Pharmaceutical Calculations (or ACT Score: 21) COMPASS Score: 51-67 You are required to enroll in:COMPASS Score: 40-65 or ACT Score: 21 HMDV 0520 Fundamentals of Reading IIYou are eligible for:MATH 1515 Applied Technical Mathematics COMPASS Score: 68-100 or ACT Score 21MATH 0930 Intermediate AlgebraMATH 1000 Problem Solving No reading improvement required.MATH 1100 Math for Elementary TeachersCOMPASS Score: 66-100 or ACT Score: 21 * Degree or certificate seeking students, or students enrolledYou are eligible for: in 12 or more hours who read below the equivalency of the 10thMATH 1000 Problem Solving grade level are required to take the appropriate reading course. Ideally, this course will be taken within the first two semesters ofCOMPASS Score: 66-100 or ACT Score: 23 enrollment. Students must complete the course(s) to fulfill theYou are eligible for: reading requirement.MATH 1400 Pre-Calculus AlgebraMATH 1450 Algebra & Trigonometry Writing for English Placement College Algebra COMPASS Score: 0-19 You are required to enroll in:COMPASS Score: 0-64 or ACT Score: 21 ENGL 0620 Foundations of GrammarYou are eligible for:MATH 1000 Problem Solving COMPASS Score: 20-30MATH 1100 Math for Elementary Teachers You are required to enroll in:VTTK 1751 Pharmaceutical Calculations ENGL 0630 Grammar & Writing ImprovementCOMPASS Score: 0-64 or ACT Score: 23 COMPASS Score: 31-74You are eligible for: You are eligible for:MATH 1400 Pre-Calculus Algebra ENGL 0640 Writing SkillsMATH 1450 Algebra & Trigonometry TECH 1005 Applied Technical WritingCOMPASS Score: 65-100 or ACT Score: 25 COMPASS Score: 75-100 or ACT Score: 21You are eligible for: You are eligible for:MATH 1405 Pre-Calculus Trigonometry ENGL 1010 English I: CompositionCOMPASS Score: 65-100 or ACT Score: 26You are eligible for:MATH 2350 Business Calculus 22
    • Admissions Admission Procedures 5. A total of three hours of religion may be transferred from an accredited institution toI. New Applicants Who Have Not Attended apply towards the humanities requirement for Eastern Wyoming College: graduation. Additional hours in religion from1. Secure application materials from the an accredited institution will be evaluated for Admissions Office or the EWC website. use as elective credit.2. Complete all the application materials and return to the Admissions Office. Applicants III. Readmission of Former Students: are encouraged to apply at least one month 1. Former students of the College who are in prior to the planned date of registering for good standing and who have not attended classes. another college/university are eligible to3. Request a 6-7 semester high school transcript return without special application. It is be sent directly to the Admissions Office or recommended that such students notify EWC send a final transcript following high school at least two weeks before the opening of the graduation. term in which they expect to return so that4. All applicants to Eastern Wyoming College their file may be activated for registration are strongly encouraged, but not required, to purposes. submit results of the American College Test 2. Former EWC students who have attended (ACT). Results are used only for academic another college/university since their last advisement, career planning, and scholarship attendance (at EWC) are considered transfer eligibility and are not used as admissions students for admission purposes. The criteria. Admissions Office may require completion of5. Applicants who are accepted will be notified a new Application for Admission, if deemed as soon as their credentials are processed. necessary.II. Transfer Applicants Who Have Not Previously IV. Special Admissions: Attended Eastern Wyoming College: 1. Eastern Wyoming College will provisionally1. Transfer students will follow the procedures admit individuals who, in the judgment of the outlined above and include an official College, can benefit from one of the College transcript from each college previously programs or courses. attended. EWC accepts courses and credits 2. The individual must have written approval from other colleges that have been approved from the Vice President for Learning. by one of the six United States Regional 3. Special Admissions students must meet the Accrediting Associations. Credit hours with same assessment/placement test criteria for grades of “C” or better from an accredited math, English, and reading as required of institution will be transferred. EWC college students.2. A high school transcript is not required when the college transcript gives complete V. International Students: information about the applicant’s high school Eastern Wyoming College is authorized under record. federal law to enroll non-immigrant students.3. Transfer students who are on “probation” or 1. Applicants must meet English proficiency and whose status is “dismissal” at the institution financial support requirements. International of their last attendance, will be placed on students whose native language is other than academic probation for the semester in English must furnish scores on the Test of which they are admitted. Admission for English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). the succeeding term requires a grade point A paper-based TOEFL score of 500 or a average of 2.00 or above on all work taken computer-based TOEFL score of 173 or during the probationary period. an Internet-based TOEFL score of 61 is4. Students wishing credit for courses taken required for acceptance. Also required is at an institution not accredited by one of completion of all sections of the Confidential the six United States Regional Accrediting Financial Statement form (available from Associations must take and successfully pass a the Admissions Office) including Statement departmental examination before credit can of Guarantor and Bank Verification. For be awarded. additional information regarding the 23
    • Admissions admission of international students, contact Special Charges the EWC Vice President for Student Services 1. Placement Fee (per session) ........... $15 at 307.532.8257. 2. Placement Test Retake Fee (per session) First retake is free. Subsequent retakesVI. Military Credit: are given with advisor approval only and1. Eastern Wyoming College evaluates military cost $5 per test. services schools and occupational credit using 3. Course Fees the American Council on Education’s Guide a. ANSC 1100 Management of to the Evaluation of Educational Experiences Reproduction ........................$150 in the Armed Services. b. CRMJ 2781 Use of Force I......... $50 c. CRMJ 2791 Use of Force II ........ $50 On-Campus Activity & Use Fees d. EDUC 2005 Prescreen for Practicum in Teaching ......... VariableIn addition to tuition costs each student will be e. HLTK 2005 Prescreen forcharged an Activity and Use Fee of $24 per credit Health Technology ............. Variablehour up to and including 16 credit hours for a f. Applied Music Courses ..... $25/creditmaximum charge of $384 per semester. g. MUSC 1150 Guitar ........ $25/credit h. MUSC 2150 Guitar II ...... $25/creditStudent Support i. PEAC 103_$4 (Supports scholarship funds) (Part-Time Students Only) ......... $35Student Activities j. WELD 1755 Shielded$4 (Admission to sporting, fine arts, Metal Arc Welding ................... $50 recreational, and leisure activities for all k. WELD 1760 Advanced Shielded on-campus students) Metal Arc Welding ................... $50Instructional Support l. WELD 2500 StructuralWelding............ $50$8 (Supports general educational costs) m. WELD 2510 Pipe Welding I ...... $50Technology Fee n. WELD 2520 Pipe Welding II ...... $50$8 (Support and upgrade technology o. Audit Class Fee (same as for credit infrastructure) students)Total On-Campus Fees per Credit Hour 4. Graduation Fee$24 (paid by Student Senate) ............... $10 5. Cap and Gown Fee ..................... $23 6. CLEP Examinations (per test) ........ $15 Outreach Activity & Use Fees + CLEP Fee 7. DANTES Examinations (per test) .... $15The Outreach Activity and Use Fee of $16 is + DANTES Feecharged on every registered credit up to and 8. Institutional Challenge Examinationincluding 16 credit hours for a maximum charge (per test) .................................. $10of $256 per semester. 9. Activity & Use Fees (see page 23) 10. Distance Learning Fee ............. VariableOutreach Use Fees per Credit Hour 11. Field Studies Fee ................... Variable$8 (Supports general educational costs, 12. Rodeo Fee ............................... $30 scholarships, and activities at the Outreach 13. Workforce Development Fee .... Variable Centers that generate the fees)Technology Fee Fees are subject to change.$8 (Support and upgrade technology infrastructure) 24
    • Admissions Semester Fee ScheduleAll tuition and fees must be paid in full at the beginning of each semester and before the student attends classes.All checks must be made payable to Eastern Wyoming College. Tuition rates are subject to change withoutnotice upon approval of the Wyoming Community College Commission. The EWC Board of Trustees reservesthe right to change fees at any time. 2011-12 Activity & Use Fees Tuition On-Campus Outreach Credit Activity & Activity & Technology In-State WUE* Out-of-State Hours Use Fees Use Fees Fee Tuition Tuition Tuition 1 $ 16.00 $ 8.00 $ 8.00 $ 71.00 $ 107.00 $213.00 2 32.00 16.00 16.00 142.00 214.00 426.00 3 48.00 24.00 24.00 213.00 321.00 639.00 4 64.00 32.00 32.00 284.00 428.00 852.00 5 80.00 40.00 40.00 355.00 535.00 1,065.00 6 96.00 48.00 48.00 426.00 642.00 1,278.00 7 112.00 56.00 56.00 497.00 749.00 1,491.00 8 128.00 64.00 64.00 568.00 856.00 1,704.00 9 144.00 72.00 72.00 639.00 963.00 1,917.00 10 160.00 80.00 80.00 710.00 1,070.00 2,130.00 11 176.00 88.00 88.00 781.00 1,177.00 2,343.00 12 192.00 96.00 96.00 852.00 1,284.00 2,556.00 13 208.00 104.00 104.00 852.00 1,284.00 2,556.00 14 224.00 112.00 112.00 852.00 1,284.00 2,556.00 15 240.00 120.00 120.00 852.00 1,284.00 2,556.00 16+ 256.00 128.00 128.00 852.00 1,284.00 2,556.00NOTE: Students pay either on-campus or outreach use fees depending upon their primary home location, but not both.*TheWestern Undergraduate Exchange (WUE) tuition rate is calculated at approximately 1 1/2 times the resident tuition rates. To qualify for theWUE rate, a student must be a resident of Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, or Washington. Nebraska residents also qualify forWUE tuition rates. 25
    • Admissions Residence Hall Fees (2011-2012) Residence Hall RefundsStandard Room–Eastern Hall (Option 1)Fall Semester Spring Semester Total If an on-campus resident withdraws from$2,320 $2,320 $4,640 college or moves out of college housing before the start of the semester or within the first 8Private Standard–Room Eastern Hall (Option 2) calendar days of the start of the semester, he/Fall Semester Spring Semester Total she shall forfeit 25% of the semester room and$2,630 $2,630 $5,260 board charges assessed and 100% of the housing security deposit. Students moving out of collegeSuite–Eastern Hall (Option 3) housing after 8 calendar days from the beginningFall Semester Spring Semester Total of the semester shall forfeit 100% of the room$2,465 $2,465 $4,930 and board charge assessment and 100% of the housing security deposit paid (i.e. NO REFUNDSPrivate Suite–Eastern Hall (Option 4) after 8 days). If, before midterm, there areFall Semester Spring Semester Total circumstances clearly beyond the student’s$2,775 $2,775 $5,550 control, an appeal regarding a refund may be made by submitting a written statement to theSemi-Private Suite–Lancer Hall (Option 5) Director of Residence Life explaining why anFall Semester Spring Semester Total exception should be made. No refunds will be$2,530 $2,530 $5,060 made to students who do not officially withdrawSummer 2011: $95 per week (Room only) or whose misconduct results in suspension/ dismissal from on-campus housing and/orPrivate Suite–Lancer Hall (Option 6) suspension/dismissal from the College.Fall Semester Spring Semester Total$2,860 $2,860 $5,720 Tuition/Fee RefundsSummer 2011: $125 per week (Room only) Tuition* is refunded on a course-by-course basisFees include: Room, Board, Local Telephone Service, and is determined by the length of the course andBasic Cable Service, and Internet Service the first meeting day of the course. For courses which meet the full semester, tuition, and ActivityMeal Plan Options and Use Fees are refunded in full for 8 calendar17 Meal Plan: Seventeen meals per week days beginning with the first day of the class.14 Meal Plan: Any fourteen meals per week plus Thereafter, the tuition refund is 25% through 29 $125 Munch Money calendar days beginning with the first day of the10 Meal Plan: Any ten meals per week plus class with no refund for Activity and Use Fees. $285 Munch Money For courses which are offered for less than a full semester, tuition, Activity and Use Fees will beThe above listed fees are subject to revision each prorated.year. In addition, there is a refundable housingsecurity deposit of $100 required with each *For students with federal financial aid, the federalhousing application. The housing security deposit financial aid refund rules take precedence over the EWCis refundable if there is no room damage and the policy.student complies with all check-out procedures.Please contact the Director of Residence Life formore information at 307.532.8336. 26
    • Admissions Residency 3. A legal dependent under the age of 24, or a spouse of a resident of the State of WyomingThe following regulations govern the classification who qualifies as a resident based upon thisof students as resident or non-resident for policy.the purpose of tuition assessment at the seven 4. A legal dependent under the age of 24 of aWyoming Community Colleges. Wyoming Community College graduate. 5. A student who marries a Wyoming residenta. RESIDENCE CLASSIFICATION POLICY shall be granted resident classification at the1. A student previously classified as a beginning of the next term following the nonresident may be reclassified any time marriage. prior to the end of the published refund 6. Active Wyoming National Guard members period of any term if he/she qualifies. and U.S. Armed Forces members stationed in2. A student classified as a resident by one Wyoming, and their dependents. Wyoming community college will be 7. Members of the U.S. Armed Forces who considered a resident at all Wyoming moved to Wyoming within twelve (12) community colleges. months from the date of honorable discharge from the service.b. CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES 8. An individual who can provide written1. Residence classification shall be initiated for verification from an employer that he/ each student at the time the application for she will be employed in Wyoming for an admission is accepted and whenever a student anticipated period of not less than seven (7) has not been in attendance for more than one months and such employment is the principal semester. means of support. The employer’s signature2. Individuals or their legal dependents, who shall be certified by a Notary Public. are U.S. citizens or are in an immigrant status 9. Persons temporarily absent from the state and certain nonimmigrants, may qualify for due to military service, attendance at residency. educational institutions, or other types of3. Nonimmigrants and their dependents, who documented temporary absences will not possess a valid visa from the U.S Citizenship have their resident status voided by such and Immigration Services with a classification absence. of Temporary Workers or Intracompany Transferee and eligible for education, d. EXCEPTIONS may qualify for residency. Eligibility for In accordance with W.S. 21-17-105, an individual consideration will be based on the privileges who does not reside in Wyoming may be and limitations of the visa held by the considered a resident for tuition purposes if he/ applicant. she meets all of the following criteria:4. Community college districts may require 1. Has been employed in Wyoming for at least applicants to supply information to document seven months, and such employment is the residency status. applicant’s principal means of support; 2. Pays Wyoming taxes as required by law;c. RESIDENCY 3. Resides in a state with a similar law; andAny of the following may be used by a student 4. Is willing to submit an affidavit to the above.and would result in an individual being classifiedor reclassified as a Wyoming resident for tuitionpurposes:1. A graduate of a Wyoming high school or recipient of a GED in Wyoming who enrolls in a community college within 12 months of either high school graduation or GED completion.2. An individual who can provide written verification that he/she has lived in Wyoming continuously for one year prior to enrolling. 27
    • Admissions Medical RequirementAll students must complete the Student HealthStatement. Although not required by EWC, itis strongly recommended that all students bornafter 1956 provide an immunization recordshowing 2 measles immunizations.All male and female students who compete inintercollegiate athletics at Eastern WyomingCollege are responsible for having a healthphysical given by a physician of their choice.Eastern Wyoming College is a member of theNational Junior College Athletic Association andthe eligibility rules of this organization governthe eligibility of all student athletes competing inintercollegiate athletics. Section 9 of Article V ofthe NJCAA By-Laws defines this responsibilityas follows: “All student-athletes participatingin any one of the NJCAA certified sports musthave passed a physcial examination administeredby a qualified health care professional licensedto administer physical examinations, prior to thefirst practice for each calendar year in which theycompete.” The Student Medical Examinationform must be obtained from Eastern WyomingCollege. Textbook InformationEach student is required to supply textbooksand personal materials necessary for satisfactoryprogress in coursework. For the convenienceof the students, the EWC bookstore stockstextbooks, supplies, and study aids. Used booksare stocked when available and are sold at adiscounted price. Book buy-back events are heldthe last week of the Spring and Fall semesters.Bookstore hours are Monday - Friday, 7:30 amto 5:00 pm during the regular school year, andMonday - Friday, 7:30 am to 4:00 pm during theSummer. The bookstore is open evenings the firstweek of classes each semester. 28
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    • Financial AidThe following information is subject to change at anytime, without The College is approved for attendance by thosenotice, due to changes in Federal, State,Veterans Administration who are eligible for educational benefits providedRegulations or Institutional Policies. Please visit ewc.wy.edu for the by the Veteran’s Administration. Veterans wishingmost up to date information. to use their education benefits must contact the EWC Records Office. Information is alsoAll student financial aid at Eastern Wyoming available on the EWC website: http://ewc.College is administered by the Director of wy.edu/future/finaid/va/index.cfmFinancial Aid. To be considered for the maximumamount of aid possible, all students should: General Eligibility Requirements for Federal Aid1. Complete an EWC Application for Admission. To be eligible to receive federal student aid, a2. Submit official high school, General student must: Education Development (GED) and college • Be a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen; transcripts. If you are a high school senior, an official sixth, seventh, or final transcript is • Have a valid Social Security number (unless required for EWC scholarships consideration. from the Republic of the Marshall Islands, Final transcripts are required after high the Federated States of Micronesia, or the school graduation. Republic of Palau);Available aid includes: • Comply with Selective Service registration, if required (see www.sss.gov for moreFEDERAL (Title IV) information);1. Federal Pell Grants • Have a high school diploma or a General2. Federal Supplemental Educational Education Development (GED) Certificate Opportunity Grants (FSEOG) or pass an exam approved by the US3. Federal Work Study Program (FWS) Department of Education;4. Direct Loan (DL) • Subsidized and Unsubsidized • Be enrolled or accepted for enrollment as a • Parent Loan (PLUS) regular student working toward a degree or5. Iraq and Afghanistan Service Grant (IASG) certificate in an eligible program at a school(For more information about Title IV Financial that participates in the federal student aidAid programs visit www.federalstudentaid. programs;ed.gov) • Not owe a refund on a federal grant or be in default on a federal student loan;STATE1. Leveraging Educational Assistance • Have financial need (except for unsubsidized Partnership (LEAP) Direct Loan and Parent PLUS Loans);2. Wyoming Hathaway Scholarship Program3. Tuition and fees for survivors or dependents • Not have a drug conviction for an offense that of emergency responders occurred while you were receiving federal student aid; andINSTITUTIONAL • Be making satisfactory academic progress.1. Scholarships2. Activity and Part-Time Grants Applying for Federal Aid3. Institutional Employment For complete information on federal aid programs, visit www.college.gov and www.MILITARY studentaid.ed.gov. Individuals who plan to1. Montgomery GI Bill apply for federal aid must complete the Free2. Wyoming National Guard Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).3. Wyoming Educational Assistance for Veterans Students are encouraged to apply via the web and Survivors at www.fafsa.ed.gov for faster processing. The4. Federal Tuition Assistance paper FAFSA may be obtained from EWC or from a high school counselor. (The FAFSA is also available in Spanish). 30
    • Financial Aid STUDENT EMPLOYMENTIt is advisable to submit the FAFSA as soon as Students are limited to working a maximumpossible after January 1 of each year. of 15 hours per week under the Institutional Employment or Federal Work-Study Programs.The Financial Aid Office will review the FAFSA There are a variety of positions available.results received directly from the federal Information is available in the Financial Aidprocessor and follow federal regulations in Office and online at ewc.wy.edu/future/finaid/determining eligibility and awarding federal aid. workstudy. Students must meet the EWCYour assistance in forwarding all information Satisfactory Academic Progress Policies forrequested by the Financial Aid Office in a timely Financial Aid to receive and maintain federal andmanner will enable them to give you priority institutional work study eligibility.consideration for Financial Aid. Students willbe advised in writing concerning eligibility for Federal Work-Study will be awarded on a “first-federal aid. (If your financial situation or your come, first-served” basis to eligible students.family’s financial situation has recently changedfor the worse because of death, separation or METHOD OF PAYMENT OF AIDdivorce, or loss of job or benefits, you should Students receiving any type of financial assistancecontact the Financial Aid Office.) Average (federal or institutional) will have their studentprocessing time is 4 weeks (may be longer at the accounts credited for one-half of the award at thestart of the semester). beginning of each semester for which they are eligible, unless otherwise specified by the donor.Eastern Wyoming College does not participate in Grant and scholarship funds from all sourcesthe Federal Perkins Loan Program, or the Teacher credit first to tuition and fees, unless the specificEducation Assistance for College and Higher aid is targeted to other educational costs (i.e.Education Grant (TEACH Grant). housing). Generally, financial aid funds will be credited to aApplying for Institutional Aid student’s account based on the number of creditIndividuals who wish to apply for institutional aid hours in which the student is enrolled on the last(specifically scholarships and activity grants) must day of late registration. After the first day of themeet all deadlines and requirements including semester, credit balances are paid within 14 dayssatisfactory academic progress as defined in the after the credit balance occurs. Please be awareEWC Satisfactory Academic Progress Policies for that your financial aid award could change basedFinancial Aid. on credit hour load. Students unsure of whether their change in credit hours will affect theirInstitutional Grants and Scholarships have a financial aid should check with the Financial Aidpriority deadline of March 15 for first-time Office prior to dropping classes.freshman. Applications received after the deadlinewill be considered on a “first-come, first-served” Federal Work-Study/Institutional Employmentbasis. payments are paid directly to the student after each month of employment.Continuing and transfer students may applyfor scholarships online at ewc.wy.edu and by Financial Aid Eligibilityrequesting the continuing student scholarshipapplication from the Financial Aid Office. The Education Amendments of 1987 require that a student must be making “satisfactoryNote: As some scholarships are need-based, students are progress” in his/her course of study to be eligibleencouraged to complete the FAFSA. for aid. In order to satisfy this requirement and prevent abuse of the intentions of the federal aidInstitutional scholarships and activity grants programs, satisfactory progress guidelines mustare determined by selected individuals and be adhered to by students who receive any typecommittees at Eastern Wyoming College.You of Title IV federal aid (Pell, FSEOG, FWS, Directwill be notified only if you have been awarded a Loan, PLUS, IASG). (See Satisfactory Academicscholarship or activity grant. Progress Policies for Financial Aid in this section). 31
    • Financial AidENROLLMENT STATUS students must meet the Satisfactory AcademicWith the exception of Pell Grants, a student Progress Policies for Financial Aid to be eligiblemust enroll for six (6) or more credit hours per for Division Scholarships. Students receivingsemester to receive federal financial assistance. Division Scholarships must be majoring in one of the majors within the respective Division. Length of Eligibility INSTITUTIONAL and FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIPSDue to limited campus-based funds (Federal Eastern Wyoming College provides a largeWork-Study, Institutional Employment, number of scholarships for students. StudentsLeveraging Educational Assistance Partnership, are encouraged to visit ewc.wy.edu/future/Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity finaid/index.cfm to view the list of scholarships,Grants), students who have already received a requirements, and application process.degree from Eastern Wyoming College or anotherinstitution shall generally be eligible for Pell MiscellaneousGrants (unless the student has already receiveda bachelor’s degree) or Direct Loans only. In TRANSFER STUDENTSsome instances, exceptions may be made at the Students who transfer to EWC from otherdiscretion of the Director of Financial Aid. postsecondary institutions shall be eligible for federal aid in accordance with establishedA student who has attended EWC for more EWC guidelines. Hours transferred from anythan six semesters will no longer be eligible for prior institution(s) will be counted toward theinstitutional aid, with the exception of jobs on maximum number of hours permissible forcampus; however, Satisfactory Academic Progress receiving federal aid at EWC. Prior student loanPolicies for Financial Aid apply. accumulation may affect a student’s overall loan eligibility at EWC.CHANGE OF MAJORSCredit hours accumulated under a previous SPECIAL NOTE:major(s) at EWC or other postsecondary If you are transferring to EWC between theinstitution(s) shall be counted in the maximum Fall and Spring semesters, please be aware thatnumber of hours allowed for aid eligibility for the financial aid does not “automatically” transfercurrently sought degree or certificate. Extension from one school to another. Contact the EWCof financial aid eligibility may be approved by the Financial Aid Office as soon as you have made theEWC Financial Aid Committee if the student decision to transfer so we can assist you with thepetitions the Financial Aid Committee regarding a transfer process.change in major. Institutional Aid Eligibility EWC Satisfactory Academic ProgressACTIVITY GRANTS Policies for Financial Aid 2011-12Activity Grants are available to high schoolgraduates with some special ability in men’s and INTRODUCTIONwomen’s basketball, women’s volleyball, golf, To be eligible for federally funded financial aidrodeo, and livestock judging. Peer Counselor programs all student financial aid recipientsActivity Grants are also available for adults who must initially and continually meet satisfactorywork with other adult students. academic progress (SAP). The Eastern Wyoming College standards of SAP measure a student’sFirst-time students who do not have a high academic performance both qualitatively andschool diploma but who have special ability as quantitatively by reviewing the following threedetermined by the activity sponsor may also areas of performance; completion rate forqualify for activity grants. coursework enrolled, cumulative grade point average earned, and the maximum time frameDIVISION SCHOLARSHIPS to complete a degree. The Office of StudentDivision Scholarships are available to first- Financial Aid is responsible for ensuring thattime students who meet the requirements all students receiving financial aid are meetingas determined by the EWC Financial Aid these minimal standards. The standards ofCommittee. EWC students or transferring SAP apply for all federal financial assistance 32
    • Financial Aidprograms including Federal Pell Grant, Federal are generally based on the student’sSupplemental Educational Opportunity Grant enrollment on the financial aid census date.(FSEOG), Federal Work-Study and Federal DirectStudent and Direct PLUS Loans. Withdrawals, audits, and grades of F, IP X, orAcademic progress requirements for EWC U are not considered successful completionsinstitutional awards and foundation scholarships for federal financial aid purposes.are defined by the respective donors andmaintained in the EWC Financial Aid Office. The b. Cumulative Grade Point Averageinstitutional awards include scholarships, activity Students must maintain a 2.0 average.grants, and institutional work-study. c. Maximum Time FrameFREQUENCY AND INTERVAL OF REVIEW Students must complete a degree orSatisfactory academic progress will be reviewed certificate program in no more that 150% ofprior to the awarding of any federal financial aid, the average length of their program. Timeinstitutional awards and foundation scholarships. frame limitations include all credits pursued,It will also be reviewed and monitored at the earned, dropped, repeated and failed. Allend of Fall, Spring and Summer semesters, and applicable transfer hours accepted by EWCprior to the disbursement of aid for the following count as hours attempted as well as hourssemester. earned. All of these credit hours are counted regardless if the student did or did notESTABLISHING INITIAL ELIGIBILITY receive financial aid.In order to establish initial eligibility for federalfinancial aid, a student’s past academic transcripts Students seeking pursuing additional degreeswill be reviewed according to the following are likely to reach maximum time frame. Theguidelines: maximum time frame may be adjusted upona. Students who have never previously attended receipt of an appeal. EWC will be considered in good standing with regard to minimum semester credits Program Total Credit Maximum completed and minimum GPA requirements. Type Hours Attemptedb. Students who have previously attended EWC Required Hours will have their past academic transcripts Allowed reviewed regardless of whether financial aid for Aid was received for any previous attendance. Eligibilityc. Transfer credits from other institutions will be considered in determining eligibility AA Between 64 96 to 120 under the maximum time frame criteria. and 80d. Students must be admitted/enrolled in a AS Between 64 96 to 108 degree or certificate program. and 72 AAS Between 62 93 to 141MAINTAINING QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE and 94ELIGIBILITYThe following are the requirements are for all Certificate 31 to 34 46.5 to 51federal financial aid programs. Students are OTHER FACTORSconsidered to be making Satisfactory AcademicProgress and will be eligible for federal financial a. Auditsaid at EWC as long as all three of the following Classes taken for audit will not be consideredrequirements are met at the end of each semester. when determining semester award amountsa. Completion Rate (67% Pace Rule) or minimum semester credits completed. Students must, at a minimum, receive a Classes taken for audit will not be considered satisfactory grade in the courses attempted by as attempted credits toward the maximum completing 67% of the credits for which they time frame for completion. enrolled. This calculation is performed by b. Remedial/Developmental Courses dividing the number of credits earned by the After a student has attempted 30 hours of credits attempted. Credit hours attempted remedial/developmental credit hours, he/ 33
    • Financial Aid she cannot receive federal financial aid for personal injury, illness, death of a family member remedial/developmental credit hours. From or special circumstances. that point on, remedial/developmental credit hours will count in his/her attempted To appeal for any of the above situations, students hours but not in enrollment status or cost of must submit a complete appeal packet. The attendance for financial aid purposes. packet includes: 1) a written statement indicatingc. Academic Amnesty what circumstance prevented the student EWC allows an academic amnesty policy as from meeting the standards and what steps the part of its institutional academic policy. For student plans to take to ensure future success; purposes of calculating SAP, earned credit 2) a program evaluation signed by the students and grades eliminated under the policy will current academic advisor; 3)an EWC Satisfactory be considered to calculate eligibility. Academic Progress Appeal form.WARNING, PROBATION AND SUSPENSION STATUS If the appeal is approved the student will beFinancial aid probation and suspension apply reinstated on probationary status. Financial aidonly to a student’s status for purposes of financial awards will be based on funds available at the timeaid eligibility at EWC. This does not become of reinstatement. Reinstatement will be effectivepart of the student’s permanent record and is for the current term or next term of enrollmentnot transferable to other institutions. Please be as determined by the Financial Aid Appealsaware, your financial aid status may differ from Committee. Reinstatement of aid will not beyour academic status. effective retroactively for an already-completeda. Warning term. Students who do not complete the minimum number of credits or who do not possess a MAXIMUM TIME FRAME satisfactory grade point average will be placed Students are allowed one appeal for maximum on warning status for their next semester of time frame. To appeal a student must submit a enrollment. A student remains eligible to complete appeal packet. The packet includes: 1) receive financial aid while on warning status. a written statement indicating why the student If both the minimum number of credits and should be allowed to exceed maximum time cumulative GPA requirement are met at the frame; 2) a program evaluation signed by the end of the warning term, the student will be students current advisor; 3) an EWC Petition removed from warning. for Maximum Time Form signed by the studentsb. Probation current academic advisor. If a student does not meet SAP requirements, an appeal for reinstatement may be If the appeal is approved the student will be completed. Students who have an approved reinstated on a probationary status. Students appeal will have financial reinstated on a must also meet the completion rate and probationary status. cumulative GPA requirements. Financial aidc. Suspension awards will be based on funds available at the If a student does not meet the requirements time of reinstatement. for maintaining eligibility at the end of the warning or probationary semester, eligibility The appeal forms are available in the EWC for federal financial aid programs will be Financial Aid Office or in the financial aid section suspended. on the EWC website, ewc.wy.edu. Students who have reached or exceeded the Withdrawals and Return of maximum time frame for completion will be Title IV Aid placed on immediate financial aid suspension. According to federal regulations, collegesREINSTATEMENT OF ELIGIBILITY must determine the amount of federal student financial assistance (SFA) a student earns if heCompletion of Credit and Cumulative GPA or she completely withdraws, either officiallyStudents may appeal federal financial aid or unofficially, from all classes. The date of asuspension for any of the following reasons; student’s withdrawal from EWC will generally 34
    • Financial Aidbe the date of the student’s notification to the Veteran’s BenefitsOffice of the Vice President for Student Servicesof the his/her intent to withdraw. However, the Eastern Wyoming College is approved forCollege may use an earlier last documented date attendance by those who are eligible forof attendance at an academically related activity educational benefits provided by the Veteransif this date more accurately reflects the student’s Administration. Veterans wishing to use theirwithdrawal date than the date the student begins education benefits should contact the Recordsthe school’s withdrawal process or notified the Secretary, who is the VA Certifying Office, forschool of his or her intent to withdraw. When a additional information.student fails to officially withdraw from EWC,the withdrawal date will be assumed to be the Application process:You must complete themid-point of the semester or the last date of appropriate Application for VA Educationdocumented activity. Benefits. This form is available online at www. gibill.va.gov. For benefits other than those listedThe amount of assistance that the student earned above, contact the Veterans Administration atis determined on a prorated basis. That is, if the 1-888-442-4551 or online at www.gibill.va.gov.student completed 30 percent of the payment Current rates are available at the www.gibll.period, the student earned 30 percent of the va.gov website.assistance he/she was originally scheduled toreceive. Once the student has completed more Wyoming National Guard Educationalthan 61 percent of the payment period, he/she Assistance Planis considered to have earned 100% of his/herfederal assistance. Subject to available state funds, all current members of the Wyoming Army or Air NationalIf EWC is required to repay any portion of a Guard are eligible to have full in-state tuition andfederal education loan, the student or parent fees paid. Contact the Records Secretary who isborrower is responsible for repaying the funds the VA Certifying Official.to EWC. The student or parent borroweris responsible for the remainder of the loan You MUST complete an application eachin accordance with the terms of the Master semester you wish to receive funds.Promissary Note. If the student is responsiblefor returning grant funds, the student must make Wyoming Educational Assistance forarrangements with EWC or the Department of Veterans and SurvivorsEducation to return the funds. Any amount thatthe student has to return is considered a grant The State of Wyoming passed legislation to assistoverpayment. veterans and dependents of deceased veterans with tuition and fees at any eligible WyomingIf a student withdraws, receives all “F”s or a College. (Wyoming Statute 19-14-106). Thiscombination of both in any semester, the Financial program is designed to help Vietnam Veterans,Aid Office is required to determine a last date of Overseas Combat Veterans, and their survivingattendance and a refund calculation may apply. dependents with tuition and fee assistance. TheThe last date of attendance for that semester will application is available on the EWC website atbe reported to the Department of Education or ewc.wy.edu/future/finaid/index.cfm.lender and subsequent disbursements may becancelled.Written examples of return of funds calculationsand additional information are available in theFinancial Aid Office upon request. 35
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    • Academic Procedures Registration Procedures AdvisorsIndividual students select and develop programs When students enroll at Eastern Wyomingof study for a given semester under the direction College, they are assigned to an academic advisorof an assigned faculty academic advisor. who aids them in planning their program of study in selecting educational and vocational objectives,The registration procedure observes the College’s and in making personal adjustment to college life.rules while providing efficient service to students.Procedures are constantly under review and All degree-seeking students are required to takechanges are made as necessitated by enrollment placement exams in English, math, and readingincreases and as permitted by developments in prior to the first day of classes to aid in properthe processing of records. class placement and to maximize academic success. Non degree-seeking students may beInstructions are issued at each enrollment which required to take the placement exams prior toconsist of the following steps: (1) planning enrolling in certain English and math courses. Itprogram of study with assigned advisor; (2) is important for all college students to possesscompleting registration materials; (3) having or acquire the math, reading, and English skillsenrollment materials checked and approved necessary for their program of study.by academic advisor; and (4) assessment andpayment of fees. Academic advisors are usually assigned at the time placement exams are taken. The studentAll information requested during enrollment and advisor then receive copies of the placementis vital and important to the student and the exam results to use in making decisions aboutCollege. Students must supply all information program selection and course enrollment.requested, accurately and completely, according Advisors are to be consulted whenever theto instructions. If address, legal name, field student registers for classes, drops or addsof study, advisor, telephone number, car classes, receives a deficiency notice, or when theregistration, or other such information changes student begins to make graduation/transfer plans.after enrollment, the student should inform the Advisors are important and students are urged toRecords Office immediately. Falsification of confer regularly with them.records may result in suspension from classes. Change of Major or Advisor Change of Registration Students who wish to change their major and/Students desiring to drop or add courses (after or advisor should contact the Records Office atregistering) should obtain the necessary form 307.532.8207.from the Records Office. After the studentcompletes the form, “Student’s Request for CreditsChange of Registration,” and secures the propersignatures, the form is returned to the Records Credits are computed in semester hours. AOffice. credit hour comprises work through one semester and normally requires an average ofThe following schedule applies to students adding three hours of effort per week. Classes withand/or dropping classes: laboratory components require more contact time. These three hours may be occupied with1. No entry is made on the student’s permanent lectures, recitations, laboratory work, reports, or academic record for classes dropped prior to assignments outside of the classroom. the last day for late registration.2. No classes may be added or dropped after The amount of credit for any course is governed the last day for late registration without the by the catalog statement. Allowance for more or approval of the Financial Aid Office, the less credit than is listed in the current catalog will academic advisor, and the class instructor. not be allowed. 37
    • Academic Procedures Credit Hour Load Advanced Placement ExaminationAn average of 15 or 16 hours of credit each Students showing proficiency by passingsemester is considered a normal load. The examinations such as College Entrancemaximum semester credit load is 18 hours. Examination Board Advanced Placement ProgramStudents must have approval of the Vice President (CEEB-APP) or American College Testing—for Learning to exceed this maximum. Proficiency Examination Program (ACT-PEP) may earn EWC college credit for demonstratedOnly students of marked ability, whose grades proficiency to a maximum of 16 semesteraverage “B” or above, should enroll for more credit hours. Grades of S and U are given in allthan the average number of hours. Students examinations. Credit by advanced placementregistering after the end of late registration may examination is not included in the student’s gradebe restricted in the number of hours for which point average but counts in hours earned towardthey can enroll. Students engaged in outside graduation. The grade of S is the equivalent ofemployment requiring an excessive amount of “C” or better (APP score of 4 or 5). Entry on thetime may be restricted in the number of credit student’s transcript for credit by examination ishours for which they may enroll. Restrictions made only if a grade of S is obtained and is notedin each case will be determined by the student’s as a grade obtained by examination. Studentsadvisor and the Vice President for Learning. should be aware that while credit may be awarded through exams for Eastern Wyoming CollegeCertain programs outlined under the Programs requirements, not all institutions will acceptof Instruction section of this catalog will identify transfer credit earned through these methods.a semester totaling 19 hours or more. Studentsshould work with their advisors to determine DANTES Subject Standardized Teststhe best way to accomplish the completion of allthe program requirements. For some students it Students showing proficiency in content areasmay be best to extend their academic planning to as demonstrated by the DANTES (Defenseinclude an additional Summer session or semester Activity for Non-Traditional Education Support)in order to successfully complete a particular Subject Standardized Tests (DSST) may receiveprogram. EWC college credit. Students may earn credit through these exams by scoring at or above Institutional Challenge Exams the minimum scores established by Eastern Wyoming College. A maximum of 15 semesterInstitutional Challenge examinations are available hours of credit by examination may be earnedfor some courses. Students showing proficiency toward EWC graduation requirements. DSSTby passing challenge examinations can be given examinations are administered by appointmentcredit up through the level of demonstrated only in the Academic Testing Center. For copiesproficiency. For details about challenge exam of the DANTES policy and information aboutavailability, the student should contact the scheduling an appointment, call 307.532.8288. Aappropriate division chair. Grades of S and U fee is assessed for each DSST examination plus anare given in all institutional challenge exams. administration fee of $15.Such credit is not included in a student’s gradepoint average (GPA). The grade of S would beequivalent to “C” or better. Entries will be madeon the student’s transcript only if the grade of Sis obtained and only if the student enrolls at theCollege in a degree program. Students should beaware that while credit may be awarded throughsuch exams by Eastern Wyoming College, notall institutions will accept transfer credit earnedthrough these methods. A fee of $10 will beassessed for each examination. 38
    • Academic ProceduresCollege Level Examination ProgramEastern Wyoming College administers subject examinations of the College Level Examination Program (CLEP).CLEP examinations may not be repeated within six months from the time the examinations were administered.Students may earn credit through the subject examinations by scoring at or above the score recommended bythe Council on College-Level Examinations; entries on the student’s records will state that the credits earnedwere by CLEP examinations along with the title of the examination. A maximum of 15 semester hours of creditby examination may be earned toward EWC graduation requirements.Students may designate the institution they wish to receive their scores. Students should be aware that notall colleges have the same policies regarding acceptance of credit by examination; therefore, students shouldconfirm with the college or university to which they are transferring that the credit by examination will transfer.The transfer of CLEP scores to EWC from other accredited institutions will be determined by the VicePresident for Student Services.CLEP examinations are administered by appointment only in the Academic Testing Center. For an appointment,call 307.532.8288. A fee is assessed for each CLEP examination, plus an administration fee of $15.Eastern Wyoming College courses for which CLEP credit may be earned: (Minimum Computer-Based Semester Required Testing Score)EWC Courses Hours CLEP Examination RequiredBIOL 1010 4 Biology 50CHEM 1020 4 Chemistry 50ECON 1010 3 Principles of Macroeconomics 50ECON 1020 3 Principles of Microeconomics 50EDFD 2100 3 Intro to Educational Psychology 50ENGL 1010 3 College Composition 50ENGL 1020 3 Analyzing & Interpreting Literature 50HIST 1110 3 Western Civilization I 50HIST 1120 3 Western Civilization II 50MATH 1400 4 College Algebra 50MATH 1450 3 Precalculus 50MATH 2200 5 Calculus 50PSYC 2300 3 Human Growth & Development 50SPAN 1010 & 1020 8 Spanish Language 50 39
    • Academic Procedures Independent Study her grade is determined by daily application and results, as well as by periodic examination.Independent study is available to those studentswho have demonstrated the self-discipline to The student’s performance is evaluated accordingstudy successfully with a minimum of structure to the following system of grades:and formal direction from an instructor. It isdesigned for use in exceptional circumstances and Grade Value Definitionis not used routinely. A 4 Exceptional B 3 Very GoodA student must work out a plan for independent C 2 Average or Acceptablestudy with his/her advisor and the faculty D 1 Poormember who will supervise the work. The plan *F 0 Failure (Assigned as a gradewill be submitted to the appropriate Division for inadequate performance,Chair for approval. Independent study is subject nonattendance, orto the same academic calendar as regularly abandonment of class)scheduled coursework and is to be completed *X 0 Incomplete. A student who isduring the term. unable to complete the coursework required in any designated course may receive an incomplete Grade Reports grade of X with an agreement between the student and instructor of the course. SuchMidterm deficiency letters are mailed to students agreement(s) must be in the form of a “contract”whose work in any course is less than satisfactory. between said instructor and student outliningThe purpose of these letters is to call attention to the coursework and time designated for suchthe progress of each student at a point in the term coursework to be finished. These contractwhich permits enough time for improvement. forms must be submitted to the appropriateStudents who receive deficiency letters (grade(s) Division Chair. The completion date designatedbelow a “C”) should confer with the instructor(s) by an instructor may not exceed one academicand their advisor for recommendations and semester. If the coursework is not completed orsuggestions as to how their work can be graded within one year, the grade of X will revertimproved. to a grade of IW.Final grade reports are prepared immediately Grade Value Definitionfollowing the close of each semester. Grades will *W 0 Withdrawalbe available on LancerNet which can be accessed *IW 0 Institutional Withdrawalon the Internet at ewc.wy.edu after the close *IP 0 In Progress. The IP gradeof the semester. A transcript may be obtained notation is used for those courses which are stillthrough a written request if access to LancerNet in progress beyond the scheduled end of theis not available to the student. term. It is not considered a grade as such, but rather an indicator of a course in progress and is Final Examinations not included in the semester summary of grade points or hours completed. The temporaryThe last week of the semester is set aside for notation of IP is assigned for each studentstudy and final examinations. Where possible, enrolled in the course until a permanent gradecollege-sponsored activities will not be scheduled is issued by the instructor. If the course is notduring the final examination period. No final completed or graded within one year, the gradeexams will be rescheduled to accommodate travel of IP will revert to a grade of IW.arrangements. Grade Value Definition S,*U 0 Satisfactory and Unsatisfactory. Grades The grade of S is interpreted as a grade of “C” or above and the grade of U is interpreted as a gradeIt is the policy of the College that the value of below “C”.the student’s work is not determined entirely bywhat he/she may know upon examination. His/ 40
    • Academic ProceduresS/U grades are intended primarily for on-the-job For example, a student carrying 16 credit hourstraining courses and credit through institutional earned the following grades:challenge examinations, credit through the 3 hour course A (4)College Level Examination Program (CLEP), 3 hour course C (2)credit by Advanced Placement Examinations, 4 hour course B (3)DANTES, and courses which are offered for S/U 4 hour course A (4)grade only. Students should be aware that while 2 hour course B (3)credit may be awarded through such exams forEastern Wyoming College requirements, not all The computation for the grade point average is asinstitutions will transfer credit earned through follows:these methods. 3 hours X 4 = 12 3 hours X 2 = 6Neither the S nor U grade carry grade points 4 hours X 3 = 12and neither will be included in the calculation of 4 hours X 4 = 16a student’s grade point average. Both S and U 2 hours X 3 = 6grades will count as hours attempted and S grades 16 hours 52 pointswill count as hours earned. Once issued, an S 52 points divided by 16 hours = 3.25 GPAgrade cannot be converted to a letter grade. 1. Semester Grade Point Average: The sum of allGrade Value Definition grade points earned in a semester divided by*AU 0 Audit. Students must signify all applicable credits attempted.at the time of registration whether or not theyare taking courses for audit. There will be 2. Cumulative Grade Point Average: The sumno opportunity to change this decision after of all grade points earned at EWC dividedenrollment. by all applicable credits attempted at EWC. Only the credit and grade points earned*For financial aid purposes, grades of F, X, W, IW, in the course or last attempt of a repeatedIP, U, and Audit do not count toward successful course are used in calculating the grade pointcompletion of classes. average. Grade Point Average Challenges to the RecordA grade point average (GPA) represents a See EWC Notification of Rights Under FERPAweighing of all applicable credit hours and grades. for Postsecondary Institutions on page 48.For purposes of calculating the grade pointaverage, grades are assigned the following pointvalues: A=4, B=3, C=2, D=1, F=0. Coursesin which a grade of IW, IP, X, W, S, U, or AU isassigned are not used in calculating the gradepoint average. A student’s GPA is derived bythe following process. First the point value ofthe grades the student earned in each course ismultiplied by the number of credit hours for thatcourse. The products (credit hours multipliedby point value) for all the student’s applicablecourses are added together, and the total isdivided by the number of applicable credit hoursattempted. The result is the student’s GPA. 41
    • Academic Procedures Exit Assessment 4.00 GPA for the President’s Honor Roll and at least a 3.50 GPA for the Dean’s Honor Roll. TheAll candidates for Associate of Arts or Associate Dean’s Part-time Student Honor Roll recognizesof Science degrees are required to participate in students who are enrolled in at least six creditexit assessments prior to graduation. The first hours, but less than twelve, and who have a GPAassessment, know as an outcomes assessment, of at least a 3.50.targets the student’s specific program of study(major) and may include portfolios, exit Graduationinterviews, papers, comprehensive exams,etc. The second assessment is the Collegiate The College holds one annual commencementAssessment of Academic Proficiency (CAAP). in May. Although attendance is optional, allAdministered in the Spring semester, the CAAP December, May, and Summer candidates areexams are a set of standardized tests developed encouraged to participate in the ceremony.to test core educational skills. This assessmenttargets selected general education skills typically Students are required to file a graduationattained in college such as reading, writing, application with the Records Office. The $10mathematics, science reasoning, and critical graduation fee is currently paid by the EWCthinking. Students graduating in the Fall term Student Senate Fee Allocation Committee.with their Associate of Arts or Associate ofScience degrees are encouraged to take the CAAP Students who have an incomplete (X) and planexams in the Spring term before graduation. to graduate have one semester or the Summer session (whichever comes first) in which toAll candidates for the Associate of Applied Science finish the incomplete. If they do not finish thedegrees and Certificates are also required to incomplete, the graduation date moves to theparticipate in an outcomes assessment prior to semester in which they finish the incomplete.graduation. While the specific assessment methodvaries depending on degree and program, one A student who graduates “With Distinction”portion will target the general education skills of has met, and exceeded, most measures ofreading, math, and writing. This exit assessment academic success. With a cumulative grade pointprocess will help students validate academic average at or above 3.5 on a 4.0 point scale, thisproficiency, identify broad academic strengths and student is considered a model of dedication andweaknesses, and plan future educational choices perseverance.more effectively. The results of the assessmentprocess will also serve to evaluate Eastern A student who graduates “With High Distinction”Wyoming College’s effectiveness in specific has met, and exemplifies, the highest standardsprogram training and overall general education of academic rigor and scholarship. With apreparation, and provide information that can be cumulative grade point average at or above 3.75used for improvement. A summary of the results on a 4.0 point scale, this student sets the standardfrom past EWC outcomes assessment activities is of academic excellence.available on the college’s website (ewc.wy.edu)under Data and Planning, Institutional Research. Student Classification Honor Roll Student classification is based on the number ofStudents who achieve high scholastic grades are semester credit hours earned.honored by being placed either on the President’s 1. FreshmanHonor Roll or the Dean’s Honor Roll. To be a) less than 30 semester hoursconsidered for the honor rolls, the student mustcarry a minimum credit load of 12 semester 2. Sophomorehours and must receive letter grades of A, B, a) 30 semester hours or more, or students withC, D, F, or S/U. The student can receive no degreessemester grades of X (Incomplete) or IP (InProgress) for honor roll purposes. In additionto the above criteria, the student must achieve a 42
    • Academic Procedures TranscriptsOfficial transcripts and records of college workmay be obtained from the Records Office upon asigned written request by the student. Requestforms may be obtained in the Records Office oron the EWC website under “Current Students”.Oral requests are not accepted. No transcriptsor records will be released for students whohave unpaid financial obligations with EasternWyoming College.Official transcripts of credit earned at otherinstitutions and other records which have beenpresented for admission or evaluation of creditbecome the official educational record. Actualacceptance of transfer credit is dependent on thecurriculum pursued by the student. No transferhours will be recorded until the student hasenrolled and completed at least one credit coursethrough Eastern Wyoming College.Students are asked to anticipate transcript needsat least 5 days in advance. A minimum of 5 daysis usually needed at the close of a semester torecord grades and issue transcripts. 43
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    • Academic Regulations Limitations of Courses Offered sessions for the semester, or b) the student has been absent 6 (six)Eastern Wyoming College reserves the right to consecutive class hours in the course, orcancel any course for which there is insufficient c) the student has not completed 20% (twentyenrollment. Certain courses are offered percent) of the assigned learning activities.irregularly and based on demand. The listing ofavailable courses in this catalog does not imply a Where a special program attendance policy variescontractual obligation to offer these courses. from the above, the program policy will prevail. Repeating Courses A student who is withdrawn from a course on or before the school’s official last day to dropWith approval of the academic advisor, a student classes will receive a grade of W (Withdrawal)may repeat courses to better a previous grade. In for the course. A student who is withdrawn aftersuch cases, both credit entries and both grades the official last day to drop classes will receive aappear on the student’s record. The credit from grade of F (Failure), a grade of IW (Institutionalany given course (or equivalent course on another Withdrawal), or a grade of W (Withdrawal) forcampus) is applicable to degree requirements the course.only once. The credit and the grade earned in thelast attempt are used in calculating the cumulative It is the responsibility of the instructor tograde point average. Variable credit courses notify, in writing, the Vice President for Studentare not considered as repeat courses unless the Services that the student is being withdrawn.instructor provides written certification that the The instructor also must indicate what gradecourse content was, in fact, repeated. A student the student is to receive. The Vice President foris not to repeat a course in which a grade of X Student Services will then notify the student of(Incomplete) has been assigned. The proper the action taken.procedure is to arrange with the instructor tocomplete the coursework. Due to the variation of course content and in types of classroom activity, make-up policies Auditing Courses will vary from instructor to instructor and will be outlined in the course syllabus given to eachThe privilege of auditing a credit class is available student.with approval of the student’s advisor and theclass instructor. Though this auditing privilege Leave of Absencecarries full rights of class participation, it does notcarry academic credit or a grade, and subsequent A student who must be absent for an extendedcredit by special examination is not available. period of time because of health or otherThe auditing privilege is subject to the same fee unavoidable circumstances may petition the Viceschedule as credit courses. Students must signify President for Learning for a leave of absence.at the time of registration whether or not they are A leave accounts for absences from classes, buttaking courses for audit. does not relieve the student from making up all work missed, nor does it excuse the student from Attendance going through the regular withdrawal procedure (outlined below) if the student discontinuesA student at Eastern Wyoming College is attendance for the remainder of the semester.expected to attend all sessions of eachcourse in which he/she is enrolled. Active Withdrawalsparticipation in all scheduled learning activities isessential for the student to satisfactorily achieve A. WITHDRAWAL FROM INDIVIDUAL CLASSESthe educational objectives of any course. An A student wishing to withdraw from aninstructor is authorized to withdraw a student individual class must obtain a change offrom a course whenever: registration card from the Records Officea) the student’s absences in the course exceed before withdrawal is official (withdrawal 20% (twenty percent) of the scheduled cards are valid only for 72 hours after issuance). Students may withdraw from any 45
