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Servathon 2012 at Freedom Island
Servathon 2012 at Freedom Island
Servathon 2012 at Freedom Island
Servathon 2012 at Freedom Island
Servathon 2012 at Freedom Island
Servathon 2012 at Freedom Island
Servathon 2012 at Freedom Island
Servathon 2012 at Freedom Island
Servathon 2012 at Freedom Island
Servathon 2012 at Freedom Island
Servathon 2012 at Freedom Island
Servathon 2012 at Freedom Island
Servathon 2012 at Freedom Island
Servathon 2012 at Freedom Island
Servathon 2012 at Freedom Island
Servathon 2012 at Freedom Island
Servathon 2012 at Freedom Island
Servathon 2012 at Freedom Island
Servathon 2012 at Freedom Island
Servathon 2012 at Freedom Island
Servathon 2012 at Freedom Island
Servathon 2012 at Freedom Island
Servathon 2012 at Freedom Island
Servathon 2012 at Freedom Island
Servathon 2012 at Freedom Island
Servathon 2012 at Freedom Island
Servathon 2012 at Freedom Island
Servathon 2012 at Freedom Island
Servathon 2012 at Freedom Island
Servathon 2012 at Freedom Island
Servathon 2012 at Freedom Island
Servathon 2012 at Freedom Island
Servathon 2012 at Freedom Island
Servathon 2012 at Freedom Island
Servathon 2012 at Freedom Island
Servathon 2012 at Freedom Island
Servathon 2012 at Freedom Island
Servathon 2012 at Freedom Island
Servathon 2012 at Freedom Island
Servathon 2012 at Freedom Island
Servathon 2012 at Freedom Island
Servathon 2012 at Freedom Island
Servathon 2012 at Freedom Island
Servathon 2012 at Freedom Island
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Servathon 2012 at Freedom Island

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Hands On Manila, Earth Island Institute Philippines and Save Freedom Island Movement will be spearheading a coastal clean-up and mangrove planting of a part of Manila Bay, particularly at the Las …

Hands On Manila, Earth Island Institute Philippines and Save Freedom Island Movement will be spearheading a coastal clean-up and mangrove planting of a part of Manila Bay, particularly at the Las Pinas-Paranaque Critical Habitat and Eco-tourism Area (LPPCHEA) or commonly known as Freedom Island and Long Island.

It's the last remaining wetlands of mangroves and salt marshes in Metro Manila that serves as a bird sanctuary for more than 80 bird species and commercially valuable marine creatures. Said bird and marine sanctuary was declared as a critical habitat in 2007 by Proclamation No: 1412. But, ironically, it is presently bombarded with threats of relentless garbage disposal and the impending reclamation project of the Philippine Reclamation Authority (PRA).

