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introduction to ceramics

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slideshow for first class of the semester

slideshow for first class of the semester

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Transcript

  • 1. (Amazing) Properties of Clay:- Malleable – can be readily formed when wet- Sticks to itself – one piece of clay can be attached toanother by merely pressing- Wet clay can hold water – for instance could be used to ‘waterproof’ a woven basket for transportingwater-Dry clay slakes back to wet clay if placed in water (if you don’t like something you’ve made, you can ‘reclaim’ the clay and use it again)-Undergoes a change at the molecular level when heat is applied in an even and consistent way, andbecomes a permanent, archival material.
  • 2. Some Forming Methods:Pinching – the most basic way of making something with clay, whereby you simply apply pressure with your fingers to form an objectCoiling - coils of clay are rolled and then joined together to make an objectSoft Slab – clay is rolled into slabs and immediately made into an object while the slabs are still malleableStiff Slab – clay is rolled into slabs and allowed to dry until they holds their shape, and then joined togetherThrowing – clay is ‘thrown’ on the potter’s wheelSlip Casting – plaster molds are made from an object and copies of the object are made using the molds andslip, which is liquid clay Most people make work using a combination of these methods and more.
  • 3. Pieces made from Pinching… The hands of Shar Shk Buk
  • 4. Paulus Berensohn Bowl
  • 5. Eight Point Keeper Susan Kennedy 2011
  • 6. James Lobb Cups
  • 7. James Lobb Asclepia Fruit Bowl
  • 8. Pieces made from Coiling…
  • 9. Untitled Magdalene Odundo
  • 10. Clinton Polaca “Nampeyo”
  • 11. Pieces made from a combination of pinching and coiling… the hands of Billy Ray Mangham
  • 12. Jerilyn Virden Amber Fold 1
  • 13. Requisite Swell Erin Furimsky
  • 14. Beth Cavener Sticher
  • 15. EverymanBilly Ray Mangham
  • 16. Pieces made from soft slabs…
  • 17. JoAnn Schnabel Sonata
  • 18. Steven Gorman
  • 19. Contemporary Yixing Swan Teapot & Cups
  • 20. Pieces made from stiff slabs… Heather Anderson’s Hands
  • 21. Lisa Pedolsky
  • 22. Cynthia Guarjardo Birds and Bees Box
  • 23. Champion Stephanie DeArmond
  • 24. Ah Leon Bridge
  • 25. Thrown pieces made using the potter’s wheel…
  • 26. North Devon, England, 1797
  • 27. Jeff Oestreich
  • 28. Val Cushing
  • 29. Pineapple Grenade Krista Assad
  • 30. Paul Donnelly Pitcher
  • 31. Thrown and altered and thrown & handbuilt combined…
  • 32. Kristen Kieffer Corset Series Vessel
  • 33. Neil Patterson Green Tpot
  • 34. Deborah Schwatzkopf Oil Pourer
  • 35. Auntie Myrtle – a covered dish Annie Chrietzberg 2007
  • 36. Dan Anderson Chicago Water Tower Tea Set
  • 37. Shoshona Snow Salt & Pepper
  • 38. Slip cast pieces…
  • 39. Bowie Croisant
  • 40. Richard Notkin
  • 41. Pieces with illustrated surfaces
  • 42. SergeiIsupov
  • 43. KurtWeiser
  • 44. Gerardo Monterrubio
  • 45. Ceramic & Mixed Media
  • 46. Lisa Clague
  • 47. Robert “Boomer” Moore
  • 48. Larry Spears

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