    • Academic Regulations or all classes before the last 15 calendar days Academic Standing of the semester and receive a grade of W (Withdrawal). For classes with a duration of A. Coding less than 15 weeks, student withdrawal must A student either currently or formerly be completed on a prorated basis to the 15 enrolled shall have on his/her record one of week semester. After this time, withdrawal the following academic status codes: will be allowed only upon approval by the Vice President for Student Services if there 0 – Student not subject to probation or are exceptional circumstances necessitating dismissal regulations; or a student who withdrawal. The student or an individual has attempted fewer than twelve instructor will have the right to appeal this cumulative credit hours. decision to the Curriculum and Learning 1 – Good Standing - A student who has Council. A Withdrawal (W) grade is not attempted twelve or more computed in the student’s grade point cumulative credit hours and has average. Withdrawal from a class does not a Cumulative Grade Point Average of release a student from any unmet financial 2.00 or higher is making satisfactory obligation. academic progress and is in good standing.B. WITHDRAWAL FROM COLLEGE 2 – Probation Withdrawal from Eastern Wyoming College 3 – Suspension is the official discontinuance of attendance. 4 – Dismissal Students wishing to withdraw are requested to obtain a withdrawal form from the B. Academic Probation & Academic Records Office, complete the form, and Suspension return the form to that office. A student who follows this procedure will receive a grade Academic Probation of W (Withdrawal) on his/her transcript Academic Probation is a warning that the for each of the classes in which the student is student’s grades are below the academic standards enrolled, and the grade of W is not computed of Eastern Wyoming College. A student in the student’s grade point average. whose Cumulative Grade Point Average Discontinuance of attendance without (GPA) falls below 2.00 will be placed on completion of the withdrawal procedure may academic probation during the next result in a grade of F (Failure) for each course semester in which he/she is enrolled. A in which the student is enrolled. student on Academic Probation will be allowed to re-enroll only after meeting with his/her assignedC. INSTITUTIONAL WITHDRAWAL Academic Advisor. The student will be strongly The Vice President for Student Services advised to consider repeating classes in which he/ may institutionally withdraw an individual she previously received either a “D” or “F”. from all classes in the event of a student’s total abandonment of classes, a delinquent If at the end of the probationary period, the financial account, death, or other extenuating student: circumstances. The grade of IW (Institutional a) Achieves a 2.00 Cumulative GPA or higher, Withdrawal) is assigned to the student’s he/she will be placed on Good Standing. classes and is not computed in the student’s b) Achieves a 2.00 Semester GPA or higher, but grade point average. The student will have the Cumulative GPA is below 2.00, he/she the right to appeal this decision to the will remain on Academic Probation. Curriculum and Learning Council. c) Fails to achieve a minimum Semester GPA of 2.00, he/she will be placed on Academic Suspension. Academic Suspension A student who is subject to Academic Suspension is not permitted to re-enroll until he/she has: 1) Filed a Petition for Academic Reinstatement 46
    • Academic Regulations (found on the EWC website) with the Vice Academic Amnesty President for Student Services (the student may be requested to appear for a personal Academic Amnesty is Eastern Wyoming College’s interview with the Academic Reinstatement policy of forgiveness for a student’s prior Committee), and; unsuccessful academic record at EWC.2) The petition approved by the Academic Reinstatement Committee. The Academic Academic Amnesty permits former students Reinstatement Committee may elect to to eliminate one semesters’ credits and grades reinstate the student or to suspend the from their record. The courses and grades will student for the period of one semester. appear on the transcript with a notation that the After being suspended for one semester, the student was granted Academic Amnesty and that student may return under the conditions appropriately marked grades are no longer part of outlined in “Academic Suspension”. the cumulative grade point average, and will not help satisfy EWC graduation requirements. All credits and grades taken during the semester(s)Academically Suspended Student Who is will be subject to Amnesty including thoseReinstated courses which were successfully completed.If the student, at the end of the reinstatementperiod: Only returning EWC students may petition fora) Achieves a 2.00 Cumulative GPA or higher, Academic Amnesty. Application must be made he/she will be placed on good standing. after the posting of grades for which Amnestyb) Achieves a 2.00 Semester GPA or higher, but is sought but no later than the 90th calendar the Cumulative GPA is below 2.00, he/she day of the subsequent Fall or Spring semester of will be placed on probation. enrollment. The petition shall be submitted to thec) Fails to achieve a minimum Semester GPA office of the Vice President for Student Services. of 2.00, he/she will be subject to academic Academic Amnesty may be applied only once and dismissal. is irrevocable.Academic Dismissal Since Academic Amnesty may affectA student who has been academically dismissed is financial aid awards, students receivingnot permitted to re-enroll until he/she: financial aid should contact the Financial1) Meets with the Vice President for Student Aid Office prior to applying for Amnesty. Services to agree on a plan for how the The petition for Academic Amnesty form can be student will achieve academic Good Standing. found on the EWC website. Further information2) Once the plan is approved, the student may can be obtained in the EWC Records Office. take no more than nine hours each semester from EWC all of which must be repeats of Student Conduct classes in which the student received either a “D” or “F” in previously. Colleges recognize the student as an adult3) If, after two semesters under the agreed upon pursuing an education. Just as a student does plan, the student has not achieved academic not lose citizenship rights upon enrolling at Good Standing, he/she will be dismissed for a college, the student also does not become one academic year. immune to society’s obligations and laws or to the4) After one year, the academically dismissed responsibilities of daily living in a broader society. student may return to EWC but may take In general, the behavioral norms expected of the no more than nine hours each semester college student are those of common decency and all of which must be repeats of classes in decorum, recognition of and non-infringement which the student received either a “D” or upon the rights and property of others and of the “F” in previously. This will continue until College, honesty in academic work and all other the student has achieved academic Good activities, and observance of local, state, and Standing. federal laws. When students enter Eastern Wyoming College, they take upon themselves certain responsibilities 47
    • Academic Regulationsand obligations including satisfactory academic Eastern Wyoming Collegeperformance and social behavior consistent with Notification of Rights under FERPAthe lawful purposes of the College. Student for Postsecondary Institutionsconduct, therefore, is not considered in isolationwithin the college community but as an integral The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Actpart of the education process. All students are (FERPA) affords students certain rights withexpected to know and abide by the Student Code respect to their education records. They are:of Conduct. A copy of the Student Code ofConduct is available upon request from the Vice (1) The right to inspect and review theirPresident for Student Services Office and also education records within 45 days of the day EWCcontains the student grievance process. receives a request for access. Academic Dishonesty Students should submit to the Vice President for Student Services, or other appropriate official,Eastern Wyoming College regards all forms of written requests that identify the record(s) theyacademic dishonesty as serious offenses that wish to inspect. The EWC official will makecannot be condoned. These forms include arrangements for access and notify the studentinappropriate dependence upon the aid of other of the time and place where the records may bepersons in carrying out class or laboratory inspected.assignments; plagiarism; and cheating on quizzes,tests, or examinations. For a first offense, (2) The right to request the amendment of thea student will be subject to the instructor’s student’s education records that the studentdisciplinary action which may include a grade believes are inaccurate or misleading.of zero on the affected coursework, lowering ofthe final grade in the course, or receiving a grade Students may ask EWC to amend a record thatof “F” in the course. The student who commits they believe is inaccurate or misleading. Theysuch an offense a subsequent time will be assigned should write the EWC official responsible for thethe grade of “F” and may be subject to dismissal record, clearly identify the part of the record theyfrom the College with the reason for dismissal want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate orspecifically stated and retained in college records. misleading.A student who has been the subject of disciplinaryaction for academic dishonesty may follow the If EWC decides not to amend the record asEWC Grievance Policy included in the Student requested by the student, the College will notifyCode of Conduct. the student of that decision and advise the student of his or her right to a hearing regarding the Safety request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be providedCorrect safety instruction and practices are a vital to the student when notified of the right to aconcern within the instructional programs and hearing.it is the responsibility of all persons to practicecorrect safety measures. (3) The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained inIf an injury occurs, either during instruction or the student’s education records, except to theat any other time while on campus, the injured extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure withoutparty must report the injury to the appropriate consent.office (instructor or advisor) so that an “Accidentand Injury Report” may be completed. One exception, which permits disclosure without consent, is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by EWC in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position; a person or company with whom the College has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent); a 48
    • Academic Regulationsperson serving on the Board of Trustees; or a personal directory information about themstudent serving on an official committee such as a be withheld during the current academicdisciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting year. Similar notification is required for eachanother school official in performing his or her subsequent academic year.tasks. The student is hereby notified of these rights andA school official has a legitimate educational that a copy of the “Privacy Rights of Parents andinterest if the official needs to review an Students” pertaining to Eastern Wyoming Collegeeducation record in order to fulfill his or her may be obtained in the office of the Vice Presidentprofessional responsibility. for Student Services.Upon request, EWC discloses education records Sexual Harassment Policywith consent to officials of another school inwhich a student seeks or intends to enroll. Definition Eastern Wyoming College endorses the definition(4) The right to file a complaint with the U.S. of sexual harassment provided under Title VII ofDepartment of Education concerning alleged the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Accordingly,failures by Eastern Wyoming College to complywith the requirements of FERPA. The name and Unwelcome sexual advances, requestsaddress of the Office that administers FERPA is: for sexual favors and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature Family Policy Compliance Office constitute sexual harassment when (1) U.S. Department of Education submission to such conduct is made 600 Independence Avenue, SW either explicitly or implicitly a term or Washington, DC 20202-4605 condition of an individual’s employment; (2) submission to or rejection of suchDirectory Information conduct by an individual is used as theThe following items are considered directory basis for employment decisions affectinginformation and may be disclosed by Eastern such individual; or (3) such conduct hasWyoming College in response to inquiries the purpose or effect of unreasonablyconcerning individual students, whether the interfering with an individual’s workinquiries are in person, in writing, or over the performance or creating an intimidating,telephone: hostile, or offensive working environment.1. Name2. Affirmation of whether currently enrolled Policy Statement on Sexual Harassment3. Major field of study Eastern Wyoming College strives to create a work4. Dates of enrollment/class environment that is desirable for all employees5. Full or part-time status and students.6. Degrees received7. Honors received Sexual harassment of employees or students is8. Local address and phone number reprehensible, illegal, and will not be tolerated9. Home address (permanent) and phone at Eastern Wyoming College. Such activity number which influences employment decisions or the10. Participation in officially recognized activities academic success of students is contradictory and and sports antithetical to the environment provided by this11. Weight and height of members of athletic institution, and prompt and remedial action will teams be taken by Eastern Wyoming College upon any12. Date and place of birth finding of sexual harassment.13. Previous institutions attended14. Photographs All complaints of sexual harassment will be investigated. Employee complaints should beStudents must submit written notification to filed with the complainant’s immediate supervisorthe Records Office within ten (10) days of or the Affirmative Action Officer. Studentthe beginning of the semester if they wish the complaints should be registered with the relevant 49
    • Academic RegulationsDivision Chair or the Affirmative Action Officer. EWC will maintain, at a minimum, recordsIf the complaint cannot be resolved at this level, of complaints for a two year period. Thethe College Grievance Procedure under EWC/ log is available for review by college staff,Board of Trustees Grievance Policy No. 1.7 representatives of accrediting agencies, and byshould be followed. Victims of sexual harassment other, appropriate outside agencies. The namesare strongly encouraged to disclose any episode(s) of any individuals involved in the complaintof sexual harassment. Such disclosure will assist (including the names of any student(s) or EWCEWC in its attempts to prevent future episodes of staff directly involved) are not part of the log.sexual harassment. Complaints, at EWC, are first addressed throughAny Eastern Wyoming College agent or the Informal Grievance procedure as outlined inemployee who is found to have engaged in sexual the EWC Student Handbook. Those complaintsharassment of another employee or student will that are not resolved using the Informalbe subject to disciplinary sanctions which may Grievance procedure, are resolved using theinclude, but not limited to, written reprimand, Formal Grievance Procedure also outlined indemotion, transfer, required professional the EWC Student Handbook. The Handbookcounseling, and/or termination of employment. contains the EWC Student Code of ConductAny student who violates this policy will be (Board of Trustee Policy 5.13) that addresses howsubject to prompt and appropriate discipline. behavioral and other issues, including studentSuch discipline may result in the student being complaints, are addressed by the College.expelled from Eastern Wyoming College. INFORMAL GRIEVANCE PROCEDURENo employee or student shall suffer reprisal from (As it pertains to students)Eastern Wyoming College as a consequence of In order to ensure the most complete processingfiling a “good faith” complaint. of complaints or concerns within the environs of Eastern Wyoming College, the College adopts Complaint Log the following procedures: The first procedure, the informal grievance procedure, is designedEastern Wyoming College maintains a record to permit an expedited and orderly processingof all formal student complaints received in of all complaints or concerns of students in anthe office of the President, Vice President for informal manner, while at the same time ensuringInstruction, or the Vice President for Student that the complaints are fully explored and thatServices. Student complaints are defined as those a reasonable effort has been made to resolvewhich are nontrivial in nature, either academic or the difficulties without the necessity of formalnonacademic, made formally in writing, signed grievance proceedings.by a student, and addressed to and submitted toan organizational officer with the responsibility to The informal complaint procedure may behandle the complaint. The formal Complaint Log utilized to resolve any student or personnelis maintained in the office of the Vice President problems arising at the college.for Student Services and contains the followinginformation: If the grievance cannot be resolved throughA. Date the complaint was first formally this informal procedure, the person or persons submitted to an appropriate officer; involved may avail themselves of the formalB. Nature of the complaint (e.g. dispute about a grievance procedure. grade, allegation of sexual harassment etc.);C. Steps taken by EWC to resolve the The informal complaint process is limited to complaint; fifty (50) calendar days from the alleged event.D. EWC’s final decision regarding the complaint Complaints of events exceeding 50 days prior including referral to outside agencies; and to statement of the complaint shall be handledE. Any other external actions initiated by the through the formal complaint procedure. Any student to resolve the complaint, if known student who has a complaint may utilize this to the institution (e.g. lawsuit, EEOC informal complaint procedure. In implementing investigation, etc.). this procedure, the complaining party should proceed as follows: 50
    • Academic Regulations resolving the complaint informally.1. A complaint should be discussed initially between the persons involved; many problems The format of the written formal grievance may be resolved on this one-to-one basis. shall contain the following:2. If the persons(s) concerned are unable to a. A concise statement of the grievance; resolve the problem on a one-to-one basis, the b. A complete description of the action(s) of following procedures should be followed: all parties involved; (a) In the event that the grievance concerns c. A detailed description of the alleged events; the College President, the complaint will be d. The date of the alleged occurrence; submitted to a mediation committee of three e. The place of occurrence of the alleged individuals. One individual shall be selected events; the complainant, one by the College President, f. The relief or remedy sought by the and the two selected individuals shall jointly complainant. select a third individual. This committee shall then make recommendations in an effort 2. If the grievant is a student, the grievant to resolve the matter. shall submit the written complaint to the (b) A student should define the complaint appropriate Division Chairperson, if the to the appropriate Division Chairperson grievance involves instruction matters, and to regarding instructional personnel or matters; the Vice President for Student Services if the and to the appropriate student activities grievance involves noninstructional matters. director regarding non-instructional personnel All formal student complaints are kept on file or matters. in the Vice President for Student Services’ office. The Division Chairperson, or ViceThis informal procedure does not rule out President for Student Services shall notify thediscussions among the complainant, his/her relevant parties in the dispute of the receipt ofsupervisors, or any other person who may assist in the formal grievance within five (5) workingresolving the situation, including the Dean in days, shall investigate, facilitate and answer thecharge of the particular department or activity grievance in writing.involved. The Board of Trustees should not beinvolved in any informal discussion of the grievance 3. If either party is dissatisfied with the writtenwith any party involved. decision from the, Division Chairperson or Vice President for Student Services, eitherIn the event the above procedure does not result in party may request a review by the Grievancea mutually agreeable solution, the student Review Committee. Such request must occurmay file a formal grievance which will then be within five (5) working days after receivingprocessed in accordance with the procedures set the written decision from the Divisionforth within the College’s Formal Grievance Chairperson or Vice President for StudentProcedure. Services. The Grievance Review Committee shall conduct an investigation of the matter FORMAL GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE within ten (10) working days after the request (As it pertains to students) is submitted. A written decision shall be submitted to the respective parties withinIf the complaining party or parties have been five (5) working days after the investigation isunable or unwilling to resolve the complaint completed.utilizing the procedures available under the“Informal Grievance Procedure,” the complaining 4. If either party is dissatisfied with the writtenparty or parties may proceed to file a formal decision of the Grievance Review Committee,grievance. either party may request a review of the decision by the College President. The request1. The formal grievance procedure begins with must occur within five (5) working days the filing of a written complaint. The written after receiving the written decision from the complaint must be filed within ten (10) Grievance Review Committee. The President working days following the alleged event, or shall conduct an investigation of the matter ten (10) working days after unsuccessfully within ten (10) working days after the request 51
    • Academic Regulations is submitted. A written decision shall be AFFIRMATIVE ACTION/EQUAL submitted to the respective parties within EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY five (5) working days after the investigation is POLICY STATEMENT completed. Eastern Wyoming College is dedicated to5. If either party is dissatisfied with the written providing opportunities and recognizing the decision of the College President, either talent of all people at our institution. The college party may request a hearing before the Board is committed to a policy of equal employment of Trustees. Such a request for hearing opportunity for all persons on the basis of merit must occur within five (5) working days without regard to race, color, national origin, after receiving the written decision from marital status, sexual preference, sex, religion, the College President. The Board shall then political belief, veteran status, age, or disability. conduct a formal hearing in accordance with In accordance with the policy, Eastern Wyoming its Rules of Practice For Contested Cases. College affirms its commitment to non- discrimination in its employment practices as they6. COLLEGE PRESIDENT. If the grievance or relate to recruitment, hiring, selection, screening, complaint concerns the College President, testing, compensation, promotion, employment the formal Complaint shall be submitted benefits, educational opportunities, access to directly to the Grievance Review Committee programs, work assignments, application of within ten (10) working days following the discipline, access to grievance procedures, and alleged event, or ten (10) working days any and all other conditions of employment after unsuccessfully resolving the complaint which are provided by Eastern Wyoming College informally. The Grievance Review policy, regulation, rule or practice. Committee shall conduct an investigation of the matter within fifteen (15) working days All administrators, faculty and staff committees after the Complaint has been submitted. A and others involved in employment decisions are written decision shall be submitted to the directed to comply with this policy. The respective parties within five (5) working Director of Human Resources is responsible for days after the investigation is completed. If administering and coordinating the College’s either party is dissatisfied with the written Affirmative Action/Equal Employment decision of the Grievance Review Committee, Opportunity Program. either party may request a hearing before the Board of Trustees. Such a request for Name, office location and telephone number are: hearing must occur within five (5) working Tom McDowell days after receiving the written decision Director of Human Resources from the Grievance Review Committee. The Affirmative Action Officer Board shall then conduct a formal hearing Tebbet Building, 234 in accordance with its Rules of Practice For Eastern Wyoming College Contested Cases. 3200 West “C” Street Torrington, WY 822407. Student Grievance Review Committee: (307) 532-8330 • Administrator (Chairperson) appointed by the College President The Crime Awareness and Campus • Professional Staff Member appointed by the Security Act of 1990 Chairperson • Faculty Member appointed by the Chairperson Prepared for EWC students, faculty, staff and • Classified Staff Member appointed by the prospective students in accordance with the Chairperson Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act of • Student Senate Member recommended by 1990. Student SenatePresident 52
    • Academic RegulationsIntroduction Lighting/Physical Plant ConcernsMany students and parents are concerned about The Physical Plant Department maintains allthe issue of personal safety on college campuses. college buildings and grounds with a concern forEastern Wyoming College (EWC) employs safety and security. Staff inspect campus facilitiessecurity measures that help ensure students enjoy regularly; promptly making repairs affectingtheir time at the College as free as possible from safety and security, and responding immediatelyany threats to safety and well-being. to reports of potential safety and security hazards, such as broken windows and locks. The campus isCrime is a national problem that affects all well-lighted. Lighting surveys are conducted oncommunities and college campuses. To minimize a regular basis to ensure that lights are in properthe occurrence of crime incidents, college working order.administrators, competent residence life andphysical plant staff members, the city and county Local Police Provide Campus Securitylaw enforcement authorities, and the studentsthemselves must work together to ensure that Eastern Wyoming College (EWC) maintainsstudents and their possessions are protected as a close working relationship with both themuch as possible. Torrington Police Department and the Goshen County Sheriff’s Department. The TorringtonThe Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act of police routinely patrol the streets and parking1990 lots on campus as well as the residence hall areas. They respond to both routine and emergencyThe Campus Security Act (1990, 1994) and the calls, and provide the College with timelyJeanne Clery Act (1998) are federal laws that information relating to criminal activity inrequire colleges and universities to disclose the community so that college employees andinformation about crime on and around their students may act to protect themselves and assistcampuses to students, employees, and prospective in crime prevention efforts. The EWC Board ofstudents. The Eastern Wyoming College (EWC) Trustees and the Torrington Police Departmentcrime statistics may be found on the website by cooperatively instituted a Campus Resourceclicking on “Crime Statistics” at http://ewc. Officer program to enhance the quality of life onwy.edu/administration/security.cfm. The EWC campus by providing safety and security, maintainCrime Awareness and Campus Security policies, a high level of visibility around the campus,procedures, and statistics are available upon maintain order, and provide a range of generalrequest in the EWC Vice President for Student and emergency services.Services’ Office. Reporting of CrimesEvery prospective and admitted student isprovided with a mailed notification that provides Crimes in progress and other emergencythe website to access the information available in situations in on-campus buildings can be reportedthis report. directly to the Torrington Police Department by picking up any campus phone and dialingStudent Demographic Information 9-9-1-1, and then following up by contactingEastern Wyoming College district operations the Vice President for Student Services. Uponinclude campuses in Torrington and Douglas, receipt of the call, police dispatch will initiate theWyoming. Torrington is the administrative center appropriate emergency response. Telephones areand main campus of the district and Douglas accessible in all buildings during normal hours offunctions as a branch campus. Enrollment is operation. Four 911 Emergency-Only telephonesapproximately 1600 credit students each semester are located strategically along campus walkwayswith additional offerings in the community and dial directly to the police dispatch office.services and continuing education areas. Total Non-emergency situations should be reported tohead count credit enrollment includes course the Vice President for Student Services locatedofferings in ten other rural communities. The in the Student Services Office, 307.532.8257,Torrington campus enrolls more traditional full- between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Mondaytime students than the other areas, which serves through Friday. The Student Services Officeprimarily non-traditional, part-time students. 53
    • Academic Regulationsserves as the student assistance and information Depending on the particular circumstances ofcenter for the campus. The Vice President for the crime, especially in all situations that couldStudent Services and the staff are available pose an immediate threat to the community andto initiate crime reports, and to respond to individuals, a copy of the notice will be posted inquestions or concerns regarding personal safety each residence hall, and at the front door of eachon campus. The Director of Residence Life may on-campus classroom building. Anyone withbe contacted at 307.532.8336 in Lancer Hall information warranting a timely warning shouldafter regular working hours. report the circumstances to the Vice President for Student Services by phone at 307.532.8257, inVictims of a crime who do not want to pursue person at the EWC Student Services Office; oraction within EWC or the criminal justice system to the Campus Resource Officer at 307.532.7001may still want to consider making a confidential (Torrington Police Department).report. With the victim’s permission, the VicePresident for Student Services can file a report on Through a cooperative program of the Wyomingthe details of the incident without revealing the Department of Education, EWC is a participantvictim’s identity. The purpose of a confidential in the anonymous WeTip hotline at www.wetip.report is to comply with the victim’s wish to com or 1.800.78.CRIME, where students andkeep the matter confidential while taking steps community members are urged, if they haveto ensure the future safety of the victim and information about vandalism, theft, drugs,others. With such information, EWC can keep threats, weapons, or any other illegal activitiesan accurate record of the number of incidents to call this 24 hour hotline to report concerns.involving students, determine where there is Callers will not be asked for their name and willa pattern of crime with regard to a particular remain anonymous. There is up to a $1,000location, method, or assailant, and alert the reward for calls leading to a conviction. Signs,campus community to potential danger. Reports posters, and business cards regarding the WeTipfiled in this manner are counted and disclosed hotline have been disseminated throughout thein the annual crimes statistics for the institution. campus.An employee of an institution whose official Crime Awareness and Prevention Activitiesresponsibilities include providing psychologicalcounseling to members of the institution’s Programs sponsored by community/campuscommunity and who is functioning within the organizations, residence life, college staff andscope of his/her license or certification are not local law enforcement personnel provideconsidered to be a campus security authority and sessions each academic year on topics includingare not required to report crimes for inclusion personal safety awareness and security, domesticinto the annual disclosure of crime statistics. violence/sexual assault, the prevention ofThey are encouraged, if and when they deem it theft and vandalism, and alcohol and drugappropriate, to inform persons being counseled abuse. Information on safety and securityof the procedures to report crimes on a voluntary issues is provided to students and employeesbasis for inclusion into the annual crime statistics. regularly through bulletins, crime alerts,Timely Warnings posters, brochures, and college and community newspapers.In the event that a situation arises, either on-or off-campus, that, in the judgment of the College AccessVice President for Student Services or CampusResource Officer, constitutes an ongoing or During business hours, EWC (excludingcontinuing threat, a campus-wide “timely residence halls) is open to students, parents,warning” will be issued. The warning will be employees, contractors, guests, and invitees.issued through the LancerNet e-mail system During non-business hours access to all EWCto faculty, staff, and students, and through the facilities is by key, if issued, or by admittance viaLancerAlert cell phone text messaging for those the Physical Plant staff. Over extended breaks,who have opted into that program. Warnings the doors of all halls will be secured around thewill also be issued on the EWC website at ewc. clock. Some facilities may have individual hourswy.edu and on the electronic bulletin boards at which may vary at different times of the year.the Information Center and Student Services. Examples are the Student Center, the Library, 54
    • Academic Regulationsand the Learning Skills Lab. In these cases, the throughout campus, through e-mail messages tofacilities will be secured according to schedules employees, and through website notifications.developed by the department responsible. Sexual Assault Prevention and ResponseSecurity Personnel Eastern Wyoming College educates the studentEWC does not employ a police staff. However, community about sexual assaults and date rapethe Physical Plant staff who work past regular through freshman orientations each Fall. Thesebusiness hours have the authority to ask topics are also covered in the required HMDVpersons for identification and to determine 1000-College Studies course. The Goshenwhether individuals have lawful business at County Task Force on Family Violence andEWC. Criminal incidents are referred to the Sexual Assault offers sexual assault, educationCampus Resource Officer or the local police and information programs to college studentsdepartment who have jurisdiction on the campus. and employees upon request. EducationalCommunity members, students, faculty, staff, programming and literature on date rapeand guests are encouraged to report all crimes education, risk reduction, and EWC responseand public safety related incidents to local law is available through Residence Life and otherenforcement, the Vice President for Student Student Services offices.Services, and/or the Physical Plant staff in atimely manner. Victims of a sexual assault at Eastern Wyoming College should first get to a place of safety andCrime Prevention Programs then obtain necessary medical treatment. Student Services strongly advocates that a victim of sexualCrime prevention programs and sexual assault assault report the incident in a timely manner.prevention programs are offered on a continual Time is a critical factor for evidence collectionbasis. Specific programs designed to inform and preservation. An assault should be reportedstudents and employees about campus security directly to a Residence Life staff member, the Viceprocedures and practices, and to encourage President for Student Services, or another collegestudents and employees to be responsible for administrator. Filing a report will not obligatetheir own security and the security of others the victim to prosecute, nor will it subject theinclude: victim to scrutiny or judgmental opinions from EWC employees. Filing a sexual assault report• Summer Pre-Registration programs for will: parents (2-3 times annually) 1. Ensure that the victim receives the necessary• Orientation activities (1 time annually) medical treatment and tests.• Residence Hall educational programming (2 2. Provide the opportunity for collection of times monthly during academic year) evidence helpful in prosecution, which• Student Services educational programming (3 cannot be obtained later (ideally a victim - 4 times each semester) of sexual assault should not wash, douche, use the toilet, or change clothing prior to a• College Studies classes (every semester) medical/legal exam).A common theme of all awareness and crime 3. Assure that the victim has access to freeprevention programs is to encourage students and confidential counseling from counselorsemployees to be aware of their responsibilities for specifically trained in the area of sexualtheir own security and the security of others. In assault crisis intervention.addition to seminars, information is disseminatedto students and employees through crime When a sexual assault victim contacts Easternprevention awareness packets, security alert Wyoming College, the Torrington Policeposters, electronic displays, videos, and articles Department or Goshen County Sheriff’s Officein the college newspaper. When time is of the will be notified as well. The victim of a sexualessence, information is released to the College assault may choose for the investigation to bethrough security alerts posted prominently pursued through the criminal justice system and 55
    • Academic RegulationsEastern Wyoming College, or only the latter. A activities. The policy states that the Collegecollege employee will guide the victim through may take disciplinary action for the followingthe available options and support the victim in violations:his or her decision. Various counseling optionsare available from the EWC Counseling Office. • The possession, use, sale, or distributionCounseling and support services outside EWC of narcotics, illegal drugs, or prescriptioncan be obtained through the Goshen County Task drugs for which the person does not haveForce on Family Violence and Sexual Assault, and a prescription, on college premises or atPeak Wellness. college-sponsored activities.Eastern Wyoming College’s Student Code of • The possession, use, sale, or distribution ofConduct prohibits “Participating in any actual alcoholic beverages on college premises or ator threatened non-consensual sexual act”, and college-sponsored activities.outlines disciplinary proceedings and guidelinesfor cases involving sexual misconduct. The Please refer to the alcohol/drug sections in theaccused and the victim will each be allowed to Student Code of Conduct and the “Chemicalchoose one person who has had no formal legal Abuse and Alcohol” policy for more detailedtraining to accompany them throughout the information on disciplinary measures related toformal grievance procedure. Both the victim illicit alcohol and drug use.and accused will be informed of the outcome of Prevention Programsthe grievance procedure. A student found guiltyof violating the EWC Student Code of Conduct EWC has a variety of methods to prevent thecould be criminally prosecuted in the state courts illicit use of drugs and abuse of alcohol byand may be suspended or expelled from the students and employees. The programs provideCollege for the first offense. Student victims services related to drug use and abuse includinghave the option to change their academic and/or dissemination of informational materials,on-campus living situations after an alleged sexual educational programs, College Studies classes,assault, if such changes are reasonably available. counseling services, referrals and college disciplinary actions. The EWC registrationThe Eastern Wyoming College (EWC) crime statement provided to every student includes thestatistics, policies, and procedures may be found alcohol and drug enforcement policies at EWC.on the website by clicking on “Campus Crime” athttp://ewc.wy.edu/administration/security.cfm Wyoming Laws(this document). Illegal Possession: Any person under the ageIn accordance to the “Campus Sex Crimes of 21 who has any alcoholic beverage in his orPrevention Act” of 2000, which amends the Jacob her possession or who is under the influence ofWetterling Crimes Against Children and Sexually alcohol is guilty of a misdemeanor.Violent Offender Registration Act, the JeanneClery Act and the Family Educational Rights Falsification of Identity: Any person underand Privacy Act of 1974, EWC is providing a the age of 21 who attempts in any manner tolink to the information regarding registered sex purchase alcoholic or malt beverages or whooffenders in Goshen County available through falsifies any identification or uses any falsehttp://goshensheriff.org/SexOffenders/ identification in order to obtain alcoholic or maltDefault.asp and in Wyoming available through beverages is guilty of a misdemeanor.the http://attorneygeneral.state.wy.us/dci/so/so_registration.html. Driving While Under the Influence (DUI) – Under 21: The legal blood alcohol concentration (BAC) for person under 21 is .02% as opposedAlcohol & Drug Enforcement Policies at EWC to a BAC of .08% for those of legal age. A .02% BAC would result from consuming any alcohol.The Eastern Wyoming College Board of Trusteeshas enacted a drug and alcohol policy that states Consequences of a Misdemeanor: Thethat drugs and alcoholic beverages may not consequences upon conviction for violatingbe present on campus or at college-sponsored any of the misdemeanors listed above shall be 56
    • Academic Regulationsimprisonment for up to six months, a fine of up Staffingto $750, or both. Minors convicted of DUI may The Residence Halls have staff members livinghave additional consequences. in the buildings. Student Housing Staff (Resident Assistants and Residence Life work-studyStudent and Employee Responsibilities students) also reside in the building. Housing staff responsibilities include securing doors,The cooperation and involvement of students observing activity in the facility and respondingand employees in a campus safety program is appropriately, reporting incidents and potentialabsolutely essential. Individuals must assume problems, reporting maintenance and safetyresponsibility for their own personal safety and concerns.the security of their belongings. The following is alist of some precautions: ProceduresAvoid Being a Victim The residence halls each have four exits. AllWalk with others when possible; be especially doors are locked 24 hours a day for the safetycautious during evening hours; keep keys ready, of the students. Keys are assigned to students touse sidewalks and well-lit pathways; be careful allow them access to the main entrance of theabout whom you let approach you when alone. residence hall in which they reside.Call 9-911 in an on-campus building or utilize theEmergency-Only telephones outside on-campus The residence halls have a duty station near theif you notice something suspicious or believe front door which enables housing staff to keepyourself to be in danger. track of which residents and visitors are in the building. This station is manned by Housing staffLock It Up from 4 pm – 2 am, Sunday-Thursday, and fromUse the locks on exterior building doors, 6 pm – 6 am, Friday and Saturday. Housing staffindividual rooms and offices, and vehicles; keep are trained to enforce quiet hours and visitationwindows secured; and store valuables out of sight. hours. They make rounds of the building andWeapons are not allowed in on-campus facilities respond to student requests. Visitors are requiredand residence halls. to sign-in and visitation hours end at 12 midnight Sunday-Thursday nights and at 2 am on FridayRecord All Serial Numbers and Saturday nights. Residents are responsible forMaintain a list of serial numbers and descriptions the conduct of their visitors.for valuable property (cameras, bicycles, etc.)Items such as coats, books, CDs, and cassettes During Fall and Spring orientation meetingswithout identifying numbers should be labeled. all residence students are warned about theAn engraver suitable for metal, plastic or wooden dangers of leaving their room doors unlocked andobjects is available through Residence Life. exterior door security measures. Fire safety, fire alarm and tornado procedures, theft prevention,Be A Crime Stopper and domestic violence/sexual assault issues areReport all accidents, thefts or other criminal also addressed.activities to the Torrington Police Departmentor the Vice President for Student Services as Key Controlsoon as possible. Help the Torrington Police do Student room door keys are not marked totheir job by cooperating when asked to provide indicate building or room number.a statement, sign a complaint, or testify in court.Stay calm and give accurate details when making Crime Statisticscalls for assistance. Be concerned for the safetyand property of everyone. Individuals can access the Eastern WyomingOn-campus Housing Security College crime statistics report directly from the Office of Postsecondary Education.The following represents a summary of the wayson-campus housing security is addressed: 57
    • Academic Regulations The Crime Awareness and Disclosure of College InformationFederal disclosure reports such as EWC’sGraduation/Completion and Transfer-Out rates,Athletic Graduation/Completion and Transfer-Out rates are available on the website at http://ewc.wy.edu/data/ir.cfm. Other StudentRight-To-Know information, such as AthleticParticipation and Financial Support, is alsoavailable on the website at ewc.wy.edu, or uponrequest in the office of the Vice President forStudent Services at Eastern Wyoming College. Student ResponsibilityAll Eastern Wyoming College students are heldindividually responsible for the informationand policies in this catalog and failure to readand comply with all stated regulations willnot exempt a student from such personalresponsibility. 58
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    • Support Services Instructional Support Services informational needs and to offer bibliographic instruction. For materials not available at theInstructional Support Services is composed of EWC Library, access is provided through regionalthe Academic Testing Center, the Library, the and national interlibrary loan networks. For theLearning Skills Lab, the Instructional Technology convenience of library patrons, a coin operatedCenter, Adult Learning Skills Lab, and Computer photocopier is available as well as a microformServices. These six areas have retained their reader/printer and a fax machine. The Libraryautonomy but work cooperatively with each operates under the Library Bill of Rights whichother. guarantees the unbiased provision of materials and protects patron privacy.Instructional Support Services provide diverseassistance to the college faculty, students, staff, Learning Skills Laband community. Learning is both a product and The Learning Skills Lab, located directly belowprocess. Within the four areas are a consortium the Library in lower Tebbet, offers a variety ofof specialists working toward the improvement of services to enhance and support the learninginstruction on campus. experience of all students.Academic Testing Center The Learning Skills Lab consists of a large, openThe Academic Testing Center offers proctoring area with tables for study/tutoring sessions;of the following exams: make-up exams for a study table in an enclosure for study groupsinstructors, as well as correspondence and on-line or quiet individual study; a seminar room withtests for EWC and other colleges; Collegiate computers; and the offices of the developmentalAssessment of Academic Proficiency (CAAP) reading and math teachers. Services include freetests; College-Level Examination Program tutoring assistance, computers and VCRs, and(CLEP) and DANTES Subject Standardized Test study areas. Tutors are available in the following(DSST) credit by examination testing; General areas (depending on requests by students andEducational Developmental (GED) tests; Law faculty): biology, English, psychology, politicalSchool Admission Tests (LSAT); ACT College science, math, accounting, computer applications,Entrance exams; COMPASS Placement Exams; veterinary technology, economics, recordsACT WorkKeys; and Western Governors’ management, chemistry, and problem solving.University (WGU) exams. Contact Learning Skills Lab personnel for details or see the website ewc.wy.edu under Academics/The Testing Center staff also provides American Current Students for more information includingDisabilities Act accommodations for qualifying the current tutor schedule, links to study skillsstudents. All testing is by appointment only. For pages, and how to become a tutor.more information, or to make appointments,contact the coordinator in the Tebbet Building Instructional TechnologyRoom 133 or by phone at 307.532.8288. The purpose of this department is to support faculty as they develop distance learning coursesLibrary and expand distance learning offerings. ThisLocated in the Tebbet Classroom Building, department works closely with the Distancethe Library is an attractive, central facility for Learning committee and faculty members. Withresearch and study. The Library plays a vital role training in instructional design (curriculumin the educational mission of Eastern Wyoming planning) and delivery, primary support is for theCollege. Resources are selected to support technology of distance learning. Services include:the instructional and recreational needs of the consultation for course planning and delivery,College and community. The Library also has support for distance delivery via online Internetaccess to online databases, on and off campus, systems and compressed video, consultationthrough the Internet, all of which make the and support for adding web components toEWC Library part of the world-wide library traditional and non-Internet distance ed courses,community. It is open during the day, 4 evenings technical training for the compressed videoa week and on Sundays. When classes are not in classroom, training in distance delivery strategiessession, library hours will be posted. Library and technologies, and training to use campuspersonnel are available to assist patrons with their classroom technology. The department also 60
    • Support Servicesprovides faculty access to graphic, audio and of-the-art computerized classrooms are providedvideo production and editing. to support the academic needs for software training in accounting, business, multimedia,Adult Learning Skills Lab and word processing. MicrocomputerThe Adult Learning Skills Lab is located in workstations are located in various buildings onTebbet Room 140, adjacent to the Learning Skills the campus and are connected via a high speedComputer Lab. The large study area and the Local Area Network to allow easy access toComputer Lab are shared with the Learning Skills laser printers, scanners, and a wide variety ofprogram. The program offers individualized Windows based software applications. Availablestudy plans for people from 18 years of age and software applications include word processing,beyond in the areas of adult basic education, GED spreadsheets, database, publishing, presentationpreparation and English as a second language. and multimedia programs. Application specificEach student is also encouraged to acquire software is also available for various academiccomputer, work, and life skills through various programs such as accounting and veterinaryactivities and assignments, regardless of the area technology. Students are provided with freeof concentration. The lab provides access to a access to the Internet and a wide variety ofTV and VCR for viewing educational tape series services. Online research materials and search(GED on TV); computer based study programs, engines are only a click of the mouse away.such as Rosetta Stone and PLATO; variousCD-ROM products; and access to technology- The computer labs in the Student Center andthe Internet, use of a digital camera and video Library are open to students during regularequipment, and word processing programs. classroom hours and in the evenings on weekdays.The schedule is arranged to provide access for The computer lab in the Library is also open forboth day and evening hours of study. TABE tests limited hours on the weekends.and GED Practice tests may be taken in theAdult Learning Skills Lab during evening hours Eastern Wyoming College provides similarwhen the Testing Center is closed. Services computer access and Internet services to studentsare coordinated with the NOWCAP-EvenStart enrolled at the Douglas, Lusk, Wheatland,Program, the county library, various state Upton, Moorcroft, Glenrock, Hulett, Guernsey,agencies, Department of Employment, UW/ Sundance, and Newcastle campuses.EOC, Workforce Development Youth Council,and the ABE Literacy Council. The Web address *The wrongful use of computer resources oris ewc.wy.edu follow the link to Community information including threats there-of, may resultEducation. in student suspension or dismissal.GEAR UP Counseling ServicesGEAR UP and Eastern Wyoming College workto help middle school and high school students Personal Counselingprepare for college each step of the way. Gaining A student’s success in college is to a large degreeEarly Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate dependent on his/her ability to adjust to the totalPrograms (GEAR UP) focus time and effort in college environment – academically, socially,working closely with these students and helping personally, and emotionally. The Counselor atthem be successful in all aspects of education so Eastern Wyoming College, through individualthat pursuing postsecondary education becomes counseling and/or group counseling, is availablea reality. This is an on-going service that helps to assist in these areas. The primary goal ofstudents plan for college, explore career choices, Counseling Services is to help EWC studentsprovides tutoring and information on how to pay mature toward independence, health, andfor college, campus tours, Summer activities, stability.ACT prep, and scholarships. Parents, faculty, students, and staff areComputer Services encouraged to utilize EWC Counseling ServicesThe Computer Services Department plays by referring students in need of assistance. Ina key role in preparing students to meet the some cases, students will be referred to othertechnological demands of the world today. State- 61
    • Support Servicesagencies or service providers best qualified toassist with the defined issue. Contact: Debbie OchsnerCareer Counseling Director of Counseling & Disability ServicesThe EWC Counseling Center provides the Kuder Eastern Wyoming CollegeCareer Development system free of charge to 3200 West C Streetstudents wanting to explore college majors, Torrington, WY 82240career choices, and educational opportunities. 307.532.8238This is a comprehensive online based system thatprovides three inventories aimed at identifying orskills, interests, and values. It offers extensiveinformation regarding careers, occupational Tom McDowell,goals, salary and employment trends, vocational ADA Coordinator/Director of Human Resourcesschool, technical school, college and university Eastern Wyoming Collegeinformation as well as required training/ 3200 West C Streeteducation for specific occupations. This Torrington, WY 82240powerful system includes access to job banks 307.532.8330in all fifty states. Interested students can makeappointments for career counseling with the TTY: via WY Relay 1.800.877.9965EWC Counselor. Disability ServicesEWC is committed to providing information,accommodation services, and agency referral tostudents with any type of permanent physicalhandicap or learning disability.Goal:To promote the independence and self-sufficiencyof students with disabilities, and encourage theprovision of equal opportunities in education forstudents with disabilities at Eastern WyomingCollege as mandated by Section 504 of theRehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans withDisabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), and the ADAAmendments Act of 2008.Services Available:• Interpreter, Reader, and Taping Services• Classroom Relocation for Accessibility• Advocacy with Faculty and Staff• Test-Taking Assistance and Accommodation• Assistance with Study Skills, Note-Taking, and Test Preparation• Career, Academic, and Personal Counseling• Tutor Referral• Equipment Loan AssistanceEligible:Any student enrolled at Eastern Wyoming Collegewho has a documented physical disability orlearning disability is eligible for assistance. 62
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    • Programs of InstructionFields of Study DEGREE A.A. A.S. A.A.S. CERTIFICATE PAGE #Accounting (ACCT) • 73Agri-Business:Farm & Ranch Management (FRCH) • 74 Beef Production (AGBP) • 75Agricultural Business (AGBUS) • 75Agricultural Economics (AGEC) • 76Agriculture 76 General Agriculture (GAGR) • 76 Agriculture Education (AGED) • 76 Rangeland Ecology & Watershed Management (REWM) • 77Animal Science (ANSC) • 78Art (ART) • 79Biology (BIOL) • 79 Environmental Science (ENVR) • 80Business Administration (BADM) • 81Business Administration (BSAD) Also available by distance! • 81Business Education (BSED) • 82Business Office Technology (BOTK) • 83Business Office Technology (BOFTK) • 84Computer Applications (CMAP) • 84Communication (COMM) • 85Computer Science 86 Computer Information Systems (CIS) • 86 Information Support Specialist (ITSS) • 86 Web Design (BWEB) • 87Construction Technology (CNTK) This program is not currently offered. • • 87Cosmetology (CSMO) • 89 Hair Technician (CSHT) • 89 Nail Technician (CSNT) • 90 Skin Technician (CSST) • 90Criminal Justice Also available by distance! 90 Law Enforcement Emphasis (CJLE) • 90 Corrections Certificate (CJCC) • 92 Corrections Emphasis (CJCR) • 91Criminal Justice (CMJT) • 91Economics (ECON) • 93Education 93 Early Childhood Education (EDEC) • 94 Early Childhood Education (EDCC) • 95 Elementary Education (ELED) • 94 Secondary Education (SCED) • 96English (ENGL) • 96Entrepreneurship (ENTR) • 97History (HIST) • 97Interdisciplinary Studies (INST) Also available by distance! • • 98Languages (Foreign) (LANG) • 99 64
    • Programs of InstructionFields of Study DEGREE A.A. A.S. A.A.S. CERTIFICATE PAGE #Massage Therapy (HLTK) Available at Douglas Campus only. • 100Mathematics 100 Arts and Science (MATH) • 101 Secondary Education (MTED) • 101Music 101 Music Applied (MUSC) • 101 Music Education (MUSED) • 102Physical Education, Health and Recreation (PEAC) • 103Political Science (POLS) • 104Preprofessional 104 Pre-Dentistry (PDEN) • 105 Pre-Medicine (PMED) • 105 Pre-Veterinary Medicine (PVET) • 105 Pre-Medical Technology (MEDTK) • 106 Pre-Nursing (PNSG) • 106 Pre-Pharmacy (PHAR) • 107Psychology (PSYC) • 107Sociology (SOC) • 108Statistics (STAT) • 109Veterinary Technology (VTTK) • 110Weatherization Technology (WTTK) • 111Weatherization Technology (WETK) • 111Welding and Joining Technology (WJTK) • • 112 Machine Tool Technology (MTT) • 113 Plate Welding (WELD) • 113Wildlife & Fisheries Biology & Management (WILD) • 114 65
    • Programs of Instruction Catalog under which General Education Requirements a student may graduate Eastern Wyoming College expects that itsThe catalog in use at the time a student first graduates will have an educational foundation thatenrolls and completes credit classes offered prepares them for a complex and rapidly changingthrough Eastern Wyoming College determines world. The curriculums offered will allow thethe degree or certificate requirements for development of general education competenciesgraduation. However, returning students who necessary for participation in society as wellhave a two-semester break, not including the as the development of specialized knowledgesummer term, must meet the requirements of the necessary within a given discipline. Every EWCcatalog in use at the time of readmission. graduate will have demonstrated competencies in these five general education areas:Students changing their program of study fromtheir initial enrollment are expected to fulfill 1. Communication Skills:graduation requirements under the catalog in Graduates will be able to understand andeffect at the time they begin classes for that communicate ideas and information inprogram. written and spoken English that reveals a mastery of terminology appropriate toIf courses originally required in the old catalog their disciplines.no longer exist, the college reserves the right tosubstitute one course for another in any program 2. Analytical and Quantitative Reasoning:or degree. Refresher classes may be required for Graduates will be able to solve problemssome skill courses. through critical thinking involving analytical and quantitative reasoning at a Second Associate Degree from EWC level appropriate to their disciplines.1. Students who wish to do so may earn more 3. Technology Skills: than one degree at Eastern Wyoming College; Graduates will be able to demonstrate however, no student may receive more than competence using technology one Associate of Arts Degree or more than appropriate to their disciplines. one Associate of Science Degree. They may receive multiple Associate of Applied Science 4. Social Awareness: Degrees if the areas of concentration are Graduates will be able to demonstrate an different. awareness of the relationship between the2. Students must consult an advisor when individual and the world. planning a degree. The advisor must approve the planned program of study for the 5. Information Literacy: additional degree. Graduates will be able to locate, evaluate,3. Students must complete the degree and use information effectively. requirements listed in the current year’s catalog for the second degree.4. A student may receive as many different degrees at graduation as he or she has earned at that point.5. A maximum of 52 semester hours of credit from the first degree may be applied toward the second degree.6. For each degree earned, a student must satisfy a 12-hour residency requirement. A student may concurrently earn two degrees by achieving 24 hours in residency. 66
    • Programs of Instruction Degree Requirements GEOL 1200 Historical Geology 4 GEOL 1470 Environmental Science 4General Transfer PHYS 1110 General Physics I 4The specific courses that fulfill each of the general ZOO 1500 Introduction to Humantransfer categories for the Associate of Arts Anatomy & Physiology 4 ZOO 2015 Human Anatomy 4and Associate of Science Degree are listed ZOO 2025 Human Physiology 4below. The process of assigning courses in eachcategory is continually being updated. Students Humanitiesshould contact their advisors for updated listings. ENGL 2140 World Literature 3 ENGL 2210 English Literature I 3Category/Courses Course Title Hours ENGL 2220 English Literature II 3Orientation ENGL 2310 American Literature I 3HMDV 1000 College Studies 1 ENGL 2320 American Literature II 3 ENGL 2370 Western AmericanConstitutional Requirement Literature 3POLS 1000 or American & Wyoming ENGL 2440 Literary Genres: Government 3 Short Story 3HIST 1211 or U.S. to 1865 3 HIST 2290 North American Indians 3HIST 1221 or U.S. from 1865 3 LIBS 2280 Literature for Children 3HIST 1210 or United States History I 3 PHIL 1000 Introduction to and Philosophy 3HIST 1250 History of Wyoming 3 PHIL 2300 Ethics in Practice 3Take POLS 1000 or HIST 1211 or HIST 1221 or RELI 1000 Introduction to Religion 3HIST 1210 and HIST 1250 Visual, Performing, Fine ArtsEnglish Composition ART 1000 General Art: Studio 3ENGL 1010 English I: Composition 3 ART 1005 Beginning Drawing 3 ART 1310 Sculpture I 3Intensive Writing ART 2010 Art History I 3ENGL 1020 English II 3 ART 2020 Art History II 3 CO/M 1010 Public Speaking 3Mathematics ENGL 2480 Literary Genres: Drama 3COSC 1010 Introduction to MUSC 1000 Introduction to Music 3 Computer Science I 4 MUSC 1400 Collegiate Chorale 1MATH 1000 Problem Solving 3 MUSC 2015 Introduction to the MusicMATH 1105 Mathematics for the of the World’s Peoples 3 Elementary School MUSC 2050 Music History Survey I 3 Teacher II 3 MUSC 2055 Music History Survey II 3MATH 1400 Pre-Calculus Algebra 4 THEA 1000 Introduction to Theatre 3MATH 1405 Pre-Calculus Trigonometry 3 Social ScienceMATH 1450 Algebra and Trigonometry 5 AGEC 1010 Agricultural Economics I 3MATH 2200 Calculus I 5 ANTH 1100 Intro to PhysicalMATH 2205 Calculus II 5 Anthropology 3MATH 2210 Calculus III 5 ANTH 1200 Intro to CulturalMATH 2350 Business Calculus 4 Anthropology 3PHYS 1120 General Physics II 4 CO/M 1030 InterpersonalSTAT 2050 Fundamentals of Statistics 4 Communication 3 CO/M 1040 Intro to HumanLab Science Communication 3AECL 1000 Agroecology 4 ECON 1010 Macroeconomics 3BIOL 1000 Principles of Biology 4 ECON 1020 Microeconomics 3BIOL 1010 General Biology I 4 GEOG 1010 Introduction to PhysicalBIOL 2020 General Biology II 4 Geography 3CHEM 1000 Introductory Chemistry 4 GEOG 1000 Intro to World RegionalCHEM 1020 General Chemistry I 4 Geography 3CHEM 1030 General Chemistry II 4 HIST 1210 United States History I 3GEOL 1100 Physical Geology 4 HIST 1211 U.S. to 1865 3 67
    • Programs of InstructionHIST 1220 United States History II 3 Physical Education ActivityHIST 1221 U.S. from 1865 3 Area I-FitnessHIST 1250 History of Wyoming 3 PEAC 1032 Aerobic Cond. I/FitnessHIST 1290 History of US West 3 Center 1HIST 2290 North American Indians 3 PEAC 1033 Aerobic Cond. II/FitnessPOLS 1000 American & Wyoming Center 1 Government 3 PEAC 1034 Aerobic Cond. III/FitnessPOLS 1200 Non-Western Center 1 Political Cultures 3 PEAC 1035 Aerobic Cond. IV/FitnessPOLS 2000 Current Issues in Center 1 American Govt. 3 PEAC 2000 Wellness: PE Concepts/PSYC 1000 General Psychology 3 Fitness Course 1SOWK 1000 Introduction to Social Work 4 Area II-General Physical ActivitySOC 1000 Sociological Principles 3 PEAC 1008 Lifetime Sports 1SOC 1100 Social Problems 3 PEAC 1012 Beginning Swimming 1SOC 2120 Fundamentals of Aging PEAC 1020 Fitness and Conditioning 1 & Human Development 3 PEAC 1050 Beginning Tennis 1SOC 2200 Sociology of Human PEAC 1252 Beginning Badminton 1 Sexuality 3 PEAC 1253 Beginning Bowling 1WMST 1080 Intro to Women’s Studies 3 PEAC 1255 Beginning Golf 1 PEAC 1257 Beginning Racquetball 1Cultural Awareness PEAC 1260 Beginning Volleyball 1(May “double count”- A course in this category may PEAC 1271 Weight Loss Conditioning 1simultaneously fulfill another general education PEAC 1273 Heavy Resistancerequirement providing that the same course has been Conditioning 1approved and is listed in that other category.) PEAC 1281 Beginning Casting andAECL 1000 Agroecology 4 Angling 1AMST 2110 Cultural Diversity PEAC 2011 Intermediate Swimming 1 in America 3ANTH 1100 Intro to Physical Anthropology 3ANTH 1200 Intro to Cultural Anthropology 3ART 2010 Art History I 3ART 2020 Art History II 3GEOG 1000 Intro to World Regional Geography 3GEOG 1010 Introduction to Physical Geography 3HIST 1110 Western Civilization I 3HIST 1120 Western Civilization II 3HIST 2290 North American Indians 3INST 2350 Intro to Global Studies 3MKT 2100 Principles of Marketing 3MUSC 1000 Introduction to Music 3MUSC 2015 Introduction to the Music of the World’s Peoples 3POLS 1200 Non-Western Political Cultures 3RELI 1000 Introduction to Religion 3WMST 1080 Intro to Women’s Studies 3 68
    • Programs of Instruction A. Associate of Arts Degree is continually being updated. Students are advised to contact their advisors for updated listings to ensureThe Associate of Arts Degree will be awarded students meeting the appropriate requirements for graduationin transfer programs who complete the following or transfer.requirements: Minimum General1. Completion of the program requirements in Hours Transfer which the student is enrolled. Required Categories2. Completion of a minimum of 64 semester hours 1 College Studies in courses numbered 1000 or above with a 3 English Composition cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or better. 3 Intensive Writing Course 3 College-level Mathematics3. No more than six hours in courses numbered 4 Lab Science 1490, 1990, 2490, or 2990 will apply toward 3 Humanities the degree. In addition, no course offered under 3 Visual, Performing, Fine Arts the Developmental Studies Department may be 6 Social Science (includes state statutory applied toward the degree. requirement on the constitution) 3 Cultural Awareness (may double count)4. Completion of at least 12 semester hours 2 Fitness (Area I)/Physical applicable towards graduation from Eastern Education Activity (Area II) Wyoming College. All students, except those medically exempted, are required to take two different physical activity courses5. Completion of the appropriate reading course which must be taken in separate semesters. Students (HMDV 0515, HMDV 0520), or an appropriate must select a minimum of one physical education score on the reading exam. activity course from Area II. Medical exemptions will be allowed only on the receipt of a signed form from6. Completion of the college-wide exit assessment the certifying doctor. and the outcomes assessment requirements specific to the major.7. File graduation application with the Student Services Office. The application is due eight weeks prior to the end of the semester in which the candidate expects to graduate.8. Students who have an incomplete and plan to graduate have one semester or the summer session (whichever comes first) in which to finish the incomplete. If they do not finish the incomplete, the graduation date moves to the semester in which they finish the incomplete. A new graduation application must be submitted to the Student Services Office.9. A grade of either “S” or “C” or better must be received in each course used to satisfy the general transfer requirements below. A grade of “S” may be earned through institutional challenge, CLEP, or advanced placement examinations.10. All students are required to meet the constitutional requirement by taking one of the following: HIST 1210 United States History I and HIST 1250 History of Wyoming, HIST 1211 U.S. to 1865, HIST 1221 U.S. from 1865, POLS 1000 American & Wyoming Government.The process of assigning specific courses that fulfilleach of the general transfer categories listed below 69
    • Programs of Instruction B. Associate of Science Degree is continually being updated. Students are advised to contact their advisors for updated listings to ensureThe Associate of Science Degree will be awarded meeting the appropriate requirements for graduationstudents in transfer programs who complete the or transfer.following requirements: Minimum General1. Completion of the program requirements in Hours Transfer which the student is enrolled. Required Categories2. Completion of a minimum of 64 semester hours 1 College Studies in courses numbered 1000 or above with a 3 English Composition cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or better. 3 Intensive Writing Course 10 Lab Science/Mathematics, including one3. No more than six hours in courses numbered college level math course and one lab 1490, 1990, 2490, or 2990 will apply toward science the degree. In addition, no course offered under 3 Humanities or Visual, Performing, Fine the Developmental Studies Department may be Arts applied toward the degree. 6 Social Science (includes state statutory requirement on the constitution)4. Completion of at least 12 semester hours 3 Cultural Awareness (may double count) applicable towards graduation from Eastern 2 Fitness (Area I)/Physical Education Wyoming College. Activity (Area II) All students, except those medically exempted, are5. Completion of the appropriate reading course required to take two different physical activity courses (HMDV 0515, HMDV 0520), or an appropriate which must be taken in separate semesters. Students score on the reading exam. must select a minimum of one physical education activity course from Area II. Medical exemptions will6. Completion of the college-wide exit assessment be allowed only on the receipt of a signed form from and the outcomes assessment requirements the certifying doctor. specific to the major.7. File graduation application with the Student Services Office. The application is due eight weeks prior to the end of the semester in which the candidate expects to graduate.8. Students who have an incomplete and plan to graduate have one semester or the summer session (whichever comes first) in which to finish the incomplete. If they do not finish the incomplete, the graduation date moves to the semester in which they finish the incomplete. A new graduation application must be submitted to the Student Services Office.9. A grade of either “S” or “C” or better must be received in each course used to satisfy the general transfer requirements below. A grade of “S” may be earned through institutional challenge, CLEP, or advanced placement examinations.10. All students are required to meet the constitutional requirement by taking one of the following: HIST 1210 United States History I and HIST 1250 History of Wyoming, HIST 1211 U.S. to 1865, HIST 1221 U.S. from 1865, POLS 1000 American & Wyoming Government.The process of assigning specific courses that fulfilleach of the general transfer categories listed below 70
    • Programs of Instruction C. Associate of Applied Science Degree POLS 1050 Basics in United States and Wyoming Government.The Associate of Applied Science Degree will beawarded students in technical programs who completethe following requirements: Minimum General Hours Transfer1. Completion of the curriculum requirements and Required Categories approved electives for the program in which the student is enrolled. 1 College Studies 3 English2. Completion of at least 12 semester hours TECH 1005 or higher level English applicable towards graduation from Eastern based on placement examination. Wyoming College. 3 Mathematics MATH 1515 or higher3. Completion of a minimum of 62 semester hours level mathematics based on with a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or placement examination. better. 2-5 Political Science/History *POLS 10004. Completion of the appropriate reading course *POLS 1050 (HMDV 0515, HMDV 0520), or an appropriate *HIST 1210 score on the reading exam. *HIST 1250 *HIST 12115. File graduation application with the Student *HIST 1221 Services Office. The application is due eight *Students must take POLS 1000, HIST 1211, HIST weeks prior to the end of the semester in which 1221, POLS 1050, or a combination of HIST 1210 the candidate expects to graduate. and HIST 1250. Students should consult with their advisors concerning transferability.6. Students who have an incomplete and plan to graduate have one semester or the summer Students should be aware of general education session (whichever comes first) in which to components that are incorporated into technical finish the incomplete. If they do not finish the classes such as computer skills. incomplete, the graduation date moves to the semester in which they finish the incomplete. A Students should be aware of general education new graduation application must be submitted components that are incorporated within the to the office of the Vice President for Student certificate program coursework. This related Services. education material emphasizes such critical topics as report writing, reading, mathematics, interpersonal7. The minimum general education requirements skills, and computer skills. for any Associate of Applied Science Degree are listed below. Specific program requirements vary and some courses may be of higher level than the minimum stated. A grade of either “S” or “C” or better must be received in any course used to satisfy the general education requirements. A grade of “S” may be earned through institutional challenge, CLEP, or advanced placement examinations.8. Completion of the college-wide exit assessment and the outcomes assessment requirements specific to the major.9. All students are required to meet the constitutional requirement by taking one of the following: HIST 1210 United States History I and HIST 1250 History of Wyoming, HIST 1211 U.S. to 1865, HIST 1221 U.S. from 1865, POLS 1000 American & Wyoming Government, 71
    • Programs of Instruction D. Certificate Programs of InstructionCertificates will be awarded to students in certificate The following are suggested programs ofprograms who complete the following requirements: instruction available at Eastern Wyoming College. Each program lists the degree offered; the various1. Completion of the curriculum requirements options, if any, within the program; the criteria specified for the respective programs, with a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or better. for the degree; and program requirements.2. Completion of the appropriate reading course Program electives are designated by asterisks (*) (HMDV 0510, HMDV 0515, HMDV 0520), or an and are generally listed immediately following appropriate score on the reading exam. suggested programs of instruction. In recognition that all student goals are not met with a single3. File certificate application with the office of academic plan, the student, with his/her advisor’s the Vice President for Student Services. The sign-off approval, may include substitute courses application is due eight weeks prior to the end of for those indicated by an asterisk. Students will the semester in which the candidate expects to be responsible to confer with their advisors in graduate. planning their schedules.4. Students who have an incomplete and plan to graduate have one semester or the summer The suggested courses to fulfill the general session (whichever comes first) in which to education requirements are incorporated into finish the incomplete. If they do not finish the each program of study. While some substitution incomplete, the graduation date moves to the of general education courses may be possible, semester in which they finish the incomplete. A students should consult with their advisors to new certificate application must be submitted ensure that all general education requirements are to the office of the Vice President for Student satisfied. Services.5. Completion of the outcomes assessment appropriate to the program. E. Distance LearningEastern Wyoming College offers four completeDistance Learning Programs: • Interdisciplinary Studies AA • Interdisciplinary Studies AS • Criminal Justice AA • Business Administration AASThe primary modes of delivery are internet,compressed video, and telecourse. Please see thewebsite, ewc.wy.edu, for a complete listing ofcourses each semester. All previously listed degreerequirements still pertain to distance degrees. 72
    • Programs of Instruction ACCOUNTING SOPHOMORE YEAR Fall Semester CreditDEGREE: CREDITS ECON 1010 Macroeconomics 3ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE 64 MATH 2350 Business Calculus 4 CO/M 1010 Public Speaking 3 ACCT 2450 Cost Accounting 3The suggested accounting/business administrative MKT 2100 Principles of Marketing 3program allows the student to earn an Associate *Approved Elective 2of Science Degree while completing the first two Total 18years of college work toward a bachelor’s degree.Those majoring in accounting, marketing, Spring Semester Creditmanagement, finance or other specific areas of ECON 1020 Microeconomics 3business generally take the same courses during BADM 2010 Business Law I 3the first two years. MATH 2355 Mathematical Applications for Business 4Students must complete all program IMGT 2400 Introduction to Information 3requirements, including approved electives, with Management *Approved Elective 3a “C” or better. Outcomes Assessment: Departmental Exam and FRESHMAN YEAR Core Competency EvaluationFall Semester Credit Total 16ACCT 1010 Principles of Accounting I 3ENGL 1010 English I: Composition 3 *Approved Electives: Any course at the 1000 orHMDV 1000 College Studies 1 above level.or HMDV 1020Orientation to Distance Learning Constitutional Requirement 3PEAC Approved Activity/ Fitness Course 1MATH 1400 Pre-Calculus Algebra 4 Total 15Spring Semester CreditACCT 1020 Principles of Accounting II 3ENGL 1020 English II 3STAT 2050 Fundamentals of Statistics 4PEAC Approved Activity/ Fitness Course 1Lab Science 4 Total 15 73
    • Programs of Instruction AGRI-BUSINESS: FARM AND SOPHOMORE YEAR RANCH MANAGEMENT Fall Semester Credit AGEC 1010 Agricultural Economics 3DEGREE: CREDITS AGEC 2010 Farm-Ranch BusinessASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE 64-66 Records 3 AGEC 2350 Agricultural CommoditiesCERTIFICATE-BEEF PRODUCTION 33 in Marketing 2 ANSC 2030 Principles of Livestock ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE- Feeding 4-3 FARM AND RANCH MANAGEMENT or CROP 2200 Forage Crops Constitutional Requirement 3The Associate of Applied Science Degree in AGEC 1970 Agriculture Internship 2Farm and Ranch Management provides the basic Total 16-17subject matter and training for successful studentsto compete for employment. Spring Semester Credit REWM 2000 Principles of Range Mgmt 3Students must complete all program AGEC 2020 Farm & Ranch Business Management 3requirements, including approved electives, with AGEC 2150 Agri-Business Finance 3a “C” or better. AGEC 2395 AG Capstone Project 2 *Approved Electives 5 FRESHMAN YEAR Total 16Fall Semester CreditAGRI 1010 Computers: Agriculture 3-4 *Approved Agricultural Electives:or CMAP 1765 Spreadsheet Application II: AGEC 1200 Economics & Management Microsoft Excel of Agricultural Equipment 2and CMAP 1800 Database Applications I: AGEC 2300 Agricultural Marketing 2 Access AGRI 2000 Agriculture Chemicals 2ANSC 1010 Livestock Production I 4 AGTK 1810 Beginning Hydraulics 3BIOL 1000 Principles of Biology 4 AGTK 1910 Equipment Maintenanceor BIOL 1010 General Biology and Repair 2or AECL 1000 Agroecology ANSC 1035 Horse Production 3HMDV 1000 College Studies 1 ANSC 1100 Management ofMATH 1000 Problem Solving 3 Reproduction 4or MATH 1515 Applied Technical Math ANSC 1210 Beginning Livestock *Approved Electives 1 Judging I 2 Total 16-17 ANSC 2110 Beef Production and Management 3Spring Semester Credit CROP 2200 Forage Crop Science 3AGTK 1910 Equipment Maintenance ELTR 1515 Electrical Concepts 2 and Repair 2 EQST 1570 Horseshoeing I 1SOIL 2200 Applied Soils 3 EQST 1580 Horseshoeing II 1TECH 1005 Applied Technical Writing 3 EQST 1725 Rodeo Rough Stock I 2or ENGL 1010 English I: Composition or EQST 1740 Rodeo Timed Events I 2 *Approved Electives 8 MCHT 1500 General Machine Shop 2 Total 16 or MCHT 1610Machine Tool Technology I 2 REWM 1300 Introduction to Water Resources 3 REWM 2500 Rangeland Plant Identification2 SOIL 2300 Soil Science & Fertilizer 2 Technology WELD1700 General Welding 3 74
    • Programs of Instruction CERTIFICATE-BEEF PRODUCTION should he/she decide to obtain an advanced degree.The Beef Production Certificate program is anintensive curriculum designed to train the student The recommended courses listed below arefor an entry level management position in the designed to transfer to the U W College ofProduction Livestock Industry. The program Agriculture, Farm/Ranch Management Option.emphasizes hands-on learning through labs and Other colleges may have other requirements.practicum experience. New technologies usedinclude: computer assisted ration formulation Students must complete all programand record keeping, ultrasound equipment, requirements, including approved electives, withsoftware for cowherd management and farm a “C” or better.management, and GPS. FRESHMAN YEARStudents must complete all program Fall Semester Creditrequirements with a “C” grade or better. MATH 1400 Pre-Calculus Algebra 4 CHEM 1000 Introductory Chemistry 4 FRESHMAN YEAR ENGL 1010 English I: Composition 3Fall Semester Credit COSC 1200 Computer InformationAGEC 2010 Farm-Ranch Business Records3 Systems 3ANSC 2030 Principles of Livestock HMDV 1000 College Studies 1 Feeding 4 PEAC Approved Activity/ Fitness Course 1AECL 1000 Agroecology 4 Total 16or BIOL 1000 Principles of Biologyor BIOL 1010 General Biology Spring Semester CreditHMDV 1000 College Studies 1 BIOL 1010 General Biology I 4ANSC 2110 Beef Production and ENGL 1020 English II 3 Management 3 CO/M 1010 Public Speaking 3ANSC 1210 Beg. Livestock Judging 2 PEAC Approved Activity/ Total 17 Fitness Course 1 *Agriculture Electives 6Spring Semester Credit Total 17AGEC 2150 Agri-Business Finance 3REWM 2000 Princ. of Range Mgmt 3ANSC 1100 Mgmt of Reproduction 4 SOPHOMORE YEARAGTK 1550 Veterinary Elements 4 Fall Semester CreditAGEC 1970 Ag Internship 2 MATH 2350 Business Calculus 4 Written Exam AGEC 1010 Agricultural Economics I 3 (Outcomes Assessment) ACCT 1010 Principles of Accounting I 3 Total 16 Humanities or Visual, Performing, Fine Arts/ AGRICULTURAL BUSINESS Cultural Awareness 3 *Agriculture Electives 3 Total 16DEGREE: CREDITSASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE 64 Spring Semester Credit STAT 2050 Fundamentals of Statistics 4The two-year agricultural-business program at ECON 1020 Microeconomics 3Eastern Wyoming College is designed to provide ACCT 1020 Principles of Accounting II 3advanced training for individuals with a desire to Constitutional Requirement 3broaden their scope of career opportunities with AGEC 2395 AG Capstone Project 2marketing firms, agricultural supply installations, (Outcomes Assessment)equipment and fertilizer companies, and other Total 15businesses serving agriculture. The curriculumwas planned so that the student can transfer thecredit earned to other colleges and universities 75
    • Programs of Instruction*Approved Agricultural Electives: Spring Semester CreditAGEC 2150 Agri-Business Finance 3 CO/M 1010 Public Speaking 3ANSC 1010 Livestock Production I 4 ENGL 1020 English II 3REWM 2000 Principles of Range STAT 2050 Fundamentals of Statistics 4 Management 3 PEAC Approved Activity/CROP 2200 Forage Crop Science 3 Fitness Course 1AGEC 2350 Agricultural Commodities REWM 2000 Principles of Range in Marketing 2 Management 3AGEC 2300 Agricultural Marketing 2 Total 14AGEC 2020 Farm-Ranch Business Management 3 SOPHOMORE YEAR Fall Semester Credit AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS AGEC 1010 Agricultural Economics I 3 Refer to: Agriculture (General) AGEC 2010 Farm-Ranch Business Records 3 AGRI 1010 Computers: Agriculture 3 Constitutional Requirement 3 AGRICULTURE CHEM 1000 Introductory Chemistry 4 PEAC Approved Activity/DEGREE CREDITS Fitness Course 1ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE Total 17GENERAL AGRICULTURE 64AGRICULTURE EDUCATION 67 Spring Semester CreditRANGELAND ECOLOGY AND WATERSHED AGEC 2020 Farm-Ranch BusinessMANAGEMENT 68 Management 3 ECON 1020 Microeconomics 3 GENERAL AGRICULTURE CHEM 2300 Introductory Organic Chemistry 4 Cultural AwarenessThe general agricultural curriculum is offered for or Humanities 3students who desire basic training in a number AGEC 2395 AG Capstone Project 2of agricultural subjects. It is recommended for (Outcomes Assessment)training for professions which involve a broad Total 15knowledge of agriculture—operators andmanagers of general farms, county agricultural AGRICULTURE EDUCATIONagents, agricultural writers, and many other typesof commercial agricultural positions. The agriculture education curriculum provides the student with a good preparation forStudents must complete all program transferring to a bachelor completion programrequirements, including approved electives, with at a four-year institution. It is designed fora “C” or better. those interested in teaching in high schools, technical schools, and community colleges. This FRESHMAN YEAR program emphasizes animal science and generalFall Semester Credit agricultural courses. Education programs varyANSC 1210 Beginning Livestock greatly at four-year institutions so the student Judging 2BIOL 1010 General Biology I 4 should consult the catalog of the college orANSC 1010 Livestock Production I 4 university of his/her choice for information onENGL 1010 English I: Composition 3 specific program requirements.HMDV 1000 College Studies 1MATH 1400 Pre-Calculus Algebra 4 Students must complete all program Total 18 requirements including approved electives with a “C” or better. 76
    • Programs of Instruction FRESHMAN YEAR RANGELAND ECOLOGY ANDFall Semester Credit WATERSHED MANAGEMENTEDFD 2020 Foundations of Education 3ENGL 1010 English I:Composition 3 Rangeland is a fundamental, renewable naturalHMDV 1000 College Studies 1 resource. Throughout the western U.S., it offersMATH 1400 Pre-Calculus Algebra 4PEAC Approved Activity/ a wide-range of opportunities for the multiple Fitness Course 1 uses of livestock and wildlife grazing, recreation,ANSC 1210 Beginning Livestock water production and natural beauty. The Judging I 2 rangeland ecology and watershed managementBIOL 1010 General Biology I 4 curriculum is designed for students wishing toor AECL 1000 Agroecology study ecology, utilization and management of Total 18 rangelands and wildland watersheds, and related resources including forestry, recreation, wildlifeSpring Semester Credit management, soil science, botany and zoology.ENGL 1020 English II 3 The curriculum is designed so that students canPEAC Approved Activity/ transfer to four-year institutions and prepare for Fitness Course 1PSYC 1000 General Psychology 3 careers in natural resource management as Range Constitutional Requirement 3 Conservationists, Soil Conservationists, andSTAT 2050 Fundamentals of Statistics 4 Range or Forest Hydrologists. *Agriculture Elective 3 Total 17 Students must complete all program SOPHOMORE YEAR requirements, including approved electives, withFall Semester Credit a “C” or better.CHEM 1000 Introductory Chemistry 4EDUC 2100 Practicum in Teaching 2 FRESHMAN YEAR Humanities 3 Fall Semester CreditAGEC 1010 Agricultural Economics I 3 BIOL 1010 General Biology I 4ANSC 1010 Livestock Production I 4 CHEM 1000 Introductory Chemistry 4 Total 16 ENGL 1010 English I: Composition 3 MATH 1000 Problem Solving 3Spring Semester Credit REWM 2500 Rangeland PlantEDEX 2484 Introduction to Special Identification 2 Education 3 HMDV 1000 College Studies 1 Cultural Awareness 3 PEAC Approved Activity/ITEC 2360 Teaching with Technology Fitness Course 1or AGRI 1010 Computers in Agriculture 3 Total 18CO/M 1010 Public Speaking 3PSYC 2300 Developmental Psychology 3 Spring Semester CreditEDFD 2451 Life Span-Adulthood 1 Constitutional Requirement 3 Total 16 CO/M 1010 Public Speaking 3 REWM 1300 Introduction to Water*Approved Ag Electives: Any Ag course at the 1000 Resources 3or above level. REWM 2000 Principles of Range Management 3 ENGL 1020 English II 3 PEAC Approved Activity/ Fitness Course 1 Total 16 77
    • Programs of Instruction SOPHOMORE YEAR Spring Semester CreditFall Semester Credit BIOL 2020 General Biology II 4AGEC 1010 Agricultural Economics I 3 CO/M 1010 Public Speaking 3BIOL 2415 Ecology and Field Biology 4 ENGL 1020 English II 3ZOO 2450 Principles of Fish and PEAC Approved Activity/ Wildlife Management 3 Fitness Course 1 Social Science 3 *Approved Agriculture Cultural Awareness 3 Electives 6CMAP 1765 Spreadsheet Total 17 Applications: EXCEL 2 Total 18 SOPHOMORE YEAR Fall Semester CreditSpring Semester Credit AGEC 1010 Agricultural Economics I 3STAT 2050 Fundamentals of Statistics 4 ANSC 1010 Livestock Production I 4RNEW 2100 Forest Management 3 CHEM 1000 Introductory Chemistry 4SOIL 2200 Applied Soils 3 Constitutional Requirement 3CROP 2200 Forage Crop Science 3 *Approved AgricultureHMDV 2000 Sophomore Project Electives 3 (Outcomes Assessment) 3 Total 17 Total 16 Spring Semester Credit ANIMAL SCIENCE STAT 2050 Fundamentals of Statistics 4 CHEM 2300 Introductory Organic 4DEGREE: CREDITS ChemistryASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE 66 Cultural Awareness 3 Humanities 3 AGEC 2395 AG Capstone Project 2The recommended courses listed below are (Outcomes Assessment)designed to transfer to the University of Total 16Wyoming College of Agriculture, Animal ScienceProduction option. Other colleges or universities *Approved Ag Electives: Any Ag course at the 1000may have other requirements and students should or above level.work with their EWC advisors to plan for othercollege requirements.Students must complete all programrequirements including approved electives with a“C” or better. FRESHMAN YEARFall Semester CreditAGRI 1010 Computers: Agriculture 3BIOL 1010 General Biology I 4ENGL 1010 English I: Composition 3HMDV 1000 College Studies 1MATH 1400 Pre-Calculus Algebra 4PEAC Approved Activity/ Fitness Course 1 Total 16 78
    • Programs of Instruction ART *Art Electives: ART 2005 Drawing II 3DEGREE: CREDITS ART 2220 Painting II 3ASSOCIATE OF ARTS 67-69 ART 2420 Ceramics II 3 ART 1250 Water Based Media I 3 ART 1179 Adobe Photoshop I 3Students must complete all program ART 2145 Digital Photography 3requirements, including approved electives, witha grade of C or better. **Approved Electives: MUSC 1000 Introduction to Music 3 FRESHMAN YEAR SOC 1000 Sociological Principles 3Fall Semester Credit WELD 1700 General Welding 3ART 1005 Beginning Drawing 3 ENGL 2210 English Literature I 3ART 1110 Foundation: ENGL 2220 English Literature II 3 Two Dimensional 3 ENGL 2310 American Literature I 3ENGL 1010 English I: Composition 3 ENGL 2320 American Literature II 3HMDV 1000 College Studies 1 RELI 1000 Introduction to Religion 3PEAC Approved Activity/ ANTH 1100 Intro to Physical Anth 3 Fitness Course 1 ANTH 1200 Intro to Cultural Anth 3 Humanities 3 GEOG 1000 Introduction to World Lab Science 4 Regional Geography 3 Total 18 GEOG 1010 Introduction to Physical Geography 3Spring Semester Credit PHIL 1000 Introduction to Philosophy 3ART 1130 Foundation: Color Theory 3 MUSC 2050 Music History Survey I 3ART 2210 Beginning Painting 3 MUSC 2055 Music History Survey II 3ART 1310 Sculpture I 3ENGL 1020 English II 3 BIOLOGY Constitutional Requirement 3 **Approved Elective 3 Total 18 DEGREE: CREDITS ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE SOPHOMORE YEAR BIOLOGY 67-71Fall Semester Credit ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 66-67ART 2410 Ceramics I 3ART 2010 Art History I 3 BIOLOGYCO/M 1010 Public Speaking 3MATH 1000 Problem Solving The Biology major is a transfer program designedor MATH 1400 Pre-Calculus Algebra 3-4 for students interested in training in the biologicalPEAC Approved Activity/ sciences. It enables students to combine courses Fitness Course 1 in biology, botany, zoology, and molecular biologyHIST 1110 Western Civilization I (or II Spring) to meet specific interests. or **Approved Elective 3 Total 16-17 Students must complete all program requirements including approved electives with aSpring Semester Credit “C” or better.ART 2020 Art History II 3PSYC 1000 General Psychology 3 FRESHMAN YEARHIST 1120 Western Civilization II 3 Fall Semester Credit (or I Fall) BIOL 1010 General Biology I 4 or **Approved Elective CHEM 1020 General Chemistry I 4 Cultural Awareness 3 ENGL 1010 English I:Composition 3 *Art Elective 3 HMDV 1000 College Studies 1 Outcomes Assessment: MATH 1400 Pre-Calculus Algebra 4 Exhibition/Demonstration Total 16 Total 15 79
    • Programs of InstructionSpring Semester Credit ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCEBIOL 2020 General Biology II 4CHEM 1030 General Chemistry II 4 The Environmental Science option providesENGL 1020 English II 3 students with a strong foundation to pursueMATH 1405 Pre-Calculus academic transfer programs in Environmental Trigonometry 3PEAC Approved Activity/ Engineering, Environmental Quality, or Fitness Course 1 Environmental Protection. The program will Social Science 3 help prepare students for careers with state and Total 18 federal agencies or the private sector. SOPHOMORE YEAR Students must complete all programFall Semester Credit requirements including approved electives with aBIOL 2415 Ecology and Field Biology 4 “C” or better.CMAP 1765 Spreadsheet Applications II: Microsoft Excel 2-3or COSC 1200 Computer Information FRESHMAN YEAR Systems Fall Semester CreditPEAC Approved Activity/ BIOL 1010 General Biology I 4 Fitness Course 1 CHEM 1020 General Chemistry I 4 Constitutional Requirement 3 ENGL 1010 English I: Composition 3 *Approved Electives 7-8 HMDV 1000 College Studies 1 Total 17-19 MATH 1400 Pre-Calculus Algebra 4 PEAC Approved Activity/Spring Semester Credit Fitness Course 1MOLB 2220 Pathogenic Microbiology 4 Total 17 Cultural Awareness 3 Humanities or Visual, Spring Semester Credit Performing, Fine Arts 3 CHEM 1030 General Chemistry II 4 *Approved Electives 6-8 ENGL 1020 English II 3 Outcomes Assessment: MATH 1405 Pre-Calculus Departmental Exam Trigonometry 3 Total 16-18 Constitutional Requirement 3 PEAC Approved Activity/*Approved Electives: Fitness Course 1BIOL 1080 Environmental Science 3 Cultural Awareness 3BIOL 2200 Genetics 3 Total 17RNEW 2100 Forest Management 3CHEM 2320 Organic Chemistry I 4 SOPHOMORE YEARCHEM 2340 Organic Chemistry II 4 Fall Semester CreditGEOL 1100 Physical Geology 4 BIOL 2415 Ecology and Field Biology 4MOLB 2210 General Microbiology 4 CMAP 1765 Spreadsheet ApplicationsPHYS 1110 General Physics I 4 II: Microsoft Excel 2-3PHYS 1120 General Physics II 4 or COSC 1200 Computer InformationSPAN 1010 1st Year Spanish I 4 SystemsZOO 2015 Human Anatomy 4 PHYS 1110 General Physics I 4ZOO 2025 Human Physiology 4 SOIL 2200 Applied Soils 3ZOO 2400 Vertebrate Natural GEOL 1100 Physical Geology History 4 or GEOL 1200 Historical Geology 4ZOO 2450 Principles of Fish and Total 17-18 Wildlife Management 3 80
    • Programs of InstructionSpring Semester Credit SOPHOMORE YEARBIOL 1080 Environmental Science 3 Fall Semester CreditSTAT 2050 Fundamentals of Statistics 4 ECON 1010 Macroeconomics 3 Humanities or Visual, MATH 2350 Business Calculus 4 Performing Fine Arts 3 CO/M 1010 Public Speaking 3REWM 2000 Principles of Range Mgmt 3 ACCT 2450 Cost Accounting 3or BOT 2100 Forest Management MKT 2100 Principles of Marketing 3 Social Science 3 *Approved Electives 2 Outcomes Assessment: Total 18 Departmental Exam Total 16 Spring Semester Credit ECON 1020 Microeconomics 3 BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BADM 2010 Business Law I 3 MATH 2355 Mathematical Applications for Business 4DEGREES: CREDITS IMGT 2400 Introduction to InformationASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE 64 Management 3ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE 64 *Approved Electives 3 Outcomes Assessment: ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE Departmental Exam and Core Competency EvaluationThe suggested program in accounting/business Total 16administration allows the student to earn anAssociate of Science Degree while completing *Approved Electives: Any course at the 1000 orthe first two years of college work toward a above level.bachelor’s degree. Those majoring in accounting,marketing, management, finance or other specific ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCEareas of business generally take the same coursesduring the first two years. The purpose of this flexible program is to provide an individual with entry level business skills. ItStudents must complete all program emphasizes the accounting, office management,requirements, including approved electives, with and computer areas. It is designed for the studenta “C” or better. who does not intend to transfer to another college to earn a bachelor’s degree. In addition FRESHMAN YEAR to fulfilling the requirements for the Associate ofFall Semester Credit Applied Science Degree, a grade of “C” or betterACCT 1010 Principles of Accounting I 3 must be received in each of the required courses,ENGL 1010 English I: Composition 3 including electives.HMDV 1000 College Studies 1or HMDV 1025Orientation to Distance FRESHMAN YEAR Learning Fall Semester Credit Constitutional Requirement 3 **ACCT 1050Practical Accounting I 2PEAC Approved Activity/ BADM 1000 Introduction to Business 3 Fitness Course 1 CMAP 1610 Windows: 1MATH 1400 Pre-Calculus Algebra 4 HMDV 1000 College Studies 1 Total 15 ENGL 1010 English I: Composition 3 *Approved Electives 6Spring Semester Credit Total 16ACCT 1020 Principles of Accounting II 3ENGL 1020 English II 3STAT 2050 Fundamentals of Statistics 4PEAC Approved Activity/ Fitness Course 1 Lab Science 4 Total 15 81
    • Programs of InstructionSpring Semester Credit BUSINESS EDUCATIONACCT 1060 Practical Accounting II 2BADM 1005 Business Mathematics I 3 DEGREE CREDITSCMAP 1700 Word Processing: ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE 64-65 WordPerfector CMAP 1715 Word Processing: Microsoft Word 2 This program offers many of the education Constitutional Requirement 3 courses required for business education majors *Approved Electives 6 as well as office and computer skills necessary for Total 16 employment in a business office. The program is designed for the student wishing to transfer SOPHOMORE YEAR after two years to complete a teaching degreeFall Semester Credit in business education at a four-year institution.BADM 1020 Business Communications 3 Education programs vary greatly at four-yearBOTK 2750 Records & Information institutions, so students should consult the catalog Management 3 of the college or university of their choice forCMAP 1900 Integrated Applications: information on the specific requirements of that MS Office 2ECON 1010 Macroeconomics 3 institution.INET 1580 Web Page Authoring 1 *Approved Electives 4 Students must complete all program Total 16 requirements, including approved electives, withSpring Semester Credit a “C” or better.ACCT 2110 Microcomputer Accounting I 2BOTK 1970 Occupational Internship I 3 FRESHMAN YEARBADM 2395 Business Office Capstone 3 Fall Semester CreditCMAP 1765 Spreadsheet Applications ECON 1010 Macroeconomics 3 II: Excel 2 EDFD 2020 Foundations of Education 3 *Approved Electives 6 ENGL 1010 English I: Composition 3 Outcomes Assessment: HMDV 1000 College Studies 1 Electronic Portfolio MATH 1400 Pre-Calculus Algebra 4 Total 16 PSYC 1000 General Psychology 3 Total 17*Approved Electives: Any course at the 1000 orabove level. Spring Semester Credit** ACCT 1010 may be taken in place of ACCT 1050 EDFD 2100 Educational Psychology 3and ACCT 1060. ITEC 2360 Teaching with Technology 3 EDUC 2100 Practicum in Teaching 2-3 PEAC Approved Activity/ Fitness Course 1 Cultural Awareness 3 Visual, Performing, Fine Arts 3 Total 15-16 SOPHOMORE YEAR Fall Semester Credit ACCT 1010 Principles of Accounting I 3 Constitutional Requirement 3 MKT 2100 Principles of Marketing 3 PEAC Approved Activity/ Fitness Course 1 Lab Science 4 *Approved Electives 4 Total 18 82
    • Programs of InstructionSpring Semester Credit Spring Semester CreditACCT 1020 Principles of Accounting II 3 CMAP 1765 Spreadsheet Applications II:HLED 1221 Standard First Aid MS Excel 2 & Safety 2 BOTK 1510 Office Skills and Services 3BADM 2010 Business Law I 3 BADM 1005 Business Mathematics I 3ENGL 1020 English II 3 CMAP 2630 Presentation Graphics: Humanities 3 PowerPoint 1 Outcomes Assessment: BOTK 1970 Occupational Internship I 2 Portfolio INET 1590 Web Page Design: 3 Total 14 *Approved Electives 2 Total 16*Approved Electives: Any course at the 1000 orabove level. SOPHOMORE YEAR Fall Semester Credit BUSINESS OFFICE TECHNOLOGY ACCT 1050 Practical Accounting I 2 BADM 1020 Business Communications 3DEGREE CREDITS CO/M 1010 Public Speaking 3 Constitutional Requirement 3ASSOCIATE OFAPPLIED SCIENCE 64 *Approved Electives 5CERTIFICATE 32 Total 16COMPUTER APPLICATIONSCERTIFICATE 12 Spring Semester Credit ACCT 1060 Practical Accounting II 2 ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE- BOTK 2970 Occupational Internship II 3 BUSINESS OFFICE TECHNOLOGY BADM 2395 Business Office Capstone 3 *Approved Electives 8This program is an expanded coverage of Outcomes Assessment:the certificate program to allow students the Electronic Portfolioopportunity to learn skills in the fields of Total 16accounting, and written and oral communications *For Associate of Applied Science—Business Officenecessary for success in the business field. Technology approved electives: Eight (8) must beStudents who complete one of the options for from approved business electives and five (5) can bethe Business Office Technology program will be general electives. Approved business electives mayable to transfer all of the coursework towards this be from Computer Applications (CMAP), BusinessA.A.S. degree. Office Technology (BOTK), Accounting (ACCT), Business Administration (BADM), Management (MGT), Economics (ECON), Computer ScienceStudents must complete all program (COSC), or Marketing (MKT).requirements, including approved electives, witha “C” or better. FRESHMAN YEARFall Semester CreditBOTK 1645 Keyboarding Office Documents 3TECH 1005 or Applied Technical Writing 3Or ENGL 1010 English I: CompositionCMAP 1715 Word Processing: MS Word 2HMDV 1000 College Studies 1BOTK 2750 Records and Information Management 3INET 1580 Web Page Authoring 2 *Approved Electives 2 Total 16 83
    • Programs of Instruction CERTIFICATE- BUSINESS CERTFICATE - COMPUTER APPLICATIONS OFFICE TECHNOLOGY This program will enable a student to meet theThis program provides basic training in computer entry level requirements for jobs that requireapplications, business communication skills, computer software uses. It will provide a solidand general office procedures. It is designed background in current software uses and ato compliment the Business Office Technology foundation to learn new software programs. Itprogram because graduates may continue their will provide a solid foundation for beginningstudies to receive an Associate of Applied Science employment skills in computer software relateddegree in Business Office Technology. employment.Students must complete all program Students must complete all programrequirements, including approved electives, with requirements, including approved electives, witha “C” or better. a “C” or better. FRESHMAN YEAR HMDV 1000 College Studies 1Fall Semester Credit CMAP 1500 Computer Keyboarding 1BOTK 1645 Keyboarding Office CMAP 1610 Windows: 1 Documents 3 CMAP 1715 Word Processing:TECH 1005 Applied Technical Writing 3 MS Word 2or ENGL 1010 English I: Composition CMAP 1765 Spreadsheet Applications I:CMAP 1715 Word Processing: MS Excel 2 MS Word 2HMDV 1000 College Studies 1 CMAP 1886 Outlook 1BOTK 2750 Records and Information CMAP 1900 Integrated Applications I: Management 3 MS Office 2INET 1580 Web Page Authoring 2 CMAP 1915 MS Office-Advanced Concepts *Electives 2 & Techniques 2 Total 16 Outcome Assessment: PortfolioSpring Semester Credit Total 12CMAP 1765 Spreadsheet Applications II: MS Excel 2BOTK 1510 Office Skills and Services 3BADM 1005 Business Mathematics I 3CMAP 2630 Presentation Graphics: PowerPoint 1BOTK 1970 Occupational Internship I: 2INET 1590 Web Page Design 3 *Electives 2 Outcomes Assessment: Electronic Portfolio Total 16*Electives: Any course at the 1000 or above level. 84
    • Programs of Instruction COMMUNICATION SOPHOMORE YEAR Fall Semester CreditDEGREE: CREDITS CO/M 1030 InterpersonalASSOCIATE OF ARTS 64-68 Communication 3 COSC Computer Elective 1-3 or CMAPBecause there are so many possible majors within PEAC Approved Activity/the field of communication, individual programs Fitness Course 1of study should be tailored to the student’s PSYC 1000 General Psychology 3specific interest and to the requirements of *Approved Electives 6the college or university to which the student Total 14-17plans to transfer. General programs that areavailable for concentration include Interpersonal Spring Semester CreditCommunication, Public Address, and Speech CO/M 1010 Public Speaking 3Pathology. Students who plan to become PEAC Approved Activity/teachers should also consult the program for Fitness Course 1Secondary Education. While this is not a degree *Approved Electives 6 Cultural Awareness 3in journalism, students wishing to major in Humanities 3journalism should consult transfer programs and CO/M 2395 Social Science Capstoneadvisors for appropriate additional courses. The Experienceprogram shown below is particularly appropriate Total 16for liberal arts students planning to transfer to theUniversity of Wyoming. *Approved CO/M Electives: ANTH 1100 Introduction to PhysicalStudents must complete all program Anthropologyrequirements, including electives, with a grade of ANTH 1200 Introduction to Cultural“C” or better. Anthropology ART 1010 Introduction to Art ART 2010 Art History I FRESHMAN YEAR ART 2020 Art History IIFall Semester Credit CO/M 2100 Reporting and Newswriting IENGL 1010 English I: Composition 3 ENGL 2210 English Literature IFREN 1010 1st Year French I 4 ENGL 2220 English Literature IIor SPAN 1010 1st Year Spanish I ENGL 2310 American Literature IHMDV 1000 College Studies 1 ENGL 2320 American Literature IIMATH 1000 Problem Solving 3-4 HIST 1110 Western Civilization Ior MATH 1400 Pre-Calculus Algebra HIST 1120 Western Civilization IISOC 1000 Sociological Principles 3 JOUR 1010 Publication Production I *Approved Elective 3 MUSC 1000 Introduction to Music Total 17-18 MUSC 2015 Introduction to the Music of the World’s PeoplesSpring Semester Credit PHIL 1000 Introduction to PhilosophyCO/M 1040 Intro to Human PSYC 2330 Psychology of Adjustment Communication 3 RELI 1000 Introduction to ReligionENGL 1020 English II 3FREN 1020 1st Year French II 4or SPAN 1020 1st Year Spanish II Constitutional Requirement 3 Lab Science 4 Total 17 85
    • Programs of Instruction COMPUTER SCIENCE Spring Semester Credit CMAP 1995 Certification Preparation 2DEGREE: CREDITS CMAP 1930 LAN Wiring and NetworkCERTIFICATE-INFORMATION SUPPORT Technologies 3SPECIALIST 31 BADM 1005 Business Mathematics 3 or MATH 1000 Problem SolvingASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE- CMAP 1940 LAN Server Installation andCOMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 64 Configuration 4CERTIFICATE-WEB DESIGN 30 CMAP 1970 Occupational Internship 3 Outcomes Assessment: CERTIFICATE-INFORMATION CompTIA A+ Exam SUPPORT SPECIALIST Total 15The Information Support Specialist (ISS)certificate program will prepare graduates ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE-with the knowledge, skills, experience, COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMSand certifications necessary for a career inInformation Technologies. Through on-linecurricula, lab simulations and occupational The Computer Information Systems A.A.S.internships, students will gain experience in program will prepare graduates for a professionalcomputer hardware and software, local area and career in Information Technologies. Throughwide area networking technologies, wireless on-line curricula, hands-on lab activities, andtechnologies, web page authoring, and soft skills occupational internships, students will gainas a remote support specialist. This program experience in computer hardware and software,is designed to transition into the Computer local area and wide area networking technologies,Information Systems A.A.S. degree, or directly wireless technologies, web page authoring,into the workforce. It is designed to be database management, computer programmingcompleted in two semesters. and game design, security, network design and sustainability, communication skills, and soft skillsStudents must complete all program as a remote support technician. This program isrequirements, including approved electives, with designed to be completed in four semesters.a “C” or better. Students must complete all program requirements, including electives, with a “C” orFall Semester Credit better.COSC 1200 Computer Information Systems 3TECH 1005 Applied Technical Freshman Year Writing 3 Fall Semester Creditor ENGL 1010 English I:Composition COSC 1200 Computer InformationCMAP 1625 Introduction to OS Systems 3 and Hardware 4 TECH 1005 Applied Technical Writing 3INET 1580 World Wide Web Authoring 2 or ENGL 1010 English I: CompositionCMAP 1650 Local Area Networks I 3 CMAP 1625 Introduction to OS andHMDV 1000 College Studies 1 Hardware 4 Total 16 INET 1580 World Wide Web Authoring 2 CMAP 1650 Local Area Networks I 3 HMDV 1000 College Studies 1 Total 16 86
    • Programs of InstructionSpring Semester Credit Spring Semester CreditINET 1590 Web Page Design 3 ART 2145 Digital Photography 3CMAP 1930 LAN Wiring and Network TECH 1005 Applied Technical Writing 3 Technologies 3 or ENGL 1010 English I: CompositionBADM 1005 Business Mathematics 3 INET 1610 Dynamics Web Graphics:or MATH 1000 Problem Solving Flash Web Design 3CMAP 1940 LAN Server Installation INET 2000 Advanced Web Programming 3 and Configuration 4 INET 2010 Database Driven Web Sites 3CMAP 1970 Occupational Internship 2 Outcomes Assessment: *Approved Electives 1 Capstone Web Page Total 16 Total 15 Sophomore YearFall Semester CreditCOSC 1010 Intro to Computer Science I 4BADM 1020 Business Communications 3 CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY Constitutional Requirement 3CMAP 1955 LAN Design & THIS PROGRAM IS NOT Implementation 3 CURRENTLY OFFEREDCMAP 1800 Database Applications I 2 *Approved Electives 2 DEGREE CREDITS Total 17 ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE 67 CERTIFICATE 38Spring Semester CreditCOSC 1030 Computer Science I, The A.A.S. degree program allows students who Programming with C ++ 4 have completed the Construction TechnologyCMAP 1995 Certification Preparation 2CMAP 2720 Systems Management 3 certificate to further their general education. ItCMAP 2970 Occupational Internship 6 provides the necessary preparation for students Total 15 to transfer to a college or university that offers a Bachelor of Applied Science (B.A.S.) degree.*Approved Electives: Any course at the 1000 orabove level. Freshman Year Fall Semester Credits CNTK 1510 Safety and Tools in CERTIFICATE -WEB DESIGN Construction 3 CNTK 1520 Residential BlueprintThis certificate program is designed to prepare Reading 3students for entry-level positions in the CNTK 1530 Site Preparation 3Information Technology (IT) industry with CNTK 1540 Foundation Systems 3emphasis in Web Design. Total 12Fall Semester Credit Spring Semester CreditsART 1110 Foundation: CNTK 1650 Framing: Floor Two-Dimensional 3 and Stairs 2ART 1179 Photoshop I 3 CNTK 1652 Framing: Walls, WindowsCOSC 1200 Computer Information And Exterior Doors 2 Systems 3 CNTK 1654 Framing: Walls, Roof 2INET 1580 Web Page Authoring 2 CNTK 1550 Concrete Flatwork 2INET 1590 Web Page Design 3 CNTK 1658 Exterior: Siding,INET 1510 Web Site Analysis 1 Trim, and Finishes 2HMDV 1000 College Studies 1 CNTK 1760 Mechanical Systems: Total 16 Heating 2 CNTK 1764 Mechanical System: Electrical 2 Total 14 87
    • Programs of InstructionSummer Semester Credits CERTIFICATE -CONSTRUCTIONCNTK 1880 Interior: Drywall TECHNOLOGY Applications 2CNTK 1882 Interior: Taping, Mudding, THIS PROGRAM IS NOT and Texturing 2 CURRENTLY OFFEREDCNTK 1884 Interior: Painting and Wallpaper 2CNTK 1920 Interior Trim: Closets 2 The Technical Certificate for Construction TechnologyCNTK 1924 Interior Trim: Cabinets 2 is an 11 month, open entry/exit program designed toCNTK 1926 Interior Trim: Moldings 2 prepare students for employment in residential home Total 12 building. This is a three semester certificate program. Sophomore Year Students will learn all phases of the latest cutting edge technologies. The courses are hands on, on site, andFall Semester Credits taught by highly qualified and educated instructors/HMDV 1000 College Studies 1 contractors. This certificate program is designed forCO/M 1010 Public Speaking 3 students to enter the world of work or to further their Constitutional Requirement 3 education.ACCT 1050 Practical Accounting 2ENGL 1010 English I: Composition 3 Fall Semester CreditPEAC Approved Activity/ CNTK 1510 Safety & Tools in Fitness Course 1 Construction 3ENTK 2500 Computer Aided CNTK 1520 Residential Blueprint Drafting I 1 Reading 3 Total 14 CNTK 1530 Site Preparation 3 CNTK 1540 Foundation Systems 3Spring Semester Total 12ENGL 1020 English II 3MATH 1000 Problem Solving 3 Spring Semester CreditSOC 1000 Sociology Principles 3 CNTK 1650 Framing: Floor and Stairs 2 Lab Science 4 CNTK 1652 Framing: Walls, Windows,ACCT 1060 Practical Accounting II 2 and Exterior Doors 2 Outcomes Assessment: CNTK 1654 Framing: Walls, Roof 2 Construction Journal, CAAP Test CNTK 1550 Concrete Flatwork 2 Total 15 CNTK 1658 Exterior: Siding, Trim and Finishes 2 CNTK 1760 Mechanical Systems: Heating 2 CNTK 1764 Mechanical Systems: Electrical 2 Total 14 Summer Semester Credit CNTK 1880 Interior: Drywall Appls 2 CNTK 1882 Interior: Taping, Mudding, and Texturing 2 CNTK 1884 Interior: Painting & Wallpaper2 CNTK 1920 Interior Trim: Closets 2 CNTK 1924 Interior Trim: Cabinets 2 CNTK 1926 Interior Trim: Moldings 2 Outcomes Assessment: Construction Journal Total 12 88
    • Programs of Instruction COSMETOLOGY Sophomore Year Fall Semester CreditDEGREE CREDITS CSMO 1400 Cosmetology Lab I 3ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE 81-82 CSMO 1405 Cosmetology Lab II 3 CSMO 1510 Clinical Applications III 6 CSMO 1515 Clinical Applications IV 6Other Options: Total 18HAIR TECHNICIAN CERTIFICATE 30NAIL TECHNICIAN CERTIFICATE 17 Spring Semester CreditSKIN TECHNICIAN CERTIFICATE 22 CSMO 1420 Cosmetology Lab V 3 CSMO 1520 Clinical Applications V 6 ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE- CSMO 1525 Clinical Applications VI 1 COSMETOLOGY CSMO 1575 Post Cosmetology Assessment 1 ENGL 1010 English I:Composition 3The cosmetology program includes not only or TECH 1005 Applied Technical Writingthe 2000 hours of cosmetology course work Constitutional Requirement 2-3as required by Wyoming law, but additional Total 16-17studies to broaden the scope of opportunities Summer Optionin the field. Graduates of this program should CSMO 1425 Techniques in Cosmetology 3possess a salable skill and be prepared to take CSMO 1535 Clinical Applications VIII 1-6the national examination for entry into the field Total 9of cosmetology. In addition to fulfilling therequirements for the Associate of Applied Science HAIR TECHNICIAN CERTIFICATEDegree, a grade of C or better must be receivedin all courses taken in cosmetology. The Hair Technology Certificate is designed for the student who only desires education/trainingStudents must complete all program in the area of hair design. This program beginsrequirements, including approved electives, with in the SECOND HALF of the fall semester, anda “C” or better. ends in the summer semester. Completion of this program prepares the student for national testing Freshman Year in the area of hair technology. Students mustFall Semester Credit complete all program requirements with a gradeCSMO 1000 Intro to Nail Technology 3 of “C” or better.CSMO 1005 Nail Technology Lab 4CSMO 1550 General Cosmetology Fall Semester Credit Science 3 CSMO 1550 General CosmetologyCSMO 1025 Hair Fundamentals 4 Science 3CMAP 1765 Spreadsheet Applications II: CSMO 1025 Hair Fundamentals 4 Excel 2 Total 7HMDV 1000 College Studies 1ENTR 1500 Successful Entrepreneurship 2 Spring Semester Creditor ENTR 1520 Creating a Business Plan CSMO 1020 Intro to Hair Technology 3or ENTR 2500 Small Business Operation CSMO 1035 Hair Fundamentals II 2 Mgmt CSMO 1500 Clinical Applications I 3 Total 19 CSMO 1030 Intro to Hair Technology II 2 CSMO 1505 Clinical Applications II 3Spring Semester Credit Total 13CSMO 1020 Intro to Hair Technology 3CSMO 1035 Hair Fundamentals II 2 Summer Option CreditCSMO 1010 Intro to Skin Technology 3 CSMO 1425 Techniques in Cosmetology 3CSMO 1015 Skin Technology Lab 1 CSMO 1535 Clinical Applications VIII 1-6CSMO 1030 Intro to Hair Technology II 2 CSMO 1375 Hair Technician Assessment 1CSMO 1505 Clinical Applications II 3 Total 10CSMO 1210 Esthetic Concepts I 2BADM 1005 Business Mathematics I 3or MATH 1515 Applied Technical Math Total 19 89
    • SKIN TECHNICIAN CERTIFICATE CRIMINAL JUSTICEThis course will prepare the student for a DEGREE CREDITScareer in the diversified area of skin care. This ASSOCIATE OF ARTS-program begins in the spring semester only and LAW ENFORCEMENT EMPHASIS 65is completed during the summer semester. The ASSOCIATE OF ARTS-extensive training will also prepare the student CORRECTIONS EMPHASIS 65for national testing in the area of skin care. ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE 65-67 CORRECTIONS CERTIFICATE 31-33Students must complete all programrequirements with a grade of “C” or better. Those considering a career in a criminal justice field should be aware of strict admissions criteriaSpring Semester Credit employed by state standards and criminal justiceCSMO 1010 Intro to Skin Technology 3 agencies. Factors that may disqualify candidatesCSMO 1015 Skin Technology Lab 1 for employment in the profession includeCSMO 1515 Clinical Applications IV 6 conviction of a crime, history of drug abuse,CSMO 1210 Esthetic Concepts I 2 Total 12 psychological problems, and various physcial conditions. Certain classes in the EasternSummer Option Credit Wyoming College criminal justice program mayCSMO 1555 General Cosmetology also be restricted to individuals for the same Science II 3 reasons. Please consult with a department facultyCSMO 1535 Clinical Applications VIII 1-6 advisor if you have any concerns in this area.CSMO 1275 Esthetics Assessment 1 Total 10 ASSOCIATE OF ARTS- CRIMINAL JUSTICE NAIL TECHNICIAN CERTIFICATE LAW ENFORCEMENT EMPHASISThe Nail Technician Certificate is designed to This program option is designed for the criminaltrain the student for an entry-level job in a high justice student who is seeking a career in lawdemand area of Cosmetology. It will also prepare enforcement. It may be used as a terminal degreethe student for national testing in the area of nail or taken as preparation for transfer to a four-technology. Students must complete all program year program. Employment may be found inrequirements with a grade of “C” or better. local, county, state, and federal law enforcement agencies.Fall Semester CreditCSMO 1000 Intro to Nail Technology 3 Students must complete all programCSMO 1005 Nail Technology Lab 4 requirements, including approved electives, withCSMO 1550 General Cosmetology a grade of “C” or better. Science 3CSMO 1515 Clinical Applications IV 6 FRESHMAN YEARCSMO 1175 Nail Technician Assessment 1 Fall Semester Credit Total 17 CRMJ 2120 Intro to Criminal Justice 3 CRMJ 2350 Introduction to Corrections II/I 3 SOC 1000 Sociological Principles 3 Lab Science 4 ENGL 1010 English I: Composition 3 HMDV 1000 College Studies 1 Total 17 90
    • Programs of InstructionSpring Semester Credit FRESHMAN YEARCRMJ 2550 Criminal Investigation I 3 Fall Semester CreditCRMJ 2420 Juvenile Justice 3 CRMJ 2120 Intro to Criminal Justice 3CRMJ 2210 Criminal Law I 3 CRMJ 2350 Intro to Corrections II/I 3ENGL 1020 English II 3 SOC 1000 Sociological Principles 3MATH 1000 Problem Solving 3 Lab Science 4PEAC Approved Activity/ ENGL 1010 English I: Composition 3 Fitness Course 1 HMDV 1000 College Studies 1 Total 16 Total 17 SOPHOMORE YEAR Spring Semester CreditFall Semester Credit PSYC 1000 General Psychology 3CRMJ *Criminal Justice Electives 3 CRMJ 2420 Juvenile Justice 3CRMJ 1510 Law Enforcement Procedures 3 CRMJ 2210 Criminal Law I 3PSYC 1000 General Psychology 3 MATH 1000 Problem Solving 3 Constitutional Requirement 3 ENGL 1020 English II 3 Cultural Awareness Elective 3 PEAC Approved Activity/PEAC Approved Activity/ Fitness Course 1 Fitness Course 1 Total 16 Total 16 SOPHOMORE YEARSpring Semester Credit Fall Semester CreditCO/M 1010 Public Speaking 3 CRMJ 2590 Drugs & Criminal Justice 3CRMJ 2690 Supervised Lab Experience 3 CRMJ 2400 Criminology 3CRMJ 2895 Criminal Justice Capstone Constitutional Requirement 3 Project 1 Visual, Performing, Fine Arts 3 *Criminal Justice Elective 3 Cultural Awareness Elective 3 Humanities 3 PEAC Approved Activity/ **Approved Elective 3 Fitness Course 1 Total 16 Total 16 Spring Semester Credit*Approved Criminal Justice Electives: CO/M 1010 Public Speaking 3CRMJ 2125 Forensic Psychology 3 CRMJ 2690 Supervised Lab Experience 3CRMJ 2280 Criminal Procedures 3 CRMJ 2895 Criminal Justice CapstoneCRMJ 2560 Criminal Investigation II 3 Project 1CRMJ 2570 Criminalistics (Forensics) 3 CRMJ 2370 Institutional Corrections 3CRMJ 2590 Drugs & Criminal Justice 3 CRMJ/PSYC 2125 Forensic Psychology 3CRMJ/SOC 2400 Criminology 3 Humanities 3 Total 16**Approved Elective: Any course at the 1000 orabove level. ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE- CRIMINAL JUSTICE ASSOCIATE OF ARTS- CRIMINAL JUSTICE Those considering a career in a criminal justice CORRECTIONS EMPHASIS field should be aware of strict admissions criteriaThis program option is designed for the criminal employed by state standards and criminal justicejustice student who is seeking a career in agencies. Factors that may disqualify candidatescorrections. It may be used as a terminal degree for employment in the profession includeor taken as preparation for transfer to a four- conviction of a crime, history of drug abuse,year program. Employment may be found in psychological problems, and various physcialcorrectional institutions, probation and parole, conditions. Certain classes in the Easternjuvenile probation, detention facilities, and Wyoming College criminal justice program maycommunity programs. also be restricted to individuals for the same reasons. Please consult with a department facultyStudent must complete all program advisor if you have any concerns in this area.requirements, including approved electives, witha “C” or better. 91
    • Programs of InstructionStudents must complete all program CERTIFICATE-CORRECTIONSrequirements, including approved electives, witha “C” or better. The Corrections Certificate program is designed for both the pre-service student and current FRESHMAN YEAR correctional employee. The program provides theFall Semester Credit academic background for an understanding of theCRMJ 1510 Law Enforcement Procedures3 criminal justice system and the role of correctionsCRMJ 2120 Intro to Criminal Justice 3 within it. It also provides the necessaryCRMJ 2350 Introduction to foundation courses towards the pursuit of the Corrections II/I 3ENGL 1010 English I: Composition 3 Associate of Arts Degree in Criminal Justice.HMDV 1000 College Studies 1PEAC Approved Activity/ Those considering a career in a criminal justice Fitness Course 1 field should be aware of strict admissions criteria Constitutional Requirement 2-3 employed by state standards and criminal justice Total 16-17 agencies. Factors that may disqualify candidates for employment in the profession includeSpring Semester Credit conviction of a crime, history of drug abuse,CRMJ 1520 Law Enforcement Operations3 psychological problems, and various physcialCRMJ 2420 Juvenile Justice 3 conditions. Certain classes in the EasternCRMJ 2550 Criminal Investigation I 3 Wyoming College criminal justice program mayMATH 1515 Applied Technical Mathematics 3 also be restricted to individuals for the same or higher level math reasons. Please consult with a department faculty Electives 3 advisor if you have any concerns in this area.PEAC Approved Activity/ Fitness Course 1 Total 16 FRESHMAN YEAR Fall Semester Credit SOPHOMORE YEAR PSYC 1000 General Psychology 3Fall Semester Credit CRMJ 2120 Intro to Criminal Justice 3CRMJ 2781 Use of Force I 3 CRMJ 2350 Intro to Corrections II/I 3CRMJ 2560 Criminal Investigation II 3 HMDV 1000 College Studies 1PSYC 1000 General Psychology 3 MATH 1515 Applied Technical MathCRMJ 2280 Criminal Procedures 3 or higher level math course 3CRMJ 2590 Drugs & Criminal Justice 3 Constitutional Requirement 3 Total 15 Total 15-17Spring Semester Credit Spring Semester CreditCRMJ 2791 Use of Force II 3 ENGL 1010 English Composition I 3HLED 1221 Standard First Aid & Safety 2 CRMJ 2210 Criminal Law I 3CRMJ 2125 Forensic Psychology 3 CRMJ 2370 Institutional Corrections 3CRMJ 2570 Criminalistics (Forensics) 3 CO/M 1030 InterpersonalCRMJ 2690 Supervised Lab Experience 3 Communications 3CO/M 1010 Public Speaking 3 CRMJ 2125 Forensic Psychology 3or CO/M 1030 Interpersonal Communication PEAC Approved Activity/CRMJ 2895 Criminal Justice Capstone Fitness Course 1 Project 1 Outcomes Assessment: Total 18 Departmental Paper Total 16 92
    • Programs of Instruction ECONOMICS EDUCATIONDEGREE CREDITS DEGREE CREDITSASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE 69 ASSOCIATE OF ARTS— EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 66-67Students must complete all program ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 64requirements, including approved electives, with SECONDARY EDUCATION 64-65a “C” or better. CERTIFICATE- EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 27 FRESHMAN YEARFall Semester Credit The Associate of Arts Degree in EducationCOSC 1010 Intro to Computer provides freshman and sophomore level courses Science I 4 required for most students majoring in education.ECON 1010 Macroeconomics 3 Education programs vary greatly at four-yearENGL 1010 English I: Composition 3HMDV 1000 College Studies 1 institutions, so the student should consult the Constitutional Requirement 3 catalog of the college or university of his/herPEAC Approved Activity/ choice for information on specific program Fitness Course 1 requirements. *Approved Elective 3 Total 18 The following courses are required for students majoring in elementary educationSpring Semester Credit and planning to transfer to the University ofECON 1020 Microeconomics 3 Wyoming: Educational Foundations 2451, LifeENGL 1020 English II 3 Span: Adulthood (in addition to PsychologyMATH 1400 Pre-Calculus Algebra 4 2300, Developmental Psychology). ElementaryPSYC 1000 General Psychology 3 Lab Science 4 Education majors must complete 3 specific Total 17 science courses and seminars; please consult your advisor for more information. SOPHOMORE YEARFall Semester Credit Education majors planning to transfer to ChadronACCT 1010 Principles of Accounting I 3 State College are well-advised to complete anCO/M 1010 Public Speaking 3 Associate of Arts Degree at Eastern WyomingSTAT 2050 Fundamentals of Statistics 4 College. Our articulation agreement withMATH 2350 Business Calculus 4 Chadron specifies that students with an A.A.PEAC Approved Activity/ Degree will have met all of their General Studies Fitness Course 1 requirements except the 6 hours at the upper Humanities 3 Total 18 division level. Middle school education requirements vary fromSpring Semester Credit state to state. In some states, students may add aACCT 1020 Principles of Accounting II 3 middle school endorsement to an elementary orBADM 2010 The Legal Environment a secondary education program. Specific courses of Business 3 for this endorsement are not currently available atMATH 2355 Mathematical Applications this community college. for Business 4IMGT 2400 Introduction to Information Students must complete all program Management 3 requirements, including approved electives, with Cultural Awareness 3 a grade of “C” or better. Outcomes Assessment: Departmental Paper Total 16*Approved Electives: Any course at the 1000 orabove level. 93
    • Programs of Instruction ELEMENTARY EDUCATION *Suggested electives for elementary education majors planning to attend Chadron: FRESHMAN YEARFall Semester Credit CO/M 1040 Introduction to HumanENGL 1010 English I: Composition 3 Communication 3PSYC 1000 General Psychology 3 or CO/M 1010 Public Speaking 3 Constitutional Requirement 3PEAC Approved Activity/ *Suggested electives for education majors Fitness Course 1 planning to attend the University of Wyoming:HMDV 1000 College Studies 1EDFD 2020 Foundations of Education 3 Elementary Education Majors: Total 14 One course in each of the following areas: Art, Music, Speech, andSpring Semester Credit American Diversity 12ENGL 1020 English II 3 Three science courses 12EDUC 2100 Practicum in Teaching 2 EDEL 1410 and EDEL 2420: Visual, Performing, Fine Arts 3 Math seminars 2MATH 1100 Mathematics for the Elementary EDEL 1430, EDEL 1440, EDEL 1450: School Teacher 3 Science seminars 3 Suggested Electives 3ITEC 2360 Teaching with Note: most coaching endorsements require HLED Technology 3 1221.EDEL 1410 Elementary School Math Seminar I 1 EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION Total 18 (minimum) The Early Childhood Education Associate of Arts SOPHOMORE YEAR degree is a four-semester program designed toFall Semester Credit prepare students for employment as teachers orLIBS 2280 Literature for Children 3 aides in early childhood programs, preschools,MATH 1105 Mathematics for the Elementary and Head Start Programs. Students will gain School Teacher II 3 background in child development as well as Cultural Awareness 3 planning and administering early childhoodPEAC Approved Activity/ educational programs. The courses will Fitness Course 1 combine lecture activities with observation and *Approved Electives 2 participation activities in early childhood settings. Lab Science 4 Total 16 The associate’s degree will allow students to enter the workforce or further their education as earlySpring Semester Credit childhood professionals.MATH 2120 Geometry & Measurement for Elementary School Teachers 3 FRESHMAN YEAREDEL 2420 Elementary School Fall Semester Credit Math Seminar II 1 ENGL 1010 English I:Composition 3EDEX 2484 Introduction to Special EDFD 2020 Foundations of Education 3 Education 3 EDEC 1020 Intro to Early ChildhoodEDFD 2450 Lifespan Human Education 3 Development 3 PSYC 1000 General Psychology 3 Area of Concentration/ PEAC Approved Activity/ Minor 6 Fitness Course 1 Outcomes Assessment: HMDV 1000 College Studies 1 Student Portfolio Constitutional Requirement 3 Total 16 Total 17 94
    • Programs of InstructionSpring Semester Credit EARLY CHILDHOOD CERTIFICATEENGL 1020 English II 3FCSC 2121 Child Development 4 The early childhood certificate is designedMATH 1000 Problem Solving 3 to prepare students for employment inor MATH 1400 College Algebra 4 home-based or center-based early child careITEC 2360 Teaching with Technology 3 settings. Students will gain background in early Cultural Awareness 3 child development, as well as planning andPEAC Approved Activity/ administering early childhood programs. The Fitness Course 1 courses will combine lecture activities with Total 17-18 observation and participation activities in early child care settings. This certificate program is SOPHOMORE YEAR designed for students to enter the world of workFall Semester Credit or to further their education as early childcareLIBS 2280 Literature for Children 3 professionals.FCSC 2131 Family Relationships 3HLED 1221 Standard First Aid & Safety 2 Fall Semester CreditEDEC 1100 Observation & Guidance of TECH 1005 Applied Technical Writing 3 Young Children 2 or ENGL 1010 English I: CompositionEDEC 1105 Observation & Guidance of HMDV 1000 College Studies 1 Young Children – Lab 1 PSYC 1000 General Psychology 3 Lab Science 4 HLED 1221 First Aid & Safety 2FCSC 1010 Perspectives in Family and (to include infant/child CPR) Consumer Science 2 Total 9 Total 17 Spring Semester Credit FCSC 2121 Child Development 4Spring Semester Credit EDEC 1300 Curriculum Planning andEDEC 1300 Curriculum Planning and Development for Development for Young Children 2 Young Children 2 EDEC 1305 Curriculum Planning andEDEC 1305 Curriculum Planning Lab 1 Development forEDEX 2484 Intro to Special Education 3 Young Children – Lab 1EDEC 1200 Administration in Early EDEC 1200 Administration in Early Childhood Programs 3 Childhood Education 3EDUC 2100 Practicum in Teaching 3 Total 10 Visual, Performing, Fine Arts 3 Outcomes Assessment: Fall Semester Credit Student Portfolio EDEC 1100 Observation and Guidance of Total 15 Young Children 2 EDEC 1105 Observation and Guidance of Young Children – Lab 1 FCSC 2131 Family Relationships 3 FCSC 1010 Perspectives in Family and Consumer Science 2 Total 8 95
    • Programs of Instruction SECONDARY EDUCATION ENGLISH FRESHMAN YEAR DEGREE CREDITSFall Semester Credit ASSOCIATE OF ARTS 64-68EDFD 2020 Foundations of Education 3ENGL 1010 English I:Composition 3 The program in English is designed to provideHMDV 1000 College Studies 1MATH 1000 Problem Solving 3 freshman- and sophomore-level courses required or higher level math of most students majoring in English or EnglishPEAC Approved Activity education. The student should consult the catalog /Fitness Course 1 of the college or university of his/her choice forPSYC 1000 General Psychology 3 information on the specific requirements of that Total 14 institution. Students planning to major in English can benefit from any additional study in writing,Spring Semester Credit language, and other areas of the humanities andENGL 1020 English II 3 fine arts.PEAC Approved Activity/ Fitness Course 1 Students must complete all program Constitutional Requirement 3 Area of Concentration 9 requirements, including approved electives, with Total 16 a grade of “C” or better. SOPHOMORE YEAR FRESHMAN YEARFall Semester Credit Fall Semester CreditEDUC 2100 Practicum in Teaching 2 ENGL 1010 English I:Composition 3 Humanities 3 FREN 1010 1st Year French I 4 Lab Science 4 or SPAN 1010 1st Year Spanish I Area of Concentration 7-8 HMDV 1000 College Studies 1 Total 16-17 MATH 1000 Problem Solving 3-4 or MATH 1400 Pre-Calculus AlgebraSpring Semester Credit Constitutional Requirement 3EDEX 2484 Introduction to Special Social Science Elective 3 Education 3 Total 17-18 Cultural Awareness 3ITEC 2360 Teaching With Spring Semester Credit Technology 3 CO/M 1030 Interpersonal Visual, Performing, Fine Arts 3 Communication 3 Area of Concentration 6 ENGL 1020 English II 3 Outcomes Assessment: FREN 1020 1st Year French II 4 Student Portfolio or SPAN 1020 1st Year Spanish II Total 18 PEAC Approved Activity/ Fitness Course 1 Elective: COSC or CMAP 1-3*Suggested electives for secondary education Lab Science 4majors: Total 16-18EDFD 2100 Educational Psychology 3CO/M 1040 Introduction to Human SOPHOMORE YEAR Communication 3 Fall Semester Credit**PSYC 2300 Developmental Psychology 3 ENGL 2210 English Literature I 3**EDFD 2451 Life Span: Adulthood 1 or ENGL 2310 American Literature I (Required at UW) Visual, Performing, Fine Arts 3 Cultural Awareness 3Note: Most coaching endorsements require HLED PEAC Approved Activity/1221. Fitness Course 1 *Approved Electives 6**PSYC 2300 and EDFD 2451 must both be taken Total 16if you are planning to transfer to the University ofWyoming. 96
    • Programs of InstructionSpring Semester Credit HISTORYENGL 2220 English Literature II 3or ENGL 2320 American Literature II DEGREE CREDITSPSYC 1000 General Psychology 3 ASSOCIATE OF ARTS 64-68 *Approved Electives 9 Outcomes Assessment: Choice of Research Project, Journal, The history program at EWC provides the or Essay necessary background for transfer to a four- Total 15 year institution for those interested in pursuing*Approved sophomore electives: history, history education or related fields.ART 2010 Art History I 3 Students should consult their advisors early inART 2020 Art History II 3 their educational process to ensure completion ofCO/M 1040 Human Communication 3 the degree; some classes are offered only on anENGL 2140 World Literature 3 every other year basis.ENGL 2370 Western American Literature 3 Students must complete all programENGL 2440 Literary Genres: requirements, including approved electives with a Short Story 3ENGL 2480 Literary Genres:Drama 3 grade of “C” or better.HIST 1110 Western Civilization I 3HIST 1120 Western Civilization II 3 FRESHMAN YEARPHIL 1000 Introduction to Philosophy 3 Fall Semester CreditPHIL 2300 Ethics in Practice 3 ENGL 1010 English I: Composition 3 HIST 1211 U. S. to 1865 3 ENTREPRENEURSHIP HMDV 1000 College Studies 1 MATH 1000 Problem Solving 3-4DEGREE CREDITS or MATH 1400 Pre-Calculus AlgebraCERTIFICATE 18 POLS Political Science Elective 3 *Approved Elective 4The Entrepreneurship Certificate program provides Total 17-18students who have the desire to start a business withan understanding of the concepts to chart a successful Spring Semester Creditcourse toward business ownership. Emphasis is placed ENGL 1020 English II 3on identifying and evaluating entrepreneurial potential HIST 1221 U. S. From 1865 3to successfully start a business. HIST Elective 3 PEAC Approved ActivityStudents must complete all program requirements, /Fitness Course 1including approved electives, with a grade of “C” or CMAP Elective 1-3better. *Approved Elective 4 Total 15-17 FRESHMAN YEARFall Semester Credit SOPHOMORE YEARENTR 1500 Successful Entreprenuership 2 Fall Semester CreditENTR 1520 Creating a Business Plan 2 GEOG Elective 3ENTR 2500 Small Business HIST 1110 Western Civilization I 3 Operations Management 2 HIST History Elective 3ENTR 2520 Legal Issues for Humanities 3 Entreprenuers 2 Lab Science 4ACCT 1050 Practical Accounting I 2 PEAC Approved Activity/ACCT 2110 Microcomputer Acct 2 Fitness Course 1MKT 1000 Sales 3 Total 17ENTR 2550 Principles of Marketing 3 Total 18 97
    • Programs of InstructionSpring Semester Credit INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIESHIST 1120 Western Civilization II 3HIST Elective 3 DEGREE CREDITSPSYC 1000 General Psychology 3 ASSOCIATE OF ARTS 64-67or SOC 1000 Sociological Principles ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE 64-68or SOC 1100 Social Problems Visual, Performing, Fine Arts 3-4 The purpose of this program is to offer a student *Approved Elective 3 an opportunity for a broad-based degree rather Outcomes Assessment: Choice than focusing on any one major area. Specific of Research Paper, Journal, courses listed meet the general education or Essay requirements for EWC. It is suggested that you Total 15-16 work with your advisor to select other electives.*Approved Electives: Degree requirements vary greatly at four-yearANTH 1100 Introduction to Physical institutions, so the student should consult the Anthropology 3 catalog of the college or university of his/herANTH 1200 Introduction to Cultural choice for information on specific program Anthropology 3ART 2010 Art History I 3 requirements. Also, the student should be awareART 2020 Art History II 3 that the Associate of Arts degree is considered theCO/M 1010 Public Speaking 3 traditional “transfer” degree, so it may be a betterCO/M 1030 Interpersonal choice for students. Communication 3ECON 1010 Macroeconomics 3 Students must complete all programECON 1020 Microeconomics 3 requirements, including approved electives, withENGL 2140 World Literature 3 a “C” or better.ENGL 2210 English Literature I 3ENGL 2220 English Literature II 3 ASSOCIATE OF ARTSENGL 2310 American Literature I 3 INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIESENGL 2320 American Literature II 3ENGL 2370 Western American FRESHMAN YEAR Literature 3 Fall Semester CreditGEOG 1000 Introduction to World ENGL 1010 English I: Composition 3 Regional Geography 3 HMDV 1000 College Studies 1GEOG 1010 Introduction to MATH 1000 Problem Solving 3-4 Physcial Geography 3 or MATH 1400 Pre-Calculus AlgebraMUSC 2050 Music History Survey I 3 PEAC Approved Activity/MUSC 2055 Music History Survey II 3 Fitness Course 1PHIL 1000 Introduction to Philosophy 3 Computer Electives 2-3PHIL 2300 Ethics in Practice 3 (COSC/CMAP/ITEC courses)POLS 1000 American and Wyoming *Approved Electives 6 Government 3 Total 16-18POLS 1200 Non-Western Political Cultures 3 Spring Semester CreditRELI 1000 Introduction to Religion 3 ENGL 1020 English II 3SPAN 1010 1st Year Spanish I 4 Cultural Awareness 3SPAN 1020 1st Year Spanish II 4 Social Science 3-4STAT 2050 Fundamentals of Statistics 4 PEAC Approved Activity/ Fitness Course 1 *Approved Electives 6 Total 16-17 SOPHOMORE YEAR Fall Semester Credit Constitutional Requirement 3 Lab Science 4 Visual, Performing, Fine Arts 3 *Approved Electives 6 Total 16 98
    • Programs of InstructionSpring Semester Credit *Note: If a student has completed 24-28 credit hours of Humanities 3 program requirements in Business Administration, AA Degree; *Approved Electives 10 Pre-professional, AS Degrees; or Education, AA & AS Degrees;*HMDV 2000 Sophomore Project he/she may be eligible to take those program Outcomes (Outcomes Assessment) 3 Assessment activities instead of HMDV 2000. This requires Total 16 the permission of one of the Division Chairs.*Approved Elective: Any course at the 1000 or above LANGUAGES (FOREIGN)level. DEGREE CREDITS**Note: If a student has completed 24-28 credit hours of ASSOCIATE OF ARTS 65-67program requirements in Business Administration, AA Degree;Pre-professional, AS Degrees; or Education, AA & AS Degrees; Eastern Wyoming College students desiring ahe/she may be eligible to take those program OutcomesAssessment activities instead of HMDV 2000. This requires major in French or in Spanish should concentratethe permission of one of the Division Chairs. on fulfilling the general requirements for a transfer program. Those students interested in ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE earning a teaching credential should add courses INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES in education and in psychology. FRESHMAN YEAR Language courses offered are 1010, 1020, 2030,Fall Semester Credit and 2475 in French and Spanish. College creditENGL 1010 English I: Composition 3 may be obtained by means of an examination.HMDV 1000 College Studies 1 (For regulations governing credit by examination,MATH 1000 Problem Solving 3-4 check that section in the catalog.)or MATH 1400 Pre-Calculus AlgebraPEAC Approved Activity/ Fitness Course 1 Students must complete all program Computer Electives 2-3 requirements, including approved electives, with (COSC/CMAP/ITEC courses) a “C” or better. *Approved Electives 6 Total 16-18 FRESHMAN YEAR Fall Semester CreditSpring Semester Credit ENGL 1010 English I:Composition 3ENGL 1020 English II 3 FREN 1010 1st Year French I 4 Cultural Awareness 3 or SPAN 1010 1st Year Spanish I Social Science 3-4 HMDV 1000 College Studies 1PEAC Approved Activity/ PEAC Approved Activity/ Fitness Course 1 Fitness Course 1 *Approved Electives 6 Constitutional Requirement 3 Total 16-17 Lab Science 4 Total 16 SOPHOMORE YEARFall Semester Credit Spring Semester Credit Constitutional Requirement 3 ENGL 1020 English II 3 Lab Science 4 FREN 1020 1st Year French II 4 Science or Mathematics 3-4 or SPAN 1020 1st Year Spanish II *Approved Electives 6 MATH 1000 Problem Solving 3-4 Total 16-17 or MATH 1400 Pre-Calculus AlgebraSpring Semester Credit Elective: Visual, Humanities or Visual, Performing, Fine Arts 3 Performing Fine Arts 3 Elective: *Approved Electives 10 Cultural Awareness 3*HMDV 2000 Sophomore Project 3 Total 16-17 (Outcomes Assessment) Total 16*Approved Electives: Any course at the 1000 orabove level. 99
    • Programs of Instruction SOPHOMORE YEAR Fall Semester CreditFall Semester Credit ZOO 1500 Intro to AnatomyCOSC 1010 Intro to Computer and Physiology 4 Science I 4 HLTK 1575 Massage TherapyFREN 2030 2nd Year French I 4 Techniques I 4or SPAN 2030 2nd Year Spanish IPSYC 1000 General Psychology 3 HLTK 1960 Massage Kinesiology 2 Elective: Humanities 3 HLTK 1950 Massage Pathology 3 *Approved Elective 3 HLTK 1850 Hydrotherapy & Spa Total 17 Techniques 2 Total 15Spring Semester CreditPEAC Approved Activity/ Spring Semester Credit Fitness Course 1 FCSC 1141 Principles of Nutrition 3 Elective: Social Science 3 HLTK 1780 Supplemental Modalities 2 General Electives 6 HLTK 1980 Deep Tissue Massage 2 *Approved Electives 6 HLTK 1725 Massage Therapy Outcomes Assessment: Choice of Research Project, Journal, Techniques II 4 or Essay HLTK 1970 Massage Therapy Clinical 2 Total 16 HLTK 1735 Massage Therapy*Approved electives: Ethics & Business 1ART 2010 Art History I 3 CMAP 1685 Using Computers In:ENGL 2210 English Literature I 3 Quicken Home andENGL 2220 English Literature II 3 Business Software 1ENGL 2310 American Literature I 3 Total 15ENGL 2320 American Literature II 3MUSC 2050 Music History Survey I 3 MATHEMATICSPSYC 2330 Psychology of Adjustment 3 DEGREE CREDITS MASSAGE THERAPY ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE 65 ASSOCIATE OF ARTS—DEGREE CREDITS SECONDARY EDUCATION 65-66CERTIFICATE 30 It is impossible to overemphasize the value ofThe Eastern Wyoming College Massage Therapy mathematics as a tool in other fields, notablyProgram prepares students for careers in massage engineering, physical science, and statistics.therapy. Students completing the curriculum Recent developments in the biological,develop the knowledge and skills necessary for behavioral, and social sciences have drawnpracticing massage therapy. Work settings include attention to the power of mathematics inhospitals, chiropractors, local clinics, day spas, these fields also. Along with the teaching offitness centers, or salons. The curriculum meets mathematics and research into pure mathematics,the accreditation standards set by the Integrative students majoring in mathematics also haveMassage and Somatic Therapies Accreditation many other options open to them. The coursesCouncil, a division of Associated Bodywork and listed below provide a strong background forMassage Professionals. Graduates may choose to specialization during the student’s junior andtake the National Certification Exam. senior years.Prerequisite: CPR Students must complete all program requirements, including approved electives, with a grade of “C” or better. 100
    • Programs of Instruction ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE- Spring Semester Credit MATHEMATICS ENGL 1020 English II 3 MATH 2205 Calculus II 5 FRESHMAN YEAR STAT 2050 Fundamentals of Statistics 4Fall Semester Credit EDEX 2484 Intro to Special Education 3ENGL 1010 English I: Composition 3 Visual, Performing, Fine Arts 3HMDV 1000 College Studies 1 Total 18PEAC Approved Activity/ Fitness Course 1 SOPHOMORE YEARMATH 2200 Calculus I 5 Fall Semester Credit *Approved Electives 3 COSC 1010 Intro to Computer Science I 4 Lab Science 4 MATH 2210 Calculus III 5 Total 17 PEAC Approved Activity/ Fitness Course 1Spring Semester Credit Constitutional Requirement 3ENGL 1020 English II 3 Cultural Awareness 3MATH 2205 Calculus II 5 Total 16PEAC Approved Activity/ Spring Semester Credit Fitness Course 1 ITEC 2360 Teaching withSTAT 2050 Fundamentals of Statistics 4 Technology 3 Lab Science 4 EDUC 2100 Practicum in Teaching 2-3 Total 17 MATH 2250 Elementary Linear Algebra 3 Humanities 3 SOPHOMORE YEAR Lab Science 4Fall Semester Credit Outcomes Assessment:COSC 1010 Intro to Computer 4 Departmental Exam Science I Total: 15-16MATH 2210 Calculus III 5 Social Science 3 *Note: Students planning to transfer to the Cultural Awareness 3 University of Wyoming should also take PSYC Total 15 2300, EDFD 2451, and EDEX 2484 IntroductionSpring Semester Credit to Special Education.COSC 1030 Computer Science I, Programming With C++ 4 MUSIC Constitutional Requirement 3MATH 2250 Elementary Linear Algebra 3 DEGREE CREDITS *Approved Electives 3 ASSOCIATE OF ARTS— Humanities & Visual & MUSIC (APPLIED) 67-69 Performing Fine Arts 3 MUSIC EDUCATION 69-76 Outcomes Assessment: Departmental Exam Total 16 MUSIC (APPLIED)*Approved Electives: Any course at the 1000 level or The Associate of Arts in Music (Applied) providesabove. the freshman and sophomore level courses required by most colleges and universities for ASSOCIATE OF ARTS-SECONDARY a Bachelor’s of Music. Although many of the EDUCATION, MATHEMATICS basic courses are the same, students planning on transferring to a four-year institution should FRESHMAN YEAR contact their chosen school for degree andFall Semester Credit transfer requirements during the beginning ofEDFD 2020 Foundations of Education 3 their first year of instruction.ENGL 1010 English I: Composition 3HMDV 1000 College Studies 1MATH 2200 Calculus I 5 There are three possible outcomes assessmentsPEAC Approved Activity/ available to those seeking a Music (Applied) Fitness Course 1 degree. One of the three assessments mustPSYC 1000 General Psychology 3 be chosen during the first semester of the Total 16 sophomore year in preparation for the work 101
    • Programs of Instructionduring the final semester. The three possible SOPHOMORE YEARassessment projects in music are Fall Semester Credit MATH Approved Math Course 3-51. Performance recital of at least 1/2 hour of (1000 or Higher)music approved by applied music instructor, MUSC Approved Music Ensemble 1 MUSC 2030 Written Theory III 3with a written critique by faculty and a non- MUSC 2035 Aural Theory III 1departmental individual. MUSC 2050 Music History Survey I 3 MUSC Applied Music Lessons 22. A lengthy scholarly paper and classroom Lab Science 4presentation on a music theory or music history Total 17-19topic, chosen by the advisor. The paper willreceive a written critique by faculty and a non- Spring Semester Creditdepartmental individual. MUSC Approved Music Ensemble 1 MUSC 2040 Written Theory IV 33. A written musical composition, for solo MUSC 2045 Aural Theory IV 1instrument or duet of at least 20 minutes in MUSC 2055 Music History Survey II 3 MUSC Applied Music Lessons 2length or a 5-10 minute large ensemble work, Humanities 3to be presented at a student recital. The Social Science 3composition will receive a written critique by Outcomes Assessment:faculty and a non-departmental individual. Performance Recital With Outside CritiqueStudents must complete all program Total 16requirements, including approved electives, witha grade of “C” or better. MUSIC EDUCATION FRESHMAN YEAR The Associate of Arts in Music Education providesFall Semester Credit the freshman and sophomore level coursesENGL 1010 English I: Composition 3 required by most colleges and universitiesHMDV 1000 College Studies 1 for a Bachelor’s of Music in Music Education.MUSC 1415 Introduction to Music Although many of the basic courses are the same, Technology 2 students planning on transferring to a four-yearMUSC 1030 Written Theory I 3 institution should contact their chosen school forMUSC 1035 Aural Theory I 1MUSC Applied Music Lessons 2 degree and transfer requirements.MUSC 1000 Introduction to Music 3MUSC Approved Music Ensemble 1 Students must complete all programPEAC Approved Activity/ requirements, including approved electives, with Fitness Course 1 a “C” or better. Total 17 FRESHMAN YEARSpring Semester Credit Fall Semester CreditENGL 1020 English II 3 EDFD 2020 Foundations of Education 3MUSC 1040 Written Theory II 3 ENGL 1010 English I:Composition 3MUSC 1045 Aural Theory II 1 MUSC 1030 Written Theory I 3MUSC Applied Music Lessons 2 MUSC 1035 Aural Theory I 1MUSC 2015 Introduction to the Music MUSC Applied Music Lessons 2 of the World’s Peoples 3 MUSC 1400 Collegiate Chorale 1MUSC Approved Music Ensemble 1 PSYC 1000 General Psychology 3PEAC Approved Activity/ Total 16 Fitness Course 1 Constitutional Requirement 3 Total 17 102
    • Programs of InstructionSpring Semester Credit required prior to matriculation at most four-yearEDUC 2100 Practicum in Teaching 2-3 institutions.ENGL 1020 English II 3MUSC 1040 Written Theory II 3 Students must complete all programMUSC 1045 Aural Theory II 1 requirements, including approved electives, withMUSC Applied Music Lessons 2MUSC 1410 Vocal Ensemble 1 a “C” or better.PEAC Approved Activity/ Fitness Course 1 FRESHMAN YEAR Constitutional Requirement 3 Fall Semester CreditHMDV 1000 College Studies 1 BIOL 1010 General Biology I 4 Total 17-18 or BIOL 1000 Principles of Biology EDFD 2020 Foundations of Education 3 SOPHOMORE YEAR ENGL 1010 English I:Composition 3Fall Semester Credit HMDV 1000 College Studies 1MATH Approved Math Course 3-5 PEAC 2000 Wellness:PE Concepts/ (1000 or Higher) Fitness Course 1MUSC 1415 Introduction to Music PEPR 1005 Intro to Physical Education 2 Technology 2 Elective 1-3MUSC 2030 Written Theory III 3 Total 15-18MUSC 2035 Aural Theory III 1MUSC 2050 Music History Survey I 3 Spring Semester CreditMUSC Applied Music Lessons 2-4 EDFD 2100 Educational Psychology 3MUSC 1410 Vocal Ensemble 1 ENGL 1020 English II 3BIOL 1010 General Biology I 4 PEAC Approved Activity/ Total 19-23 Fitness Course 1 PSYC 1000 General Psychology 3Spring Semester Credit Constitutional Requirement 3EDEX 2484 Introduction to Special Visual, Performing, Fine Arts 3 Education 3 Total 16MUSC 2040 Written Theory IV 3MUSC 2045 Aural Theory IV 1 SOPHOMORE YEARMUSC 2055 Music History Survey II 3 Fall Semester CreditMUSC Applied Music Lessons 2-4 FCSC 1141 Principles of Nutrition 3MUSC 1410 Vocal Ensemble 1 MATH 1000 Problem Solving 3-4PEAC Approved Activity/ or MATH 1400 Pre-Calculus Algebra Fitness Course 1 ZOO 2015 Human Anatomy 4 Humanities 3 HLED 1006 Personal Health 3 Outcomes Assessment: Cultural Awareness 3 Performance Recital With Total 16-17 Outside Critique Total 17-19 Spring Semester Credit HLED 1221 Standard First Aid & Safety 2 PHYSICAL EDUCATION, ZOO 2025 Human Physiology 4 HEALTH AND RECREATION COSC 1200 Computer Information System 3 CO/M 1030 InterpersonalDEGREE CREDITS Communication 3ASSOCIATE OF ARTS 64-68 Humanities 3 PEPR 2395 Physical Education 2The physical education department has three Capstone Experienceprincipal functions: 1) provide general physical (Outcomes Assessment)activity and recreation activity classes to fulfill Total 17degree requirements for graduation, 2) prepareteachers for professional physical education, Students planning to transfer to theand 3) conduct the college intramural program University of Wyoming should take PSYC 2300for all students. A minimum of 100 noncredit and EDFD 2451.contact hours with youth age 16 and under ineach of the freshman and sophomore years will be 103
    • Programs of Instruction POLITICAL SCIENCE *Approved Electives ANTH 1200 Introduction to CulturalDEGREE CREDITS Anthropology 3ASSOCIATE OF ARTS 65-70 CO/M 1010 Public Speaking 3 CO/M 1030 InterpersonalStudents must complete all program Communication 3 CO/M 1040 Introduction to Humanrequirements, including approved electives, with Communication 3a grade of “C” or better. Political Science majors CRMJ 2120 Introduction toare also highly encouraged to take part in the Criminal Justice 3Political Science Internship with the Wyoming ECON 1020 Microeconomics 3State Legislature for a total of six (6) credit hours. GEOG 1000 Introduction to WorldThe internship is offered every spring semester. Regional Geography 3 GEOG 1010 Introduction to FRESHMAN YEAR Physcial Geography 3Fall Semester Credit GEOG 1020 Human Geography 3CMAP Elective 1-3 HIST 1110 Western Civilization I 3ENGL 1010 English I:Composition 3 HIST 1120 Western Civilization II 3HMDV 1000 College Studies 1 HIST 1211 U.S. to 1865 3MATH 1000 Problem Solving 3-4 HIST 1221 U.S. from 1865 3or MATH 1400 Pre-Calculus Algebra PHIL 2300 Ethics in Practice 3POLS 1000 American & Wyoming RELI 1000 Introduction to Religion 3 Government 3 SOC 1100 Social Problems 3 *Approved Elective 4 SPAN 1010 1st Year Spanish I 4 Total 15-18 SPAN 1020 1st Year Spanish II 4 STAT 2050 Fundamentals of Statistics 4Spring Semester CreditENGL 1020 English II 3 PREPROFESSIONAL PROGRAMSPOLS Political Science Elective 3PEAC Approved Activity/ DEGREE CREDITS Fitness Course 1 ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE—PSYC 1000 General Psychology 3 PRE-DENTISTRYSOC 1000 Sociological Principles 3 OR PRE-MEDICINE 70 *Approved Elective 4 Total 17 PRE-VETERINARY MEDICINE 64-72 PRE-MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 69 SOPHOMORE YEAR PRE-NURSING 64-65Fall Semester Credit PRE-PHARMACY 66-67ECON 1010 Macroeconomics 3GEOG Geography Elective 3 The pre-professional curricula are designed to Humanities 3 meet the requirements of the major institutions Lab Science 4 offering professional programs in these fieldsPOLS Political Science Elective 3 and can be varied if necessary to meet specialPOLS 1070 Election Campaign requirements of specific professional schools. It Politics 1-2 is recommended that students contact the college Total 17-18 to which they plan to transfer and secure direct information concerning their particular degreeSpring Semester Credit requirements.PEAC Approved Activity/ Fitness Course 1PHIL 1000 Introduction to Philosophy 3 Students must complete all programPOLS Political Science Elective 3 requirements, including approved electives, with Visual, Performing, Fine Arts 3 a “C” or better. *Approved Elective 6 Outcomes Assessment: Choice **The State of Wyoming has entered into of Research Paper, Journal a regional compact (Western Interstate or Essay Commission for Higher Education—WICHE) Total 16 which provides education in disciplines not 104
    • Programs of Instructionavailable in the state. Students who are residents PRE-VETERINARY MEDICINEof Wyoming desiring entrance to one of thecolleges in the thirteen cooperating states FRESHMAN YEARshould contact the WICHE certifying officer Fall Semester Creditat the University of Wyoming for additional BIOL 1010 General Biology I 4information. CHEM 1020 General Chemistry I 4 ENGL 1010 English I:Composition 3 HMDV 1000 College Studies 1 PRE-DENTISTRY OR PRE-MEDICINE MATH 1400 Pre-Calculus Algebra 4 PEAC Approved Activity/ FRESHMAN YEAR Fitness Course 1Fall Semester Credit Total 17BIOL 1010 General Biology I 4CHEM 1020 General Chemistry I 4 Spring Semester CreditENGL 1010 English I: Composition 3 ENGL 1020 English II 3MATH 2200 Calculus I 5 Humanities or Visual,HMDV 1000 College Studies 1 Performing, Fine Arts 3PEAC Approved Activity/ *Science/Math Electives 10-12 Fitness Course 1 Total 16-18 Total 18 SOPHOMORE YEARSpring Semester Credit Fall Semester CreditBIOL 2020 General Biology II 4 Constitutional Requirement 3CHEM 1030 General Chemistry II 4 PEAC Approved Activity/ENGL 1020 English II 3 Fitness Course 1 Constitutional Requirement 3 Arts/Humanities/PSYC 1000 General Psychology 3 Social Sciences Electives 3 Total 17 *Science/Math Electives 8-12 Total 15-19 SOPHOMORE YEAR Spring Semester CreditFall Semester Credit Social Science 3ZOO 2015 Human Anatomy 4 Cultural Awareness 3CHEM 2320 Organic Chemistry I 4 *Science/Math Electives 10-12 Cultural Awareness 3 Outcomes Assessment:PHYS 1110 General Physics I 4 Portfolio/Rubrics Based Asmnt Humanities or Visual, Total 16-18 Performing, Fine Arts 3 Total 18 *Science/Math Electives must be selected from the following list:Spring Semester Credit BIOL 2020 General Biology II 4ZOO 2025 Human Physiology 4 CHEM 1030 General Chemistry II 4CHEM 2340 Organic Chemistry II 4 MATH 1405 Pre-Calculus Trigonometry 3MOLB 2220 Pathogenic Microbiology 4 CHEM 2320 Organic Chemistry I 4PHYS 1120 General Physics II 4 PHYS 1110 General Physics I 4PEAC Approved Activity/ STAT 2050 Fundamentals of Statistics 4 Fitness Course 1 MOLB 2210 General Microbiology 4 Outcomes Assessment: CHEM 2340 Organic Chemistry II 4 Portfolio/Rubrics Based PHYS 1120 General Physics II 4 Assessment MOLB 2220 Pathogenic Microbiology 4 Total 17 BIOL 2200 Genetics 3 MATH 2200 Calculus I 5 105
    • Programs of Instruction PRE-MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY PRE-NURSING FRESHMAN YEAR This program provides students with the coursesFall Semester Credit that meet the prerequisites for four-year (BSN)BIOL 1010 General Biology I 4 nursing programs at UW and UNMC. ThoseCHEM 1020 General Chemistry I 4 students preparing for a 2 year (ADN) programENGL 1010 English I: Composition 3HMDV 1000 College Studies 1 should consult with a pre-nursing advisorMATH 1400 Pre-Calculus Algebra 4 concerning courses that meet requirements forPEAC Approved Activity/ the school to which they intend to transfer. Fitness Course 1 Total 17 Students must complete all program requirements including approved electives with aSpring Semester Credit “C” or better.BIOL 2020 General Biology II 4CHEM 1030 General Chemistry II 4 FRESHMAN YEARCOSC 1200 Computer Information Fall Semester Credit Systems 3 BIOL 1000 Principles of Biology 4ENGL 1020 English II 3 or BIOL 1010 General Biology I Constitutional Requirement 3 ENGL 1010 English I: Composition 3PEAC Approved Activity/ HMDV 1000 College Studies 1 Fitness Course 1 MATH 1000 Problem Solving 3-4 Total 18 or MATH 1400 Pre-Calculus Algebra SOC 1000 Sociological Principles 3 SOPHOMORE YEAR PEAC Approved Activity/Fall Semester Credit Fitness Course 1MOLB 2210 General Microbiology 4 Total 15-16PSYC 1000 General Psychology 3ZOO 2015 Human Anatomy 4 Spring Semester Credit Cultural Awareness 3 ENGL 1020 English II 3 Social Science 3 Constitutional Requirement 3 Total 17 CHEM 1000 Introductory Chemistry 4 PSYC 1000 General Psychology 3Spring Semester Credit Cultural Awareness 3CO/M 1040 Introduction to PEAC Approved Activity/ Human Communication 3 Fitness Course 1MOLB 2220 Pathogenic Microbiology 4 Total 17STAT 2050 Fundamentals of Statistics 3ZOO 2025 Human Physiology 4 SOPHOMORE YEAR Humanities or Visual, Fall Semester Credit Performing, Fine Arts 3 ZOO 2015 Human Anatomy 4 Outcomes Assessment: FCSC 1141 Principles of Nutrition 3 Portfolio/Rubrics Based Humanities or Visual, Assessment Performing, Fine Arts 3 Total 17 *Approved Electives 7 Total 17 Spring Semester Credit EDFD 2450 Lifetime Human Development 3 MOLB 2220 Pathogenic Microbiology 4 ZOO 2025 Human Physiology 4 STAT 2050 Fundamentals of Statistics 4 Outcomes Assessment: Portfolio/Rubrics Based Assessment Total 15 106
    • Programs of Instruction*Approved Electives: Spring Semester CreditPHIL 2300 Ethics in Practice 3 ZOO 2025 Human Physiology 4FCSC 2121 Child Development 4 CHEM 2340 Organic Chemistry II 4BIOL 1050 Medical Terminology 3 MOLB 2220 Pathogenic Microbiology 4HLED 1221 Standard First Aid STAT 2050 Fundamentals of Statistics 4 & Safety 2 PEAC Approved Activity/BIOL 2200 Genetics 3 Fitness Course 1CO/M 1030 Interpersonal Outcomes Assessment: Communication 3 Portfolio/Rubrics BasedCOSC/CMAP(Computer Elective Courses) AssessmentHLTK 1510 Nurse Assistant 4 Total 17 PRE-PHARMACY PSYCHOLOGYThis recommended program fulfills the first DEGREE CREDITStwo years of a pharmacy curriculum. Students ASSOCIATE OF ARTS 65-69interested in transferring to a specific schoolof pharmacy should plan their second pre- The following program is suggested for thoseprofessional year using the transfer institution’s students who wish to transfer to the Universitycatalog. of Wyoming and complete course requirements for the B.A. Degree in Psychology through theStudents must complete all program College of Arts and Sciences. Bachelor of Sciencerequirements, including approved electives, with options with emphasis on foreign language ora “C” or better. foreign culture are also available through the University of Wyoming. Students intending to FRESHMAN YEAR transfer to Chadron State College, or anotherFall Semester Credit institution, should secure a college catalog fromBIOL 1010 General Biology I 4 that institution and develop a course of study withCHEM 1020 General Chemistry I 4 the assistance of their academic advisor.ENGL 1010 English I: Composition 3MATH 2200 Calculus I 5HMDV 1000 College Studies 1 Students must complete all program Total 17 requirements, including approved electives, with a “C” or better.Spring Semester CreditBIOL 2020 General Biology II 4 FRESHMAN YEARCHEM 1030 General Chemistry II 4 Fall Semester CreditENGL 1020 English II 3 ENGL 1010 English I:Composition 3 Constitutional Requirement 3 PSYC 1000 General Psychology 3 Cultural Awareness 3 SOC 1000 Sociological Principles 3 HMDV 1000 College Studies 1 Total 17 Constitutional Requirement 3 Lab Science 4 SOPHOMORE YEAR Total 17Fall Semester CreditZOO 2015 Human Anatomy 4 Spring Semester CreditCHEM 2320 Organic Chemistry I 4 ENGL 1020 English II 3 Social Science 3-4 CO/M 1010 Public Speaking 3 Humanities or Visual, MATH 1000 Problem Solving 3-4 Performing, Fine Arts 3 or MATH 1400 Pre-Calculus AlgebraPEAC Approved Activity/ Social Science Elective 3 Fitness Course 1 Psychology Elective 3 Total 15-16 PEAC Approved Activity/ Fitness Course 1 Total 16-17 107
    • Programs of Instruction SOPHOMORE YEAR SOWK 1000 Introduction to Social Work 4Fall Semester Credit SOC 1100 Social Problems 3 Humanities 3 SOC 2200 Sociology of Human Social Science Electives 6-7 Sexuality 3 Psychology Elective 3 SOC 2350 Race & Ethnic Relations 3 Lab Science or Math Elective 4 SOC 2400 Criminology 3 Total 16-17 SPAN 1010 1st Year Spanish I 4 SPAN 1020 1st Year Spanish II 4Spring Semester Credit Cultural Awareness 3 *Psychology Electives Social Science Electives 6-7 PSYC 2000 Research and Psychological Psychology Electives 6-7 Methods 4PEAC Approved Activity/ PSYC 2300 Developmental Psychology 3 Fitness Course 1 PSYC 2330 Psychology of Adjustment 3PSYC 2395 Social Science Capstone PSYC 2340 Abnormal Psychology 3 Experience PSYC 2380 Social Psychology 3 Total 16-18 PSYC 2125 Forensic Psychology 3 PSYC 2210 Drugs & Behavior 3*Lab Science/Math Electives:BIOL 1000 Principles of Biology 4 SOCIOLOGYBIOL 1010 General Biology I 4BIOL 2020 General Biology II 4 DEGREE CREDITSCHEM 1000 Introductory Chemistry 4 ASSOCIATE OF ARTS 64-65CHEM 1020 General Chemistry I 4CHEM 1030 General Chemistry II 4 The following program is suggested for thoseGEOL 1100 Physical Geology 4 students who wish to transfer to the University ofGEOL 1200 Historical Geology 4MATH 2205 Calculus II 5 Wyoming and complete course requirements forMATH 2250 Elementary Linear Algebra 3 the B.A. Degree in Sociology through the CollegeMATH 2350 Business Calculus 4 of Arts and Sciences. Bachelor of Science optionsPHYS 1110 General Physics I 4 with emphasis in foreign language or foreignPHYS 1120 General Physics II 4 culture are also available through the UniversitySTAT 2050 Fundamentals of Statistics 4 of Wyoming. All students intending to transfer toZOO 1500 Introduction to Human another institution should secure a general catalog Anatomy and Physiology 4 from the college or university to which they planZOO 2015 Human Anatomy 4 to transfer, and they should plan a course of studyZOO 2025 Human Physiology 4 with the advice of their academic advisor.*Social Science Electives:AGEC 1010 Agricultural Economics I 3 Students must complete all programANTH 1100 Introduction to Physical requirements, including approved electives, with Anthropology 3 a “C” or better.ANTH 1200 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology 3 FRESHMAN YEARCO/M 1030 Interpersonal Fall Semester Credit Communication 3 ENGL 1010 English I: Composition 3CO/M 1040 Introduction to Human HMDV 1000 College Studies 1 Communication 3 MATH 1000 Problem Solving 3-4ECON 1010 Macroeconomics 3 or MATH 1400 Pre-Calculus AlgebraECON 1020 Microeconomics 3 PEAC Approved Activity/GEOG 1000 World Regional Geography 3 Fitness Course 1GEOG 1010 Introduction to SOC 1000 Sociological Principles 3 Physcial Geography 3 *Approved Electives 3HIST 1220 United States History II 3 Total 14-15HIST 1290 History of US West 3POLS 1200 Non-Western Political Cultures 3POLS 2000 Current Issues in American Government 3 108
    • Programs of InstructionSpring Semester Credit PSYC 2340 Abnormal Psychology 3ENGL 1020 English II 3 PSYC 2380 Social Psychology 3SOC Elective 3PEAC Approved Activity/ Approved Electives: Physical Science (lab), Fitness Course 1 Math, Earth Science, or Social Science Cultural Awareness 3 Physical Science Electives (8-9 credits): Visual, Performing, Fine Arts 3 CHEM 1000 Introductory Chemistry 4 *Approved Electives 3 CHEM 1020 General Chemistry I 4 Total 16 CHEM 1030 General Chemistry II 4 PHYS 1110 General Physics I 4 SOPHOMORE YEAR Earth Science Electives:Fall Semester Credit GEOL 1100 Physical Geology 4BIOL 1010 General Biology I 4 GEOL 1200 Historical Geology 4PSYC 1000 General Psychology 3 MATH Electives: Constitutional Requirement 3 MATH 2200 Calculus I 5 *Approved Elective 4 MATH 2205 Calculus II 5 Humanities 3 MATH 2210 Calculus III 5 Total 17 MATH 2350 Business Calculus 4 STAT 2050 Fundamentals of Statistics 4Spring Semester Credit *Approved Electives: *Social/Behavioral SPAN 1010 1st Year Spanish I 4 Science Electives 6 SPAN 1020 1st Year Spanish II 4 *Approved Electives: Physical Sciences (lab), Math, STATISTICS Earth Sciences, or Social Sciences 11-12 DEGREE CREDITS Outcomes Assessment: ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE 67 Departmental Essays Total 17-18 Students must complete all program*Social/Behavioral Electives (6 credit hours): requirements, including approved electives, withANTH 1100 Introduction to a grade of “C” or better. Physical Anthropology 3ANTH 1200 Introduction to FRESHMAN YEAR Cultural Anthropology 3 Fall Semester CreditCO/M 1030 Interpersonal ECON 1010 Macroeconomics 3 Communication 3 ENGL 1010 English I: Composition 3CO/M 1040 Introduction to Human MATH 2200 Calculus I 5 Communication 3 HMDV 1000 College Studies 1ECON 1010 Macroeconomics 3 PEAC Approved Activity/ECON 1020 Microeconomics 3 Fitness Course 1GEOG 1000 Intro to World Constitutional Requirement 3 Regional Geography 3 Total 16GEOG 1010 Introduction to Physcial Geography 3 Spring Semester CreditHIST 1210 United States History I 3 ECON 1020 Microeconomics 3HIST 1220 United States History II 3 ENGL 1020 English II 3POLS 1200 Non-Western MATH 2205 Calculus II 5 Political Cultures 3 STAT 2050 Fundamentals of Statistics 4SOWK 1000 Introduction to Social Work 4 CO/M 1010 Public Speaking 3SOC 1100 Social Problems 3 Total 18SOC 2200 Sociology of Human Sexuality 3SOC 2350 Race & Ethnic Relations 3SOC 2400 Criminology 3PSYC 2000 Research Psychological Methods 4PSYC 2300 Developmental Psychology 3PSYC 2330 Psychology of Adjustment 3 109
    • Programs of Instruction SOPHOMORE YEAR exclusive of diagnosis, prescription, and surgeryFall Semester Credit and to pass examinations that may be required forACCT 2010 Principles of Accounting I 3 licensing in certain areas.COSC 1010 Introduction to Computer Science I 4 It is recommended that students in the VeterinaryMATH 2210 Calculus III 5PEAC Approved Activity/ Technology Program spend four semesters Fitness Course 1 of course work on campus followed by the Lab Science 4 Veterinary Technology 2950 preceptorship off Total 17 campus. A plan is available to allow studentsSpring Semester Credit to complete on campus course work in a fiveACCT 2020 Principles of Accounting II 3 semester sequence if they so desire.BADM 2010 The Legal Environment Students must complete all program of Business 3 requirements, including approved electives, withMATH 2250 Elementary Linear Algebra 3 a “C” or better. Lab Science 4 FRESHMAN YEAR Cultural Awareness 3 Fall Semester Credit Outcomes Assessment: BIOL 1000 Principles of Biology 4 Departmental Exam or BIOL 1010 General Biology I Total 16 or CHEM 1000 Introductory Chemistry or CHEM 1020 General Chemistry I VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY or AECL 1000 Agroecology HMDV 1000 College Studies 1DEGREE CREDITS VTTK 1500 Orientation toASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE Veterinary Technology 4 72-73 VTTK 1610 Anatomy & Physiology of Domestic Animals 3Veterinary Technology comprises an aggregate VTTK 1700 Medical Terminology 2of techniques and skills required in the practice VTTK 1751 Pharmaceuticalof Veterinary Medicine. Professional veterinary Calculations 3 Total 17technicians work under the direction of a licensedveterinarian. They do not diagnose, prescribe or Spring Semester Creditperform surgical operations. VTTK 1600 Clinical Procedures 4 VTTK 1620 Anatomy & PhysiologyTechnicians work at veterinary hospitals, of Domestic Animals 3colleges, and laboratories. They may work for VTTK 1625 Veterinary Urinalysis 1private individuals and institutions or they may VTTK 1630 Veterinary Hematology 3be employed by federal or state agencies that VTTK 1750 Veterinary Pharmacology 3are responsible for protecting animal health and ENGL 1010 English I: Composition 3welfare. The work may include cleaning and Total 17sterilizing equipment, performing diagnostic SOPHOMORE YEARtests, feeding and caring for animals, restraining Fall Semester Creditanimals for treatment, administering anesthetics, VTTK 2500 Principles of Anesthesiologyassisting in surgery, collecting of samples for & Radiography 3diagnostic purposes, maintaining and repairing VTTK 2600 Diagnostic Microbiology 2equipment, obtaining and developing radiographs, VTTK 2610 Infectious Diseases 3and assisting in office procedures. VTTK 2700 Laboratory and Exotic Animals 3The veterinary technician may be employed VTTK 1550 Practical Surgical &to perform a single procedure in a specialized Medical Experience I 3area or a broad spectrum of procedures in a VTTK 1755 Veterinary Parasitology 2generalized practice. Total 16The primary objectives are to qualify studentsto perform those techniques required in theoperation of a general veterinary practice 110
    • Programs of InstructionSpring Semester Credit Fall Semester Credit Constitutional Requirement 2-3 HMDV 1000 College Studies 1VTTK 2505 Diagnostic Imaging 2 SAFE 1510 OSHA General IndustryVTTK 2550 Practical Surgical & Safety 1 Medical Experience II 3 CNTK 1510 Safety and Tools inVTTK 2620 Noninfectious Diseases 3 Construction 3VTTK 2900 Nutrition in Veterinary WTTK 1500 Weatherization Technician Medicine 3 Fundamentals 3VTTK 2750 Clinical Problems 3 WTTK 1525 Weatherization Technician (Outcomes Assessment) Intermediate 3 Total 16-17 WTTK 1520 Solar Photo Voltaic BasicsVTTK 2510 (Clinical Experience I, 1 credit), and Electrical Theory 3VTTK 2520 (Clinical Experience II, 1 credit), WTTK 1775 BPI-Building Analyst 3and VTTK 2950 (Clinical Experience III, 4 Outcomes Assessment:credits) to be scheduled during Fall, Spring, BPI Certificateor Summer as determined appropriate by the Total 17advisor and the student. WEATHERIZATION TECHNICIAN WEATHERIZATION TECHNOLOGY ADVANCED CERTIFICATEDEGREE CREDITS Students must complete all programCERTIFICATE 17 requirements, including electives, with a “C” orCERTIFICATE 34 better.Weatherization is an umbrella that includes many Fall Semester Creditaspects of the existing home market that needs HMDV 1000 College Studies 1energy efficient upgrades that address comfort, SAFE 1510 OSHA General Industryenergy efficiency, and a safe indoor air quality. Safety 1The learner can build a career starting with a CNTK 1510 Safety and Tools insolid understanding of the house as a system Construction 3 WTTK 1500 Weatherization Technicianand building science basics, beginning with the Fundamentals 3pressure and themal boundaries, combustion WTTK 1525 Weatherization Techniciansafety, worker safety, material, tools and Intermediate 3equipment, typical weatherization strategies, WTTK 1520 Solar Photo Voltaic Basicsmobile home and multi-family basics, and blower and Electrical Theory 3door operation. Courses can lead to a career in WTTK 1775 BPI-Building Analyst 3the vast home weatherization “green” renewals Outcomes Assessment:and energy direction for the 21st century. BPI Certificate Total 17Students must complete all programrequirements, including approved electives, with Spring Semester Credit WTTK 1650 Weatherization Techniciana “C” or better. Mobile Home 3 WTTK 1640 Solar Photo Voltaic Installation 3 BADM 1005 Business Mathematics I 3 ENTR 1500 Successful Entrepreneurship 2 WTTK 1785 Resnet HERS 3 WTTK 1970 Weatherization Internship 3 Outcomes Assessment: Resnet Certificate Total 17 111
    • Programs of Instruction WELDING AND JOINING TECHNOLOGY be examined and tested in the testing lab using one or more of the following test methods: dyeDEGREE CREDITS penetrant, macroetch, guided bend, and tensileASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE 65 test. All testing will be done in accordance withCERTIFICATE 30 the American Welding Society Structural WeldingCERTIFICATE - MACHINE TOOL 30-32 Code D1.1; The American Society of MechanicalCERTIFICATE - PLATE WELDING 12 Engineers, Section IX of Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code; and The American Petroleum ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE Institute Standard for Welding Pipelines. Eastern Wyoming College is an AWS Accredited TestWelders are skilled people who like to work Center.with their hands. A welder can find work almostanywhere from the smallest shop down the Students must complete all programstreet to the largest industrial complex in our requirements, including approved electives, withmajor cities. All hard goods manufactured make a “C” or better.extensive use of welding in building cars, trucks,buses, trains, ships, aircraft, space vehicles, farm FRESHMAN YEARimplements, and jewelry. Fall Semester Credit HMDV 1000 College Studies 1 SAFE 1510 OSHA GeneralA graduate welder is capable of welding ferrous Industry Safety 1and nonferrous metals in all positions and can WELD 1700 General Welding 3operate shears, drills, and power tools. A welder WELD 1755 Shielded Metalis competent in layout, cutting, and forming Arc Welding 5metals and determining electrodes and filler WELD 1773 GMAW 2metal to be used. They must know how to work WELD 2670 Welding Inspection 3from blueprints and written procedures and Total 15know welding symbols. The welding programat Eastern Wyoming College is centered in Spring Semester Creditthe Mechanical Arts Building and is set up as MCHT 1500 General Machine Shop 2close to industry as is possible. Each student is WELD 1650 Print Reading: Welding Symbols 3assigned a welding machine, table, and positioner. WELD 1760 Advanced Shielded MetalDiscussion of safety rules, regulations, and safe Arc Welding 4use of equipment are included in the curriculum. WELD 1772 FCAW 2 WELD 2680 Welding Metallurgy 3The objectives of the program are to enable the ENTK 1510 Drafting I 1student to meet entry-level requirements for or ENTK 2500 Computer Aided Draftingemployment, build a basis for further study, and Total 15for lifelong learning in the metal working trades. SOPHOMORE YEARStudents will study both the theory and practice Fall Semester Creditof shielded metal arc welding, oxyacetylene TECH 1005 Applied Technical Writing 3welding, gas tungsten arc welding, gas metal arc or ENGL 1010 English I:Composition MATH 1515 Applied Technicalwelding, and flux cored arc welding. Technical Mathematics 3aspects of the above processes are taught with or higher level mathemphasis on plate and pipe welding of mild steel, Constitutional Requirement 3stainless steel, and aluminum. Flat, horizontal, WELD 1780 GTAW-Plate 3vertical, and overhead positions are covered in WELD 2500 Structural Welding 5each area. The theory and practice of mechanical Total 17and manual cutting with oxyacetylene and aircarbon arc cutting and gouging, joint design,preparation and layout of plate and pipe are alsoincluded in the program.Students will be required to qualify in each of theprocesses listed above. Specimens completed will 112
    • Programs of InstructionSpring Semester Credit CERTIFICATE - MACHINE TOOLHLED 1221 Standard First Aid & Safety 2 TECHNOLOGYMCHT 1610 Machine Tool Technology I 2ELTR 1515 Electrical Concepts 2WELD 2510 Pipe Welding I 4 Students must complete all programWELD 2520 Pipe Welding II 5 requirements including approved electives with a Computer Elective 1 grade of “C” or better. Electives 2 Outcomes Assessment: FRESHMAN YEAR National Competency Test in Fall Semester Credit Welding HMDV 1000 College Studies 1 Total 18 ENTK 2500 Computer Aided Drafting I 1 CERTIFICATE-WELDING AND MCHT 1500 General Machine Shop 2 JOINING TECHNOLOGY MCHT 1610 Machine Tool Technology 2 TECH 1005 Applied Technical Writing 3Students must complete all program SAFE 1510 Fundamentals ofrequirements, including approved electives, with Occupational Safety 1a “C” or better. POLS 1050 Basics in US and WY Government or 2-3 FRESHMAN YEAR or POLS 1000 American & WyomingFall Semester Credit GovernmentHMDV 1000 College Studies 1 WELD 1700 General Welding 3SAFE 1510 OSHA General Total 15-16 Industry Safety 1WELD 1700 General Welding 3 Spring Semester CreditWELD 1755 Shielded Metal MCHT 1620 Machine Tool Arc Welding 5 Technology II 3WELD 1773 GMAW 2 ENTK 2505 Computer AidedWELD 2670 Welding Inspection 3 Drafting II 1 Total 15 WELD 1650 Print Reading 3 MATH 1515 Applied Technical Math 3Spring Semester Credit AGTK 1810 Hydraulics 3MCHT 1500 General Machine Shop 2 Outcomes Assessment:WELD 1650 Print Reading: Project Welding Symbols 3 Electives 2-3WELD 1760 Advanced Shielded Metal Total 15-16 Arc Welding 4WELD 1772 FCAW 2 CERTIFICATE - PLATE WELDINGWELD 2680 Welding Metallurgy 3ENTK 1510 Drafting I This program will enable a student to meet entryor ENTK 2500 Computer Aided Drafting I 1 level requirements for employment as a plate Outcomes Assessment: welder and build a basis for further study and National Competency Test lifelong learning in the metal working trades. in Welding Total 15 Students must complete all program requirements, including approved electives, with a “C” or better. FRESHMAN YEAR Fall Semester Credit WELD 1755 Shielded Metal Arc Welding 5 WELD 1773 Gas Metal Arc Welding 2 WELD 1772 Flux Core Arc Welding 2 WELD 1650 Print Reading & Welding Symbols 3 Total 12 113
    • Programs of Instruction WILDLIFE AND FISHERIES BIOLOGY Spring Semester Credit AND MANAGEMENT STAT 2050 Fundamentals of Statistics 4 Cultural Awareness 3DEGREE CREDITS Humanities or Visual,ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE 67-69 Performing Fine Arts 3 *Approved Electives 6-7The basic curriculum will give students a liberal Outcomes Assessment: Departmental Exameducation and serve as a broad foundation upon Total 16-17which they can build for positions in various stateand federal agencies which are concerned with *Approved Electives:the utilization, investigation, and administration BIOL 1080 Environmental Science 3of the nation’s wildlife resources. BIOL 2200 Genetics 3 BOT 2100 Forest Management 3Students must complete all program ZOO 2400 Vertebrate Naturalrequirements, including approved electives, with History 4a “C” or better. REWM 2000 Principles of Range Management 3 FRESHMAN YEAR REWM 1300 Introduction to WaterFall Semester Credit Resources 3BIOL 1010 General Biology I 4CHEM 1020 General Chemistry I 4ENGL 1010 English I:Composition 3HMDV 1000 College Studies 1MATH 1400 Pre-Calculus Algebra 4PEAC Approved Activity/ Fitness Course 1 Total 17Spring Semester CreditBIOL 2020 General Biology II 4CHEM 1030 General Chemistry II 4ENGL 1020 English II 3MATH 1405 Pre-Calculus Trigonometry 3 Constitutional Requirement 3PEAC Approved Activity/ Fitness Course 1 Total 18 SOPHOMORE YEARFall Semester CreditBIOL 2415 Ecology and Field Biology 4CMAP 1765 Spreadsheet Applications II: Microsoft Excel 2-3or COSC 1200 Computer Information SystemsGEOL 1100 Physical Geology 4or GEOL 1200 Historical Geologyor PHYS 1110 General Physics IZOO 2450 Principles of Fish and Wildlife Management 3 Social Science 3 Total 16-17 114
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    • Courses of Instruction Course Numbering System Course Prerequisites and WaiversAll courses are distinguished by number and title. Many EWC courses have prerequisites that must be met before enrollment in those courses,Lecture, Laboratory and Credit Codes and which can be found at the end of courseExplanatory information appears in parentheses descriptions. A course prerequisite is typicallyfollowing each course title, for example: BIOL met by an appropriate COMPASS score or by1010, General Biology I (3L, 3LB, 4CR). completion of a prerequisite course. However,1. The number “3” preceding the letter “L” in unusual circumstances a student may have indicates three 55-minute lecture hours each demonstrated comparable knowledge or week. background equivalent to but different from the2. The number “3” preceding the letters “LB” listed prerequisite. In those unusual cases the indicates three 55-minute lab hours each full-time faculty member teaching the course week. may grant permission for the prerequisite waiver.3. The number “4” preceding the letters “CR” Adjunct faculty may waive course prerequisites denotes four semester hours credit for the only after consultation with the appropriate course. division chair or Vice President for Learning. Accounting-Business (ACCT)The following numbers are designated for specialvariable courses that allow credit for subjects 1010 Principles of Accounting I (3L, 3CR):which may not be covered by other courses. A basic course for those preparing for a bachelor’sDue to the nature of these courses, students degree in business administration or accounting.transferring to the University of Wyoming Fundamental accounting concepts and proceduresor other colleges may need to petition for employed by business entities are examined.acceptance of credits. Contact the registrar at the Basic areas covered include the accounting cycle,transfer institution if you have a concern. income statement, balance sheet, merchandise, cash, systems and controls, receivables,Course Numbers for Variable Courses inventories, plant and intangible assets, and1395, 1895, 2395, 2895 Capstone Courses current liabilities. Students who have successfully1460, 1960,2460,2960 Field Studies: completed ACCT 1050 or ACCT 1060 cannot1465, 1965, 2465, 2965 Directed Studies/ earn credit in ACCT 1010 and those who have Research Problems successfully completed ACCT 1010 cannot earn1470, 1970,2470,2970 Internship/ credit in ACCT 1050 or ACCT 1060. Practicum1475, 1975,2475, 2975 Independent 1020 Principles of Accounting II (3L, 3CR): Studies A basic course for those preparing for a bachelor’s1480,1980,2480, 2980 Cooperative degree in business administration or accounting. Work Experience This course is a continuation of ACCT 1010 with1485,1985,2485,2985 Seminar: an emphasis on partnerships, corporations, bonds,1490, 1990, 2490, 2990 Topics: foreign currency transactions, the statement1495,1995,2495,2995 Workshop: of cash flows, financial statement analysis,Special courses numbered 1490, 1990, 2490, cost accounting and variances, budgeting, andand 2990 and titled “Topics:” are limited to a managerial profit analysis.maximum of six (6) hours in any one department. Prerequisites: ACCT 1050 and ACCT 1060, orNo more than six hours will apply toward the ACCT 1010 with a grade of “C” or better.Associate of Arts or the Associate of ScienceDegree. 1050 Practical Accounting I (2L, 2CR): This is a basic course in accounting fundamentalsTitles of the individual courses will be entered focusing on the accounting cycle and financialin the transcript, and registrars of transfer statements. Double entry accrual accountinginstitutions should write to the Vice President for procedures are emphasized for a service businessLearning for specific course descriptions. organized as a sole proprietorship. Specific areas covered include recording and posting 116
    • Courses of Instructiontransactions, end-of-the-period procedures, and 2450 Cost Accounting (3L, 3CR):payroll accounting. No previous knowledge A systems approach examining the functionalof accounting is necessary. Students who have and activity or strategic-based cost managementsuccessfully completed Accounting 1050 or systems whereby organizations use information toAccounting 1060 cannot earn additional credit plan, make decisions, and evaluate performance.in Accounting 1010. Students who have credit Specific topics include cost estimation, CVPin Accounting 1010 cannot earn credit in analysis, budgeting, variance analysis, make orAccounting 1050 or Accounting 1060. buy, special orders, joint products and variable costing.1060 Practical Accounting II (2L, 2CR): Prerequisite: MATH 1400, ACCT 1010, ACCTA continuation of Accounting 1050. This course 1020 with a grade of “C” or better.emphasizes accounting procedures for purchase Agricultural Economics (AGEC)and sale of merchandise, end-of-period activitiesfor a merchandising business, a voucher system, 1010 Agricultural Economics I (3L, 3CR):accounts and notes receivable, inventories and A description and analysis of nationallong-term assets. Students who have successfully income, business cycles, income distribution,completed Accounting 1050 or Accounting 1060 governmental economic policies, the bankingcannot earn additional credit in Accounting system, and monetary and fiscal policy. Students1010. Students who have credit in Accounting cannot earn credit for both AGEC 1010 and1010 cannot earn credit in Accounting 1050 or ECON 1010.Accounting 1060.Prerequisite: ACCT 1050 with a grade of “C” or 1200 Economics and Management of Agriculturalbetter. Equipment (2L, 2CR): A study of equipment management as it effects2110 Microcomputer Accounting I (1L, 2LB, 2CR): overall agricultural operation. Emphasis willA course which provides a hands-on approach to be placed on comparative buying, analysis oflearning how computerized integrated accounting comparable mechanical systems, and ownershipsystems function. Topics include creating a chart versus rental and custom operator services.of accounts, recording customer and vendortransactions, processing payroll, integrating 1510 Farm/Ranch Applications & Review ofbanking functions, and printing/interpreting Management (3L, 3CR):reports. In addition, setting up a new company This course is primarily offered for agriculturalis covered as well as advanced topics such as operators who would like to improve or updateexporting to Excel software and using the audit their management skills. The course will covertrail. No prior knowledge of computers or general principles of financial management andautomated accounting is necessary; however the decision making as well as examples and casesstudent much have an understanding of double- where students make applications to their ownentry bookkeeping as it is utilized in a manual specific situation. The students will culminate theaccounting system. course with a completed business plan detailingPrerequisite: ACCT 1050 or ACCT 1010 with the changes and direction they will follow upona grade of “C” or better or the achievement of a completing the class.satisfactory score on an accounting fundamentalspretest. 1970 Ag Internship (2LB, 2CR): This class is designed to provide a work-related experience for students. It will emphasize concepts, skills and attitudes needed for employment in farm, ranch, or agri-business management and production. The student must consult the instructor before enrolling in this course. This course is offered for S/U grade only. This course requires 60 hours of work- time, completion of a resume, job application, learning objectives, mock interview, and letter 117
    • Courses of Instructionof application. This course should be taken in the Agriculture (AGRI)second semester of the Farm/Ranch Management 1010 Computers: Agriculture (2L, 2LB, 2CR):program.Prerequisites: Must have completed 12 hours of This course is designed as a beginning coursecourses in the A.A.S. Farm and Ranch program for agricultural students interested in learningwith a grade of “C” or better. about microcomputers and software applications for agriculture. Main applications are word2010 Farm-Ranch Business Records (3L, 3CR): processing, spreadsheet, database, graphics, andThis is a basic course in farm/ranch bookkeeping Internet applications. The course is designed forand accounting. students with little or no previous experience in computer science.2020 Farm-Ranch Business Management (3L, 3CR): 2000 Agriculture Chemicals I (2L, 2CR):Economic principles, business methods, andscience applied to organization and operation. A study of agricultural chemicals as used inMeasurements of size of business, rates and production agriculture. Particular attention willefficiency of production. be focused on types and application procedures for insecticides, herbicides, fungicides, and soil2150 Agri-Business Finance (3L, 3CR): sterilants. Safety and proper application will beA course dealing with loan applications, options, stressed.and determination of loan needs, repayability, Agriculture Technology (AGTK)and the function and operation of various lending 1550 Veterinary Elements (3L, 2LB,4CR):agencies.Prerequisite: AGEC 2010 with a grade of “C” or Subjects covered in this course include basicbetter. animal anatomy and physiological processes, general principles of disease and disease2300 Agricultural Marketing (2L, 2CR): resistance including classification of causes,A study of marketing and market planning as diseases transmissible from animals to manthey deal with sales. Also covered will be the (zoonosis), poisons and poisonous plants,functions, theory, and practices of salesmanship as chemotherapeutic agents and disinfectants,they relate to wholesale and retail sales. immunization principles and programs, specific infectious diseases and the effects of season, and2350 Agricultural Commodities in Marketing (2L, parasitic diseases and the effects of season, and2CR): parasitic diseases. A lab compliments this courseThis course deals with the use of the commodities so students can get hands on experience.futures markets for risk management in 1810 Beginning Hydraulics (2L, 2LB, 3CR):the marketing of livestock and grain. Thecash market will also be studied, including Studies the use of hydraulic pumps and systems.transportation, forward contracting types of Special emphasis is given to pumping, controlling,markets, and price trends. and measuring flows and to system design and analysis. Also emphasized is distinguishing the2395 AG Capstone Project (1L, 2LB, 2CR): difference between types of valves, pumps, hoses,This course is required to successfully complete and connection arrangement and flow patterns.the AAS Farm/Ranch Management Degree 1910 Equipment Maintenance and Repair (2L,and the AS degrees in General Agriculture, 2CR):Agricultural Economics, Agricultural Business,and Animal Science. Sophomore students A course stressing the fundamentals of preventiveintending to graduate with the AAS degree will maintenance of farm equipment to reducebe completing a business plan. Sophomore failures, save on operating costs, and keepingstudents intending to graduate with the AS degree equipment safe. Establishes good habits in thewill complete a thesis paper consistent with their continuous care of equipment through periodicdegree field. adjustments and servicing as required. 118
    • Courses of Instruction Agroecology (AECL) 1210 Beginning Livestock Judging I (2L, 2CR):1000 Agroecology (3L, 3LB, 4CR): A basic course covering breeds of livestock,This course introduces ecological interactions fundamentals of livestock selection, and properthat affect food producing (agricultural) systems. methods of livestock judging. Designed forLectures and laboratory exercises study the those with little or no previous livestock judgingvarious biological components and the science experience.of sustainable agricultural production. Features 1220 Techniques of Livestock Judging II (2LB, 1CR):differences between developed and developing Advanced study in the principles of livestockcountries. Explores crises and challenges facing selection with emphasis on judging and givingagriculutre and global society. This course is oral reasons. This course is offered for S/U gradeequivalant to BIOL 1000 or BIOL 1010. only. Prerequisite: ANSC 1210 with a grade of “C” or American Studies (AMST) better.2110 Cultural Diversity in America (3L, 3CR):This course studies processes by which 2030 Principles of Livestock Feeding (3L, 2LB,individuals and groups produce, maintain and 4CR):express cultural identities in various U.S. issues. This course will include the review of basicRace, gender and ethnicity will be addressed, principles of chemistry; classification of nutrientsemphasizing historical roots and social context of and feeds; basic digestive anatomy and physiologycontemporary cultural variety. in monogastric, ruminant, and monogastric herbivorous animals; basic nutritive processes Animal Science-Agriculture (ANSC) including ingestion, digestion, absorption,1010 Livestock Production I (3L, 2LB, 4CR): circulation, metabolism, and excretion; andIntroduction to basic production and specific feeding programs for various classes ofmanagement problems of meat animals. A cattle, swine, horses, and companion animals.well-rounded picture of the scope, importance,and operation of livestock farms and ranches is 2110 Beef Production and Management (2L, 2LB, 3CR):presented. Consideration is given to livestockjudging, feedlot operation, and marketing and This course emphasizes a profit-orientedprocessing of meat animals. approach to beef cattle production and management making decisions. Different management systems are discussed. Computer1035 Horse Production (3L, 3CR): software programs are utilized in labs to show theA basic course covering the evolution and history benefit of a good record system as a managementof the equine species; classes, breeds, and colors; tool. Integrates information learned in otherconformation and blemishes; aging by the teeth; classes such as reproduction, nutrition, and range.nutrition and nutritional diseases; lacerations,fractures, and lameness; infectious diseases; 2230 Advanced Techniques of Livestock Judging IIIparasitism; and reproduction. (2LB, 1CR): A concentrated study of livestock selection with1100 Management of Reproduction (3L, 3LB, 4CR): major emphasis on team competition and nationalLecture-laboratory course. Introduces methods livestock shows. This course is offered for S/Uof manipulating reproduction within livestock grade only.management systems. Includes artificial Prerequisite: ANSC 1220 with a grade of “C” orinsemination, diagnosis of pregnancy, induction better or with instructor approval.and control of estrus and ovulation, inductionof parturition, embryo transfer and control of 2240 Advanced Techniques of Livestock Judging IVreproductive diseases. A substantial lab fee is (2LB, 1CR):required. Most of the class deals with cattle and This course is designed for the competitivesome horses. livestock judging team to further advance theirPrerequisite: BIOL 1010 or VTTK 1610 with skills in terms of live animal evaluation, orala grade of “C” or better, or with instructor reasons, and performance data evaluation.approval. Extreme time and dedication will be involved 119
    • Courses of Instructionwith travel to competitive contests and practices. develop the formal, conceptual, expressive, andThis course is offered for S/U grade only. technical understanding of the drawing process.Prerequisite: ANSC 2230 with a grade of “C” or Drawing II is designed to refine knowledge andbetter or instructor approval. skills gained in Drawing I and to extend the Anthropology (ANTH) student’s ability to make sound choices toward the solving of compositional problems. This1100 Introduction to Physical Anthropology (3L, course is required of all art majors.3CR): Prerequisite: ART 1005 with a grade of “C” orSurvey of basic concepts of archaeology and basic better, or consent of instructor.concepts relating to the origin, evolution, andbiological nature of the human species. 1110 Foundation: Two-Dimensional (1L, 4LB, 3CR): Introduction to the elements and principles1200 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3L, of design and structure for ordering two-3CR): dimensional space. Explores creative visualAn introduction to the nature of culture and problem solving techniques. Problems are relatedsociety with a survey of material culture, to investigative theories of visual perception.economic systems, social and political Required of art majors.organization, language, magic and religion, andthe arts. 1130 Foundation: Color Theory (1L, 4LB, 3CR): Introduction to the elements and principles of Art (ART) color theory and fundamentals. Problems are1000 General Art: Studio (1L, 4LB, 3CR): related to investigations of color perception,A basic introduction to art designed to give sensation, and manipulation of color harmonies.a beginner a practical appreciation through Required of art majors.design activities applied to different media. Prerequisite: ART 1110 with a grade of “C” orSupplementary aspects are covered by lectures better, or consent of instructor.and demonstrations concerning art history,drawing, crafts, and others. For non-art majors 1179 Photoshop I (2L, 2LB, 3CR):only. An introduction to Adobe Photoshop as a creative medium. We will explore a range of possibilities1005 Drawing I (1L, 4LB, 3CR): with various aspects of the program, includingThis is a foundation course in drawing from layers, filters, tools, and color modifications.observation. Students will be introduced to Projects will use scanned and captured imagesdrawing fundamentals through problems in still such as photographs, sketches, and real textureslife, interior space and live model. Lectures, in a range of possible fine art and commercialdrawing sessions and structured critiques will applications.be used to develop the formal, technical andconceptual understanding of the drawing process. 1250 Water Based Media I (1L, 4LB, 3CR):Through the act of drawing with a variety of Studies in watercolor using various techniquesmedia, students will have the opportunity to enabling the student to control the medium.develop basic knowledge and skills essential to Students are expected to have previousall visual artists. There are no prerequisites for experience in color theory.this class. Although students may have drawingexperience, this course assumes no formal 1310 Sculpture I (1L, 4LB, 3CR):training in observational drawing. An introduction to the fundamentals of sculpture and three-dimensional form. Exploration of2005 Drawing II (1L, 4LB, 3CR): various media techniques and concepts throughAn intermediate level drawing course building a series of assigned and open projects. Includesupon the fundamentals of observation, artistic an emphasis on the traditional methods andinvention, perspective and composition through formal, abstract elements of sculpture. Leadsproblems in still life and landscape. Drawing in to an understanding of both classic and modernboth wet and dry media is explored along with concepts of form. Required of all art majors.the use of color and pastels. Lectures, drawingsessions, and structured critiques are used to 120
    • Courses of Instruction2010 Art History I (3L, 3CR): representation. Required of all art majors.Art History I is the first semester of a one-year Prerequisite: ART 1050 with a grade of “C” orsurvey. Studies will include Ancient, Medieval, better, or consent of instructor.Renaissance, and Modern Art with specialreference to various historic factors which 2220 Painting II (1L, 4LB, 3CR):motivated and conditioned the aesthetic forms. A development of techniques and conceptsThe first semester is concerned with Ancient, introduced in Beginning Painting 2210.Medieval, and Gothic periods. Either semester Exploration of different historical modes ofmay be taken separately without regard to order. representation as well as advanced study in colorRequired of all art majors. theory, composition, and technique. Students will work primarily in Acrylic, although they will2020 Art History II (3L, 3CR): be exposed to mixed media approaches.Art History II is the second semester of a one- Prerequisite: ART 2210 with a grade of “C” oryear survey. Includes the study of Ancient, better.Medieval, Renaissance, and Modern Art witha special reference to various historical factors 2410 Ceramics I (1L, 4LB, 3CR):which motivated and conditioned the aesthetic An introduction to ideas about ceramic formforms. Second semester is concerned with through various construction techniques.Renaissance, Baroque, Rococo, Eighteenth Explores methods of pottery constructionCentury and Nineteenth Century periods. Either such as coil, slab, free-form and throwing onsemester may be taken separately without regard the wheel. Students learn ceramic decoration,to order. glaze application, and theory of firing. CourseRequired of all art majors. emphasizes principles of design with clay and technical awareness.2115 Electronic Media (3L, 3CR):Designed to investigate the role of electronic 2420 Ceramics II (1L, 4LB, 3CR):media in visual literacy. Students gain practice Continued exploration of ideas about ceramicwith basic graphics software and hardware, form specifically through wheel-throwingexplore using the Internet in informing the techniques. Includes glaze testing, glazedevelopment of art work, and discuss how application, surface decoration, kiln operation.application of these skills are used in the Course emphasizes design and conceptualclassroom, studio, and commercial art fields. development through the creation of specificPrerequisites: ART 1050 and ART 1110 with a wheel-thrown forms.grade of “C” or better. Prerequisite: ART 2410 with a grade of “C” or better, or consent of instructor.2145 Digital Photography (2L, 2LB, 3CR): Biology (BIOL)Students will learn photographic and computertechniques essential for creating computer based 1000 Principles of Biology (3L, 3LB, 4CR):imagery. This course is designed to develop your Primarily for the non-major. Considersskills in pixel based photographic design and fundamental principles of ecology, evolution,imagery. It will cover digital camera operation, cell biology and genetics, as well as theirphoto editing software, desktop scanners, and relevance to contemporary society. Emphasizesprinting. Digital images will be edited with critical thinking and problem-solving abilities.appropriate professional digital imaging software. Laboratory is required. (This course is notPrerequisite: ART 1179 with a grade of “C” or equivalent to BIOL 1010, and credit cannot bebetter. earned for both courses.)2210 Beginning Painting (1L, 4LB, 3CR): 1010 General Biology I (3L, 3LB, 4CR):A continuation of Art 1050. An introduction A survey of the basic principles of biology. Unitsto problems in painting with emphasis on skill, are included on the scientific method, the cell,techniques, and concepts. Problems concerning genetics, evolution and diversity, and ecology.color theory, composition, media techniques, and Prerequisite: Placement score for MATH 0920concepts of painting. The student is encouraged or better, and ENGL 0640 or better, and noto explore the possibilities of all manners of reading improvement required, or appropriate ACT score. 121
    • Courses of Instruction1050 Medical Terminology (3L, 3LB): 2415 Ecology and Field Biology (3L, 3LB, 4CR):This course provides instruction in the structure An introductory course for the major and non-of medical language, introducing commonly major designed to study fundamental conceptsused word roots, prefixes, suffixes, and the in ecosystem and population ecology. Emphasisterms formed from these word parts. Many will be placed on understanding basic principlesadditional terms not built from word parts will and their application in understanding natural andalso be included. The course is recommended man-manipulated ecosystems. Laboratory willfor students planning on entering medical fields focus on field studies, sampling techniques, andas well as those in medical fields who wish to methods of analyzing data.upgrade their present knowledge. Prerequisite: BIOL 1000 or1010 with a grade of “C” or better.1080 Environmental Science (3L, 3CR):Intended for both majors and non-majors. Business Administration (BADM)Primary focus will be on modern environmental 1000 Introduction to Business (3L, 3CR):problems including conservation of natural This course explores the nature of the Americanresources, ecosystems, water pollution, air free enterprise system and its businesspollution, waste management, endangered species organizations. It provides a broad overview of theand land use issues. business environment, management, organization,Prerequisite: BIOL 1000 or 1010 with a grade of marketing, finance, and human resources. Other“C” or better. topics covered include international trade, securities markets, and risk management.1390 Introduction to Scientific Research I (3LB,1Cr): 1005 Business Mathematics I (3L, 3CR):This course provides the student with an A course providing instruction in solvingintroduction to concepts utilized in a biological practical business problems utilizing fundamentalresearch environment. Students will read principles of mathematics. Topics includescientific literature, perform computer-based fractions, decimals, percents, bank records andliterature searches, experimental design and reconciliation, payroll, the mathematics of buyingdata collection, statistical anaylses, and write and selling, depreciation, simple and compounda scientific paper. In addition, if the quality of interest, annuities, and financial statementthe research project is adequate, students may analysis.have the opportunity to present their work at a Prerequisite: MATH 0900 or MATH 1515 withscientific conference. a grade of “C” or better or appropriate score onPrerequisite: Instructor permission. placement exam.2020 General Biology II (3L, 3LB, 4CR):A continuation of Biology 1010. Units are 1020 Business Communications (3L, 3CR):included on ecology, nutrition, reproduction and This course will cover the topic of businessdevelopment, anatomy and physiology, animal communications—written, oral, nonverbal,behavior, and the life and diversity of plants and and listening. Application will be made toanimals. business situations. The major focus of thisPrerequisite: BIOL 1010 with a grade of “C” or course is on writing business messages andbetter. reports. Emphasis will be given to the study of effective writing principles, problem analysis, and2200 Genetics (3L, 3CR): the writing process. Prerequisites: ENGL 1010A study of genetics and inheritance. Topics or TECH 1005 with a grade of “C” or better.include the structure and function of geneticmaterial, protein synthesis, gene regulation, and 1030 Personal Finance (3L, 3CR):Mendelian, molecular, and population genetics. An introductory course in managing personalStudents who received credit in VTTK 2820 finances. Topics covered include financialprior to Fall 1993 cannot earn additional credit in planning, managing taxes, managing cash, useBIOL 2200. of credit, risk management and investments.Prerequisite: BIOL 1010 or VTTK 1610 with a Considerable emphasis is placed on insurance andgrade of “C” or better. the basics of investing. 122
    • Courses of Instruction2010 Business Law I (3L, 3CR): 1970 Occupational Internship I (1-3CR)(Max 6):An introductory course providing a broad This course is designed to provide a work relatedoverview of business-related legal topics. experience for students. It will emphasizeStudents are familiarized with courts and concepts, skills, attitudes, and develop analternative dispute resolution, constitutional law, understanding of the function of citizenshiptorts, contracts, intellectual law, criminal law, and needed for office professionals. The studentcyber law. must consult the coordinator/instructor before enrolling in this course. A maximum of six credit2395 Business Office Capstone (3L, 3CR): hours may be earned through a combination ofThis course covers office organization, systems, BOTK 1970 and BOTK 2970. This course ifand functions. The class includes coverage on mail offered for S/U grade only.services, human relations, records management,communication systems, reprographics, basic 2750 Records & Information Management (3L,accounting procedures, computer applications 3CR):and equipment usage, ethics, globalization A course covering the background training inof business practices, cultural awareness and the basic filing principles and in the technique ofinternational business practices. It is designed as records control with special emphasis given to thea capstone course and allows the principles common in all systems of filing.student to experience the wide variety of roles anoffice professional assumes in an information age. 2970 Occupational Internship II (1-3CR)(Max 6): This course is designed to provide a work related Business Office Technology (BOTK) experience for students. It will emphasize1510 Office Skills and Services (2L, 2LB, 3CR): concepts, skills, attitudes, and develop anThis course is designed to provide the students understanding of the function of citizenshipwith the ability to operate electronic calculators, needed for office professionals. The studenttranscription machines, and multi-line telephone must consult the coordinator/instructor beforesystems in a business office setting. Customer enrolling in this course. A maximum of six creditservice will be emphasized, addressing such hours may be earned through a combination oftopics as preventing and solving problems, BOTK 1970 and BOTK 2970. This course islistening and communication skills; professional offered for S/U grade only.appearance and attitude. Also included is a Chemistry (CHEM)review of grammar and punctuation. The coursewill be a combination of lecture and application 1000 Introductory Chemistry (3L, 3LB, 4CR):exercises. A one-semester course dealing with principles of chemistry and some applications to inorganic1640 Keyboarding Applications I (1L, 4LB, 3CR): chemistry. For students in home economics,The beginning typewriting student will learn nursing, and most agriculture curricula. Studentstouch-typing skills. This course includes who receive credit in this course cannot earninstruction in the preparation of centered additional credit in Chemistry 1020.displays, simple tables, letters, manuscripts, and Prerequisite: MATH 0930 with a grade of “C” orother standard business documents. better or concurrent enrollment in MATH 0930 or a placement-test recommendation for MATH1645 Keyboarding Office Documents (1L, 4LB, 1400 or a higher level course.3CR):This course designed to give appropriate 1020 General Chemistry I (3L, 3LB, 4CR):preparation in document formatting for work in A broad general coverage of the principles ofoffice employment. This course seeks to develop chemistry and their application to chemicalin the student a marketable skill in keyboarding systems for majors in engineering, the physicalas well as a knowledge of business forms, letters, sciences, and laboratory technology. Studentstabulations, and manuscripts. Emphasis will who receive credit in this course cannot earnbe placed on detailed proofreading, document additional credit in Chemistry 1000.formats, and application of knowledge to office Prerequisite: MATH 1400 with a grade of “C” orproblems. Production speed and accuracy are better or concurrent enrollment in MATH 1400emphasized. or a placement-test recommendation for MATH 1405 or a higher level course. 123
    • Courses of Instruction1030 General Chemistry II (3L, 3LB, 4CR): 2060 Forensics (2LB, 1CR)(Max 4):A continuation of Chemistry 1020. Develops basic skills in contest and public servicePrerequisite: CHEM 1020 with a grade of “C” or speaking by refining the speaking and thinkingbetter. competence of students. Requires attendance at two competitive tournaments per semester2300 Introductory Organic Chemistry (4L, 4CR): in debate and/or individual events. May beA one-semester non-lab course in organic repeated three times for credit.chemistry and beginning biochemistry. Studentscannot earn credit for both Chemistry 2300 and 2100 Reporting & Newswriting I (2L, 2LB,3CR):Chemistry 2320. This course begins with an overview ofPrerequisite: CHEM 1000 or CHEM 1020 with a journalistic practice but concentrates on reportergrade of “C” or better. techniques: the study and practice of the basic kinds of newswriting—such as interviews,2320 Organic Chemistry I (3L, 3LB, 4CR): features, speech and meeting reports, sports—First semester for a two semester sequence. with attention to the problems of gathering andEmphasis is placed on the structural differences of evaluating the news for responsible, effectiveorganic compounds and the mechanistic concepts reporting. Students will be called upon to pursueof organic reactions. Students cannot earn credit news assignments outside of class.for both Chemistry 2320 and Chemistry 2300.Prerequisites: CHEM 1030 with a grade of “C” 2395 Social Science Capstone Experience (OCR):or better. The Social Science Capstone Experience is directed toward the application of broad2340 Organic Chemistry II (3L, 3LB, 4CR): principles in the social sciences with specificThe second semester of a two-semester sequence. attention given to the student’s discipline ofEmphasis is placed on the structural differences of study. The course seeks to enhance and enrichorganic compounds and the mechanistic concepts the student’s academic background, and involveof organic reactions. the student in activities/experiences thatPrerequisites: CHEM 2320 with a grade of “C” demonstrate an ability to continue study in theor better. social sciences. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing, major in Communication and Mass Media relevant social science semester of graduation. (CO/M)1010 Public Speaking (3L, 3CR): Computer Applications (CMAP)An introduction to the principles of public 1500 Computer Keyboarding (1/2L, 1LB, 1CR):speaking, with emphasis on practical skills Students will develop basic touch keyboardingin communicating to audiences, classes, and skills through computer instruction. Designedgroups. Course includes training in manuscript for non-office systems majors. This course ispreparation and composition. offered for S/U grade only.1030 Interpersonal Communication (3L, 3CR): 1505 Information Processing Orientation (1/2L,Introduction to oral communication in 1LB, 1CR):interpersonal group and audience situations. An introductory course in computer literacy,Brief survey of communication rhetoric, featuring a “hands-on” approach usingprinciples, and techniques. microcomputers. Elementary concepts of computer organization, hardware, software, and1040 Introduction to Human Communication (3L, peripheral devices will be introduced. Standard3CR): operations will be explained and routine careThis course focuses on the role of communication of equipment will be covered. This course isin current affairs, business, and personal relations. designed to be a “first course” in computerPractical application of theory to communication science. No previous exposure to computers isproblems in everyday life. assumed. 124
    • Courses of Instruction1610 Windows: (1/2L, 1LB, 1CR): include merges; working with columns; usingThis course is intended to familiarize the student math features; creating styles; working withwith basic concepts and skills necessary for using macros; using graphics; and designing basic webMicrosoft Windows to become a productive pages. This course will be a combination ofuser of computing technology. Windows is a lecture and application exercises.consistent and integrated graphical user interfacethat is an efficient and popular way of interacting 1715 Word Processing: Microsoft Word (1L, 2LB,with IBM compatible computers. 2CR): This course is designed to introduce basic,1625 Introduction to OS and Hardware (2L, 4LB, intermediate, and advanced word processing4CR) features using the Microsoft Word wordThis course provides an introduction to the IT processing program with PC-compatibleindustry and in-depth exposure to personal microcomputers. Working hands-on with thiscomputers, hardware, and operating systems. software will insure transfer of learning fromStudents learn the functionality of various textbook and applications to business, personal,hardware and software components and best and home-based business using word processing.practices in maintenance and safety issues.Through hands-on lab activities, students learn 1765 Spreadsheet Applications II: Microsoft Excelhow to assemble and configure computers, install (1L, 2LB, 2CR):operating systems and software, and troubleshoot A course designed to learn the operation ofhardware and software problems. This course Microsoft Excel. Using practical businessis designed to prepare the students for the problems, students will learn the fundamentals ofCompTIA A+ certification. spreadsheet operations, database functions, and creating and enhancing all types of charts (graphs)1650 Local Area Networks I (2L, 2LB, 3CR): using spreadsheet data. Other areas coveredThis course teaches students the skills needed include macro commands, advanced analysisto obtain entry-level home network installer tools, creating templates and graphic objects,jobs. It also helps students develop some of the Internet and Web integration. Emphasis is placedskills needed to become network technicians, on the use of MS-Excel in the workplace.computer technicians, cable installers, andhelp desk technicians. It provides a hands-on 1800 Database Applications I: Access (1L, 2LB,introduction to networking and the Internet using 2CR):tools and hardware commonly found in home This course provides instruction in a relationaland small business environments. Topics include database management system. Areas coveredPC installation, Internet connectivity, wireless include file organization, storage, retrieval,connectivity, file and print sharing and installation queries, file management, catalogs, linking files,of game consoles, scanners, and cameras. and programming. Access is a windows-based database that lets you enter, update, and work1685 Using Computers In: (1/2-1CR): with data in an easy-to-use format.A course in which students acquire knowledgeabout current computer concepts, terminology, 1850 Desktop Publishing I: (2L, 2LB,3CR):and software. Word processing, spreadsheet, This course is designed to provide andatabase, graphics, or other appropriate computer understanding and practical application ofsoftware will focus on a specified curriculum, computer desktop publishing emphasizing hands-which may vary with each offering. This course is on learning. Topics include but are not limited tooffered for S/U or letter grade. single and multi-page publications, editing text, colors, and graphic design objects to create flyers,1700 Word Processing: WordPerfect (1L, 2LB, newsletters, brochures, and logos. Additional2CR): topics cover business forms.This course provides experience in learning thefeatures of WordPerfect. It begins with the basic 1886 Outlook (1/2L, 1LB, 1CR):skills of word processing including editing and This course is designed to provide anformatting documents, saving and printing files. understanding of Microsoft’s Outlook and isIt then progresses into advanced topics which geared toward learning basic e-mail skills. The 125
    • Courses of Instructionstudent will learn how to work with and manage desk and customer service positions. Networkthe e-mail, calendar, appointment scheduling, monitoring and basic troubleshooting skills aremeeting scheduling, contacts and to-do lists that taught in context.are available in Outlook. It will cover every topic Prerequisite: CMAP 1650 with a grade of “C” orlisted by the Microsoft Office Specialist Program, better.giving the student the opportunity to get Outlookcertified at the Expert level. 1940 LAN Server Installation and ConfigurationPrerequisite: CMAP 1610 with a grade of “C” or (3L, 3LB, 4CR):better. This course focuses on networking fundamentals and multiuser/multitasking network operating1900 Integrated Applications I: Microsoft Office systems. Characteristics of the Linux and(1L, 2LB, 2CR): Windows network operating systems will beThis course is designed to give students discussed. Students will explore a variety ofintroductory skills in using the components of topics including installations and configurationthe Microsoft Office Suite, which include: Word, procedures. More advanced administrative tasksExcel, Access, Powerpoint, and the integration of such as troubleshooting issues, security issues,the above components. and remote access will also be covered.1905 Integrated Applications II: WordPerfect Suite 1955 LAN Design and Implementation (2L, 2LB,(1L, 2LB, 2CR): 3CR):An introduction to the use of WordPerfect Suite This course familiarizes students with theintegrated software package that includes word equipment, applications, and protocols installedprocessor, spreadsheet, presentation, and database in local and enterprise networks, with a focus onas well as advanced document preparation and switched networks, IP Telephony requirements,voice recognition software training. and security. It also introduces advanced routing protocols such as Enhanced Interior1915 MS Office-Advanced Concepts and Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP) and OpenTechniques (1L, 2LB, 2CR): Shortest Path First (OSPF) Protocol. Hands-This course is designed for the student already on exercises include configuration, installation,familiar with the fundamentals of Microsoft and troubleshooting of networks and networkOffice-MS Word, MS Excel, MS Access, and equipment.MS PowerPoint. The course will extend basic Prerequisite: CMAP 1650 with a grade of “C” orknowledge of MS Office by the use of practical better.problems for personal computer applications.Students completing this course will have a firm 1970 Occupational Internship (1-3CR):knowledge of MS Office and will be able to solve This course is designed to provide a work-relateda variety of personal computer-related problems. experience for students. It will emphasizeThe two-course sequence of MS Office prepares concepts, skills, and attitudes needed forstudents to pass the Proficient level of Microsoft networking technicians. The student must consultOffice Specialist Exam. the coordinator/instructor before enrolling inPrerequisite: CMAP 1900 with a grade of “C” or this course. This course is offered for S/U gradebetter. only. Prerequisite: Successful completion of CMAP1930 LAN Wiring and Network Technologies (2L, 1650 and CMAP 1625 with a grade of “C” or2LB, 3CR): better. Contact hours vary depending on creditThis course prepares students for jobs as hours.network technicians. It also helps studentsdevelop additional skills required for computer 1995 Certification Preparation (4LB, 2CR):technicians and help desk technicians. It provides This self directed studies course is designed toa basic overview of routing and remote access, train students for taking certification examsaddressing, and security. It also familiarizes and to provide a structured environment forstudents with servers that provide e-mail services, preparation of specific exams. In this courseWeb space, and authenticated access. Students students will be taught a variety of test takingalso learn about soft skills required for help techniques, study habits, certification simulations, 126
    • Courses of Instructionand finding alternative recourses. Computer Science (COSC)Prerequisite: Successful completion of CMAP 1010 Introduction to Computer Science I (3L, 2LB,1625, CMAP 1650 with a grade of “C” or better. 4CR): An introduction to algorithmic problem solving2510 Multimedia Presentation (1L, 2LB, 2CR): and computer programming. Problem analysis,This course introduces the technical foundation algorithmic top–down design, implementation,and general principles that compose multimedia testing, debugging, and maintenance are stressedand making effective presentations. Students will as the student learns the fundamental structuresbe introduced to the requirements of making of programming, data types, and file input/effective presentations and with special regard output. Algorithms will be developed by handto effective multimedia productions. Different and programming will be done in a popularproduction techniques for making effective programming language.presentations will be covered. Students will Prerequisite: MATH 0930 or equivalent with atrace project development from design to grade of “C” or better. Previous experience withimplementation and delivery. computers and programming is recommended but not required.2630 Presentation Graphics: PowerPoint (1/2L,1LB, 1CR): 1030 Computer Science I, Programming with C++This course provides students with the skills (3L, 2LB, 4CR):needed to create and edit presentations. Studies algorithmic problem solving usingCoverage includes basics as well as adding principles of structured programming and objectenhancements, changing formats, creating oriented design. Algorithms are implemented in adifferent graph types, and linking to other high level object oriented programming language.programs. PowerPoint is a windows-based Graphical user interfaces are used to motivatebusiness presentations software package. the object approach. Programming exercises and experimentation with software in the laboratory2720 Systems Management (2L, 2LB, 3CR): portion supplement the discussion.Students will progress through a variety of Prerequisite: MATH 0930 and COSC 1010 withcase studies and role-playing exercises, which a grade of “C” or better.include gathering requirements, designingbasic networks, establishing proof-of-concept, 1200 Computer Information Systems (2L, 2LB,and performing project management tasks. In 3CR):addition, lifecycle services, including upgrades, An introduction to computers and informationcompetitive analyses, and system integration, are processing, computer systems, hardware,presented in the context of pre-sale support. computer software, information processingPrerequisites: Successful completion of CMAP systems, and management information systems.1955 with a grade of “C” or better. Spreadsheet, data base, and word processing software are used extensively by the student in2970 Internships (12LB, 6CR): applying program capabilities to practical businessThis course is designed to provide a work-related problems. Students who earn credit in COSCexperience for students. It will emphasize 1200 cannot earn credit in CMAP 1900.concepts, skill, and attitudes needed for job Prerequisite: MATH 0920 with a grade of “C” orplacement in an Information Technologies better or appropriate score on math placementSpecialist. The student must consult the exam.coordinator/instructor before enrolling in thiscourse. This course is offered for S/U grade only.Prerequisite: Successful completion of CMAP1955 with a grade of “C” or better. 127
    • Courses of Instruction Construction Technology (CNTK) 1650 Framing: Floors and Stairs (1L, 2LB, 2CR): This course is designed to provide students with1510 Safety and Tools in Construction (2L, 2LB,3CR): the skills necessary to plan, select, estimate, andThis course is designed to familiarize students install floor systems and stairs in a residentialwith OSHA safety rules and regulations related house that meet the current Internationalto residential construction. Topics include safety Building Codes and industry standards.laws, proper identification of hand and power Prerequisite: CNTK 1520 with a grade of “C” ortools, safe use of hand and power tools, and better, or concurrent enrollment in CNTK 1520.maintenance of hand and power tools. 1652 Framing: Walls, Windows, and Exterior Doors (1L, 2LB, 2CR):1520 Residential Blueprint Reading (2L, 2LB, 3CR): This course is designed to provide students withThis course is a study of basic principles of the skills necessary to plan, select, estimate, andinterpreting blueprints and plans along with install wall systems, window applications, andreading of specifications basic to the building exterior doors. Students become knowledgeabletrades. about layout procedures for interior and exteriorPrerequisite: CNTK 1510 with a grade of “C” or walls in a residential house that meet the currentbetter, or concurrent enrollment in CNTK 1510. International Building Codes, industry standards, and manufacturers’ specifications. Students also1530 Site Preparation (2L, 2LB, 3CR): acquire knowledge about the different types,This course is designed to help students learn the application and materials used on exterior doors.techniques of site preparation for a residential Prerequisite: CNTK 1650 with a grade of “C” orhouse. Topics include site selection, legal better, or concurrent enrollment in CNTK 1650.requirements, location of property corners,layout of house location, establishing grades, and 1654 Framing: Roof (1L, 2LB, 2CR):designing adequate drainage. This course is designed to provide students with the skills necessary to plan, select, estimate, and1540 Foundation Systems (2L, 2LB, 3CR): install roof systems. Students install a roof onThis course is designed to help students learn the a residential house. The installation meets thetechniques of foundation preparation according to current International Building Codes, industrythe International Building Codes. Topics include standards, and manufacturers’ specifications.types of foundation forms, form installation and Students become knowledgeable about differentremoval techniques, OSHA trenching and fall types of framing methods and roof coveringprotection regulations, planning concrete layout, materials and applications.and concrete placement. Prerequisite: CNTK Prerequisite: CNTK 1652 with a grade of “C” or1530 with a grade of “C” or better, or concurrent better, or concurrent enrollment in CNTK 1652.enrollment in CNTK 1530. 1658 Exterior: Siding, Trim, and Finishes (1L, 2LB, 2CR):1550 Concrete Flatwork (1L, 2LB, 2CR): This course is designed to provide studentsA course designed to help students learn the with the knowledge and skills necessary totechniques of and skills associated with concrete identify, select, estimate, and install exteriorflatwork according to the current Uniform siding, trim, and finishes for a residential house.Building Codes. Topics include concrete types, The installation meets the established industryconcrete preparation, estimating materials, types standards, and manufacturers’ specifications.of concrete application, forming, and finishing Prerequisite: CNTK 1654 with a grade of “C” ormethods. better, or concurrent enrollment in CNTK 1654.1630 Basic Cabinetmaking (1L, 2LB, 2CR): 1760 Mechanical Systems: Heating (1L, 2LB, 2CR):For anyone wishing to learn basic cabinet making This course is designed to provide students withskills. Cabinet design, construction techniques, the knowledge and skills necessary to identify,finishing procedures, and safe tool and machine select, and estimate heating system materialsoperation are included in classroom and and to install a heating system in a residentiallaboratory instruction. Students will construct an house. The installation meets the establishedappropriate cabinet of their choice. 128
    • Courses of Instructioncurrent industry standards, and manufacturers’ 1884 Interior: Painting and Wallpaper (1L, 2LB,specifications. 2CR): This course is designed to provide students with1762 Mechanical Systems: Plumbing (1L, 2LB, the knowledge and skills necessary to plan, select,2CR): estimate, and install paint and wallpaper systems.This course is designed to provide students with Installations meet established industry standards,the knowledge and skills necessary to identify, and manufacturers’ specifications.select, and estimate plumbing materials and toinstall a plumbing system in a residential house. 1920 Interior Trim: Closets (1L, 2LB, 2CR):The installation meets current industry standards, This course is designed to provide studentsand manufacturers’ specifications. with the knowledge and skills necessary to plan, design, estimate, and install closet systems in a1764 Mechanical Systems: Electrical (1L, 2LB,2CR): residential house. Installations meet establishedThis course is designed to provide students with industry standards, and manufacturers’the knowledge and skills necessary to identify, specifications. Students become knowledgeableselect, and estimate electrical system materials about different types and materials of closetand to install an electrical system in a residential hardware and accessories.house. The installation meets current industrystandards, and manufacturers’ specifications. 1924 Interior Trim: Cabinets (1L, 2LB, 2CR): This course is designed to provide students1860 Woodworking Fundamentals I (2L, 4LB, 4CR): with the knowledge and skills necessary to plan,A course for those wanting to learn or further design, estimate, and install cabinet systems in atheir woodworking skills. An emphasis will residential house. Installations meet establishedbe placed on SAFETY, problem solving, industry standards, and manufacturers’material selection, and practical approaches to specifications. Students acquire knowledge aboutwoodworking. In the laboratory students will cabinet hardware and accessories.receive an introduction to the safe and correctuse of hand tools and stationary power tools and 1926 Interior Trim: Moldings (1L, 2LB, 2CR):equipment, to build a project of the student’s This course is designed to provide studentschoice. with the knowledge and skills necessary to plan, select, estimate, and install molding systems in a1865 Woodworking Fundamentals II (2L, 4LB, 4CR): residential house. Installations meet establishedThis course provides an enhanced knowledge of industry standards, and manufacturers’techniques and materials used in the design and specifications. Students acquire knowledge aboutconstruction of wood furnishings. Emphasis on different types and materials of molding.problem solving, multi-joining technology andcustom finishing. Cosmetology (CSMO)Prerequisite: CTNK 1860 with a grade of “C” or 1000 Intro to Nail Technology (3CR):better or instructor approval. This course will explore the structure, growth1880 Interior: Drywall Applications (1L, 2LB, 2CR): and diseases of the skin and nail, ingredientThis course is designed to provide students with technology, its usage and safety.the knowledge and skills necessary to plan, select, Prerequisite: Placement score for MATH 0920estimate, and install interior drywall systems. or better and ENGL 0640 or better and noInstallations meet established industry standards, reading improvement required, or instructorand manufacturers’ specifications. approval. Enrollment in Cosmetology or Nail Technician1882 Interior: Taping, Mudding, and Texturing (1L, program.2LB, 2CR): 45 hours lecture.This course is designed to provide studentswith the knowledge and skills necessary to plan, 1005 Nail Technology Lab (5CR):select, estimate, and install taping, mudding, and This course provides a complete guide to basictexturing systems. Installations meet established nail technology as it applies to the hands and feet.industry standards, and manufacturers’ Prerequisite: Placement score for MATH 0920 orspecifications. 129
    • Courses of Instructionbetter and ENGL 0640 or better and no reading reading improvement required, or instructorimprovement required, or instructor approval approval. Enrollment in Cosmetology or HairEnrollment in Cosmetology or Nail Technician Technician program.program. 45 hours lab.213 hours lab. 1035 Hair Fundamentals II (2CR):1010 Intro to Skin Technology (3CR): This course will cover the applications of hairThis course is an introduction to skin structure, styling principles.disorders, analysis, product technology and Prerequisite: Placement score for MATH 0920massage principles. or better and ENGL 0640 or better and noPrerequisite: Placement score for MATH 0920 reading improvement required, or instructoror better and ENGL 0640 or better and no approval. Enrollment in Cosmetology or Hairreading improvement required, or instructor Technician program.approval. Enrollment in Cosmetology or Skin 48 hours lab.Technician program.45 hours lecture. 1075 Pre-Clinic Assessment (1CR): This course is a required segment of the1015 Skin Technology Lab (1CR): Cosmetology Curriculum to assess the knowledgeThis is an opportunity for the cosmetology and skill level of key applications for progressionand/or skin tech student to work through the to the clinic area.applications taught in CSMO 1010. Prerequisite: Enrollment in CosmetologyPrerequisite: Placement score for MATH 0920 or Program.better and ENGL 0640 or better and no reading 35 hours lab.improvement required, or instructor approval.Enrollment in Cosmetology or Skin Technician 1100 Nail Technician Clinicals (6CR):program. This lab is the opportunity for Nail Technicians to45 hours lab. practice all applications on the public. Prerequisite: Enrollment in Nail Technician1020 Intro to Hair Technology (3CR): program and completion of CSMO 1000 with aThis course covers the sciences of hair and its grade of “C” or better.practices. 190 contact hours.Prerequisite: Placement score for MATH 0920 orbetter and ENGL 0640 or better and no reading 1175 Nail Technician Assessment (6CR):improvement required, or instructor approval. This comprehensive exam is a three dayEnrollment in Cosmetology or Hair Technician procedure. It assesses the Nail Tech student’sprogram. skill level for exiting the program and to make45 hours lab. application to take the National Nail Technician exam.1025 Hair Fundamentals (4CR): Prerequisite: Enrollment in Nail Tech program.This course covers the basic structure of hair, hair 35 hours lab.care practices, and an introduction to basic hairdesign principles. 1210 Esthetics Concepts I (2CR):Prerequisite: Placement score for MATH 0920 This course fulfills the requirements of infectionor better and ENGL 0640 or better and no control, general nutrition, and electricity withinreading improvement required, or instructor the skin care area.approval. Enrollment in Cosmetology or Hair Prerequisite: Enrollment in Cosmetology or SkinTechnician program. Technician program.213 hours lab. 45 hours lab.1030 Intro to Hair Technology II (2CR): 1215 Esthetics Clinicals I (4CR):This course is part II of the science of hair and its This clinical will focus on the hands onpractices. application techniques of subjects covered inPrerequisite: Placement score for MATH 0920 CSMO 1210.or better and ENGL 0640 or better and no Prerequisite: Enrollment in Skin Technician 130
    • Courses of Instructionprogram and completion of CSMO 1010 with a Prerequisite: CSMO 1020, CSMO 1025,grade of “C” or better. CSMO 1030, and CSMO 1035 with a grade of184 clinic floor hours. “C” or better. Cosmetology majors must have completed a minimum of 8 credit hours of the1220 Esthetics Concepts II (3CR): general education requirements or instructorThis course begins to explore the areas of approval.advanced clinical skin care, spa body treatments 90 hours lab.and color theory.Prerequisite: Enrollment in Skin Technician 1405 Cosmetology Lab II (3CR):program and completion of CSMO 1210 with a This course fulfills 3 of the 9 credit hoursgrade of “C” or better. required for the cosmetology student who will140 contact hours. explore the physcial properties and safety of services and practices on hair.1225 Esthetics Clinicals II (3CR): Prerequisite: CSMO 1020, CSMO 1025,This clinical application course is intended for the CSMO 1030, and CSMO 1035 with a grade ofstudent to practice and assess their application “C” or better. Cosmetology majors must haveskills and complete the required number of hours completed a minimum of 8 credit hours of therequired to make application to take the National general education requirements or instructorExamination for Esthetics. approval.Prerequisite: Enrollment in Skin Technician 90 hours lab.program and completion of CSMO 1215 with agrade of “C” or better. 1410 Cosmetology Lab III (1CR):90 hours lab. This is intended for Cosmetology students to perform and practice hands on skill necessary for1275 Esthetics Assessment (1CR): clinical applications.This is a comprehensive examination intended to Prerequisite: Completion of CSMO 1020 with aevaluate the students’ level of competency in the grade of “C” or better.area of esthetics. 45 contact hours.Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Skin Technicianprogram. 1415 Cosmetology Lab IV (1CR):35 hours lab. This is intended for Cosmetology students to perform and practice hands on skills necessary for1370 Hair Assessment Overview (1CR): clinical applications.This is a preparatory course designed for the Hair Prerequisite: Completion of CSMO 1020 with aTechnician to prepare and practice specific tasks grade of “C” or better.orientated towards the National Examination for 45 contact hours.Hair Technician.Prerequisite: Enrollment in Hair Technician 1420 Cosmetology Lab V (3-6CR):program and completion of CSMO 1020 with a This course fulfills up to 6 of the 9 lab creditgrade of “C” or better. hours required for the cosmetology student35 hours lab. who will explore the final stages of training for cosmetology services and also includes1375 Hair Technician Assessment (1CR): preparation for the final assessment inA comprehensive assessment intended to evaluate Cosmetology.the students’ level or competency in the area of Prerequisite: CSMO 1400 and CSMO 1405 withhair technology. a grade of “C” or better.Prerequisite: Enrollment in Hair Technician 90-180 hours lab.program.35 hours lab. 1425 Techniques in Cosmetology (3CR):1400 Cosmetology Lab I (3R): This course fulfills 3 of the 9 lab credit hoursThis course fulfills 3 of the 9 lab credit hours required for the cosmetology student and isrequired for the cosmetology student who will required for the Hair Technician student. It willexplore chemical properties and safety of services explore new and innovative techniques as theyand practices on hair. relate to the areas of cosmetology. 131
    • Courses of InstructionPrerequisite: Enrollment in Cosmetology or Hair 1520 Clinical Applications V (6CR):Technician program. The Cosmetology student This is one of the required clinical applicationsmust have completed up to 8 of the required for a Cosmetology student. It focuses on thegeneral education courses or instructor approval. hands-on application techniques in all areas of100 hours lab. cosmetology to the public. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Cosmetology1430 Cosmetology Mentorship (1CR): program.This course is intended for the student finishing 216 hours lab.the required hours to become a mentor for agroup of students. The mentor will “manage” 1525 Clinical Applications VI (1-6CR):the portfolio set up for the salon, and will be This is one of the required clinical applicationsrequired to guide the business practices that for a cosmetology student. It focuses on thenormally follow. hands-on application techniques in all areas ofPrerequisite: Completion of CSMO 1075 with a cosmetology to the public.grade of “C” or better. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Cosmetology45 contact hours. program. 30-216 hours lab.1500 Clinical Applications I (4CR):This is a required course for the Hair Technician 1530 Clinical Applications VII (1) (Su)student and focuses on the hands-on application This is an optional clinical application for thetechniques in all areas of cosmetology to the cosmetology student; however this is two of fivepublic. of the required clinical applications for a hairPrerequisite: Enrollment in the Hair Technician technician student. The focus will be on specificprogram. techniques in hair design.168 hours lab. Prerequisite: Completion of CSMO 1020 and CSMO 1550 with a grade of “C” or better.1505 Clinical Applications II (4CR): 30 hours lab.This is one of the required clinical applicationsfor a Cosmetology or Hair Technician student. It 1535 Clinical Applications VIII (1-6CR):focuses on the hands-on application techniques in This is a required course for the Skin and Hairall areas of cosmetology to the public. Technician student and is an optional class for thePrerequisite: Enrollment in Cosmetology or Hair Cosmetology student. It focuses on the hands-onTechnician program. application techniques in all areas of cosmetology168 hours lab. to the public. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Cosmetology,1510 Clinical Applications III (6CR): Skin, or Hair Technician program..This is one of the required clinical applications 30-300 hours lab.for a Cosmetology student. It focuses on thehands-on application techniques in all areas of 1550 General Cosmetology Science (3) (Fa, Sp)cosmetology to the public. This course will explore the cosmetologyPrerequisite: Enrollment in the Cosmetology sciences. This is a broad exploration intoprogram. infection control, anatomy and physiology,216 hours lab. electricity and basic cosmetology chemistry. Prerequisite: Placement score for MATH 0920 or1515 Clinical Applications IV (6CR): better and ENGL 0640 or better and no readingThis is one of the required clinical applications for improvement required, or instructor approval.a Cosmetology, Nail, or Skin Technician student. 45 hours lecture.It focuses on the hands-on application techniquesin all areas of cosmetology to the public. 1555 General Cosmetology Science II (3CR):Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Cosmetology, This course is an extened study for the SkinNail Technician, or Skin Technician program. Technician student. Studies in basic ingredient216 hours lab. technology, basic chemistry as it applies to the area, anatomy and physiology as applicable, and esthetic application. 132
    • Courses of InstructionPrerequisite: Enrollment in Skin Technician be hands-on exercises that will allow you toprogram; no reading improvement required. write your own instructional goals, construct45 hours lecture. a lesson plan, develop a teaching method, and conduct a presentation for your class. Your1560 Skin and Nail Technology (2CR): final presentation will be video taped for yourThis course will explore the in-depth structure, confidential review.growth and diseases of the skin and nail, This course if offered for S/U grade only.ingredient technology, its safety and usage. Prerequisite: P.O.S.T. certification.Prerequisite: Enrollment in or completion ofCSMO 1000 with a grade of “C” or better. 2120 Introduction to Criminal Justice (3L, 3CR):30 hours lecture. This course introduces the student to the study of criminal justice. It covers the philosophy and1570 Assessment Overview (2CR): history of law enforcement, the judicial system,This is a preparatory course designed for the and corrections. Major issues facing thesecosmetology student to prepare and practice disciplines are also covered.specific tasks orientated towards the NationalExamination for Cosmetology. 2125 Forensic Psychology (3L, 3CR):Prerequisite: Completion of CSMO 1075 with a This course introduces the criminal justice/grade of “C” or better. social science major to the uses of psychology in30 hours lecture. the field. Topics covered include basic criminal profiling, suspect interviewing, psychological1575 Cosmetology Assessment (1CR): theories of crime/delinquency, victimology,A comprehensive assessment intended to evaluate legal applications of psychology in conductingthe students’ level of competency in the area of assessments, and correctional psychology.cosmetology. Prerequisite: PSYC 1000 (General Psychology)Prerequisite: Enrollment in Cosmetology and CRMJ 2120 (Introduction to Criminalprogram. Justice) or permission of Instructor.35 hours lab. 2210 Criminal Law I (3L, 3CR): Criminal Justice (CRMJ) The course deals with the broad spectrum of1510 Law Enforcement Procedures (3L, 3CR): criminal law and the procedures of criminalThis course covers basic law enforcement justice. Substantive criminal law, criminaloperations including patrol procedures, traffic procedures and roles of evidence that are ofenforcement, police report writing, field importance to the law enforcement officer areinterviews, problem solving, first responses to studied. The course builds a sound base foremergencies, and police ethics and discretion. a more advanced study of criminal law. AlsoPrerequisite: CRMJ 2120 or concurrent included may be other relevant subject matter theenrollment. instructor feels is necessary. Prerequisite: CRMJ 2120 with a grade of “C” or1520 Law Enforcement Operations (3L, 3CR): better.This course covers community policing practices,using an interdisciplinary problem solving 2250 Criminal Justice Administration (3L, 3CR):approach to solving, police-community relations, An introduction to the theories of organizationcrime prevention programs, and interagency and administration in law enforcement andoperations. corrections. Topics covered include police andPrerequisite: CRMJ 2120 or concurrent corrections history, comparisons of variousenrollment. organizational systems, and the study of police/ correctional operations.1950 General Instructor Development (2L, 2CR):This comprehensive and up-to-date program will 2280 Criminal Procedures (3L, 3CR):help you develop your individual training skills. This course deals with procedural problems thatKey training points in this step-by-step approach occur in processing an individual through thewill help you create quality training programs criminal justice system with special emphasis onfor your agency. Included in this course will 133
    • Courses of Instructionsearch and seizure. final disposition of the case.Prerequisite: CRMJ 2120 with a grade of “C” or Prerequisite: CRMJ 2550 with a grade of “C” orbetter. better.2350 Introduction to Corrections II/I (3L, 3CR): 2570 Criminalistics (Forensics) (2L, 2LB, 3CR):A general course describing the history and Introduces the student to the collection,evolution of the corrections process. Covers preservation and analysis of biological, chemical,all aspects of institutional and community based physical and other forensic evidence from thecorrections. crime scene. Also includes work with trace evidence including hair, fibers, etc. Instruction2370 Institutional Corrections (3L, 3CR): will encompass crime scene management andThis course covers the history and current evidence collection as well as laboratory analysisstatus of institutional correctional facilities procedures.including prisons, jails, and intermediate units. Prerequisite: BIOL 1000 or BIOL 1010, CRMJPrograms, procedures, institutional culture and 2120 and CRMJ 2550 with a grade of “C” oradministration are covered. better.Prerequisite: CRMJ 2120 (Introduction to 2590 Drugs & Criminal Justice (3L, 3CR):Criminal Justice) and CRMJ 2350 (Introductionsto Corrections) or permission of instructor. This course covers the physiology and chemistry of abused substances. Also addressed are the2400 Criminology (3L, 3CR): history and evolution of drug regulationsAn introduction to the study of the nature including the current status of the Controlledand causes of criminal behavior. Biological, Substance Act. Detection, identification, andpsychological, and sociological theories are drug enforcement are also covered.examined. Types of criminal behavior, historical Prerequisite: CRMJ 2120 (Introduction toperspectives, crime statistics, and current trends Criminal Justice) or permission of instructor.are also covered.Prerequisite: SOC 1000 with a grade of “C” or 2690 Supervised Lab Experience (1L, 4LB, 3CR):better. This course exposes the criminal justice major to the various work settings in the field. The2420 Juvenile Justice (3L, 3CR): student will rotate between placements withThis course is designed as an introduction to law enforcement, detention, corrections,the field of juvenile justice. It will cover all and communications. The schedules will bethe aspects of the juvenile justice system, from variable and depend upon availability at eachearly history reform schools to the progressive site. Approximately 8-10 hours per week at thedevelopment centers of today, along with assigned site will be required, as will weeklyalternatives to incarceration. This course will meetings with the instructor.follow the evolution of the courts and the laws Prerequisite: Criminal Justice major, sophomorepertaining to the juvenile. standing, approval of criminal justice agencies.Prerequisites: CRMJ 2120 with a grade of “C” orbetter. 2781 Use of Force I (2L, 2LB, 3CR): Introduces the criminal justice major to the use2550 Criminal Investigation I (3L, 3CR): of force. Non-lethal force and the escalation ofA course relating to the fundamentals of force is covered, as are legal and ethical concerns.investigation. Included are crime scene Instruction is provided in the use and care ofsearch, sketching and recording, collection and police sidearms including the service revolver andpreservation of physical evidence, scientific semiautomatic pistol.aids, sources of information, interviewing Prerequisite: Criminal Justice major.and interrogation, modus operandi, and casepreparation. 2791 Use of Force II (2L, 2LB, 3CR): This is the second course in the use of force2560 Criminal Investigation II (3L, 3CR): sequence. It includes continued use of the policeThe study of various crimes and investigative sidearm with the goal of increasing proficiency.techniques from the initial report through the It also introduces the student to the use of the 134
    • Courses of Instructionpolice rifle, shotgun, and special weapons and Economics (ECON)tactics such as the use of tear gas and explosivedevices. 1010 Macroeconomics (3L, 3CR):Prerequisite: CRMJ 2120 (Introduction to A description and analysis of nationalCriminal Justice) and CRMJ 2781 (Use of Force income, business cycles, income distribution,I) with a grade of “C” or better. governmental economic policies, the banking system, and monetary and fiscal policy. Students2895 Criminal Justice Capstone Project (1L, 1CR): cannot earn credit for both ECON 1010 andThis course is designed as a review for the AGEC 1010.Criminal Justice major. Syllabi from all CJclasses will be reviewed and all objectives will 1020 Microeconomics (3L, 3CR):be discussed and tied together showing the A description and analysis of price determination,interaction and interconnectiveness of the resource allocation, market structures,Criminal Justice System. This course is offered international economics, and current economicfor S/U grade only. issues.Prerequisite: Sophomore status as Criminal Education (EDUC)Justice major set to graduate at the end of samesemester. 1500 Multicultural Awareness (3L, 3CR): An introduction to the impact of familyAdditional criminal justice courses will be offered relationships and cultural diversity in Americanat the Wyoming Law Enforcement Academy. society for educators and child care providers.Course descriptions are available from the office Family patterns and the diverse characteristics ofof the Vice President for Learning. ethnicity, race, exceptionality, class, and religion will be examined. Crop Science-Agriculture (CROP) 1501 Effective Substitute Teaching (2-3CR):1150 Pesticide Safety and Application (3L, 3CR): The objectives of this course are to understandIn this course, basic chemical principles are professional ethics and responsibilities; expandreviewed and applied to an in-depth study of awareness of classroom management techniques;herbicides, insecticides, and fertilizers. Students increase knowledge of effective teachingbecome familiar with selection methods and rates. behaviors; and develop a teaching resourceThey also learn about laws governing purchase file. Not applicable toward EWC graduationand use of insecticides and fertilizers. Particular requirements. May be applied toward electives.attention is given to environmental concerns. The This course is offered for S/U grade only.integrated pest management approach to total Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in EDUCpest control is stressed. 2005 or documented DFS Pre-screen or criminal background check within previous 24 months.2200 Forage Crop Science (2L, 2LB, 3CR): Contact hours vary depending on credit hours.A general course dealing with forage and 2 credits = 25 hours lecture, 20 hours classroomcommercial crops including methods of seeding, observationcultivation, harvest, selection, grading, and 3 credits = 25 hours lecture, 30 hours classroomvariety improvement. History and importance observationof legumes, grasses, and cash crops when used asforages. 1515 Effective Literary Strategies (1-2CR):Prerequisites: AECL 1000, BIOL 1000, or BIOL The Wyoming Writing Institute––Effective1010 with a grade of “C” or better. Reading/Writing Strategies is offered in the field to teachers, para-professionals, and other staff associated with a school district as requested by the district. All pertinent staff members take the course as a part of a staff development plan requiring training of all staff. This training focuses on standards-based literary structures–– writers’ workshop, literary circles, and guided reading–– with the focus of growing students to 135
    • Courses of Instructionattain success in reading, writing, listening, and and participation. They will assist educators inspeaking. laying a foundation for their students for national and internal citizenship in the 21st Century.2005 Pre-Screen for Practicum in Teaching (0CR):This course completes the process necessary Education-Early Childhood (EDEC)for the background check required prior to 1020 Introduction to Early Childhood Educationparticipating in any K-12 field experience. (3L, 3CR): This course is designed to introduce students2100 Practicum in Teaching (2-3CR)(Max 6): to the study of early childhood education—Students will participate in an extensive preschool through the primary grades. Thepracticum experience for prospective educators student will study the types, objectives andin an accredited school under the supervision of a philosophies of various early childhood programs.certified teacher. The course addresses a wide range of issuesPrerequisite: Educational Foundations 2020 related to young children and their educationwith a grade of “C” or better, or 400 clock hours through lectures, discussion and observation.employed in an educational setting. Concurrentenrollment in EDUC 2005 or documented DFS 1100 Observation and Guidance of Young Childrenpre-screen or criminal background check within (2L, 2CR):previous 24 months. This course provides effective methods of observation and guidance to meet children’s2105 Tutorial Instruction (2-3CR)(Max 4): needs individually and in groups with an emphasisThis course is designed to provide the student on promoting a positive and constructive climatewith practical experience and theoretical in the early childhood setting. Topics includeunderpinnings of tutoring in specific academic assessment, recording behaviors, planningdisciplines in which the student has demonstrated environments, materials and equipment,both interest and effectiveness. A tutor must be scheduling, discipline and parent-teacherselected based upon GPA and an interview with communication.the Learning Skills Lab Coordinator. A tutor Prerequisite: EDEC 1020 and FCSC 2121 withmust complete a series of self-directed modules grades of “C” or better.to receive 1 credit. These self-directed modulesmust be completed in the first semester of 1105 Observation and Guidance of Young Childrenenrollment. In addition, the student must work 4 Lab (2LB, 1CR):hours a week for 2 credits or 6 hours a week for 3 This course provides supervised experience in thecredits. Maximum of 3 credits per semester and observation and guidance of young children at an4 lifetime credits. early childhood center. Prerequisite: EDEC 1100 (or concurrent2150 Creative Activities (2L, 2CR): enrollment). Enrollment in EDUC 2005This course provides basic instruction in methods or documented DFS pre-screen or criminalwhich encourage creativity, imagination, concept background check within previous 24 months.formation and self-expression in children through 2 hours lab.the use of appropriate activities and materials.Dramatic play, language development, arts, crafts, 1200 Administration in Early Childhood Programsand activities to stimulate cognitive development (3L, 3CR):will be included. This course is designed to develop skills in both2 hours lecture. business and human relations components of administering child care for young children.2220 Multi-Cultural Education (1L, 1CR): Content includes procedures in establishing earlyThis is an introductory class designed to give the childhood centers, administering paperwork,student an overview of some of the many aspects fiscal management, selection, developmentof multicultural education. The course focuses and motivation of staff, parent and communityon a multitude of multicultural activities which involvement strategies, and program regulationscan be incorporated across the curriculum. These and evaluation.activities involve student research, observation, Prerequisite: Successful completion 136
    • Courses of Instructionof or concurrent enrollment in EDEC Education-Elementary1020-Introduction to Early Childhood Education. (EDEL)1300 Curriculum Planning and Development for 1410 Elementary School Math Seminar I (1L, 1CR):Young Children (2L, 2CR): This course is designed to discuss strategiesThis course will focus on the development of and instructional activities used in Theory ofskills in planning, implementing and evaluating Arithmetic I and to be a linkage between whatdevelopmentally appropriate experiences the prospective teachers study and what theyto encourage intellectual, physical, social, will teach. It provides the opportunity to discussemotional, and creative growth in young children. appropriate activities, strategies and programs inThe focus will be on the concept of optimum teaching areas related to problem solving and todevelopment of the whole child. the use of whole numbers, rational numbers, andPrerequisite: EDEC 1020, FCSC 2121 with real numbers.grades of “C” or better. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in MATH2 hours lecture. 1100.1305 Curriculum Planning and Development for 1430 Life Science in the Elementary School (1L,Young Children Lab (2LB, 1CR): 1CR):This course will provide the opportunity for Covers selection of basic life science concepts,students to engage in supervised experiences in materials and curricula appropriate forplanning, implementing, and evaluating curricular elementary school. This course parallels theactivities in an early childhood program. content of Biology 1000 or 1010 and previous orPrerequisite: Successful completion of or concurrent enrollment is ideal, but not required.concurrent enrollment in EDEC 1300.Enrollment in EDUC 2005 or documented DFS 1440 Physical Science in the Elementary Schoolpre-screen or criminal background check within (1L, 1CR):previous 24 months. Covers selection of basic physical science concepts, materials and curricula appropriate1480 CDA-Child Development Associate Seminar for elementary school. This course parallels(3L, 3CR): the content in PHYS 1090 and previous orThis course is designed to prepare candidates concurrent enrollment in a physics or chemistryfor the assessment process for the Child course is ideal but not required.Development Associate credential. This courseis intended to assist the student in preparing the 1450 Earth Science in the Elementary School (1L,Professional Resource File, The Parent Opinion 1CR):Questionnaire and prepare for the national This course covers the selection of basic earthexamination and Verification visit. science concepts to the teaching of elementaryPrerequisite: Students must be 18 years of age, students. The course includes topics inhold a high school diploma or GED, have 480 geography, meteorology, geology, and astronomy.hours of experience working with children withinthe past five years and have 120 clock hours of 2420 Elementary School Math Seminar II (1L, 1CR):formal child care education within the past five This course is designed to discuss strategiesyears. This course if offered for a S/U grade only. and instructional activities used in Theory of Arithmetic II and to be a linkage between what the prospective teachers study and what they will teach. It provides the opportunity to discuss appropriate activities, strategies and programs in teaching areas related to probability, statistics, and geometric concepts. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in MATH 1105. 137
    • Courses of Instruction Education-Educational Foundations Electrical Technology (ELTR) (EDFD) 1515 Electrical Concepts (2L, 2CR): This course introduces students to A/C and D/C2020 Foundations of Education (3L, 3CR): electricity. This will include the principles ofA basic course for those preparing for a teaching voltage, current, resistance and power. Studentscareer. This experience supplies a critical will use electrical meters for measuring andexamination of educational thought and practice reinforcing Ohm’s law.in the United States viewed as a phase of socialprogress. The study will include classroom Electrical Apprenticeship (ELAP)observations as well. 1515 Electrical Apprenticeship I (2L, 2LB, 3CR): This course is designed to provide an electrical2100 Educational Psychology (3L, 3CR): apprentice with the necessary skills andStudents will demonstrate knowledge and knowledge to ensure safe and efficient workunderstanding of psychological concepts, practices on the job. This course is designedprinciples, and research relevant to teaching and to develop the basic uses of mathematics forlearning with an emphasis on the school setting. electricity, electrical code, and electricalPrerequisite: EDFD 2020 and PSYC 1000 with a motors and transformers. The course meets thegrade of “C” or better. Wyoming statutory requirement for electricity related classroom training.2450 Lifespan Human Development (3L, 3CR): This course is offered for S/U grade only.This course provides an overview of humangrowth and development from conception until 1525 Electrical Apprenticeship II (2L, 2LB, 3CR):the end of life. The course material combines This course is designed to provide an electricaltheory, research and practical applications from apprentice with the necessary skills anddevelopmental psychology. Lecture topics knowledge to ensure safe and efficient workinclude prenatal and birth factors; genetic practices on the job. This course is designedinfluences on development; physical, cognitive, to develop the basic uses of mathematics forsocial emotional, and cultural variables which electricity, electrical code, and electrical motorsinfluence development in infancy, childhood, and transformers. This course meets theadolescence, early-, middle-, and late adulthood. Wyoming statutory requirement for electricityPrerequisite: PSYC 1000 with a grade of “C” or related classroom training.better. This course is offered for S/U grade only. Prerequisite: Successful completion of ELAP2451 Life Span: Adulthood (1L, 1CR): 1515 or instructor approval.This course provides a psychosocial overviewof human development during the adult years. 1535 Electrical Apprenticeship III (2L, 2LB, 3CR):Issues of physical, psychological, social and This course is designed to provide the secondemotional development will be explored. year electrical apprentice with the necessary skillsPrerequisite: PSYC 2300 with a grade of “C” or and knowledge to ensure safe and efficient workbetter or concurrent enrollment. practices on the job. Topics of study include but not limited to safety, AC electricity, inductance, Education-Exceptional Children capacitance, transformers, motors and application (EDEX) of the National Electrical Code. This course is offered for S/U grade only.2484 Introduction to Special Education (3L, 3CR): Prerequisite: Successful completion of ELAPThis course is designed to meet the needs of 1525 or instructor approval.education majors for a required course in specialeducation. 1545 Electrical Apprenticeship IV (2L, 2LB, 3CR):Prerequisite: Successful completion of This course is designed to provide the secondEDFD 2020 with a grade of “C” or better year electrical apprentice with the necessary skillsAND successful completion of or concurrent and knowledge to ensure safe and efficient workenrollment in EDUC 2100 Practicum in Teaching. 138
    • Courses of Instructionpractices on the job. Topics of study include but grounding calculations based on the Nationalnot limited to safety, AC electricity, inductance, Electrical Code and review for the State exam.capacitance, transformers, motors and application This course is offered for S/U grade only.of the National Electrical Code. Prerequisite: Successful completion of ELAPThis course is offered for S/U grade only. 1575 or instructor approval.Prerequisite: Successful completion of ELAP1535 or instructor approval. Engineering Technology (ENTK) 1510 Drafting I (1/2L, 1LB, 1CR):1555 Electrical Apprenticeship V (2L, 2LB, 3CR): This course is an introduction to the fundamentalThis course is designed to provide the third year techniques of drafting with the use of draftingelectrical apprentice with the necessary skills instruments and freehand sketching of pictorialand knowledge to ensure safe and efficient work and multiview drawings, including the skills ofpractices on the job. Topics of study include dimensioning and lettering.but not limited to safety, blueprint reading,construction procedures, grounding and ground 2500 Computer Aided Drafting I (1/2L, 1LB, 1CR):fault calculations, and service calculations based This course is an introduction to Computeron the National Electrical Code. Aided Drafting (CAD). The content of thisThis course is offered for S/U grade only. course is designed to provide the student withPrerequisite: Successful completion of ELAP a basic understanding of CAD program features1545 or instructor approval. and explore drafting and design essentials in a 2-dimensional format. Coursework is valuable1565 Electrical Apprenticeship VI (2L, 2LB, 3CR): for anyone needing to prepare, interpret, or useThis course is designed to provide the third year virtually any type of drawings, plans, schematics,electrical apprentice with the necessary skills or other technical graphic communicationand knowledge to ensure safe and efficient work documents.practices on the job. Topics of study include Prerequisite: Previous experience withbut not limited to safety, blueprint reading, computers is recommended.construction procedures, grounding and groundfault calcuations, and service calculations based 2505 Computer Aided Drafting II (1/2L, 1LB, 1CR):on the National Electrical Code.This course is offered for S/U grade only. This course is a continuation of ComputerPrerequisite: Successful completion of ELAP Aided Drafting I. The content of this course is1555 or instructor approval. designed to provide the student with an advanced understanding of CAD program features and1575 Electrical Apprenticeship VII (2L, 2LB, 3CR): further explore drafting and design essentials inThis course is designed to provide the fourth a 2-dimensional format. Coursework is valuableyear electrical apprentice with the necessary for anyone needing to prepare, interpret, or useskills and knowledge to ensure safe and efficient virtually any type of drawings, plans, schematics,work practices on the job. Topics of study or other technical graphic communicationinclude but not limited to safety, motor controls, documents.power distribution, solid state controls and Prerequisite: ENTK 2500 with a grade of “C” orprogrammable controllers based on the National better.Electrical Code. 2510 Computer Aided Drafting III (1/2L, 1LB, 1CR):This course if offered for S/U grade only.Prerequisite: Successful completion of ELAP This course is a continuation of CAD I and1565 or instructor approval. CAD II. The content of this course is designed to provide the student with a comprehensive1585 Electrical Apprenticeship VIII (2L, 2LB, 3CR): understanding of CAD program features andThis course is designed to provide the fourth drafting and design techniques in a 2-dimensionalyear electrical apprentice with the necessary format. Focus will be on the creation ofskills and knowledge to ensure safe and efficient presentation quality drawings and prints.work practices on the job. Topics of study include Students will be introduced to a 3-dimensionalbut not limited to advanced motor controls, design using wire-frame and solid modelingbranch and feeder circuits, service entrance and techniques. Coursework is valuable for 139
    • Courses of Instructionstudents transferring CAD credits to a four-year independent study lab course may be added untilinstitution, or for anyone needing to prepare, midterm. A student must schedule a minimuminterpret, or use virtually any type of drawings, of 2 hours per week per credit hour for a classplans, schematics, or other technical graphic scheduled within the parameters of the regularcommunication documents. semester; otherwise, the hours per week will bePrerequisite: ENTK 2500 and ENTK 2505 with dependent on the student’s date of entry to thea grade of “C” or better. class. English (ENGL) 2 lab hours per credit hour (total of 30 lab hours per credit hour).0100 English as a Second Language (3CR):This course is designed to develop the basic 1010 English I: Composition (3L, 3CR):writing skills of the high-beginning level Instruction, reading, and writing practice in theESL learner through daily assignments, the fundamentals of composition, including essaydevelopment of the paragraph and essay, and assignments such as expository, argumentative,the study of grammatical structures relevant persuasive, comparison and contrast, analysis, andto various writing genres. Learners will exam research papers.and practice writing three rhetorical forms: Prerequisite: ENGL 0640 with a grade of “C” orchronological process, spatial description and better or appropriate score on placement exam.listing using specific descriptive details, reasonsand examples. 1020 English II (3L, 3CR):Prerequisite: IBT TOEFL: 61 or Computer-based An introductory study of literature in its variedTOEFL: 173 or Paper-based TOEFL: 500 forms such as poetry, drama, short fiction, novels,3 hours lecture. and literary nonfiction. Several composition assignments requiring students to write about0620 Foundations of Grammar (3L, 3CR): literary works.Study of English grammar with emphasis on Prerequisite: ENGL 1010 with a grade of “C” orword formation. Grading in this course will be better.based on student progress. A final grade of “C” orbetter does not necessarily indicate readiness for 2050 Creative Writing—Introduction to Fiction (3L,the next course in the sequence. 3CR):Prerequisite: Appropriate score on the placement This course deals with an analysis of the forms ofexamination. fiction and the practice of creative writing at an introductory level.0630 Grammar and Writing Improvement (3L, 3CR): Prerequisite: ENGL 1020 with a grade of “C” orThe study of English grammar with emphasis on better.sentence formation.Prerequisite: Appropriate score on the placement 2140 World Literature (3L, 3CR):examination. This course focuses on the major literary works representative of the significant periods in the0640 Writing Skills (3L, 3CR): history of Western civilization. Through reading,Instruction, reading, and writing practice in the study and discussion, students explore literatureorganization of short compositions. Review of from Homer through the medieval period ofsentence elements and of usage as necessary. This Chaucer.course may be used as a preparatory course for Prerequisite: ENGL 1020 with a grade of “C” orstudents who plan to enroll in English 1010. better.Prerequisite: Appropriate score on the placementexamination or ENGL 0630 with a grade of “C” 2210 English Literature I (3L, 3CR):or better. A survey of major British authors and literary movements. The first semester covers British0810 Spelling Improvement (1-2CR)(Max 2): literature from the Old English period throughStudents learn to improve their spelling skills Neo-Classic period.using a phonetics and rules approach. This is a Prerequisite: ENGL 1020 with a grade of “C” orself-paced program using a variety of methods, better.including computer-assisted instruction. This 140
    • Courses of Instruction2220 English Literature II (3L, 3CR): Entrepreneurship (ENTR)A continuation of English 2210. The secondsemester covers writers and literary movements 1500 Successful Entrepreneurship (2L, 2CR):from the Romantic period to the present. An introductory course focusing onPrerequisite: ENGL 1020 with a grade of “C” or indentification of the business skills, personalbetter. traits and characteristics necessary to succeed as2310 American Literature I (3L, 3CR): an entrepreneur. Students analyze and determineA survey of major American authors and literary how to obtain the skills needed to own, operatemovements. The first semester covers American and manage a small business successfully.literature from the early 1600’s through the mid- Through guided self-analysis, students assess their19th Century. own alignment with the passion, creativity andPrerequisite: ENGL 1020 with a grade of “C” or innovation that typifies entrepreneurial success.better. In addition, students explore the role of small business in both the U.S. and global economy,2320 American Literature II (3L, 3CR): examine a variety of industries, businesses,A continuation of English 2310. The second entrepreneural ventures and create a personalsemester covers literature from the mid-19th business preference profile.Century to the present. Prerequisite: HMDV 0510 with a grade of “C” orPrerequisite: ENGL 1020 with a grade of “C” or better or appropriate score on placement exam.better. 1520 Creating a Business Plan (2L, 2CR):2370 Western American Literature (3L, 3CR): Students evaluate a business opportunity, collectA survey of works by major writers of Western and organize research data into a marketingfiction and nonfiction, including short stories, plan and prepare a financial plan for their smallnovels, and autobiographies. Includes works with business idea. In addition, students gain skills toboth historical and modern settings. be able to continue developing their business planPrerequisite: ENGL 1010 with a grade of “C” or as they learn new information and gain ability tobetter. make a “go” or “no-go” determination. 2 hours lecture.2440 Literary Genres: Short Story (3L, 3CR): 2500 Small Business Operations Management (2L,Examination of the short story as a literary 2CR):genre. Includes reading of short stories bywriters of international rank, emphasizing but Students develop skills for introducing newnot necessarily limited to British, American, and products and services, quality management,Canadian writers. Includes writing essays of process design, job design, technologyanalysis. management and related business designPrerequisite: ENGL 1010 with a grade of “C” or decisions. Students also develop operationsbetter. decision making skills for inventory, materials, scheduling and planning specific to the needs2480 Literary Genres: Drama (3L, 3CR): of a small business as it progresses through theReading of plays to acquaint students with business life cycle.problems and possibilities of drama as a genre. 2520 Legal Issues for Entrepreneurs (2L, 2CR):Prerequisite: ENGL 1020 with a grade of “C” orbetter. A course focusing on the legal start-up, growth, management and exit strategies of small business. Students identify and analyze the legal and tax implications of the forms of business ownership. In addition, students examine the process of forming the various types of corporations. Student investigate human resource laws, contracts, reporting requirements, bankruptcy, collections and small claims court topics. Students also determine how to protect their business innovations with copyright, trademark, patents and intellectual property law. 141
    • Courses of Instruction2550 Principles of Marketing (3L, 3CR): 1740 Rodeo Timed Events I (1L, 2LB, 2CR):An overview of marketing including the This is the first course is a series of rodeo timedstrategies for product, distribution, promotion, events classes. Students will learn the rules ofand pricing decisions; the relationship of these the different timed events, safety procedures fordecisions to the external environment; global each of the events, proper tack for the events, andperspectives for tactical and strategic planning rules and regulations regarding brand inspectionsrelated to marketing; and ethics in marketing and health certificates. Lab sessions will deal withconsiderations. Students cannot earn credit for practical applications of material that is presentedboth ENTR 2540 and MKT 2100. in the lecture. A $30 fee will be charged for Equine Studies (EQST) this course. Verification of a NIRA card will be required. Students may enroll in only one rodeo1570 Horseshoeing I (1/2L, 1LB, 1CR): event class or one rough stock class per semester.This course will include a study of the hoof ingeneral, shaping shoes, trimming, and placement. 1750 Rodeo Timed Events II (1L, 2LB, 2CR): This is the second course in a series of rodeo1580 Horseshoeing II (1/2L, 1LB, 1CR): timed events classes. Students will learn aboutThis course deals with the detection of hoof physical fitness for the time event competitor,problems, determination of causes for such correct application of equine bandages,problems, and the proper method of treatment development of a positive competitive attitude,to correct these problems. Students will be communication skills as a rodeo competitor,required to shoe a minimum of one horse without humane treatment of timed event stock, enteringassistance before completion. rodeos, and selection of proper attire. LabPrerequisite: EQST 1570 with a grade of “C” or sessions will deal with practical applications ofbetter. material that is presented in the lecture. A $30 fee will be charged for this course. Verification1725 Rodeo Rough Stock I (1L, 2LB, 2CR): of a NIRA card will be required. Students mayThis is the first course in a series of rodeo enroll in only one rodeo event class or one roughrough stock events classes. Students will learn stock class per semester.the rules of the different rough stock events,safety procedures for each of the events, proper 2740 Rodeo Rough Stock III (1L, 2LB, 2CR):equipment for each of the events, and the correct This is the third course in a series of rodeo roughuse for each piece of equipment. Lab sessions stock events classes. Students will learn aboutwill deal with practical application of material selection of bucking horses and bulls, nutrition,that is presented in the lecture. A $30 fee will be immunization and parasite control for roughcharged for this course. Verification of a NIRA stock, safety in loading and hauling broncs andcard will be required. A student may enroll in bulls, health certificate and brand inspectiononly one rodeo event class or one rough stock regulations pertinent to bucking stock, andclass per semester. financial transactions involved with rodeo. Lab sessions will deal with practical application of1730 Rodeo Rough Stock II (1L, 2LB, 2CR): material that is presented in the lecture. A $30This is the second course is a series of rodeo fee will be charged for this course. Verificationrough stock events classes. Students will of a NIRA card will be required. A student maylearn about physical fitness for the rough enroll in only one rodeo event class or one roughstock competitor, development of a positive stock class per semester.competitive attitude, communication skills as arodeo competitor, humane treatment of bucking 2750 Rodeo Rough Stock IV (1L, 2LB, 2CR):horses and bulls, application of support devices This is the fourth course in a series of rodeofor the competitor, entering rodeos, and selection rough stock events classes. Students will learnof proper attire. Lab sessions will deal with techniques for judging each of the different roughpractical application of material that is presented stock events as well as public relations involvingin the lecture. A $30 fee will be charged for the rodeo competitor. Lab sessions will deal withthis course. Verification of a NIRA card will be practical application of material that is presentedrequired. A student may enroll in only one rodeo in the lecture. A $30 fee will be charged forevent class or one rough stock class per semester. 142
    • Courses of Instructionthis course. Verification of a NIRA card will be labeling regulations, and evaluating nutritionalrequired. A student may enroll in only one rodeo claims made by food products and fad diets.event class or one rough stock class per semester. Prerequisite: No reading improvement required.2760 Rodeo Timed Events III (1L, 2LB, 2CR): 1141 Principles of Nutrition (3L, 3CR):This is the third course in a series of rodeo timed A study of the science of food as it relates toevents classes. Students will learn about selection the attainment and the maintenance of healthof stock, nutrition, immunization and parasite and/or contributes to specific pathologies.control for the performance horse and the cattle, Course emphasis will include: principleshauling horses, and financial transactions involved of nutrition; scientific basis of nutrition;with rodeo. Lab sessions will deal with practical nutrients, their functions, requirements, andapplications of material that is presented in the interactions; nutritional fads and fallacies;lecture. A $30 fee will be charged for this course. energy consumption; energy expenditure; andVerification of a NIRA card will be required. metabolism. Special topics will include nationalStudents may enroll in only one rodeo event class and world nutrition and laboratory situations.or one rough stock class per semester. 2121 Child Development (2L, 3LB, 4CR):2770 Rodeo Timed Events IV (1L, 2LB, 2CR): A course in the study of the various societalThis is the fourth course in a series of rodeo and cultural influences on the growth andtimed events classes. Students will learn development of children during the earlytechniques for judging each of the different timed childhood period. Emphasis will be placed on theevents as well as public relations involving the perior from conception to age eleven. Studentsrodeo competitor. Lab sessions will deal with will observe infants, toddlers, preschoolers, andpractical applications of material that is presented primary grade children for a total of 30 hoursin the lecture. A $30 fee will be charged for during the semester in order to related theory tothis course. Verification of a NIRA card will be the actual behavior of children.required. Students may enroll in only one rodeo Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in EDUCevent class or one rough stock class per semester. 2005 or documented DFS Pre-Screen or criminal background check within previous 24 months and Family and Consumer Science (FCSC) PSYC 1000 or consent of instructor.1010 Perspectives in Family and ConsumerScience (2L, 2CR): 2131 Family Relationships (3L, 3CR):This course is designed to explore the history, This course will help the student developcore concepts, professional experience and career understanding about patterns of interactionsoptions in the field of Family and Consumer at different stages of the family life cycle andScience. Students will gain experience in transactions between families and other socialonline education as well as assessment and goal system.setting to achieve expectations for professional French-Language (FREN)competencies in the field. Students will beginto develop a professional portfolio as part of this 1010 1st Year French I (4L, 1LB, 4CR):course. Fundamentals of grammar, composition, reading, and conversation.1140 Nutrition (3L, 3CR):This class will provide the students with a basic 1020 1st Year French II (4L, 1LB, 4CR):background in the six classes of nutirents and Continuation of French 1010.the role of each nutrient in food selection, Prerequisite: FREN 1010 with a grade of “C” orweight loss, and weight maintenance. Basic better.diet planning principles will be discussed andstudents will analyze diets in accordance with 2030 2nd Year French I (4L, 1LB, 4CR):such principles and propose dietary changes to Progressive reading of French prose, withimprove nutritional status. Nutritional status additional review in verbs, idioms, andand needs throughout the life span. Students will conversation.become better consumers as they are introduced Prerequisites: FREN 1010 and FREN 1020 withto reading and interpreting labels, understanding a grade of “C” or better. 143
    • Courses of Instruction Geography (GEOG) German-Language (GERM)1000 World Regional Geography (3L, 3CR): 1010 1st year German I (4L, 1LB, 4CR):Covers the distributions, traits, and processes Explores fundamentals of grammar, composition,of the Earth’s peoples and landscapes through conversation, and reading.the perspective of regional geography, which isthe study of the spatial relationships of natural 1020 1st year German II (4L, 1LB, 4CR):environments and human societies. This course examines fundamentals of grammar, composition, conversation, and reading.1010 Introduction to Physical Geography (3L, 3CR): Prerequisite: GERM 1010 with a grade of “C” orA one-semester survey of geography which better.introduces the earth’s regions through a Health Education-Physicalconceptual approach. & Health Education (HLED)1020 Human Geography (3L, 3CR): 1006 Personal Health (3L, 3CR):Analysis of spatial patterns of and interactionbetween the world’s great cultural systems. A study of health problems as they relate to theTopics include settlement patterns, behavior development of personal health values leading topatterns, agricultural land use and resource an understanding of the responsibility of oneself,utilization. the family, community, and the world. Geology (GEOL) 1140 Nutrition (3L, 3CR): This class will provide the students with a basic1100 Physical Geology (3L, 2LB, 4CR): background in the six classes of nutirents andThe study of the earth’s physical make-up the role of each nutrient in food selection,including rocks and minerals, streams, glaciers, weight loss, and weight maintenance. Basicgeologic structures, earthquakes and plate diet planning principles will be discussed andtectonics. Laboratory sessions will cover rocks, students will analyze diets in accordance withminerals and topographic maps. such principles and propose dietary changes to improve nutritional status. Nutritional status1200 Historical Geology (3L, 2LB, 4CR): and needs throughout the life span. Students willHistorical geology is a one-semester introductory become better consumers as they are introducedstudy of the earth’s formation, composition and to reading and interpreting labels, understandingchanges, and the corresponding evolution of life labeling regulations, and evaluating nutritionalthrough time. claims made by food products and fad diets. Prerequisite: No reading improvement required.1470 Environmental Geology (3L, 3LB, 4CR):This course is an application of geologic 1221 Standard First Aid & Safety (2L, 2CR):principles to topical problems in environmental A study of accident prevention, assessmentand resource geology. Topics include analysis of procedures and immediate first aid care forenvironmental issues such as earthquake disaster victims of accidents or sudden illness. Thepreparedness, landslides, land use, floods and student has the option of receiving certificationhuman occupation, ground water withdrawal by the American Red Cross for Adult, Child,and contamination issues, volcanic and coastal Infant CPR ($5.00) and First Aid ($5.00).hazards, and the response of landscapes andpeople to resource development (minerals/air/ 1280 Drug Use and Abuse (2L, 2CR):water/energy). Laboratories will be used to A general study of licit and illicit drugs and theiranalyze and debate data relevant to environmental metabolic and central nervous system alterationsproblems from a geological perspective. with special emphasis on the consequent impactPrerequisite: Placement score for ENGL 0640 or on an individual, family, subculture, and worldbetter and no reading improvement required, or society, both in the past and the present.appropriate reading ACT score. 144
    • Courses of Instruction Health Technology (HLTK) 1650 Advanced First Aid and Basic Emergency Care (2L, 4LB, 3CR):1220 Growth & Development (3L, 3CR): Provide training in fundamentals of emergencyThis course introduces the theories, processes care. Follows State of Wyoming Guidelines toand enhancement of the development of infants, provide students with core knowledge, skillsyoung children, adolescents, and adults. Through and attitudes to function in the capacity of a firstresearch, discussion, and field observation/ responder.participation, the student will study life spangrowth and development. 1690 Emergency Medical Technology (2L, 4LB, 4CR):1510 Nurse Assistant (3L, 2LB, 4CR): This course is a basic EMT class. The structureThis course is designed to provide concepts and is dealing with emergency care. This course isskills of caring for residents of long-term care offered for S/U grade only.facilities under the supervision of licensed nursing Prerequisite: High school diploma or GED.personnel. The successful student will be eligiblefor certification and to function in the field of 1695 Emergency Medical Technology II (2L, 2LB,long term care. It also prepares the student to 3CR):take the competency exam to become certified in This course is a basic EMT class. The topicsthe State of Wyoming. The CNA certificate may include advanced patient assessment, respiratorybe transferred out of state. This course is offered system, general pharmacology, and medicalfor S/U grade only. emergencies and medications. Prerequisite: HLTK 1690, EMT I with a grade of1515 Home Health Assistant Re-Certification “C” or better.(1CR):This course is designed to provide 16 1725 Massage Therapy Techniques II (3L, 2LB,recertification hours for certified nursing 4CR):assistants employed in home health, public The focus of this course is to expand on thehealth, or community settings. It will apply the massage techniques already learned by theprinciples learned in the basic nursing assistant students and enables them to provide a moreprogram to the specific needs of clients in the comprehensive massage treatment. It emphasizeshome setting. This course is offered for S/U proper body mechanics and self-care. Studentsgrade only. will fine-tune the timing of their massagePrerequisite: Current unencumbered Wyoming treatments, and will be putting the finishingNursing Assistant Certificate. touches on their Swedish massage treatments. They will learn to perform abdominal, gluteal,1560 Introduction to Health Careers (1L, 1CR): and chest massage routines.This course is designed to introduce the student Prerequisites: Successful completion of HLTKto the U.S. Health Care Delivery System as 1575 with a grade of “C” or better and CPR.well as the health related professions involvedin patient care. In addition, other health related 1735 Massage Therapy Ethics and Business (1L,professions will be explored. Through classroom 1CR):content and field observations, the student will Due to the intimate nature of massage,investigate the various health/health-related professionalism is of utmost importance. Thiscareers. course discusses professional ethics as they relate to the massage profession. As part of this course,1575 Massage Therapy Techniques I (3L, 2LB, 4CR): students will learn to creat a code of ethics. ThisThis course provides students with an in-depth course also introduces students to the businessknowledge of basic massage techniques and aspects of running a massage practice. Topicsprotocol. Emphasis will be on the application included in the business portion are scheduling,of basic massage strokes and their variations. budgeting, bookkeeping, marketing, advertisingStudents will learn proper draping and and massage related business issues. Students willpositioning techniques and recommended client learn to write and execute a detailed, workableprotocol. massage business plan.Prerequisite: CPR Prerequisite: Successful completion of HLTK 1575 with a grade of “C” or better and CPR. 145
    • Courses of Instruction1780 Supplemental Modalities (1L, 2LB, 2CR): 1980 Deep Tissue Massage (1L, 2LB, 2CR):This course highlights two supplemental This course prepares the massage student to applymodalities that enhance Massage Therapy. deep muscular therapy techniques. Emphasis willPrinciples and techniques are covered for the be placed on the use of proper body mechanicsmodalities in addition to the therapeutic effects. and the use of proper techniques to deliver deepPrerequisite: Successful completion of HLTK tissue massage safely. Trigger point therapy will1575 with a grade of “C” or better. be used extensively in this course, and the use of deep tissue tools will be introduced. Proper1850 Hydrotherapy & Spa Techniques (1L, 2LB, gauging of pressure will also be discussed.2CR): Prerequisite: Successful completion of HLTKThis course covers the fundamentals of 1575 with a grade of “C” or better and CPR.hydrotherapy and spa techniques. It addressesthe application of water as treatment in each 2005 Pre-Screen for Health Tech (OCR):of its three forms, hot and cold treatments, This course completes the process necessaryhydrocollators, body wraps, mud wraps, salt for the background check required prior toglows, facial steams, and other to be announced. participating in HLTK 1510.Prerequisite: Successful completion of HLTK1575 with a grade of “C” or better and CPR. History (HIST) 1110 Western Civilization I (3L, 3CR):1950 Massage Pathology (3L, 3CR):This course discusses common pathologies that An introductory course in the study of Westernmassage therapists are likely to encounter in their civilization with attention given to the political,professional practices. It also discusses whether social, and economic developments from thethese conditions are indicated or contraindicated beginning of civilization to 1650.for massage and describes how they may be 1120 Western Civilization II (3L, 3CR):treated. An emphasis is placed on medicalterminology. A continuation of History 1110. From 1650 toPrerequisite: Successful completion of HLTK the present.1575 with a grade of “C” or better and CPR. 1210 United States History I (3L, 3CR):1960 Massage Kinesiology (1L, 2LB, 2CR): A general course which reviews the history of theThis course teaches students to indentify the United States from the colonial period to 1865.location and movements of skeletal muscles. Emphasis is placed on the important events andStudents will identify bones and boney landmarks. personalities that shaped our nation’s heritage.They will learn muscle origin and insertion using 1211 U.S. to 1865 (3L, 3CR):specific boney landmarks as points of anatomicalreference. They will also learn directional terms A general survey course which reviews theand terms of movement. Students will learn United States’ history from the colonial periodto identify and describe the movement of each to 1865. Emphasis is placed on the importantmuscle. events and personalities that shaped our nation’sPrerequisite: CPR heritage. This course meets the requirements of the Wyoming statutes providing instruction in the1970 Massage Therapy Clinical (4LB, 2CR): provisions and principles of the United States andThis course provides students with opportunities Wyoming constitutions.to develop the practical skills necessary to Prerequisite: Placement score of ENGL 0640 orwork as a professional massage therapist under better and no reading improvement required, orthe guidance of their instructor. Students will appropriate ACT score.practice the responsibilities of receptionist, 1220 United States History II (3L, 3CR):therapist, laundry duties and all other aspects ofthe profession. A continuation of History 1210. 1865 to thePrerequisite: Successful completion of HLTK present.1575 with a grade of “C” or better and CPR. 146
    • Courses of Instruction1221 U.S. from 1865 (3L, 3CR): the student in activities/experiences thatA general survey course which reviews the demonstrate an ability to continue study in theUnited States’ history from 1865 to the present. social sciences. This course offered for S/U gradeEmphasis is placed on the important events and only.personalities that shaped our nation’s heritage. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing, major inThis course meets the requirements of the relevant social science, semester of graduation.Wyoming statutes providing instruction in theprovisions and principles of the United States and Human Development (HMDV)Wyoming constitutions.Prerequisite: Placement score of ENGL 0640 or 0510 Fundamentals of Reading I (2L, 2LB, 3CR):better and no reading improvement required, or This course is designed to develop readingappropriate ACT score. comprehension and reading vocabulary, as well as general reading strategies. Students1250 History of Wyoming (3L, 3CR): will spend 4 hours per week in the classroom.A study of Wyoming history from the late 18th Special emphasis will be placed on readingCentury to the present. content-related materials and developing a working vocabulary for general subject reading.1290 History of US West (3L, 3CR): Prerequisite: Appropriate score on the placementAn introductory course designed to acquaint examination.students with the history of the Trans-MississippiWest. Emphasis is placed on the 19th Century. 0520 Fundamentals of Reading II (2L, 2LB, 3CR): This course is designed to develop reading2020 American Military History (3L, 3CR): comprehension and reading vocabulary, as well asThis course surveys U.S. military experiences general reading strategies. Students will spendfrom the colonial period to the present. In 3 hours per week in the classroom and 1 houraddition to specific wars, it examines military per week in a reading lab. Special emphasis willdoctrines and political, social and economic be placed on reading content-related materialsforces that shaped the conduct of war in American and developing a working vocabulary for generalhistory. subject reading. Prerequisite: Appropriate score on the placement2045 Introduction to Asian Civilization (3L, 3CR): examination.A survey course which emphasizes the cultural,economic, political, and social development of 1000 College Studies (1L, 1CR):East Asia or monsoon Asia with special attention This course is designed as a general orientationpaid to India, China, Japan and Korea since the and a transition to college for all new studentsarrival of Europeans in East Asia. The impact of and all transfer students who have less thanWestern technology upon political ideas, cultural- thirty semester hours. This course will enablereligious values, and economics will be stressed. the student to explore and understand the whole college environment, to identify and utilize2290 North American Indians (3L, 3CR): campus resources (programs and other courses)This course studies American Indian history that will enhance his/her academic experience.through 500 years and across the continent. The course will assist the student to begin toConsiders Indian political, social and economic develop short and long term academic andcontinuity and change. Focuses on how Indian career goals. The course will assist the studentpeoples experienced and responded to times of to identify community resources which will alsodramatic change. enhance his/her academic experience.2395 Social Science Capstone Experience (0CR): 1025 Orientation to Distance Learning (1L, 1CR):The Social Science Capstone Experience This course provides an overview of the elementsis directed toward the application of broad required for successful distance learning.principles in the social sciences with specific Technological skills and learning strategiesattention given to the student’s discipline of necessary for effective interaction with distancestudy. The course seeks to enhance and enrich courses will be the focus of this interactivethe student’s academic background and involve orientation. This course is highly recommended 147
    • Courses of Instructionfor anyone who enrolls in a distance education Passing the course with a grade of “C” or bettercourse. Distance learners may substitute for satisfies the Outcomes Assessment activity forHMDV 1000 for EWC degree requirements. Interdisciplinary Studies majors.This course is offered for S/U or letter grade. Prerequisite: English 1010 with a grade of “C” or better.1050 Study Skills (2L, 2CR): Information Management (IMGT)This course is designed to teach skills andattitudes which enable students to achieve their 2400 Introduction to Information Management (3L,academic goals. Areas addressed will include 3CR):note-taking, preparation for and taking tests, Concerned with the role of information systemsmemory and concentration, effective listening, in managing organizations to make them morewriting skills, time management, goal setting, and competitive and efficient. Specific topics includeother related skills. organizational and technical foundations of information systems and building and managing1500 Human Development: Empowerment (3L, systems.3CR): Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.This course defines the personal qualities and Instructional Technology-Educationcharacteristics that contribute to student success (ITEC)as it teaches the attitudes and study skills thatcontribute to academic achievement. Students 2360 Teaching With Technology (1-3CR):become more aware, discover self-motivation, This course provides an introduction to effectiveaccept personal responsibility, and master utilization and integration of informationself-management techniques through in-class technology with classroom instruction. Topicsexercises, take-home assignments, and journal will include: hardware, software, integratedwriting. The course provides instruction in applications, grade books, Internet, world widelistening, reading, writing, note-taking, and web, e-mail, educational media and evaluation,test-taking skills so that students acquire the and educational issues regarding informationdisciplines that distinguish life-long learners. This technology.course may be substituted for both HMDV 1000 Contact hours vary depending on credit hours.and HMDV 1050 for EWC degree and electiverequirements. Internet (INET) 1510 Website Analysis (1L, 1CR):1510 Success in the Workplace (1L, 1CR): This course introduces methods of assessingA class designed to emphasize those concepts, website design and content. In this course,skills, and attitudes needed by an individual to students use analytical skills to critically appraisehave a successful work-related experience. Topics websites. They also gain knowledge of theinclude resumes, workplace ethics, customer current trends in website design.relations, and other employment skills. 1550 Introduction to the Internet. (1/2L, 1LB,1550 Lifestyle Management (2L, 2CR): 1CR):This class covers basic lifestyle topics to help This course provides an understanding of thestudents become more successful in life and in development and function of the Internet, andschool. It includes topics in nutrition, exercise, introduces students to the basic tools for usinggoal setting, resume building, interviewing skills, the Internet for communication and research andmental and emotional health topics and working as a resource for electronic media. The coursewith community resources. will include hands-on interaction with Internet tools.2000 Sophomore Project (3L, 3CR):This course is designed to be an interdisciplinary 1580 Web Page Authoring (1L, 2LB, 2CR):approach to library research and the I-Search This course is intended for the beginning Webpaper, providing students with a variety of page designer. It will familiarize students withresearch skills and methods. It will stress the HTML (Hypertext Markup Language), XHTLAPA/MLA documentation style. Emphasis (Extensible Hypertext Markup Language) andwill be placed on critical thinking and analysis. CSS (Cascading Style Sheets). Using these tools, 148
    • Courses of Instructionstudents will learn to design their own simple International Studies (INST)web pages for personal or business use. 2350 Introduction to Global Studies (3L, 3CR):1590 Web Page Design (2L, 2LB, 3CR): Turns an interdisciplinary eye on theThis is an introductory course on web page design contemporary world of consuming and globalusing design techniques in Dreamweaver. Upon connections. Takes a broad overview of variouscompletion of this course, participants will have approaches to the study of globalization whilethe necessary skills to design and publish basic exploring the links between consumption, civilcustom web sites for viewing on the World Wide society, social justice, and ecological integrity.Web. Dreamweaver is a web design programused to create multimedia-rich web pages Journalism (JOUR)through interactive web pages containing text, 1010 Publications Production I (2LB, 1CR) (Max 4):images, animation, sounds, and video. Practical experience dealing with campus or campus-related affairs and events. Students1610 Dynamic Web Graphics: Flash Web Design may work in writing, editing, advertising,(2L, 2LB, 3CR): photographic, and/or production areas, includingDynamic Web graphics allows the Web designer on-line publication. Sustained professional-levelto create animations and Web interfaces. Web performance is required.pages are used by most businesses today, and skillsacquired in this course will help the designer Library Science-Education (LIBS)enhance the published Web page. 2280 Literature for Children (3L, 3CR):2000 Advanced Web Page Scripting (3L, 3CR): Wide reading and discussion of the literatureThis course builds on the fundamentals taught for children is emphasized in this course. Booksin Web Page Authoring to further web site that have won recognition as distinguisheddesign and development. It will focus on using contributions to American literature for childrenJavaScript with style sheets and the Document are examined. The selection of books for school,Object Model to extend the interaction of the home, and public library is considered. Inuser and the browser to create a truly dynamic addition to becoming acquainted with a widesite. We will also explore the uses of JavaScript in sampling of children’s literature, students alsoWeb 2.0. establish criteria for evaluation.Prerequisite: INET 1580 with a grade of “C” or Prerequisite: ENGL 1010 with a grade of “C” orbetter. better.3 hours lecture. Machine Tool Technology (MCHT)2010 Database Driven Web Sites (2L, 2LB, 3CR): 1500 General Machine Shop (1L, 2LB, 2CR):Students will acquire the skills necessary to build This is a course in the theory and practice of handand maintain dynamic Web pages. Topics include tools and shop equipment. Emphasis is givendata resources, record sets, dynamic content, and to good working habits and attitudes towarddatabase use. benchwork layout, drilling, tapping, filing,Prerequisite: COSC 1200 with a grade of “C” or grinding, metal cutting, drill sharpening, andbetter. letter stamping. The course will teach students how to get the job done safely, accurately, and quickly. 1610 Machine Tool Technology I (1L, 2LB, 2CR): A course providing instruction in turning fundamentals including safety, tooling, feeds, speeds, threading, boring, work holding, and machine maintenance on belt drive and geared head manual lathes. The student will also learn how to calibrate and read a micrometer and a dial caliper. 149
    • Courses of Instruction1620 Machine Tool Technology II (1L, 4LB, 3CR): Mathematics (MATH)This course provides the student with the 0900 Pre-algebra Arithmetic (3L, 3CR):technical understanding and skill required to domore advanced turning, threading, and boring on This course is designed for those who are weakthe lathe. This is followed by learning to set up in basic skills, those who require a review of theand use the vertical mill to cut key seats. fundamentals, and those who desire a chance toPrerequisite: MCHT 1610 with a grade of “C” or develop their self-confidence in mathematics.better. This course is a comprehensive study of arithmetic including such topics as operations Management-Business (MGT) on whole numbers, primes, fractions, decimals, ratio and proportion, and percents, as well as the1000 Introduction to Supervision (3L, 3CR): use of formulas and introductory algebra skillsThis course seeks to develop an understanding including the use of a scientific calculator.and appreciation of the basic concepts of Prerequisite: Appropriate score on mathematicssupervision, to include planning, organizing, placement exam or consent of instructor.human resources management, directing,and controlling. Topics covered also 0906 Math Lab I (3LB, 1CR):include motivation, delegation, leadership, If the student is having difficulty incommunications, team-building, total quality Developmental Studies 0900, or if the studentmanagement, and discipline. The course should wishes to have lab work time on a regular basisassist one to acquire the skills necessary for with tutorial assistance, he/she may take the matheffective first-level management. lab. The lab would be on a to be arranged basis. Marketing (MKT) The student will be able to register for the lab any time before midterm. This course is offered for1000 Sales (3L, 3CR): S/U grade only.Students will acquire skills and knowledge Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in MATHnecessary to achieve success in the sales 0900.profession. Students will develop knowledge and 3 hours lab.an understanding of how to prepare for a sellingcareer, how to better understand their customers, 0915 Math 0920 Lab (3LB, 1CR):selling techniques and procedures, and how to If a student is having difficulty in Mathematicsincrease their sales effectiveness. 0920, or if the student wishes to have lab work time on a regular basis with tutorial assistance,2100 Principles of Marketing (3L, 3CR): he/she may take the math lab. The lab will be onAn overview of marketing including the a to be arranged basis. The student will be ablestrategies for product, distribution, promotion, to register for the lab any time before midterm.and pricing decisions; the relationship of these This course is offered for S/U grade only.decisions to the external environment; global Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in MATHperspectives for tactical and strategic planning 0920.related to marketing; and ethics in marketingconsiderations. 0920 Elementary Algebra (4L, 4CR):Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. This is a one-semester beginning course in algebra. Basic concepts of algebra will be studied, including real numbers, linear, quadratic, and rational equations, with emphasis placed on solving “word” or “story” problems. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in BADM 1005, MATH 0900, or MATH 1515 or appropriate score on math placement exam within one year prior to registering for the course, or consent of instructor. 150
    • Courses of Instruction0930 Intermediate Algebra (4L, 4CR): 1400 Pre-Calculus Algebra (4L, 4CR):Basic techniques and skills of algebra with Algebraic equations and inequalities are studiedapplications. Topics include solving linear as well as the following functions: polynomial,equations and inequalities, quadratic equations, rational, exponential, and logarithmic. Emphasisrational expressions, factoring, exponents, is placed on graphing relations and functions.graphing of linear equations and conic sections, Prerequisite: MATH 0930 with a grade of “C”and an introduction to functions and logarithms. or better, or appropriate score on mathematicsPrerequisite: MATH 0920 with a grade of “C” placement exam within one year prior toor better, or appropriate score on mathematics registering for the course or consent ofplacement exam within one year prior to instructor.registering for the course or consent ofinstructor. 1405 Pre-Calculus Trigonometry (3L, 3CR): Topics include circular and trigonometric1000 Problem Solving (3L, 3CR): functions and their inverses, identities andThis course is specifically designed to satisfy basic equations, complex numbers, and vectors, andmathematics requirements at many colleges for applications of these.students not planning to enroll in Mathematics Prerequisite: MATH 1400 with a grade of “C”1400 or a calculus course. The course treats or better, or concurrent enrollment in MATHmodern topics chosen for their applicability 1400 or an ACT math score of 25 or consent ofand accessibility; it provides students with instructor.the mathematical and logical skills needed toformulate, analyze, and interpret quantitative 1450 Algebra and Trigonometry (5L, 5CR):arguments in a variety of settings. Statistics is This course will cover the topics of Math 1400introduced and the use of a calculator is stressed and Math 1405 in a single course. Students whoin the course. have received credit in either of the above coursesPrerequisite: MATH 0920 with a grade of “C” may not receive credit for Math 1450. Topicsor better, or appropriate score on mathematics to be covered include algebraic equations andplacement exam within one year prior to inequalities; algebraic functions (polynomial,registering for the course or an ACT math score rational, exponential and logarithmic) with anof 21 or consent of instructor. emphasis on graphing these and other relations; complex numbers; circular and trigonometric1100 Numbers & Operations for Elementary School functions and their inverses; trigonometricTeachers (3L, 3CR): identities and equations; and applications of all ofThis course if for prospective elementary school the above.teachers. The purpose of this course is to Prerequisite: MATH 0930 with a grade of “C”prepare students to be competent in teaching or better, or appropriate score on mathematicsthe major concepts and practical skills related to placement exam within one year prior tothe real number system with the four arithmetic registering for the course or an ACT math scoreoperations. Students enrolling in this course of 23.must also enroll concurrently in EDEL 1410,Elementary School Math Seminar I. 1515 Applied Technical Mathematics (3L, 3CR):Prerequisite: MATH 0920 with a grade of “C” or A mathematics course for students in thebetter, or level 2 on the Math Placement Exam or technical fields with applications which stressan ACT math score of 21 or consent of instructor. problem solving techniques, measurement systems (both English and Metric), ratio and1105 Data Probability, and Algebra for Elementary proportions, percentages, scale drawings, basicSchool Teachers (3L, 3CR): geometry and the use of geometric formulas, theThis course is a continuation of Mathematics interpreting of graphs and tables, and basic trig1100. The purpose of this course is to prepare functions. This course may not be used to meetstudents to be competent in teaching the major the math requirements for AA or AS programs.concepts and practical skills related data analysis, Prerequisite: MATH 0900 with a grade of “C” orprobability, & algebra. better, or an appropriate score on the placementPrerequisite: MATH 0920 with a grade of “C” or exam within one year prior to registering for thebetter or Level 2 on the Math Placement Exam or course or consent of instructor.consent of instructor. 151
    • Courses of Instruction2120 Geometry & Measurement for Elementary 2350 Business Calculus (4L, 4CR):School Teachers (3L, 3CR): Review of functions, their graphs and theirThis course is a continuation of MATH 1105. algebra; derivatives and their applications;Ths purpose of this course is to prepare students techniques of differentiation; the calculus forto be competent in teaching the major concepts the exponential and logarithmic functionsand practical skills related to geometry and with applications to business; integrationmeasurement. Students enrolling in this course and applications; differential equations andmust also enroll concurrently in EDEL 1420: applications. Students who have earned credit inElementary School Math Seminar II. Mathematics 2200 cannot earn additional creditPrerequisite: MATH 1105 with a grade of “C” or in Mathematics 2350.better or consent of instructor. Prerequisite: MATH 1400 with a grade of “C” or better, or appropriate score on mathematics2200 Calculus I (5L, 5CR): placement exam within one year prior toThis course is designed for students in registering for the course or an ACT math scoreengineering, physics, chemistry, statistics, of 26 or consent of instructor.agriculture, mathematics, and others whosemajors require a calculus sequence with emphasis 2355 Mathematical Applications for Business (4L,on physical science applications. Mathematical 4CR):topics included are: plane analytic geometry, Continues business and economic applicationsdifferentiation, applications of the derivative, of mathematics from Math 2350. Topics includeintegration, and applications of integration. finance, linear algebra and matrices, linearStudents who have earned credit in Mathematics programming, least squares, probability and2350 cannot earn additional credit in statistics. A mandatory computer lab usingMathematics 2200. spreadsheet software will meet one day per week.Prerequisites: MATH 1400 and MATH 1405 Prerequisites: MATH 2200 OR 2350 with awith grades of “C” or better, or appropriate score grade of “C” or better; or MATH 1400 with aon mathematics placement exam within one year grade of “C” or better and consent of instructor.prior to registering for the course or an ACTmath score of 27 or consent of instructor. Mining Technology (MINE)2205 Calculus II (5L, 5CR): 1850 MSHA Surface New Miner (1 1/2L, 1 1/2CR):This is a continuation of Mathematics 2200. This course provides 24 hours of the mandatoryTopics covered are trigonometric, logarithmic, Mine Safety and Health Administration trainingand exponential functions, techniques of for surface mine workers. Onsite training mustintegration, indeterminate forms, and polar be completed at an actual mine site. This coursecoordinates. is offered for a grade of S/U only.Prerequisite: MATH 2200 with a grade of “C” or 1855 MSHA Surface Annual Refresher (1/2L,better. 1/2CR): This refresher course is offered annually to2210 Calculus III (5L, 5CR): any individual who has prior certification ofA continuation of Mathematics 2205 including completion of a Surface New Miner traininginfinite series, partial differentiation, and multiple program. This course provides eight (8) hoursintegrals. Strong emphasis on vectors in analytic of mandatory MSHA (Miner Safety and Healthgeometry and calculus, with physical applications. Administration) training for surface minePrerequisite: MATH 2205 with a grade of “C” or workers. This course is offered for a grade ofbetter. S/U only. Prerequisite: Certification of completion of2250 Elementary Linear Algebra (3L, 3CR): Surface New Miner.Topics include linear equations and matrices,vector spaces, linear transformations, 1870 MSHA Underground New Miner (2CR):determinants, orthogonality, and eigenvalues and This course provides 32 of the mandatory 40eigenvectors. hours of Mine Safety and Health AdministrationPrerequisite: MATH 2205 with a grade of “C” or for the underground mine instruction. Thebetter or consent of instructor. remaining eight (8) hours of the onsite training 152
    • Courses of Instructionis the student’s responsibility and must be Musiccompleted at an actual mine site. This course isoffered for a grade of S/U only. 1000 Introduction to Music (3L, 3CR): A basic appreciation course in which the student1875 MSHA Underground Annual Refresher is introduced to the fundamental areas of music(1/2CR): study and traditions.This refresher course is offered annually toany individual who has prior certification of 1010 Music Fundamentals (2L, 2CR):completion of an Underground New Miner For the non-music major, Music Fundamentalstraining program. This course provides eight emphasizes the basic skills of reading, writing,(8) hours of mandatory MHSA (Mine Safety and and playing music. By the end of the course,Health Administration) training for underground each student will be able to play basic melodies,mine workers. This course if offered for a grade chords, and rhythms on such instruments as theof S/U only. recorder, drums, bells, and piano. AdditionalPrerequisite: Non-expired 5000-23, past proof of instruments may be added. This course does not5000-23, or signed agreement with employer as equal MUSC 1030.experienced miner. Molecular Biology (MOLB) 1030 Written Theory I (3L, 3CR): The study of the fundamentals of music and of2210 General Microbiology (3L, 3LB, 4CR): written harmony.General Microbiology is a lecture/laboratory Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in MUSCcourse which provides instruction in the 1035.fundamentals of microbiology. It includesthe study of bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and 1035 Aural Theory I (2LB, 1CR):viruses. Both beneficial and harmful effects ofmicroorganism in humans and the environment Ear training, sight singing, and keyboard harmony.are discussed. Basic laboratory techniques for the Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in MUSCisolation and identification of microorganisms are 1030.introduced. This course is designed for studentswho are majoring in biology, allied health, and 1040 Written Theory II (3L, 3CR):preprofessional programs. Continuation of Music 1030.Prerequisite: BIOL 1010 with a grade of “C” or Prerequisites: MUSC 1030 with a grade of “C”better. or better and concurrent enrollment in MUSC 1045.2220 Pathogenic Microbiology (3L, 3LB, 4CR):This course is a lecture and laboratory course 1045 Aural Theory II (2LB, 1CR):which covers bacteria, parasites, viruses and Continuation of Music 1035.fungi which cause human disease. Laboratory Prerequisite: MUSC 1035 with a grade of “C”sessions emphasize the techniques used in the or better and concurrent enrollment in MUSCidentification of disease-causing organisms. 1040.Students in biology, allied health, andpreprofessional programs would benefit from this 1071 Applied Music-Instrument I (4LB, 2CR)(Max 8):course. Individual lessons on woodwind, brass, orPrerequisite: BIOL 1000 or BIOL 1010 with a percussion instruments. One lesson weekly pergrade of “C” or better, or approval of instructor. semester. For beginners, no previous training required. 1073 Applied Music Piano (4LB, 2CR)(Max 4): Individual lessons in piano for beginners, no previous training required. Twelve lessons per semester. Each lesson is approximately one hour. A computer lab accompanies each lesson. Instruction will concentrate on improving piano 153
    • Courses of Instructionskills in technique, basic improvisation and 2030 Written Theory III (3L, 3CR):harmonization. A continuation of Music 1030 and Music 1040 with added work in harmonic analysis and with1074 Applied Music Voice (4LB, 2CR)(Max 4): some consideration of contrapuntal techniques.Individual lessons in voice. One lesson weekly Prerequisites: MUSC 1040, MUSC 1045 with aper semester. For beginners, no previous training grade of “C” or better, and concurrent enrollmentrequired. in MUSC 2035.1150 Guitar I (4LB, 2CR)(Max 8): 2035 Aural Theory III (2LB, 1CR):Individual lessons in guitar. One lesson weekly A continuation of Music 1035 and Music 1045.per semester. For beginners, no previous training Prerequisites: MUSC 1040, MUSC 1045 with arequired. grade of “C” or better, and concurrent enrollment in MUSC 2030.1280 Accompanying (2LB, 1CR)(Max 4):Supervised practice in the art of accompaniment 2040 Written Theory IV (3L, 3CR):with discussion of traditional usages as applicable Continuation of Music 2030.to the various schools and periods of vocal and Prerequisites: MUSC 2030, MUSC 2035 with ainstrumental solo literature and group literature. grade of “C” or better, and concurrent enrollment in MUSC 2045.1378 College Band (2LB, 1CR)(Max 4):Band is open to all college students having 2045 Aural Theory IV (2LB, 1CR):previous experience with brass, woodwind, or A continuation of Music 2035.percussion instruments. A wide variety of styles Prerequisites: MUSC 2030, MUSC 2035, andand musical abilities will be represented. 1 two- concurrent enrollment in MUSC 2040.hour class period. 2050 Music History Survey I (3L, 3CR):1400 Collegiate Chorale (2LB, 1CR)(Max 4): A historical survey of the history and literature of Western Music: Ancient Greece through the1404 Master Chorus (2LB, 1CR): Baroque period (c.1750). The course examinesMaster Chorus is open to all college students the cultural context in which the music of ahaving little to no experience in voice. Although period was created, how music influenced thatthe music is challenging, emphasis is placed on culture (or how culture influenced the music),learning and creating a choral repertoire for the and biographical studies of important musicians.group. Music ranges from classical to modern May be taken out of sequence (See Music Historylarge choral works. Survey II).1415 Introduction to Music Technology (1L, 2LB, 2055 Music History Survey II (3L, 3CR):2CR): Continuation of Music 2050. A historicalA beginning course in Music Technology. This survey of the history and literature of Westerncourse will cover setting up a music workstation, Music: The Classical period (c.1750) throughchoosing software and equipment. It will also the present. The course examines the culturalcover the basics of several popular music software context in which the music of a period wasprograms. In addition to the weekly lecture, created, how music influenced that culturestudents will be able to spend time with a (or how culture influenced the music), andcomputer music workstation. biographical studies of important musicians.2015 Introduction to the Music of the World’s 2071 Applied Music—Instrument (2-4CR)(Max 8):Peoples (3L, 3CR): Individual lessons in advanced woodwind, brass,This course introduces students to the music or percussion instrument, with a concentrationand cultures of the world’s peoples. Students on breath control, range, resonance, the studywill study, hear, and research music from a wide of appropriate literature for the student’svariety of geographical areas of the world. instrument and ability. For those students with previous training in woodwind, brass, or 154
    • Courses of Instructionpercussion. Two credits will equal one (1) one- Nursing Studies (NRST)half hour lesson per week, 4 credits equal one (1) 1640 Basic Intravenous Therapy Course (2CR):one hour lesson per week. Students are required This Basic Intravenous Therapy for Licensedto practice two hours per week, per credit and Practical Nurses Course is directed towardcomplete a practice log of practice sessions. establishing acceptable standards so the studentPrerequisite: MUSC 1071 with a grade of “C” or is able to delineate the beginning skills andbetter. knowledge needed to administer and manage IV2073 Applied Music Piano (2-4CR)(Max 8): therapy. Basic Guidelines include: backgroundIndividual lessons in piano for intermediate to information, legal aspects of IV systems,advanced students or those students with previous fluid and electrolyte balance, procedures fortraining in piano. Students will continue to venipunctures, prevention and assessment ofimprove piano skills in technique, sight-reading, complications, principles of pharmacology asharmonization, and improvisation. Two credits related to IV therapy, and demonstration andwill equal one (1) one-half hour lesson per week, practice of required skills.four credits equal one (1) one hour lesson per Prerequisite: Enrollment in HLTK 2005week. Students are required to practice 2 hours or documented DFS pre-screen or criminalper week, per credit and complete a practice log background check within previous 24 months.of practice sessions.Prerequisite: Applied Music-Piano MUSC 1073 1645 Advanced Intravenous Therapy Course (2CR):with a grade of “C” or better. This Advanced Intravenous Therapy for Licensed Practical Nurses Course is directed2074 Applied Music Voice (2-4CR)(Max 8): toward establishing acceptable standards so theIndividual instruction in advanced vocal technique student will be able to safely and competentlywith concentration on breath control, range, follow functions and duties, in addition toresonance, placement of the voice, diction, those identified above, including discontinuingand the study of appropriate literature for each peripheral intravenous therapy for pediatricstudent’s voice and ability. For those students patients ages 5-12, obtain a blood specimen,with previous training in voice. Two credits will medication administration, and managementequal one (1) one-half hour lesson per week, four of central lines under the direct supervision ofcredits equal one (1) one hour lesson per week. a registered professional nurse, physcian, orStudents are required to practice 2 hours per dentist. This course is offered for S/U gradeweek, per credit and complete a practice log of only.practice sessions. Prerequisite: Current LPN License andPrerequisite: Applied Music-Voice MUSC 1074 successful completion of NRST 1640 with awith a grade of “C” of better. grade of “C” or better.2150 Guitar II (4LB, 2CR)(Max 8): Philosophy (PHIL)Individual lessons in guitar. 1000 Introduction to Philosophy (3L, 3CR):Prerequisite: MUSC 1150 with a grade of “C” or This course will introduce the student to thebetter. meaning and method of philosophy. Critical examination of life occurs through contact with2455 Convocation (0CR): some of the major philosophers in WesternMonthly recital hour for student, faculty and culture. Drawing upon key sources in Westernguest performances. Required for all music thought, the student will be challenged to beginmajors and those non-music majors in second his/her own critical look at life.year Applied Music courses. This course is Prerequisite: ENGL 1010 with a grade of “C” oroffered for S/U grade only. Meets monthly. better.Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in anApplied Music course. 155
    • Courses of Instruction2300 Ethics in Practice (3L, 3CR): improve cardiorespiratory fitness. ConcurrentAn examination of contemporary ethical conflicts enrollment in Physical Education 2000 is highlyto provide students with a grounding in the recommended, but not required.language, concepts and traditions of ethics Students enrolling for a grade must attendand with the tools necessary to analyze moral an orientation. Students enrolling fordilemmas in a variety of areas. an audit, must sign the course waiverPrerequisite: English 1010 with a grade of “C” or upon registration, but need not attend anbetter. orientation. Concurrent enrollment in PEAC 1020, 1033,2345 Natural Resources Ethics (3L, 3CR): 1034, 1035, 1036, 1271, 1273, 1291 is notIntroduces students to ethics in the context allowed.of natural resources use, conservation, andpreservation. Ethical frameworks include 1033 Aerobic Conditioning II/Fitness Center (2LB,teleological and deontological theories primarily 1CR):applied to human needs and desires. Concepts A continuation of Physical Education 1032,and applications of environmental justice this course allows students the opportunity toare addressed including private property, attain a high level of total fitness. The coursesustainability, and obligations to future will include, but is not limited to: individualgenerations. Students cannot earn credit for both fitness evaluation, computerized analysis of testPHIL 2345 and RNEW 2345. results, a prescribed exercise program, and anPrerequisite: BIOL 1000, BIOL 1010, or PHIL opportunity to attend fitness related seminars.1000 with a grade of “C” or better. Weight machines, bicycle ergometers, treadmills, ellipticals, a rowing machine, a stairmaster, a step PE Activity-Physical & Health mill, and other aerobic activities will be used to Education (PEAC) elicit improvements in total fitness. Students will be re-evaluated upon completion of 25 workoutsAll students, except those medically exempted, in the Fitness Center.desiring to receive an Associate of Arts Degree Prerequisite: Students enrolling for a gradeor an Associate of Science Degree from Eastern must: 1) complete PEAC 1032 with a gradeWyoming College are required to take two of “C” or better within the past calendardifferent physical education activity courses year; or 2) complete a re-evaluation if thewhich must be taken in separate semesters. student has satisfactorily completed PEACStudents must select a minimum of one physical 1032 outside of one calendar year. Studenteducation activity course from Area II. Medical electing to audit the course must sign theexemptions will be allowed only on the receipt of course waiver upon registration and area signed form from the certifying doctor. Note: not required to meet the prerequisites.For those students transferring to the University Concurrent enrollment in PEAC 1020, 1032,of Wyoming or Chadron State College, general 1034, 1035, 1036, 1271, 1273, 1291 is noteducation credit may not be given for more than allowed.one physical education activity class per semester. 1034 Aerobic Conditioning III/Fitness CenterArea I-Fitness (2LB, 1CR): An advanced course in aerobic conditioning1032 Aerobic Conditioning I/Fitness Center (2LB, designed for individuals interested in attaining1CR): a higher level of total body fitness. The courseThis course is designed for individuals interested will include individual fitness assessments,in improving total fitness through an aerobic computerized analysis of test results, a prescribedbased conditioning program. Orientation for exercise program, and the opportunity tothe course will include screening, individual participate in a series of fitness related seminars.fitness assessments, and individualized exercise Bicycle ergometers, mini-tramps, aerobicycles,prescriptions based upon the student’s goals. treadmills, a computerized rowing machine,Weight training equipment, bicycle ergometers, ellipticals, step mill, stairmaster and other aerobictreadmills, a rowing machine, elliptical trainers, conditioning activities will be coupled withand other aerobic equipment will be used to weight machines to give each student a maximal 156
    • Courses of Instructionworkout. 1034, 1035, 1036, 1271, 1273, 1291 is notPrerequisite: Students enrolling for a grade allowed.must: 1) complete PEAC 1033 with a gradeof “C” or better within the past calendar Area II-General Physical Activityyear; or 2) complete a re-evaluation ifthe student has satisfactorily completed 1008 Lifetime Sports (2LB, 1CR):PEAC 1033 outside of one calendar year. Students receive a brief introduction to individualStudents electing to audit the course and dual sports. Approximately two weeksmust sign the course waiver upon (4 class periods) will be spent on each of theregistration and are not required to meet following: archery, badminton, bowling, golf,the prerequisites. Concurrent enrollment in horseshoes, racquetball, table tennis, and tennis.Physical Education 2000 is highly recommended,but not required. Concurrent enrollment in 1012 Beginning Swimming (2LB, 1CR):PEAC 1020, 1032, 1033, 1035, 1036, 1271, A course designed for the beginning swimmer.1273, 1291 is not allowed. Skills will be taught and measured according to the American Red Cross level for the beginning1035 Aerobic Conditioning IV/Fitness Center (2LB, swimmer.1CR):And advanced course in aerobic conditioning 1020 Fitness and Conditioning (2LB, 1CR):designed for individuals interested in attaining Students will evaluate their physical conditiona higher level of total body fitness. The course relative to cardiovascular endurance, strength,will include individual fitness assessments, and flexibility. An individualized trainingcomputerized analysis of test results, a prescribed program will be developed to improve and/orexercise program, and the opportunity to maintain these aspects of fitness based upon theparticipate in a series of fitness related seminars. student’s desire.Bicycle ergometers, mini-tramps, aerobicycles, Concurrent enrollment in PEAC 1032, 1033,treadmills, a computerized rowing machine, 1034, 1035, 1036, 1271, 1273, 1291 is notellipticals, step mill, stairmaster and other aerobic allowed.conditioning activities will be coupled withweight machines to give each student a maximal 1040 Trap Shooting I (1/2L, 1/2LB, 1CR):workout. PEAC 1040 is a course designed for studentsPrerequisite: Students enrolling for a grade interested in the safe handling of firearms andmust: 1) complete PEAC 1034 with a grade beginning shotgun shooting skills and techniques.of “C” or better within the past calendar The course will include instruction concerningyear; or 2) complete a re-evaluation if Wyoming Hunter Safety rules/regulations,the student has satisfactorily completed with the discussion of the concept of ‘fairPEAC 1034 outside of one calendar year. chase’ and the ethical hunter being emphasized.Students electing to audit the course Approximately 1/2 class time will be spent in themust sign the course waiver upon classroom/lecture with the other 1/2 being spentregistration and are not required to meet on site at the Goshen County Sportsman Clubthe rerequisites. Concurrent enrollment in Rifle Range. Students will pass a 50 point examPhyscial Education 2000 is highly recommended, with 90% efficiency prior to being allowed tobut not required.Concurrent enrollment in PEAC handle a weapon. All times spent at the shooting1020, 1032, 1033, 1034, 1036, 1271, 1273, 1291 range will be supervised by a certified Hunteris not allowed. Safety Instructor. Students may provide his/her own shotgun or one will be provided for him/2000 Wellness: Physical Education Concepts/ her.Fitness Course (1L, 1LB, 1CR):A course designed to illustrate the relationship 1044 Trap, Skeet, and Sporting Clays (1/4L, 3/4LB,between lifestyle (nutrition, exercise, fitness, 1CR):etc.) and personal wellness. Emphasis is placed PEAC 1044 is a course designed for the advancedon the role of exercise in wellness. Course will shotgun shooter. The course will includeinclude lecture and laboratory experiences. instruction concerning gun safety, huntingConcurrent enrollment in 1020, 1032, 1033, regulations, and ethical considerations of the 157
    • Courses of Instructionshooter. Instruction will be provided in the classroom session will be held per week and willskills required to shoot trap, skeet, and sporting include information on nutrition, diet analysis,clays. Selection of proper equipment, reloading and eating behavior modification, as they relate toshells, and rules and regulations for ATA will be weight control and weight loss. Individual weightdiscussed. Approximately 1/4 class time will be loss goals will be established for each student.spent in the classroom/lecture with the other In addition, an individualized exercise program3/4 being spent on site at the Goshen County utilizing the Eastern Wyoming Fitness CenterSportsman Club Rifle Range. All times spent will be developed for each student. Students areat the shooting range will be supervised by a expected to follow the exercise program in thecertified Hunter Safety Instructor. Students Fitness Center by working out a minimum of 2may provide his/her own shotgun or one will be days per week and/or a maximum of 6 days perprovided for him/her. week.Prerequisite: Trap Shooting I or Hunter’s Safety Concurrent enrollment in PEAC 1020, 1032,Education Certification. 1033, 1034, 1035, 1036, 1273, 1291 is not allowed.1050 Beginning Tennis (2LB, 1CR):A course designed to acquaint the student with 1273 Heavy Resistance Conditioning (2LB, 1CR)the equipment, rules, etiquette, scoring, and skills (Max 2):of tennis. Instruction will cover grips, ground A basic strength training program designedstrokes, service, volley, and overhead strokes. for students interested in developing muscularSingles and doubles strategies will be discussed. strength and size. An individualized weight program will be developed for each student in1252 Beginning Badminton (2LB, 1CR): accordance with his/her goal. Students will meetA course designed to teach the student the in the Fitness Center, and under the supervisionfollowing badminton skills: grips, footwork, and direction of an instructor, proceed throughserve, forehand strokes, backhand strokes, and their individualized programs.overhead strokes. Singles and doubles strategies Concurrent enrollment in PEAC 1020, 1032,will also be discussed. 1033, 1034, 1035, 1036, 1271, 1273, 1291 is not allowed.1253 Beginning Bowling (2LB, 1CR):A course designed to acquaint the student 1281 Beginning Casting and Angling (2LB, 1CR):with equipment selection, rules and courtesies A course designed to develop basic castingof bowling as well as the skills and scoring of techniques for spin, bait, and fly fishing.bowling. Instruction will cover approach, timing, Selection, care and repair of equipment will berelease (delivery), and aiming. discussed. Field trip experience will be required.1255 Beginning Golf (2LB, 1CR): 1305 Heavy Resistance Conditioning II (2LB, 1CR)A course designed to acquaint the student with (Max 2):the selection and care of equipment, rules An advanced course in basic strength trainingand etiquette of the game, and game skills. designed for students interested in developingInstruction will cover swing, grip, putting, muscular strength and size. An individualizedchipping, and driving. weight program will be developed for each student in accordance with his/her goal.1257 Beginning Racquetball (2LB, 1CR): Students will meet in the Fitness Center, andA course designed to acquaint the student with under the supervision and direction of anrules, etiquette, safety measures, and skills of instructor, proceed through their individualizedracquetball. Instruction will cover grip, forehand programs.stroke, backhand stroke, overhand stroke,underhand stroke, and various serves. Singles and 2011 Intermediate Swimming (1CR):doubles strategies will be discussed. A course designed for the intermediate swimmer. Skills will be taught and measured according1271 Weight Loss Conditioning (1L, 2LB, 1CR): to the American Red Cross level for theExercise and dietary modifications will be intermediate swimmer.combined in the weight loss course. One 158
    • Courses of InstructionArea III-Physical Activity Physical Education-Athletics (PEAT) Courses listed below do not apply toward theCourses in Area III, listed below, do not physical education activity requirement for anyapply toward the physical education activity degree or certificate program.requirement for any degree or certificateprogram. 2025 Rodeo Activities (1/2L, 1LB, 1CR)(Max 2):1036 Fitness & Aerobic Conditioning 2051 Varsity Golf (1/2L, 1LB, 1CR)(Max 4):(2LB, 1CR)(Max, Unlimited):This course provides students the opportunity 2062 Varsity Basketball (1/2L, 1LB, 1CR)(Max 2):to pursue individual fitness goals. Emphasisis placed on fitness as a lifelong pursuit with 2064 Varsity Volleyball (1/2L, 1LB, 1CR)(Max 2):wellness being the ultimate goal. This coursewill not apply toward any degree or certificate 2065 Varsity Cheerleading (1/2L, 1LB, 1CR)program offered through Eastern Wyoming (Max 4):College. This course is offered for S/U gradeonly. Physical Education Professional-Prerequisites: Students enrolling for a Physical & Health Education (PEPR)grade must: 1) complete PEAC 1035with a grade of “C” or better within the 1005 Introduction to Physical Education (2L, 2CR):past calendar year; or 2) complete a re- An introductory course designed to introduceevaluation if the student has satisfactorily and orient future teachers of health, physicalcompleted PEAC 1035 outside of one education, and recreation to the purposes,calendar year. Students electing to audit objectives, obligations, concepts, andthe course must sign the course waiver opportunities within these fields.upon registration and are not required tomeet the prerequisites. 1052 Prevention of Athletic Injuries/Illness (3L,Concurrent enrollment in PEAC 1020, 1032, 3CR):1033, 1034, 1035, 1271, 1273, 1291 is not Teaches prospective athletic trainer basic conceptsallowed. of prevention of injury and illness by use of conditioning, taping, padding, physicals, nutrition1291 Individual Adapted Physical Education (2LB, and other means.1CR):This course is designed to assist students and 1061 Majors Basketball (1L, 1LB, 1CR):community members in rehabilitation of either Designed for physical education majors andsurgeries or physical weaknesses. In order to minors, or those wishing a course in coachingenroll in this class, the student must be referred basketball methodology. Course focuses onby his/her doctor and the doctor must prescribe advanced skill development with emphasis onthe exercise program the student will perform. teaching progressions in basketball.Students thus enrolled will be allowed access tothe Fitness Center and must sign an “Assumption 1062 Majors Volleyball (1L, 1LB, 1CR):of Risk” form prior to his/her first workout. This Designed for physical education majors andcourse is offered for S/U grade only. minors. For those wishing coaching volleyballPrerequisites: Must have doctor’s authorization/ methodology. Course focuses on advancedprescription of program, and sign release skill development with emphasis on teaching(assumption of risk) form. progressions in volleyball.Concurrent enrollment in PEAC 1020, 1032,1033, 1034, 1035, 1036, 1271, 1273 is not 2012 Physical Education for Elementary Schoolsallowed. (3L, 3CR): This course prepares the instructor to plan and instruct a physical education program that will benefit the children of different age and grade levels. Emphasis is placed on learning skill development and human movement of 159
    • Courses of Instructionthe elementary school child. Class includes a 1120 General Physics II (3L, 3LB, 4CR):minimum of sixteen hours of field experience A continuation of Physics 1110. Students whounder the supervision of an elementary physical have earned credit in Physics 1050 cannot earneducation specialist. Students enrolling in this additional credit in either Physics 1110 or Physicscourse must also enroll concurrently in EDUC 1120.2005 or have a documented DFS Pre-screen or Prerequisite: PHYS 1110 with a grade of “C” orcriminal background check within previous 24 better.months. Political Science (POLS)2017 Water Safety Instructor (1/2L, 1LB, 1CR): 1000 American & Wyoming Government (3L, 3CR):Procedures and standards as required by the Fundamental introductory course which meetsAmerican Red Cross in performance and teaching the requirements of the Wyoming statutestechniques of swimming. Learn to conduct the providing instruction in the provisions andcommunity water safety class and seven levels of principles of the constitutions of the Unitedlearning to swim. States and Wyoming. Students cannot earn creditPrerequisite: Red Cross Instructor Candidate for both Political Science 1000 and PoliticalTraining. Science 1050. Prerequisite: Placement score of ENGL 0640 or2395 Physical Education Capstone Experience (1L, better and no reading improvement required, or2LB, 2CR): appropriate ACT score.This course is designed as a capstone class in thearea of physical education. As a capstone class, it 1015 Overview of US & WY Constitutions (2L, 2CR):is designed to be taken in the final semester that This course provides instruction in the provisionsa transfer physical education major is in residence and principles of the Constitutions of the Unitedat Eastern Wyoming College. The intent of the States and Wyoming via an interactive approachclass is to determine whether or not a graduating at the Wyoming Boys’ State conference. A finalstudent can perform skills and has knowledge report/research paper is required.competencies of acceptable levels in physicaleducation to merit advancement to junior status 1050 Basics in United States and Wyomingat a transfer institution. In each case, a student Government (2L, 2CR):seeking an A.A. degree in physical education An introductory course emphasizing the basicwill work with the faculty member assigned to structure and practices of United States andthis class to complete skill competency testing, Wyoming government. The course is designedknowledge based competency testing, physical to serve the community college student seekingfitness testing, and theory testing. This course is a two-year terminal degree and satisfies the stateoffered for S/U grading only. requirement. Students cannot earn credit forPrerequisite: Physical Education, Health and both Political Science 1050 and Political ScienceRecreation Major. 1000. Physics (PHYS) 1070 Election Campaign Politics (1-2CR)(Max 2):1110 General Physics I (3L, 3LB, 4CR): A course directed to an analysis of the electionA course in elementary college physics designed campaign in the election year. While emphasisfor premedical, predental, pharmacy students, will be directed to local and state campaigns,and others not having a calculus background. attention will also be devoted to the nationalStudents who have earned credit in Physics 1050 campaign. Students will become acquainted withcannot earn additional credit in either Physics candidates, issues and political behavior associated1110 or Physics 1120. with election campaigns.Prerequisites: MATH 1400 and MATH 1405 or Students taking the class for one hour will beequivalent with a grade of “C” or better. required to meet basic course requirements while students taking class for two hours will be assigned a candidate to assist in the campaign. 160
    • Courses of Instruction1075 Current Issues in Political Science (1L, 1CR) 2460 Introduction to Political Philosophy (3L, 3CR):(Max 2): Surveys history of Western political thoughtA course designed to promote an interest and including study of concepts and approaches toawareness of current issues in our political political philosophy.system and offer a forum for the expression andexchange of political opinion. 2470 Internship I (6CR): This course will permit a student to become an1100 Wyoming Government (1L, 1CR): intern to a Wyoming legislator during a generalThis course provides an introduction to the or budget session of the Wyoming legislature.Constitution and governmental process of The student will assist the legislator on a full-Wyoming. Intended for students who have time basis and meet with other interns in aearned credit for American Government at an state-wide program under the direction of a stateout-of-state college or by Advance Placement coordinator. 40 hours per week during session.but have not fulfilled the Wyoming Constitution Prerequisite: POLS 1000 with a grade of “C” orrequirement of University Studies. This course is better.offered for S/U grade only. Psychology (PSYC)1200 Non-Western Political Cultures (3L, 3CR): 1000 General Psychology (3L, 3CR):This course will provide the student an A general survey of psychology through lecture,opportunity to appreciate the basic aspects of discussion, and assigned readings. Major topicsnon-western political cultures and philosophies will include a brief history of the science ofthat shape political institutions and practices in psychology, the scientific method as appliedAfrica, Asia, and the Middle East. to psychology, and the physiological and psychological bases of behavior. Subtopics will2000 Current Issues in American Government (3L, include sensation and perception, motivation,3CR): emotion, learning, individuality and personality,The purpose of this course is to introduce the mental health, and the life span development ofstudent to public analysis and the process of the individual.decision making. Attention will be devoted 2000 Research Psychological Methods (3L, 2LB,to current issues and topics in Americangovernment. 4CR):Prerequisite: POLS 1000 with a grade of “C” or An introduction to some of the methods ofbetter or approval of instructor. investigating psychological questions. Students are exposed to the various research strategies2310 Introduction to International Relations (3L, ranging from observational to experimental3CR): designs. Topics include identifying researchThis course analyzes the nature of international questions, designing topic proposals, conductingrelations, emphasizing various methods of basic research, gathering data, performingexplaining and interpreting international statistical analyses, interpreting results, critiquingbehavior of nation-states. This course illustrates published research, writing in scientific style, andcontemporary problems of world politics. developing familiarity with the APA format. Prerequisite: Completion of PSYC 1000 and2395 Social Science Capstone Experience (0CR): ENGL 1010 with grades of “C” or better.The Social Science Capstone Experienceis directed toward the application of broad 2125 Forensic Psychology (3L, 3CR):principles in the social sciences with specific This course introduces the criminal justice/attention given to the student’s discipline of social science major to the uses of psychology instudy. The course seeks to enhance and enrich the field. Topics covered include basic criminalthe student’s academic background and involve profiling, suspect interviewing, psychologicalthe student in activities/experiences that theories of crime/delinquency, victimology,demonstrate an ability to continue study in the legal applications of psychology in conductingsocial sciences. assessments, and correctional psychology.Prerequisite: Sophomore standing, major in Prerequisite: PSYC 1000 General Psychologyrelevant social science, semester of graduation. and CRMJ 2120 Introduction to Criminal Justice or permission of Instructor. 161
    • Courses of Instruction2210 Drugs and Behavior (3L, 3CR): social sciences.A survey of the effects of various drugs on Prerequisite: Sophomore standing, major inbehavior. This course focuses on the behavioral, relevant social science, semester of graduation.social, historical, and medical aspects of eachmajor class of psychoactive drugs. Range Ecology and WatershedPrerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in PSYC Management (REWM)1000. 1300 Introduction to Water Resources (3L, 3CR):2300 Developmental Psychology (3L, 3CR): An introductory course presenting the basicThe development and behavior of children from principles of water resource management.conception through adolescence is stressed. The course will emphasize regional, appliedEmphasis is placed on the major roles played by watershed management which includes rangelandmaturation and learning in the growth of a child. and forest watersheds, irrigated farmlands,Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in PSYC fisheries habitat, and water quality. Basic1000. hydrologic concepts and terminology will be introduced. Prerequisite: MATH 0920 with a grade of “C” or2330 Psychology of Adjustment (3L, 3CR): better or appropriate score on placement exam.A study of the individual’s adjustments to theproblems of everyday life. Emphasis is given 2000 Principles of Range Management (3L, 3CR):to the discovery of self and the identification of An introductory course that presents systemsintegrative and non-integrative adjustments as of grazing, livestock management on the range,they affect self-fulfillment. measurement of grazing capacity and forage use,Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in PSYC and range improvements including revegetation,1000. weed control, and fertilization.2340 Abnormal Psychology (3L, 3CR): Prerequisite: BIOL 1010 or BIOL 1000 with aA survey of major mental and behavioral grade of “C” or better or instructor approval.disorders which explores the identification oftypes of disorders, their etiology, and potential 2500. Rangeland Plant Identification. (1L, 2LB,treatment methods. 2CR):Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in PSYC Sight identification and distribution of western1000. U.S. rangeland plants. Prerequisite: BIOL 1010 or BIOL 1000 with a2380 Social Psychology (3L, 3CR): grade of “C” or better.An exploration of social behavior through the Religion (RELI)viewpoint of psychological theories and research.Topics include, but are not limited to, the science 1000 Introduction to Religion (3L, 3CR):and methods for exploring social behavior, An introduction to world religions. A multi-social cognition, culture and socialization, the disciplinary approach is utilized to investigate the“self,” interpersonal perception and attraction, similarities and differences that exist between aconformity, leadership, aggression, and variety of religions.persuasion and propaganda. Prerequisite: ENGL 1010 with a grade of “C” orPrerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in PSYC better.1000.2395 Social Science Capstone Experience (0CR):The Social Science Capstone Experienceis directed toward the application of broadprinciples in the social sciences with specificattention given to the student’s discipline ofstudy. The course seeks to enhance and enrichthe student’s academic background and involvethe student in activities/experiences thatdemonstrate an ability to continue study in the 162
    • Courses of Instruction Renewable Resources (RNEW) 1705 OSHA Construction Safety (2L, 2CR): This course is designed to raise awareness within2100 Forest Management (3L, 3CR): construction and industry working environments.A discussion of the objectives and the general The course illustrates how one can preventprinciples of forestry, including identification oneself and others from being injured in theirof trees, forest production, methods of cutting work environments. A variety of topics comeand measuring forest, forest conservation, range from the Occupational, Safety, and Health Act ofmanagement, wildlife management, and forest 1970. This course is offered for S/U grade only.recreation. Social Work (SOWK)Prerequisite: BIOL 1000 or1010 with a grade of“C” or better. 1000 Introduction to Social Work (4L, 4CR): A foundation course designed to explore the2345 Natural Resource Ethics (3L, 3CR): institution and profession of social work and theIntroduces students to ethics in the context field of Social Welfare.of natural resource use, conservation, andpreservation. Ethical frameworks include Sociology (SOC)teleological and deontological theories primarilyapplied to human needs and desires. Concepts 1000 Sociological Principles (3L, 3CR):and applications of environmental justice An introductory course providing both a surveyare addressed including private property, of the discipline and a foundation for othersustainability, and obligations to future sociology courses. Major areas of interest beinggenerations. Students cannot earn credit for both explored range from small groups and families toRNEW 2345 and PHIL 2345. bureaucracies and social movements. SignificantPrerequisite: BIOL 1000, BIOL 1010, or PHIL concepts and theories are introduced along1000 with a grade of “C” or better. with the tools of social research. Though much attention is given to contemporary American Safety Education (SAFE) society, comparative and historical material is1510 OSHA General Industry Safety (1L, 1CR): included.This course is designed to familarize studentswith OSHA rules and regulations pertaining to 1100 Social Problems (3L, 3CR):general industry. Students will be introduced to This course explores various approaches topolicies, procedures, and standards that relate defining and identifying social problems andto all aspects of general industry safety, and applies basic sociological concepts and methods toawareness on the job site. the analysis of selected social problems and issues. Emphasis is placed on the contemporary society1535 OSHA Construction Safety Refresher (1/2L, of the United States. Cross-cultural and historical1/2CR): comparisons are presented where relevant.This course is designed for anyone in theconstruction industry. The course reorients how 2200 Sociology of Human Sexuality (3L, 3CR):one can prevent oneself and others from being An investigation of human sexuality as a socialinjured in their work environments. A variety of and cultural phenomenon. Theoretical issues oftopics come from the Occupational, Safety, and human sexuality are related to empirical evidenceHealth Act of 1970. This course is offered for in discussing social attitudes and actual behaviorS/U grade only. with American society. Prerequisite: PSYC 1000 or SOC 1000 with a1536 OSHA Industry Safety Refresher (1/2L, grade of “C” or better.1/2CR):This course is designed for industrial workers and 2350 Race and Ethnic Relations (3L, 3CR):supervisors with safety and health responsibilities. Examines relations among minority and dominantStudents will be introduced to OSHA policies, groups with an emphasis on the society andprocedures and standards as well as general culture of the United States. Relevant cross-industry safety and health principles covered in cultural analysis will also be included.OSHA Act Part 1910. This course is offered for Prerequisite: SOC 1000 or ANTH 1200 with aS/U grade only. grade of “C” or better. 163
    • Courses of Instruction2395 Social Science Capstone Experience (0CR): 2030 2nd Year Spanish I (4L, 1LB, 4CR):The Social Science Capstone Experience Progressive reading of Spanish prose withis directed toward the application of broad additional review in verbs, idioms, andprinciples in the social sciences with specific conversation.attention given to the student’s discipline of Prerequisites: SPAN 1010 and SPAN 1020 eachstudy. The course seeks to enhance and enrich with a grade of “C” or better.the student’s academic background, and involvethe student in activities/experiences that Speech Pathology & Audiology (SPPA)demonstrate an ability to continue study in thesocial sciences. 1050 Beginning Sign Language (2-3CR):Prerequisite: Sophomore standing, major in This introductory course teaches the use ofrelevant social science, semester of graduation. sign language to familiarize students with communication for the teaching of hearing2400 Criminology (3L, 3CR): impaired children. This course is offered for S/UAn introduction to the study of the nature grade only.and causes of criminal behavior. Biological, Statistics (STAT)psychological, and sociological theories are 2050 Fundamentals of Statistics (4L, 4CR):examined. Types of criminal behavior, historicalperspectives, crime statistics, and current trends A presentation of the central ideas andare also covered. applications of statistical inference. TopicsPrerequisite: SOC 1000 with a grade of “C” or include the collection and tabulation of data,better. statistical description of frequency distributions, elements of probability, applications of statistical Soil Science-Agriculture (SOIL) distributions, confidence interval estimation, tests of hypotheses, analysis of variance for the one-2200 Applied Soils (2L, 2LB, 3CR): way classification, and simple linear regressionAn applied study of the composition and general and correlation.properties of soils. Emphasis is given to the Prerequisite: MATH 1000 or MATH 1400 orpractical management of those properties and a equivalent with a grade of “C” or better.study of those factors which must be consideredin the proper management of those soils. Technology (TECH)2300 Soil Science and Fertilizer Technology (2L, 1005 Applied Technical Writing (3L, 3CR):2CR): This course focuses on developing the skillsA study of soil fertility and plant nutrition in needed to write clearly and concisely on the job.crop production. Soil-plant relations, diagnostic Topics include: technical definitions, summarytechniques and methods of evaluating soil fertility preparation, technical reports, memos, andare emphasized. business letters. The course also includes oralPrerequisite: CHEM 1010 with a grade of “C” or presentations, job search preparation, and wordbetter. processing and e-mail correspondence in business. Spanish-Language (SPAN) This course is intended for students in technical programs.1010 1st Year Spanish I (4L, 1LB, 4CR): Prerequisite: Compass Placement Test Score of 31Fundamentals of grammar, composition, reading, or higher.and conversation. 1700 Basic Construction – Plumbing (1CR):1020 1st Year Spanish II (4L, 1LB, 4CR): Homeowner remodeling Class 1 – BathroomsA continuation of Spanish 1010. This course is offered for S/U grade only.Prerequisite: SPAN 1010 with a grade of “C” orbetter. 1750 Professional Development & Leadership (1/2L, 1/2 LB, 1/2CR)(Max 2): In today’s demanding marketplace, students need to be prepared to sell themselves and their skills. This course is an employability skill- building program designed to help students 164
    • Courses of Instructiondevelop an extra edge and help employers gain Veterinary Technology (VTTK)valuable workers. By reinforcing school-to-work competencies of students, it is designed Enrollment in Veterinary Technology courses isto develop the student in four areas: as an restricted to Veterinary Technology majors (unlessindividual, as a team member, as a leader and as approval is granted by the Division Chair foran employee. Sciences.) 1500 Orientation to Veterinary Technology (3L,1980 Cooperative Work Experience (1-8CR): 2LB, 4CR):An enhancement to the student’s curriculumthat can become a valuable part of the student’s This course is an introductory course incollege education. It provides students the veterinary technology. Lectures will includeopportunity to apply their classroom learning in metric conversations, clinical sanitation, thethe work environment. A minimum of 100 hours profession of veterinary technology, veterinaryof on-the-job training represents one semester technology ethics, and communications in thehour. veterinary hospital, patient physical examinations and breed identifications of cattle, horses, Theatre & Dance (THEA) sheep, pigs and goats. Laboratory sessions of1000 Introduction to Theatre (3L, 3CR): 6-8 students will cover restraint and physicalA brief history of world theatre and the study of examination of domestic species and veterinarymodern American theatre, movies, and television. instrument identification. Students will be assigned dates to be respnsible for care of the2050 Theatre Practice (1-3CR(Max 5): dogs and cats kept by the Veterinary TechnologyA practical course in the application of scenic Department.construction, set design, lighting design, make- Prerequisite: Placement score for ENGL 0640 orup, costuming, publicity or performance. higher and MATH 0900 or higher and no readingStudents will work in the theatre shop, on crews, improvement required or consent of instructor.or in performance. This course is offered for S/U 1550 Practical Surgical & Medical Experience Igrade only. (2L, 2LB, 3CR):A minimum of 30 lab hours per credit hour. Instruction and experience are provided in Truck Driving Training (TTD) practical aspects of veterinary surgical and1500 Novice CDL Training (5CR): medical nursing. All diagnosing and surgery willThis course prepares the student to take the be performed by a staff veterinarian. Both largestate required CDL test. It is designed primarily and small animals are used for laboratory sessions.for the energy service industry. On and off Prerequisite: VTTK 1600 and VTTK 1630 withhighway terrains are utilized as well as late model a grade of “C” or better, VTTK 2500 with a gradetractors and loaded trailers, tankers, and high of “C” or better or concurrent enrollment incenter point of gravity loads may be used in VTTK 2500.training. Simulation may also be used to replicatedangerous, expensive, or hard-to duplicate 1600 Clinical Procedures (3L, 3LB, 4CR):scenarios. Upon completion of this course, This course continues with the professionalstudents must make arrangements to take the activities of a Veterinary Technician. LecturesDOT test to be issued their commercial driver’s will cover veterinary medical records, patientlicense. histories, OSHA and safety in the veterinaryPrerequisite: Students attending this course hospital, general animal nursing, euthanasia ofmust have completed written exams for the animals, grief counseling of clients, first aidDepartment of Motor Vehicles and obtained care of animals and breed identification of catsa Commercial Driving Permit for class A or and dogs. Laboratory sessions include practicalclass B vehicles with an Air Brake endorsement. application of clinical techniques commonlyStudents must present a valid Federal Department done by veterinary technicians in the treatmentof Transportation (DOT) medical examination of animals. Students will be assigned dates tocertificate and valid Social Security card on the be responsible for the care of dogs and catsfirst day of class. This course is offered for S/U kept by the Veterinary Technology Department.grade only. Prerequisite: VTTK 1500 with a grade of “C” or80 hours lecture, 20 hours drive time. better. 165
    • Courses of Instruction1610 Anatomy and Physiology of Domestic 1750 Veterinary Pharmacology (3L, 3CR):Animals (3CR): This class introduces the basic principles ofThis course consists of two one and one-half- the uses of therapeutic agents in veterinaryhour lecture-demonstration periods per week medicine and the classification of therapeuticin the basic anatomy and physiology of domestic agents in common use. Specific subject matteranimals. includes definitions and terminology; routesPrerequisite: Placement score for ENGL 0640 or of administration and dosage forms; historyhigher and no reading improvement required. of pharmacology; measurements used in pharmacology; actions and effects of drugs;1620 Anatomy and Physiology of Domestic assimilation and elimination of drugs in animals;Animals (3CR): regulation of the manufacture, sale, and use ofInstruction in anatomy and physiology of drugs; factors that modify drug action; and studydomestic animals is completed in this course. The of classes and examples of specific drugs.format is the same as in Veterinary Technology Prerequisite: Placement score for ENGL 0640 or1610. higher and MATH 0900 or higher and no readingPrerequisite: VTTK 1610 with a grade of “C” or improvement required.better. 1751 Pharmaceutical Calculations (3L, 3CR):1625 Veterinary Urinalysis (1/2L, 1LB, 1CR): A course designed to introduce students toUrinalysis is a lecture/laboratory course which basic mathematical calculations used in the fieldprovides instruction in the evaluation of physical of pharmacology. Major topics to be coveredand chemical properties of urine, as well as in the include: guidelines for writing prescriptions,microscopic examination of urine sediment. abbreviations used in prescription writing, drug dose calculations using both the ratio and the1630 Veterinary Hematology (2L, 2LB, 3CR): factor label method, metric conversions, andThis course provides instruction in the principles medication dispensing.of obtaining and examining blood samples from Prerequisite: MATH 0900 with a grade of “C” ordifferent species of animals commonly seen in better or appropriate score on placement examveterinary practice today. The laboratory sessions or MATH ACT of 21 or better.include a practical approach to staining andevaluating the blood of animals in both healthy 1755 Veterinary Parasitology (2L, 1LB, 2CR):and disease conditions. Emphasis is placed on This course will introduce students to thethe recognition of the types and development macro-parasites that commonly infect veterinarystages of erythrocytes and leukocytes. Blood species. Students will learn how to collectcoagulation mechanisms, the immune system, samples, perform diagnostic tests on thesepreparation and handling of cytology samples and samples, identify parasites, and will gain hands-ontraining in the use of automated cell counters experience in these areas. In addition, materialare also included. Also included in this course is covering prevention, treatment, life cycles, andinstruction in the measurement of the chemical clinical disease will be presented.constituents of various body fluids, particularly Prerequisite: BIOL 1000, BIOL 1010, CHEMserum and plasma. The relationships of the test 1000, CHEM 1020, or AECL 1000 with a graderesults with organ function in health and disease of “C” or better.are stressed. 2500 Veterinary Anesthesia (2L, 2LB, 3CR):1700 Medical Terminology (2L, 2CR): This course covers fundamental skills andThis course will introduce students to knowledge necessary to administer anesthesiaterminology that they will use in succeeding and provide pain relief to common domesticveterinary technology courses, report writing, species. The laboratory portions are small groupsprofessional practice, and professional reading. of approximately 6 students and consist of handsEmphasis will be placed on word usage, word on experience to safely manage small and largemeanings, and word pronunciations. animals in all stages of anesthesia.Prerequisite: Placement score for ENGL 0640 or Prerequisite: VTTK 1600 and VTTK 1750 andhigher and no reading improvement required. VTTK 1751 with a grade of “C” or better. 166
    • Courses of Instruction2505 Diagnostic Imaging (1L, 2LB, 2CR): 2550 Practical Surgical & Medical Experience IIThis course provides instruction to safely (2L, 2LB, 3CR):produce diagnostic radiographic and ultrasound This course is a continuation and expansion ofimages. Topics will also include basic principles Veterinary Technology 1550. Instruction andof advanced imaging. Laboratories introduce experience will continue in practical aspectsstudents to techniques to position and prepare of veterinary surgical and medical nursing. Alldogs, cats and horses for radiographic and diagnosing and surgery will be performed by aultrasound studies. staff veterinarian. Both large and small animalsPrerequisite: VTTK 1600, VTTK 1750, and are used for laboratory sessions.VTTK 1751 with a grade of “C” or better. Prerequisite: VTTK 1550 with a grade of “C” or better.2510 Clinical Experience I (1CR):First-year students spend a minimum of 40 hours 2600 Diagnostic Microbiology (2CR):at a veterinary clinic of their choice, approved This is a lecture and laboratory course whichby the instructor. The emphasis of this course provides instruction in the fundamentalswill be on observation of the normal workings of microorganisms and their role in diseaseof a veterinary practice. Course requirements production. Laboratory exercises introducecan be fulfilled at any time or times that do not the student to the techniques utilized in theconflict with regular semester courses, such as identification of bacterial, fungal, and viralwinter interim session, spring break, summer, veterinary pathogens.or weekends during the regular semester. This 3 hours a week for 8 weeks lecture, 2 hours acourse must be completed before the beginning week for 16 weeks lab.of the third semester in veterinary technology.The instructor must have information identifying 2610 Infectious Diseases (3L, 3CR):the site for the completion of VTTK 2510 five Instruction is provided in the basic principlesworking days prior to the start date for Clinical of infection, including etiologic agents,Experience I. pathogenicity, and host’s immune response.Prerequisite: VTTK 1500 with a grade of “C” or Much of the course consists of descriptions ofbetter or concurrent enrollment in VTTK 1500. infectious diseases of veterinary and zoonotic importance. Topics covering the use and2520 Clinical Experience II (1CR): prevention of infectious agents which may beThis course is a continuation of Clinical employed as weapons in bio-terrorism are alsoExperience I, but emphasizes hands-on included.experience by the student. A minimum of 40hours must be spent at a veterinary clinic of the 2620 Noninfectious Diseases (3L, 3CR):student’s choice, approved by the instructor. An introductory course on the causes,Course requirements can be fulfilled at any appearance, and handling of noninfectioustime or times that do not conflict with regular diseases in companion and economic animals.semester courses, such as summer, winter interim Instruction covers traumatic, metabolic,session, spring break, or weekends during the nutritional, immune-mediated, neoplastic,regular semester. This course can be taken at congenital, toxicologic, and physical causes ofthe same clinic as Clinical Experience I. The disease. A three- to four-week block is devotedrequirements cannot be completed concurrently to electrolyte balance and fluid therapy.with Clinical Experience I, and must becompleted before Clinical Experience III. The 2700 Laboratory and Exotic Animals (2L, 2LB,instructor must have information identifying 3CR):the site for the completion of VTTK 2520 five An introduction to the uses, care, housing,working days prior to the start date for Clinical and diseases of laboratory and exotic animalExperience II. species is provided, both in commercial usagePrerequisite: VTTK 1500,VTTK 1550,VTTK 1600, and in the home/pet environment. EmphasisVTTK 1625,VTTK 1630,VTTK 1755, andVTTK 2510 is on the mammalian species, with informationwith a grade of “C” or better. also provided concerning reptiles and birds. The course includes hands-on laboratory training in animal handling and restraint along 167
    • Courses of Instructionwith training in blood collection, drug dosing animals are stressed as are other species on aand administration, anesthesia, and related comparative basis.techniques. Prerequisite: BIOL 1000, BIOL 1010, CHEM 1000, CHEM 1010, CHEM 1020 or AECL 10002750 Clinical Problems (2L, 2LB, 3CR): with a grade of “C” or better.This course consists of one lecture hour perweek of preparation for the job market, the 2950 Clinical Experience III (4CR):comprehensive examination and the Veterinary This course consists of 320 hours of workTechnician National Examination. One hour of experience during which the student works inlecture and two hours of lab per week will involve veterinary or veterinary-related institution thatactual or developed veterinary clinical activities has been approved by the instructor. Evaluationthat faculty present for students to work through. forms are completed by the cooperatingThe final examination for this course will be the establishment. This course is offered for S/UVeterinary Technology Program Comprehensive grade only. The instructor must have informationExamination that students must pass with a 70% identifying the site for the completion of VTTKor better to successfully complete this course. 2950 five working days prior to the start date forPrerequisites: All veterinary technology courses Clinical Experience III.with a grade of “C” or better except VTTK 2950 Prerequisites: VTTK 2520 with a grade of “C” or(concurrent enrollment in veterinary technology better or concurrent enrollment in VTTK 2520.courses is acceptable). Weatherization (WTTK)2815 Large Animal Techniques (2LB, 1/2CR): 1500 Weatherization Technician Fundamentals (2L,The work in this lab course will be done by the 2LB, 3CR):students under supervision. Techniques to be Students will gain understanding of the evolutionstudied include: physical restraint in various of weatherization. The client base served will bespecies, breeding soundness evaluation for bulls, examined as well as the recognition that buildingcastration of various species, dehorning of cattle science guides selection of weatherizationand goats, reduction of genital prolapse in cattle measures utilized. Principles of cost effectivenessand sheep, fluid therapy techniques in various and savings to investment ratio will be covered.species, venipuncture for blood collection and/or IV therapy in various species, paracentesis of 1520 Solar Photo Voltaic Basics & Electricalthe abdominal cavity in cattle, local and general Theory (1L, 4LB, 3CR):anesthesia techniques in various species, and some Current and emerging opportunities areobstetrical techniques. This course is offered for presenting themselves as conventional fuelS/U grade only. sources and have created an abundance of environmental challenges. Photo voltaics are a2816 Large Animal Techniques II (2LB, 1/2CR): non-polluting renewable resource that is gainingThis lab course is similar to Large Animal rapidly as a world-wide solution to clean andTechniques I; however, different procedures will efficient energy.be practiced. This course is offered for S/Ugrade only. 1525 Weatherization Technician Intermediate (1L, 4LB, 3CR):2900 Nutrition in Veterinary Medicine (3L, 3CR): Students will build on their weatherization(3 hours of UW Transferable Elective) fundamentals so that they are prepared for aTopics in this course include a brief review leadership position as a crew leader in training.of chemical principles relevant to nutrition; Students should be ready to successfully completeclassification of nutrients and feeds; basic the BPI/Resnet certification exams and will thenanatomy and physiology of the digestive systems become a Building Performance Professional.of domestic animals; basic nutritive processes Prerequisite: WTTK 1500 with a grade of “C” orincluding ingestion, digestion, absorption, better.circulation, metabolism, and excretion; specificfeeding programs for various classes of cattle,swine, horses, and companion animals. Basicration formulations for beef cattle and small 168
    • Courses of Instruction1640 Solar Photo Voltaic Installation (1L, 4LB, Welding Technology (WELD)3CR):Installation is the companion to understanding 0500 Intro to Shielded and Metal Arc Welding (2LB,electrical theory as it applies to Photo Voltaic 1CR):systems. Installation requires the ability to lift A 30 hour welding course using the shieldedand carry heavy and bulky components onto a metal arc welding process. The course providesroof, assemble an array that is properly sited and the training to weld light and medium thicknessfastened, and properly wired to a set of batteries sheet and plate in all positions using E6010 andor to a net metering system. E7018 electrodes.Prerequisite: WTTK 1520 with a grade of “C” or This course is offered for S/U only.better. 0600 Flux Cored Arc Welding (2LB, 1CR):1650 Weatherization Technician Mobile Home (1L, A 30 hour welding course using the flux cored arc4LB, 3CR): welding process. The course provides the trainingThis course will cover the basics of manufactured to weld medium and thick (3/4”) in all positionshome construction and related audit procedures, using .045” electode wire.repair and upgrade alternatives, and other This course is offered for S/U only.procedures for improving the energy efficiencyand comfort of these types of homes. 0800 Maintenance and Repair Welding (2LB, 1CR):Prerequisite: WTTK 1500 and WTTK 1525 with A 30 hour welding course using shielded metala grade of “C” or better. arc welding (stick) and gas metal arc welding (wire) processes. The course provides the1775 BPI-Building Analyst (2L, 2LB, 3CR): training to weld light and medium thickness sheetThe Building Performance Institute (BPI) Energy and plate in all positions.Audition Program is an intensive course of This course is offered for S/U only.study in preparation for a national certificationexamination which includes an in depth 1520 Welding for Fun (1L, 2LB, 2CR):understanding of building science and all of the This course will feature safety and basic weldingcomponent interactions of a whole house. The procedures for those individuals who areexam consists of a timed written exam and a interested in the more artistic aspects of welding.timed practical proctored exam. This course is not intended for those pursuing certification standards or job-entry level skills.1785 Resent HERS (2L, 2LB, 3CR): 1 hour lecture, 2 hours lab.Residential Services Network (RESNET) andHome Energy Rating System (HERS) are 1650 Print Reading: Welding Symbols (3L, 3CR):essentially very similar to BPI, but RESNET is This course teaches the fundamentals of shopgenerally new construction under the umbrella print interpretation as applied in the weldingof Energy Star. HERS is a rating system from trade, including the standard American500 to 0, with 0 being the highest rating (zero Welding Society (AWS) symbols used in design,net energy). Major differences between BPI fabrication, and construction.and RESNET are in energy code compliance,energy efficient financing, and mortgage industry 1700 General Welding (1L, 5LB, 3CR):technical standards. The study of shielded metal arc welding, oxyacetylene welding, cutting and brazing1970 Weatherization Internship (6LB, 3CR): processes. The student will develop the skillsThis course is designed for students to receive necessary to produce good quality welds on mildpractical experience using what they have learned steel joints using filler materials commonly used inin the Weatherization program. It may also be industry. Manual oxyacetylene cutting of straighttaken as an enhancement and retraining for those and bevel cuts. Safety practices will be included.students that were not successful in passing theircertification exams. 1755 Shielded Metal Arc Welding (1L, 9LB, 5CR):Prerequisite: WTTK 1775 and WTTK 1785 with Training to develop the manual skill necessary toa grade of “C” or better. make high quality shielded metal arc welds in the flat and horizontal positions on mild steel plate, 169
    • single and multiple pass. To weld using mild steel 2520 Pipe Welding II (1L, 8LB, 5CR):electrodes, low hydrogen electrodes and iron Shielded metal arc welding pipe (uphill)—thepower electrodes using welding power sources. student will gain technical knowledge of pipe welding procedures and develop welding skills1760 Advanced Shielded Metal Arc Welding (8LB, necessary to make high quality welds on open4CR): root mild steel pipe in the 2G, 5G, and 6GThis course provides the training in shielded positions using E6010 and E7018 electrodes.metal arc welding (SMAW) to develop the Weld testing will be based on the Americanmanual skills necessary to produce high quality Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME 1X)multipass fillet and groove welds on medium Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.thickness mild steel plates with backing in allpositions. 2540 Pipe Layout and Fabrication (1L, 2LB, 2CR):Prerequisite: WELD 1755. This course will provide the fundamentals of Layout and Fabrication of a weldment consisting1772 FCAW (4LB, 2CR): of plate and typical pipe connections.The study of flux cored arc welding (FCAW) Prerequisite: MATH 1515 with a grade of “C” orfundamentals and safety. It provides training to better.develop the manual skills necessary to make highquality welds in all positions on mild steel plates. 2645 SMAW and GTAW (4LB, 2CR): This course provides the student with a thorough1773 GMAW (4LB, 2CR): technical understanding of Shielded MetalThe study of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) Arc Welding and Gas Tungsten Arc Weldingfundamentals and safety. It provides training to preparation for pipe welding. It develops thedevelop the manual skills necessary to make high skills necessary to produce quality groove weldsquality welds in all positions on mild steel plates. on 2” and 4” schedule 80 carbon steel pipe in all positions using GTAW for the Root Pass and1780 GTAW - Plate (6LB, 3CR): E7018 for fill and Cover Passes.The study of gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) This course is offered for S/U only.fundamentals and safety. It provides training todevelop the manual skills necessary to make high 2670 Welding Inspection Technology (3L, 3CR):quality GTAW welds in all positions on mild Students will study the theory of shielded metalsteel, stainless steel and aluminum, using both arc welding (SMAW), oxyacetylene weldingdirect and alternating current. (OAW), cutting (OC), brazing (TB), and destructive and nondestructive testing methods.2500 Structural Welding (1L, 9LB, 5CR): Attention will be given to the types of welds,This course provides training to develop the joints, filler rods, and electrodes used with metalswelding skills necessary to produce high quality commonly joined by welding. Safety practicesgroove welds with backing on 1” thick mild steel will be included.plates in all positions using the shielded metal arcwelding and flux cored arc welding processes. 2680 Welding Metallurgy (3L, 3CR):Weld testing will be based on the American The study of gas metal arc welding (GMAW),Welding Society Structural Welding Code D1.1. gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), flux cored arc welding (FCAW), submerged arc welding2510 Pipe Welding I (1L, 7LB, 4CR): (SAW), air carbon arc cutting (AAC), and plasmaThis course provides training to develop the arc cutting (PAC) processes. Also the studywelding skills necessary to produce high quality of procedure and welder qualifications, basicgroove welds on open root steel pipe in the welding metallurgy, metal identification, test2G, 5G, and 6G (45 degree fixed) positions positions, destructive and nondestructive testingusing E6010 and E7010 electrodes with methods, filler rods and electrodes, and variousdownhill travel. Weld testing will be based on welding codes commonly used for welding ofthe American Petroleum Institute (API 1104) carbon and alloy steels, cast irons, and hardfacingpipeline welding practices. applications. 170
    • Courses of Instruction Women’s Studies (WMST) 2450 Principles of Fish and Wildlife Management (3L, 3CR):1080 Introduction to Women’s Studies (3L, 3CR): An introductory course for the following majors:Introducation to key issues in women’s studies. wildlife conservation, biology, agriculture,Topical examination of women’s participation in, range management, extension agents, ecology,and relationship to, institutions of society such as environmental science, recreation management,family and school, as well as processes and activi- and education. The topics include wildlife values,ties such as work, art, literature and politics in habitat, ecology and management, populationhistorical and cross-cultural analysis. structure, natural history, and contemporary Zoology (ZOO) issues. Prerequisite: BIOL 1000 or 1010 with a grade of “C” or better.1500 Introduction to Human Anatomy andPhysiology (3L, 3LB, 4CR):This lecture and laboratory course is anintroductory study of the structure and functionof the human body designed to meet the needsof students preparing for some LPN programs,medical office assistant programs, and someHealth and Physical Education majors. Creditmay NOT be earned for both ZOO 1500 andZOO 2015/2025, nor does this course prepare astudent to take ZOO 2025.2015 Human Anatomy (3L, 3LB, 4CR):This lecture/laboratory course providesinstruction concerning the structure of thehuman body with regard to its compositionand arrangement. Students in biology, nursing,allied health, and pre-professional programs areencouraged to take this course.Prerequisite: BIOL 1000 or1010 with a grade of“C” or better or approval of instructor.2025 Human Physiology (3L, 3LB, 4CR):This lecture/laboratory course providesinstruction concerning the function of the humanbody with regard to the manner in which thecomponent parts interact with each other toensure the survival of the organism. Studentsin biology, nursing, allied health, and pre-professional programs are encouraged to take thiscourse.Prerequisite: ZOO 2015 with a grade of “C” orbetter or approval of instructor.2400 Vertebrate Natural History (3L, 2LB, 4CR):A study of the major classes of vertebrateswith special emphasis on those found in theRocky Mountain Region. Focus will be onmorphological and taxonomic characteristics,functional relationships, environmentaladaptations, and life cycles.Prerequisite: BIOL 1000 or 1010 with a grade of“C” or better. 171
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    • Community Education, Outreach & Workforce Development Evening and Weekend Courses Wyoming College offers courses in many core areas including general education, business,Eastern Wyoming College is committed to computer, criminal justice, education, socialoffering a large variety of courses at times which sciences, and human development.meet the needs of busy adults. Course scheduleswill be mailed to all Goshen County residents. Support services available to help studentsOutreach Coordinators will disseminate include technology support, student advising,schedules to their community members. registration, library, bookstore, counseling,Schedules are available on the web at ewc.wy.edu. financial aid, online registration, and online gradePhone-in registration is available. reports. Distance Learning Options Consider the following: • How comfortable are you withThere has never been a better time to get your using technology such as computers,degree through online and distance learning. Let e-mail, and the Internet?EWC show you how! • Are you a self-directed, self- motivated, and self-disciplined student?Eastern Wyoming College wants to bring quality It is important to stick to a scheduleeducation to every part of our service area and with distance courses.through distance education, everyone can have • Are you comfortable with formsan opportunity to take college credit courses and of interaction such as chat rooms,earn a degree. EWC was recently approved by e-mail, or telephone calls?The Higher Learning Commission to offer four • Do you have the time commitmentcomplete degree programs via distance. to devote to a distance course? Distance courses require as much or• Interdisciplinary Studies AA degree more of your time than traditional and AS degree—This program offers classes. a broad-based degree which includes • Are you willing to be an active all general education courses and lets participant and an advocate for your the student choose among electives. own education? Then distance learning Both of these degrees transfer well to may be for you! four-year colleges and universities. For questions, please call the Outreach Office at• Criminal Justice AA degree—Many (307)532.8346, or check the web at career opportunities are offered ewc.wy.edu. with a criminal justice background. This program will help prepare you Summer Session for this fast growing occupational field. One six-week summer session is offered each summer. Classes scheduled vary based upon• Business Administration AAS student interest and demand. Short-term courses degree—This flexible program are frequently scheduled. Contact Registration provides an individual with entry and Records to request a summer schedule, or level business skills with emphasis in check on the web at ewc.wy.edu. accounting, office management, and computer areas. It will prepare the Adult Education student to go to work in a variety of office and business occupations. The Adult Basic Education (ABE) program at Eastern Wyoming College offers instruction inClasses are offered via Internet, compressed General Education Development (GED), adultvideo, and videotape modes. A three year literacy, English as a Second Language (ESL) androtation schedule of distance classes ensures that citizenship preparation at all outreach locationsall program requirements are met for the above within the six county service area. Typically,degrees by one of these three modes. Eastern students are provided with individualized 173
    • Community Education, Outreach & Workforce Developmentinstruction with either an instructor or college done anywhere in our service area.work-study tutor; however, traditional classroominstruction is also available. The ABE program The State of Wyoming Department of Workforceworks with students to establish a convenient Services has grant money for some of thetime of study, but it is the commitment of trainings. ETSS and TANF grant money isthe student that makes the program function available for custodial parents who meet incomesuccessfully. All ABE classes, materials and guidelines for the most workforce trainings.instructional technologies are free to participants Businesses may access dollars from the careerenrolled in our programs. We are committed training fund to finance training for theirto making a difference in the lives of people we employees.help so that they may achieve their academic Contact the EWC Workforce Training Officegoals. For more information, please contact at 307.532.8366 or 1.888.WORKWYO or307.532.8399. 1.888.967.5996. workforce@ewc.wy.edu Community Education Senior Citizen ProgramIn addition to the regular academic and vocational The college will admit all persons who areprograms offered during the day or evening, residents of the State of Wyoming, and 60 years ofEWC has a comprehensive community education age or older, to enroll without tuition charges inprogram. any credit courses offered by Eastern Wyoming College. Seniors are expected to pay for fees,Community Education’s mission is to provide books and materials for each class in which theylife-long learning opportunities for residents enroll.of eastern Wyoming. Community Educationdevelops, offers and coordinates classes and Outreach Programservices for the recreational, cultural, vocational,social and personal enrichment needs and The college is working cooperatively with thewants of the people in the EWC service area. public schools in its six-county service area inCommunity Education brings Eastern Wyoming Eastern Wyoming to provide a wide variety ofresidents together in a manner that helps improve programs, activities, and services. Many of theand enrich the quality of their lives. high schools offer concurrent enrollment classes. Concurrent enrollment is an option wherebyWorkforce Training and Continuing Education high school students may earn college credit while taking classes in their high schools fromIn addition to the regular academic and vocational instructors who have been approved by EWC.programs offered, EWC has a comprehensive Students may also take dual enrollment classesworkforce training and continuing education whereby they enroll in distance learning classesprogram. Our training includes, but is not that are taught by EWC faculty; to be duallylimited to welding, computers, criminal justice, enrolled, the high school must approve the creditsafety, medical, leadership, business management, for the high school curriculum. In addition, theand weatherization. Continuing education has college has outreach coordinators in most ofbeen provided to real estate agents, insurance the towns in the six-county service area. Theseagents, education personnel, medical personnel, coordinators offer credit and non-credit classeslaw enforcement, and others. in their communities. The college has a branch campus in Douglas which offers day and eveningThe college works with community groups, courses emphasizing general education, business,agencies, and businesses to enhance economic and computer areas. For more information checkdevelopment efforts in our service area. Classes out our web site at ewc.wy.edu.which cater to the business community willbe offered in a short term, flexible format and The Associate of Arts Degree, the Associatedelivery will be as quickly as possible. Tell us of Science Degree, the Associate of Appliedwhat your needs are and we will customize a Science Degree, or certificates may be earnedclass for you. Serving the needs of our workforce entirely off campus providing the student earnsis vitally important to us. These classes may be a minimum of twelve hours from Eastern 174
    • Community Education, Outreach & Workforce DevelopmentWyoming College and completes the curriculumrequirements of a selected major.For questions about outreach please contact:Associate Vice President for Outreach andLearning 175
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    • TransferringCurrently three universities provide opportunities a degree from the University of Wyomingfor people to complete Bachelor’s and Master’s under a new bachelor’s of applied sciencedegrees while staying in our community. All of (B.A.S.) degree track.these universities provide courses in our areaand have transfer policies that accept EWC UW provides access to the following degree,associate degrees. Therefore a student can start endorsement, and certificate programs inwith EWC’s lower cost, high quality courses and Torrington and at numerous outreach sites in thethen continue on toward a higher degree without region.leaving home. EWC also works closely withother universities and colleges to help students Bachelor’s Degreestransfer courses and degrees easily. Call (307) • Applied Science (BAS)532.8237 for information about the ease of • Business Administrationtransfer to Chadron State College, Black Hills • Criminal JusticeState University, University of Colorado, and • Elementary Educationother colleges. • Family and Consumer Sciences (Professional Child Development Option) University of Wyoming • Nursing (Accelerated Program) • PsychologyThe University of Wyoming maintains an • RN/BSN Completionoutreach center on EWC’s Torrington campus. • Social ScienceStudents who plan to transfer to the University of • Women’s Studies (Minor)Wyoming should be aware of a number of thingsthat make the process a simple matter. Master’s Degrees • Education: Curriculum and Instruction1. Common Course Numbering – the • Education: Educational Leadership University of Wyoming and all seven • Education: Specialization in Adult and Wyoming Community Colleges have adopted Post-Secondary Education - Online a common course numbering system for • Education: Specialization in Instructional equivalent courses. A student can count on Technology – Online English 1010 having the same number and • Education: Specialization in Special title at all schools. Education2. Transfer Guide – students may refer to the • English transfer guide to identify transfer course • Executive MBA – Online equivalents and how they fit into UW • Kinesiology and Health University Studies Program requirements. • Nurse Educator Option – Online3. Classes identified as fulfilling University • Public Administration Studies coursework – the University • Speech-Language Pathology of Wyoming has University Studies • Social Work requirements for students in any major or college. EWC has classes that meet all of Doctoral Degrees these requirements in the first two years. • Ed.D. in Educational Leadership4. Articulation Agreement – students transferring to UW from any Wyoming Certificate & Endorsement Programs community college with an associate of arts • Early Childhood Mental Health or science degree will have met the lower Certificate division USP 2003 requirements, except for • Early Childhood Program Director – the second math course. Students transferring Online to UW from any Wyoming community • Early Childhood Special Education college without an AA or AS degree will have Endorsement their transcripts reviewed with the Transfer • Early Childhood Three to Five Guide on a course by course basis. Endorsement5. Community college graduates with an • Early Childhood Three to Eight associate of applied science (A.A.S.) degree Endorsement and work experience will be able to earn • English as a Second Language 177
    • Transferring Endorsement Upper Iowa University • Land Surveying Certificate • Literacy Endorsement Students can transfer to Upper Iowa University • Principal Endorsement with an EWC AA or AS degree and complete a • Social Work – School Social Work bachelor’s degree or master’s degree online. Preparatory • Special Education Endorsement/ Bachelor’s Programs Certificate Accounting • Superintendent Endorsement Business Administration • Teachers of American Indian Children Criminal Justice Public Administration – Law EnforcementFor additional information contact: EmphasisJanet BassUniversity of Wyoming Outreach School Master’s ProgramsEastern Regional Center Master’s of Business Administration3200 West C Street Master’s of Public AdministrationTorrington, WY 82240307.532.8371, Fax: 307.532.8308 For more information, call 1.800.773.9298 orEmail: jbass@uwyo.edu send an email to online@uiu.edu.Website: outreach.uwyo.edu/ocp Ashford University University of Great Falls This articulation agreement will formallyStudents can complete a bachelor degree in the recognize that Ashford University and Eastern5 areas listed below through the University of Wyoming College are active educationalGreat Falls. UGF will accept 98 semester hours collaborators, committed to providing greaterin appropriate courses from EWC; a minimum educational opportunities and services forof 30 credits must be taken from the University students transferring between institutions. Thisof Great Falls. UGF courses are delivered by commitment supports the concept of seamlessvideotape, Internet, and live audio conference. transfer that embraces the principle that transfer students should not be required to repeat competencies already achieved. The purpose ofBachelor’s Programs this articulation is to enable Eastern WyomingCriminal Justice-Law Enforcement College’s students who transfer to AshfordHealth Care Administration University to carry with them the credit theyParalegal have already earned for as much relevant study asHuman Services Theology and Religion possible.Master’s Programs University of PhoenixInformation SystemsMarketing The intention of this agreement is to increaseManagement the credit transfer options available to associateSociology degree students who wish to continue their education in a bachelor’s degree program atFor more information,call 1.800.342.9824 or University of Phoenix. Services will include aemail Dr. Colby Currier at published Course Transfer Guide (course-by-ccurrier@ugf.edu course transfer categories) and sample Program Transfer Guides (how an associate’s degree may transfer to a bachelor’s degree) which can be made available to EWC students, faculty, and advisors. 178
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    • Administration, Faculty and StaffTAMI AFDAHL, Director of College Relations PAMELA CAPRON, CosmetologyA.S. Sheridan College, 1993 Certificate, Je Boutique College of BeautyB.S. Black Hills State University, 1995 Cosmetology School, 1982Work: (307) 532.8206 Certificate, Universal College of Cosmetology, 1998Email: tami.afdahl@ewc.wy.edu Work: (307) 532.8362 Email: pam.capron@ewc.wy.eduTOM ANDERSEN, Women’s Basketball CoachB.S. Valley City State University, 1978 DONNA K. CHARRON, CosmetologyM.S. Bemidji State University, 1987 Certificate - Beauty School of Fashion, 1979Work: (307) 532.8321 A.A.S. Eastern Wyoming College, 2000Email: tom.andersen@ewc.wy.edu Work: (307) 532.8363 Email: donna.charron@ewc.wy.eduTIM ANDERSON, Welding/Portable LabA.A.S. Eastern Wyoming College, 2005 TINA CHRISTINCK, BiologyWork: (307) 532.8380 B.S. Northwestern Oklahoma State University, 1997Email: tim.anderson@ewc.wy.edu M.Ed. Northwestern Oklahoma State University, 1999 Work: (307) 532.8294TOM ARMSTRONG President Email: tina.christinck@ewc.wy.eduB.A. Colorado State University, 1972M.A. Adams State College, 1982 JAKE CLARK, Instructor/Rodeo CoachPh.D. Colorado State University, 1996 B.S. Chadron State College, 1994Work: (307) 532.8202 Work: (307) 532.8337Email: tom.armstrong@ewc.wy.edu Email: jake.clark@ewc.wy.eduAARON BAHMER, Instructional Technologist JOHN CLINE, ArtB.A. University of Wyoming, 1991 B.F. A., Frostburg State University, 2002B.S. University of Wyoming, 1991 M.F.A., East Tennessee State University, 2005B.S. University of Wyoming, 1991 Work: (307) 532.8291M.S. University of Wyoming, 2002 Email: john.cline@ewc.wy.eduWork: (307) 532.8284Email: aaron.bahmer@ewc.wy.edu REX COGDILL, Vice President for Student Services B.S. Chadron State College, 1976LYNN BEDIENT, Welding M.A. University of Arizona, 1982Certificate, Eastern Wyoming College, 1982 Ph.D. University of Nebraska, 1995Work: (307) 532.8274 Work: (307) 532.8257Email: lynn.bedient@ewc.wy.edu Email: rex.cogdill@ewc.wy.eduEDWIN C. BITTNER, Veterinary Technology MELL COOPER, Associate Director - EnrollmentB.S. University of Wyoming, 1971 ManagementV.M.D. University of Pennsylvania, 1975 A.S. Casper College, 1973Work: (307) 532.8267 B.S. University of Wyoming, 1975Email: ed.bittner@ewc.wy.edu Work: (307) 532.8237 Email: mell.cooper@ewc.wy.eduJAMIE BLACK, Residence Life CoordinatorA.A. Eastern Wyoming College, 2010 BOB COX, Vice President forWork: (307) 532.8341 Finance and Administrative ServicesEmail: jamie.black@ewc.wy.edu B.S. University of Wyoming, 1977 M.B.A. University of Wyoming, 1981HOLLY BRANHAM, Executive Assistant to the Work: (307) 532.8218President Email: bob.cox@ewc.wy.eduA.A. Chadron State College, 1978Work: (307) 532.8303 ELLEN CREAGAR, Social Science/Businessholly.branham@ewc.wy.edu B.A. Wellesley College, 1986 J.D. University of Colorado, 1990JUDY BROWN, Gear-Up Director M.A.T. University of Wyoming, 2010B.A. University of Wyoming, 1991 Work: (307) 532.8345Work: (307) 532.8269 Email: ellen.creagar@ewc.wy.eduEmail: judy.brown@ewc.wy.edu 180
    • Administration, Faculty and StaffROBERT D. CREAGAR, Mathematics VIQI GARCIA, Veterinary TechnologyB.S. Colorado School of Mines, 1991 A.A.S. Eastern Wyoming College, 1996M.S. University of CO-Denver, 1995 B.S. Colorado State University, 1993Work: (307) 532.8298 Certification of Veterinary Technology, 1996Email: bob.creagar@ewc.wy.edu A.I. Certification, 2001 Work: (307) 532.8331LAWRENCE CURTIS, Criminal Justice Email: viqi.garcia@ewc.wy.eduWyoming Law Enforcement Academy, 1984B.A. Chadron State College, 1991 KELLEE GOODER, Director of Residence LifeFBI National Academy, 1999 B.A. Chadron State College, 2001Work: (307) 532.8297 Work: (307) 532.8336Email: lawerence.curtis@ewc.wy.edu Email: kellee.gooder@ewc.wy.eduRAY DEWITT, Mathematics TERI GRIFFIN, Adult Learning CenterB.S. Montana State University, 2000 Coordinator, DouglasM.S. Montana State University, 2004 B.S. University of Wyoming, 1989Work: (307) 532.8281 Work: (307) 358.5622Email: ray.dewitt@ewc.wy.edu Email: teri.griffin@ewc.wy.eduCOVENTRY DOUGHERTY-WOODIN, Science ASHLEY HARPSTREITH, Associate Workforce DirectorB.S. California State University, 2005 B.S. University of Wyoming, 2003M.S. California State University, 2008 Work: (307) 532.8366Work: (307) 358.5622 Email: ashley.harpstreith@ewc.wy.eduEmail: coventry.dougherty-woodin@ewc.wy.edu JENNIFER HART, Social Science InstructorMIKE DURFEE, Community Education Associate B.A. Western Washington University, 2001Director M.S. Western Washington University, 2003B.S. Chadron State College, 1970 Work: (307) 532.8322M.S. Kearney State College, 1997 Email: jennifer.hart@ewc.wy.eduEd.S. University of Wyoming, 1985Work: (307) 532.8323 AUSTIN HAWKS, AgricultureEmail: mike.durfee@ewc.wy.edu B.S. Brigham Young University–Idaho, 2006 B.S. Utah State University, 2010HEIDI EDMUNDS, Psychology M.S. Utah State University, 2010A.A. Eastern Wyoming College, 2001 Work: (307) 532.8271B.A. University of Wyoming, 2003 Email: austin.hawks@ewc.wy.eduM.A.E. Chadron State College, 2005LPC State of Wyoming ANNIE HILTON, History, Political ScienceWork: (307) 532.8296 A.A. Northwest College 2003Email: heidi.edmunds@ewc.wy.edu B.S. University of Wyoming, 2005 M.A. University of Wyoming, 2007ROBERT EIRICH, Livestock Judging Coach/Instructor Work: (307) 532.8323A.A.S. Western Nebraska Community College, 1988 Email: anne.hilton@ewc.wy.eduB.S. University of Wyoming, 1990M.S. University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 2006 KEITH JARVIS, Director of Physical PlantWork: (307) 532.8374 Work: (307) 532.8255Email: rob.eirich@ewc.wy.edu Email: keith.jarvis@ewc.wy.eduANDY ESPINOZA, Workforce Computer Instructor CASEY JONES, Men’s Basketball/Golf CoachB.A. University of Southern Colorado, 1979 A.A. Eastern Wyoming College, 1998Work: (307) 532.8262 B.S. Evergreen State College, 2000Email: andy.espinoza@ewc.wy.edu Work: (307) 532.8246 Email: casey.jones@ewc.wy.edu 181
    • Administration, Faculty and StaffJO ELLEN KEIGLEY, ETSS Grant/Workforce SUSAN MCBRIDE, Director of the Douglas CampusCoordinator B.A. University of Wyoming, 1974A.A. Eastern Wyoming College, 2006 M.A. University of Wyoming, 1979B.S. Chadron State College, 2009 Work: (307) 358.5622Work: (307) 532.8365 Email: sue.mcbride@ewc.wy.eduEmail: joellen.keigley@ewc.wy.edu TOM MCDOWELL, Director of Human ResourcesCHUCK KENYON, Information Technology B.S. University of Wyoming, 1970Coordinator Work: (307) 532.8330A.A.S. Eastern Wyoming College, 1985 Email: tom.mcdowell@ewc.wy.eduB.S. Colorado State University, 2008Work: (307) 532.8302 DIANE MCQUEEN, ABE/GED/ESL DirectorEmail: chuck.kenyon@ewc.wy.edu B.A. Coe College, 1982 M.A. Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia, 1997EARL KISIEL, Entrepreneurship Instructor Work: (307) 532.8399A.A. Clark Technical College, 1976 Email: diane.mcqueen@ewc.wy.eduB.S. Ohio University, 1978M.A. University of Phoenix, 2002 JAMES MAFFE, Information Technology AdministratorWork: (307) 532.8312 B.S. University of Florida, 1981Email: earl.kisiel@ewc.wy.edu Work: (307) 532.8258 Email: jim.maffe@ewc.wy.eduPEGGY KNITTEL, Microbiology, Zoology,Veterinary Technology, Biology JANET L. MARTINDALE, Testing Center CoordinatorB.S. Creighton University, 1974 B.S. Central Missouri State University, 1995M.D. University of Nebraska College of M.S. University of Wyoming, 2004Medicine, 1981 Work: (307) 532.8288Work: (307) 532.8266 Email: janet.martindale@ewc.wy.eduEmail: peggy.knittel@ewc.wy.edu MELISSA A. MEEBOER, BusinessGERALDINE LEWIS, Mathematics B.S. University of Wyoming, 1978B.S. Chadron State College, 1968 M.B.A University of Wyoming, 1981Work: (307) 532.8256 Work: (307) 532.8285Email: geri.lewis@ewc.wy.edu Email: melissa.meeboer@ewc.wy.eduJANICE LILLETVEDT, Director of Fitness Center COURT MERRIGAN, Learning Skills CoordinatorPhysical Education B.A. Creighton University, 1998B.S. Montana State University, 1972 M.A. University Sheffield, 2002M.S. Montana State University, 1976 Work: (307) 532.8378M.Ed. Chadron State College, 1984 Email: court.merrigan@ewc.wy.eduWork: (307) 532.8244Email: jan.lilletvedt@ewc.wy.edu JOHN D. NESBITT, English, Spanish B.A. University of CaliforniaBECKY LORENZ, Library Assistant Director at Los Angeles, 1971B.A. University of Wyoming, 1978 M.A. University of California at Davis, 1974Work: (307) 532.8210 Ph.D. University of California at Davis, 1980Email: becky.lorenz@ewc.wy.edu Diploma in Spanish Philology, Instituto de Filologia Hisp·nica, Saltillo,VALERIE DEE LUDWIG, Vice President for Learning Coahuila (Mexico), 1994B.S. University of Wyoming, 1976 Work: (307) 532.8292M.S. University of Wyoming, 1990 Email: john.nesbitt@ewc.wy.eduEd.S. University of Wyoming, 1994Ph.D. University of Wyoming, 2002 STAN NICOLLS, Welding Lab CoordinatorWork: (307) 532.8221 A.A.S. Eastern Wyoming College, 2003Email: dee.ludwig@ewc.wy.edu Certified Welding Educator, Hobart Institute of Welding Technology Work: (307) 532.8370 Email: stan.nicolls@ewc.wy.edu 182
    • Administration, Faculty and StaffTIM NYQUIST, Weatherization Technology KIMBERLY RUSSELL, Director of InstitutionalBuilding Science Master, MASCO Home Services, Research2010 A.A. Western Nebraska Community College, 1999Work: (307) 532.2911 B.S. University of Wyoming, 2001Email: tim.nyquist@ewc.wy.edu Work: (307) 532.8251 Email: kimberly.russell@ewc.wy.eduDEBBIE OCHSNER, Director of CounselingA.A. Eastern Wyoming College, 1983 ZACH SMITH, Admissions CoordinatorB.S. University of Wyoming, 1999 B.A. University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 2006M.S. University of Wyoming, 2003 Work: (307) 532.8232Work: (307) 532.8238 Email: zach.smith@ewc.wy.eduEmail: debbie.ochsner@ewc.wy.edu CATHERINE STEINBOCK, Early Childhood EducationKAREN PARRIOTT, Business Office Director B.S. University of Wyoming, 1994B.A. Chadron State College, 1992 M.S. University of Wyoming, 2001Work: (307) 532.8264 Work: (307) 532.8339Email: karen.parriott@ewc.wy.edu Email: catherine.steinbock@ewc.wy.eduRICHARD PATTERSON, Criminal Justice KERRY STEWARD, Douglas Business/ComputerWyoming Law Enforcement Academy, 1979 ApplicationsA.A. Eastern Wyoming College, 1982 B.S. University of Wyoming, 1986B.A. Chadron State College, 1984 Wyoming State Teacher’s Certificate, SecondaryM.A. Chadron State College, 1986 Business EducationEd.S. Chadron State College, 1989 Work: (307) 358.5622Ph.D. University of Wyoming, 1992 Email: kerry.steward@ewc.wy.eduLPC State of WyomingLAT State of Wyoming LORNA A. PEHL STICKEL, ChemistryWork: (307) 532.8344 B.A. Seattle Pacific University, 1983Email: richard.patterson@ewc.wy.edu M.S. University of Wyoming, 1988 Ph.D. University of Wyoming, 2000MAGAN PAULSON, Lusk Outreach Coordinator Work: (307) 532.8287B.S. Dickinson State University, 2003 Email: lorna.stickel@ewc.wy.eduWork: (307) 334.2733Email: magan.paulson@ewc.wy.edu MONTE B. STOKES, Veterinary Technology B.S. Montana State University, 1993LANCE PETSCH, Coordinator of Intramurals & D.V.M. Colorado State University, 1997Activities, Asst. Volleyball Coach Work: (307) 532.8273A.A. Eastern Wyoming College, 1993 Email: monte.stokes@ewc.wy.eduB.S. University of Wyoming, 2000Work: (307) 532.8248 OLIVER SUNDBY, Institutional Development DirectorEmail: lance.petsch@ewc.wy.edu B.A. University of Wyoming, 1970 M.A. University of Northern Colorado, 1978VERL E. PETSCH, JR., Director of Athletics, Work: (307) 532.8304Physical Education, Coach Email: oliver.sundby@ewc.wy.eduB.S. University of Wyoming, 1966M.S. Chadron State College, 1970 TYLER VASKO, Software AdministratorWork: (307) 532.8248 A.S. Eastern Wyoming College, 1996Email: verl.petsch@ewc.wy.edu B.S. University of Wyoming, 1999 Work: (307) 532.8235CHERYL L. RABOIN, Mathematics Email: tyler.vasko@ewc.wy.eduA.A. Rainy River State Junior College, 1970B.S. University of Wyoming, 1985M.S. Chadron State College, 1992Work: (307) 532.8295Email: cheryl.raboin@ewc.wy.edu 183
    • Administration, Faculty and StaffLELAND J. VETTER, Machine Tooling, Welding GWENDOLYN YUNG, Health TechnologyNorth Dakota State College of Science B.S. University of Nebraska Medical Center CollegeCertificate - Welding Technology, 1977 of Nursing, 1995Diploma - Industrial Maintenance, 1979 Work: (307) 532.8247Diploma - Tool & Die Making, 1980 Email: gwendolyn.yung@ewc.wy.eduC.W.I./C.W.E. American Welding Society,1991,1992 EmeritiCertificate - Eastern Wyoming College, 2001A.A.S. Eastern Wyoming College, 2002 MARGARET ANDERSON Professor EmeritusWork: (307) 532.8275 in EnglishEmail: leland.vetter@ewc.wy.edu JOHN ANTHONY Assistant Dean Emeritus, Instruction, Douglas CampusRICHARD L. VONBURG, Agriculture, Economics, LYNNEA BARTLETT Vice President Emeritus,Statistics Institutional DevelopmentChair-Division of Business and Technology BILLY BATES Dean Emeritus, Student ServicesB.S. University of Wyoming, 1968 ANN BEAULIEU Dean Emeritus, InstructionM.S. University of Wyoming, 1970 DOROTHY N. BROWN Librarian EmeritusWork: (307) 532.8299 ROY BUTLER Instructor Emeritus inEmail: rick.vonburg@ewc.wy.edu Transport Refrigeration MARILYN COTANT Vice President Emeritus, StudentSUSAN L. WALKER, Veterinary Technology ServicesA.A. Eastern Wyoming College, 1992 LARRY DODGE Instructor Emeritus in MathematicsD.V.M. Colorado State University, 1997 DANIEL DOHERTY Instructor Emeritus,Work: (307) 532.8279 Theatre & Dance, Communication & Mass MediaEmail: susan.walker@ewc.wy.edu KATHERYNE EARL Instructor Emeritus in MathematicsCHRISTOPHER R. WENZEL, Biology, Zoology, Botany, JEANNE H. HAMER Instructor Emeritus in MusicRangeland Ecology, Watershed Management DONALD R. HILLS Instructor Emeritus in BusinessB.S. Lake Superior State University, 1988 AdministrationM.S. University of Wyoming, 1993 DON HODGSON Instructor Emeritus in History/Work: (307) 532.8293 Political ScienceEmail: chris.wenzel@ewc.wy.edu KEN JOHNSON Instructor Emeritus in Business, Douglas CampusMOLLY WILLIAMS, Director of Financial Aid JOHN E. KAPPELER Instructor Emeritus in BusinessA.S. Laramie County Community College, 1980 AdministrationB.S. University of Wyoming, 1989 MARGARET K. LEE Dean Emeritus, InstructionWork: (307) 532.8325 BILL MARSH Dean Emeritus, College ServicesEmail: molly.williams@ewc.wy.edu JANAN MCCREERY Instructor Emeritus in Education SUE MILNER Instructor Emeritus in ArtVICKIE WINNEY, Health Technology, Douglas Campus DAVID M. MOREY Instructor Emeritus in ChemistryA.S. Odessa College, 1984 VERL J. PUNKE Instructor Emeritus in BiologyWork: (307) 358.5622 ROLLAND RABOIN Instructor Emeritus inEmail: vickie.winney@ewc.wy.edu Psychology CHARLES ROGERS President EmeritusAARON WOLFE, GEAR UP Outreach Coordinator GLENN SCHLEVE Instructor Emeritus in CriminalA.A. Walla Walla Community College, 1991 JusticeB.A. Eastern Washington University, 1997 WILLIAM SCHMIDT Instructor Emeritus inB.A. University of Wyoming, 2001 CosmetologyWork: (307) 532.8357 PHIL SHELLER Associate Dean Emeritus, InstructionEmail: aaron.wolfe@ewc.wy.edu JOHN SIMONS Instructor Emeritus in Veterinary TechnologyCLYDE WOODS, Purchasing Coordinator GUIDO E. SMITH President EmeritusB.B.A. Pacific Lutheran University, 1986 JUDY STELLPFLUG Instructor Emeritus inM.B.A. City University, 1991 CosmetologyCertified Purchasing Manager, National Association of ROBERT C. THOMAS Dean Emeritus, Business AffairsPurchasing Management, Inc TIM WALTER Instructor Emeritus in AgricultureWork: (307) 532.8359 RICHARD E. WATSON Instructor Emeritus,Email: clyde.woods@ewc.wy.edu Refrigeration & Air Conditioning 184
    • Administration, Faculty and Staff Part-time Faculty JAMIE SULLIVAN Douglas Office CHRIS URBANEK Computer ServicesEastern Wyoming College employs a large number PATRICIA VELAZQUEZ Athleticsof part-time instructors. These people fortify our LYNN WAMBOLDT Learning Officeregular instructional program in day and extended HOLLY WEST Financial Aidclasses, both on-campus and off-campus. LYNDA YOUNG Food ServicesWe wish to extend our appreciation to these people Outreach Coordinatorsand regret that space does not permit us to list themindividually. JODY ASH Chugwater MELISSA BUCKMILLER Moorcroft, Sundance Staff Personnel KIM CONZELMAN Newcastle SANDY ENGLING GlendoSTEVE AKRIGHT Grounds MARGARET FARLEY GlenrockSUZANNE ANDREWS Bookstore CANDICE WATT UptonTRACY BENSON Buildings LAURA LYNN HulettJUDY BRANSON Outreach MAGAN PAULSON LuskMARLISE BROWER Fitness Center CATHY STODDARD LaGrangeDEBBIE BUTORAC Buildings KIM WEITZMAN GuernseyTRISH COLBY Business Office SUE TRAUTWEIN WheatlandCRAIG CORLEY Douglas MaintenanceCASEY DEBUS LibrarySONDRA DENT College Relations Technical Advisory CommitteesDEBRA DOREN AdmissionsPAT EILERT Buildings AGRICULTUREEMETERIO ESCAMILLA Buildings GREG ASA Ag BusinessDEBBIE EUTSLER Food Service EDDIE GREENWALD Ag BusinessLINDA EVANS College Relations JASON GROENE Torrington High SchoolRICHARD GARNER Buildings KELLY GROENE Ag BusinessNICK GOMPERT Food Services HEATHER HAAS Ag BusinessJ. R. GUTIERREZ Buildings DAVE HANSEN Pinnacle BankJOHN HALE Buildings DOUG HUBBARD Ag BusinessSANDRA HAROLD GEAR UP LOWELL KAUTZ Ag BusinessTERRI HAUF Financial Aid BRETT MEYER Ag BusinessCINDY HIEGEL Buildings CHRISTINE MILLER Miller FeedlotBRANDY HOREJS Business Office RON MILLER Horizon West Inc.CARMALEE HOWE Learning Office MATT MOORE Ag BusinessJUDY IVERSON Food Services BRETT MULLOCK Ag BusinessTINA JEPSON Bookstore LISA OCHSNER Ag BusinessKIM JONES College Relations TODD OSTERMILLER, JR Ag BusinessVICKI KUTSCH ETSS Grant BOB PEDULLA Scottsbluff High SchoolDIXIE KROENLEIN Information Center CLAY PETERSON Ag BusinessHOLLY LARA Development DIXIE ROTH Ag BusinessGREG MARTIN Computer Services JAY TEICHERT Ag BusinessSHELBY MARTINDALE Food ServicesREBECCA MCALLISTER Financial Aid WELDING/MACHINE TOOLINGLORI MOORE Payroll MICHAEL HELZER Wyoming Machinery Co.LAURIE MUELLER Food Services MARK HERMANN P & H Mine Pro.KATE NORTON Vet Tech GUNTHER KOOB Trinity Steel Supply Co.MICHAEL NORTON Buildings RUSSEL RUX Campbell County HighKAREN POSTEN Student Services SchoolHENRY PRADO Buildings TED SCHAAF LinweldELAINE RUSH Food Services HENRY WOEHL Douglas High SchoolSUSAN SCHAEFER Community Education ROLLIE YOUNG Source GasSUE SCHMIDT Student RecordsAMY SMITH RecordsDON SNYDER Grounds AssistantVONDA SOESTER Copy CenterBOBBI STUCK Food Services 185
    • Administration, Faculty and StaffVETERINARY TECHNOLOGY EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATIONGREGG HASTINGS Veterinary Technician TARA SCHWARTZKOPF Coomunity HospitalRUTH COTTON Veterinary Practice JANAN MCCREERY Community Member Owner/Manager KERRY BULLINGTON Torrington LearningDR. LORI MANESS Veterinarian/ Veterinary Center Director Practice Owner MOLLY MOOREHOUSE Wee Pals PreschoolDR. MIKE MEEBOER Veterinarian/Veterinary Teacher Practice Owner KATE WISE Student/TLCDR. SOMMER PIEPER Veterinarian SUSAN KELLER Trail ElementaryGRETA MEHLING Veterinary Technician BRENDA LOVERCHECK Lincoln ElementaryJAMIE MCKIMMEY Veterinary TechnicianDR. KRISTEN REESE Veterinarian HEALTH TECHNOLOGY LORI ANDERSON Banner Health ClinicBUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY SANDY DUGGER Banner Health HospitalJUEL AFDAHL Torrington High School NATALIE KORELL Banner Health-GoshenDARLA BUSBOOM Southeast High School Care Center AdministratorNORMA JUNG BSAD GraduateKARI MARLATT Torrington Travel TerminalROD MILLER Community HospitalTRENDA WEISSHAAR CPA AdvantageCOSMETOLOGYBETTY ABERNETHY Executive Director, WY Board of CosmetologyHOLLY GOULART Cosmetologist/Salon OwnerDEB GRANDY Nail TechnicianMARISA JOHNSON Cosmetologist/Salon OwnerBRENDA MATHRE State Inspector, Wyoming Board of CosmetologyCRIMINAL JUSTICE Wyoming Highway Patrol Torrington Police Department Goshen County Sheriff WY Dept of Corrections- Field Services WY Dept of Corrections- Institutions Current EWC Criminal Justice StudentWEATHERIZATION TECHNOLOGYDARIN BIRKLE Bloedorn LumberMARK JUNG Bloedorn LumberNEIL NEWMAN Hi Plains ConstructionTOM MCINTOSH Champs ExteriorsTROY OUDERKIRK Wyoming Weatherization ServiceDON HAUGHT Valley Plumbing & HeatingJIM SMITH Valley Plumbing & HeatingPAUL REED Paul Reed ConstructionTIM LAEGER Home DepotDENNIS ESTES City of Torrington 186
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    • IndexAcademic Amnesty ............................... 47 Entrance Placement Testing ..................... 21Academic Dishonesty ............................ 48 Evening and Weekend Courses ................ 173Academic Procedures ............................ 36 Exit Assessment ................................... 42Academic Regulations ........................... 45Academic Testing Center ........................ 60 (FERPA) Family Educational Rights and .........Academic Standing ............................... 46 Privacy Act ........................................ 48Accreditation ...................................... 12 Fields of Study ................................... 62Administration, Faculty, and Staff............. 179 Final Examinations ............................... 40Admission Policies................................ 21 Financial Aid ....................................... 29Admission Procedures ........................... 23 Financial Aid Eligibility .......................... 31Admissions......................................... 20 Financial Aid Probation/Suspension........... 34Adult Education ................................. 173Adult Learning Skills Lab ....................... 61 GEAR-UP ......................................... 61Advanced Placement Examination............. 38 General Education Requirement............... 66Advisors ............................................ 37 General Information ............................. 10Affirmative Action/Equal Employment Government ....................................... 12Opportunity Policy Statement .............13, 52 Grade Point Average ............................. 41Attendance ........................................ 45 Grade Reports .................................... 40Auditing Courses ................................. 45 Grades .............................................. 40 Graduation......................................... 42Calendar ............................................. 7 Grievance Procedure ............................ 50Campus Activities and Organizations ......... 15Campus Life ....................................... 14 Honor Roll ........................................ 42Campus Map ........................................ 5 Housing (See On-Campus Housing) .......... 15Car Registration .................................. 18Catalog Under Which A Student May ............. Independent Study ............................... 40Graduate ........................................... 66 Institutional Aid Eligibility ..................... 31Challenges to the Record ....................... 41 Institutional Challenge Exams .................. 38Change of Curriculum or Advisor ............. 37 Instructional Support Services ................. 60Change of Registration .......................... 37 Intructional Technology ......................... 60College Level Examination Program .......... 39College Mission ................................... 11 Learning Skills Lab ............................... 60College Vision ..................................... 11 Leave of Absence ................................. 45Com Ed/Outreach/Workforce ............... 173 Library ............................................. 60COMPASS/ACT Guide ......................... 22 Limitations of Courses Offered ................ 45Complaint Log .................................... 50Computer Services ............................... 61 Medical Requirement ............................ 28Counseling Services .............................. 61 Memberships ...................................... 13Course Numbering System .................... 112Courses of Instruction-refer to Programs of .... Officers of the Board ............................ 12Instruction On-Campus Housing ............................ 15Credit Hour Load ................................ 38 On-Campus/Outreach Use Fees .............. 24Credits ............................................. 37 Outreach Program ............................. 174Crime Awareness and Campus SecurityAct of 1990 ........................................ 52 Programs of Instruction and Courses of Instruction ..........................DANTES Subject Standardized Test ........... 38 AccountingDegree Requirements ........................... 67 Courses ................................. 116Development of Eastern Wyoming Program ................................. 73College ............................................. 11 Agri-Business:Farm & Ranch ManagementDisabilty Services ................................. 62 Program ................................. 74Distance Learning Options .................... 173 Agri-Business: Beef Production Certificate Program ................................. 75 188
    • IndexAgricultural Business Computer Science-Computer Information Program ................................. 75 SystemsAgricultural Economics Program ................................. 86 Courses ................................. 117 Computer Science-Information Support Specialist Program ................................. 76 Program ................................. 86Agriculture Computer Science-Web Design ................ 87 Courses ................................. 118 Construction Technology Program ................................. 76 Courses ................................. 128Agriculture-General Program ................................. 87 Program ................................. 76 CosmetologyAgriculture-Agriculture Education Courses ................................. 129 Program ................................. 76 Programs ................................ 89Agriculture-Rangeland Ecology and Cosmetology-Hair Technician .................. 89Watershed Management Cosmetology-Skin Technician Courses ................................. 162 Program ................................. 90 Program ................................. 77 Cosmetology-Nail TechnicianAgriculture Technology Program ................................. 90 Courses ................................. 118 Criminal JusticeAgroecology Courses ................................. 133 Courses ................................. 119 Programs ................................ 90American Studies Crop Science Courses ................................. 119 Courses ................................. 135Animal Science Economics Courses ................................. 119 Courses ................................. 135 Program ................................. 78 Program ................................. 93Anthropology Education Courses ................................. 120 Courses ................................. 135Art Program ................................. 93 Courses ................................. 120 Education-Early Childhood Program ................................. 79 Courses ................................. 136Biology Program ................................. 95 Courses ................................. 121 Education-Elementary Program ................................. 79 Courses ................................. 137Biology-Environmental Science Program ................................. 94 Program ................................. 80 Education-SecondaryBusiness Administration Program ................................. 96 Courses ................................. 122 Education-Educational Foundations Programs ................................ 81 Courses ................................. 138Business Education Education-Exceptional Children Program ................................. 82 Courses ................................. 138Business Office Technology Electrical Apprenticeship Courses ................................. 123 Courses ................................. 138 Programs ................................ 83 Electrical TechnologyChemistry Courses ................................. 138 Courses ................................. 123 Engineering TechnologyCommunication Courses ................................. 139 Program ................................. 85 EnglishCommunication and Mass Media Courses ................................. 140 Courses ................................. 124 Programs ................................ 96Computer Applications Entrepreneurship Courses ................................. 124 Courses ................................. 141 Program ................................. 84 Program ................................. 97Computer Science Equine Studies Courses ................................. 127 Courses ................................. 142 189
    • IndexFamily and Consumer Science Nursing Studies Courses ................................. 143 Courses ................................. 155French Language PE Activity-Physical and Health Education Courses ................................. 143 Courses ................................. 156Geography Philosophy Courses ................................. 144 Courses ................................. 155Geology Physical Education-Athletics Courses ................................. 144 Courses ................................. 159German Language Physical Education, Health, and Recreation...... Courses ................................. 144 Program ........................................... 103Health Education-Physical and Health Physical Education Professional-Physical and ... Courses ................................. 144 Health EducationHealth Technology Courses ................................. 159 Courses ................................. 145 PhysicsHistory Courses ................................. 160 Courses ................................. 146 Plate Welding Program ................................. 97 Program ................................ 113Human Development Political Science Courses ................................. 147 Courses ................................. 160Interdisciplinary Studies Program ................................ 104 Programs ................................ 98 Preprofessional ProgramsInformation Management Program ................................ 104 Courses ................................. 148 Preprofessional Programs-Pre-Dentistry orInstructional Technology-Education Pre-Medicine Courses ................................. 148 Program ................................ 105International Studies Preprofessional Programs-Pre-Veterinary Courses ................................. 149 MedicineInternet Program ................................ 105 Courses ................................. 148 Preprofessional Programs-Pre-MedicalJournalism Technology Courses ................................. 149 Program ................................ 106Languages:(Foreign) Preprofessional Programs-Pre-Nursing Program ................................. 99 Program ................................ 106Library Science-Education Preprofessional Programs-Pre-Pharmacy Courses ................................. 149 Program ................................ 107Machine Tool Technology Psychology Courses ................................. 149 Courses ................................. 161 Program ................................ 113 Program ................................ 107Management-Business Range Ecology & Watershed Management Courses ................................. 150 Courses ................................. 162Marketing Religion Courses ................................. 150 Courses ................................. 162Massage Therapy Renewable Resources Program ................................ 100 Courses ................................. 163Mathematics Safety Education Courses ................................. 150 Courses ................................. 163 Programs ............................... 100 Social WorkMining Technology Courses ................................. 163 Courses ................................. 152 SociologyMolecular Biology Courses ................................. 163 Courses ................................. 153 Program ................................ 108Music Soil Science-Agriculture Courses ................................. 153 Courses ................................. 164 Programs ............................... 101 190
    • IndexSpanish Language Textbook Information ........................... 28 Courses ................................. 164 Transcripts ......................................... 43Speech Pathology and Audiology Transferring ...................................... 176 Courses ................................. 164 Ashford University .................... 178Statistics University of Great Falls ............. 178 Courses ................................. 164 University of Phoenix ................ 178 Program ................................ 109 University of Wyoming ............... 177Technology Upper Iowa University ............... 178 Courses ................................. 164 Tuition ............................................ 25Theatre and Dance Tuition & Fee Refunds ........................... 26 Courses ................................. 165Truck Driving Training Veteran’s Benefits ................................. 35 Courses ................................. 165Veterinary Technology Withdrawal ........................................ 45 Courses ................................. 165 Withdrawals and Return of Title IV Aid ...... 34 Program ................................ 110 Wyoming Educational Assistance for Veteran’sWeatherization Technology and Survivors ........................... 35 Courses ................................. 109 Wyoming National Guard Educational Program ................................ 111 Assistance Plan.......................... 35Welding Technology Courses ................................. 169 Programs ............................... 112Wildlife and Fisheries Biology andManagement Program ................................ 114Women’s Studies Courses ................................. 171Zoology Courses ................................. 171Reading Requirement ........................... 21Refunds ............................................ 26Registration Procedures ......................... 37Repeating Courses ............................... 45Residency .......................................... 27Residence Hall Fees .............................. 26Residence Hall Refunds ......................... 26Residence Policy .................................. 27Safety ............................................ 48Satisfactory Progress (Financial Aid) .......... 32Second Associate Degree from EWC ......... 66Semester Fee Schedule .......................... 25Senior Citizens Program ....................... 174Services for Disabled Students ................. 62Sexual Harassment Policy ....................... 49Special Charges ................................... 24Student Classification ............................ 42Student Conduct.................................. 47Summer Session ................................. 173Support Services .................................. 59 191