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  • 1. Background The Philippine archipelago is known to have one of the most diverse environments, bot h in terms of resources and culture.
  • 2.  Ironically, it has one of the poorest economies in the world and is on its way to major ecological disasters.
  • 3.  Industrial pollution worsened eight-fold in the period of 1975 to 1988 while its economy grew very little. Aside from rapid forest destruction, worsening air pollution, inefficient and irresponsible solid waste management, the country’s coastal plains have been constantly subjected to the ill after-effects of industries.
  • 4.  Solid waste disposal in urban centers reach dangerous levels where as much as 2.7 thousand tons of garbage are produced by Metro Manila alone. Open dumps and waterways serve as disposal grounds where they pose danger to the nearby residents
  • 5. Marine Debris Pervasive debris kills wildlife & destroys habitats, too. Birds, fish, and marine mammals often mistake plastic and other debris for food. Sea turtles mistake plastic bags for jellyfish, one of their favorite foods. Gray whales have been found dead with plastic bags and sheeting in their stomachs.
  • 6. Marine Debris: A danger to Wildlife
  • 7.  Plastic debris also acts as a sponge for toxic, hormone-disrupting chemicals (like PCBs and DDT) that reside in seawater, and the chemical components of plastics themselves may also be a potential source of other toxins that find their way into the food chain.
  • 8.  Found in even the most remote ocean places, debris can remain for generations.
  • 9.  The good news is marine debris is preventable. As this obvious crisis of pollution in the Philippines, it is only crucial that those affected engage in this concern to lead the pack in creating a better environment for present and future generations.
  • 10.  Hands On Manila, Earth Island Institute Philippines and Save Freedom Island Movement will be spearheading a coastal clean-up and mangrove planting of a part of Manila Bay, particularly at the Las Pinas-Paranaque Critical Habitat and Eco-tourism Area (LPPCHEA) or commonly known as Freedom Island and Long Island.
  • 11. Freedom Island Its the last remaining wetlands of mangroves and salt marshes in Metro Manila that serves as a bird sanctuary for more than 80 bird species and commercially valuable marine creatures. Said bird and marine sanctuary was declared as a critical habitat in 2007 by Proclamation No: 1412. But, ironically, it is presently bombarded with threats of relentless garbage disposal and the impending reclamation project of the Philippine Reclamation Authority (PRA).
  • 12. The 175 hectare island also serves as a natural borderFreedom Island defends the coast from strong winds and waves and its lagoon performs as an outlet for major waterways of nearby cities. The mangrove and salt marshes ecosystem functions as a buffer that protects sea grasses, seaweeds and coral reefs from heavy sedimentation and serves as a habitat for a wide- range of aquatic and marine species that also provides feeding areas for commercially important fishes and mollusks. Large number of local fisherfolk families and coastal dwellers depend on it for their livelihood and security.
  • 13.  However, the bay has suffered from serious water quality deterioration due to the dumping of sewage, garbage, industrial pollutants and land reclamation.
  • 14.  The problem exacerbates with the decline of the mangrove population from 54,000 hectares during the latter part of the 19th century to only about 794 hectares at present primarily due to land conversion / reclamation projects and toxic contamination. Mangrove loss means disruption or loss of food and habitat of marine species. And the last- remaining mangrove forest in Freedom Island also means the last of our hope for the living things that depends on it.
  • 15. Objectives
  • 16. Objectives This will also serve as an opportunity to inform the general public of the importance to maintain the cleanliness of our rivers and the continued protection of our water resources which is the lifeblood of our societies. Such activities are also undertaken to advocate for the government to seriously address the protection of our oceans and rivers not only in Metro Manila but for the entire nation.
  • 17. GENERAL RULES/ GUIDELINES WHEN IN ANECOLOGICALLY SENSITIVE AREA: Follow the command of your marshal / group coordinator. Dont roam around in the area alone. Be aware of the safety measures.
  • 18. GENERAL RULES/ GUIDELINES WHEN IN ANECOLOGICALLY SENSITIVE AREA: •Do not disturb wildlife. Do not run after them nor try to catch them. Also avoid making loud noises. •Dont feed wild animals
  • 19. GENERAL RULES/ GUIDELINES WHEN IN ANECOLOGICALLY SENSITIVE AREA: -In the case of dead or injured animals, a volunteer should NEVER try to pick-up, attempt to treat, or move the injured or dead animal. If the animal is already dead, just leave it there. If the animal is injured/sick and needs veterinary attention, report it immediately to the over-all commander (this must be reported to the DENR). - Do not pick flowers and plants. Leave everything that belongs to nature. Do not take home shells and sands.
  • 20. GENERAL RULES/ GUIDELINES WHEN IN ANECOLOGICALLY SENSITIVE AREA:  Be cautious and aware of sensitive habitat areas (i.e. sand dunes). Precautions should therefore be instituted for such areas.
  • 21. GENERAL RULES/ GUIDELINES WHEN IN ANECOLOGICALLY SENSITIVE AREA: When inside a forest, stick to the trail and do not enter grass fields or trample on wild flowers. Dont use new trail markers, signs or other graffiti to mark the way. Take home all of your waste products including left-over food and cigarette butts (if possible, do not smoke!).
  • 22. GENERAL RULES/ GUIDELINES WHEN IN ANECOLOGICALLY SENSITIVE AREA: - It is strongly prohibited to build fires. - In the unlikely event of a serious accident occurring, inform authorized persons immediately.
  • 23.  Take nothing but pictures & trash. Kill nothing but time. Leave nothing but footprints.
  • 24. 1st STEP: REGISTRATION BOOTH Make the volunteers sign up first at the registration booth. If there’s a need for waivers, make sure all volunteers read and sign the liability waiver form. LEGIBLE names and addresses are critical, so please stress this to your volunteers. Collect waivers in the registration booth and distribute supplies. Assign people in groups. (About 10 people per group) Make sure volunteers in the group know their leaders. Distribution of supplies. To be given to each group are the following:
  • 25. Distribution of supplies. To be given to eachgroup are the following: Sacks (for plastics, for styro & other foams, for foot wear, for bottles, other trash) Thongs Rake Pitch forks Shovel Gloves Catalogue Data/ Data cards & pencils for the documenter.
  • 26. Distribution of supplies. To be given to eachgroup are the following: Trees Rake Shovel Gloves Data cards & pencils for the documenter.
  • 27. Distribution of supplies. To be given to eachgroup are the following: Mangrove propagules Sticks Data Cards & pencils for the documenter
  • 28. •Before each group starts. Orient thembriefly on the location, objectives and of thethings that needed to be done. Location / Mapping Group assignments Discuss the importance of working in teams to facilitate the process of both collecting trash or planting trees and the information for the data cards. For Coastal Clean-up, group of 10 consists of: The team leader Documenter 2 holding the sack for plastic wastes 2 holding the sack for Styrofoam & other foams 2 holding the sack for footwear & rubber 2 holding the sack for other trash (metals, bottles, ceramics, cans, etc.)
  • 29.  For Tree planting, one group consists of: The Team Leader 5 volunteers to dig holes and plant trees 3 volunteers to pick up trash along the trail 1 documenter For Mangrove propagule planting, one group consists of: The Team Leader 1 documenter 5 volunteers to plant propagules 3 volunteers to pick up trash in the site vicinity
  • 30.  Emphasize on safety as a priority. If you have prior contact with volunteers, advise them to wear sun block, appropriate sturdy shoes, long sleeves, hats, sunglasses, towel, bug repellant, hand sanitizer or alcohol, and to bring their own water/beverage bottle and other personal needs. During the orientation and safety precaution talk, tell your group to always keep an eye on the sea or waterway, avoid over- exertion, and stay in teams. Children must be supervised by adults at all times.
  • 31.  Remind volunteers that as much as possible, additional trash generated by us should be prevented. Avoid disposable food and water containers, spoons & forks, and other snacks with such wasteful packaging (especially cigarette butts). Please try our best not to add trash in the area. Or if this cannot be avoided, please ensure to bring your trash when you leave.
  • 32. 2nd STEP FOR COASTAL CLEAN-UP GROUPS:CLEANING UP THE ASSIGNED AREA: Wear gloves on both hands when you’re picking up trash with and closed toe shoes at all times, and have clothing and sun- block to protect you from the sun.
  • 33. 2nd STEP FOR COASTAL CLEAN-UP GROUPS:CLEANING UP THE ASSIGNED AREA:  - Instruct the group to pick up non-biodegradable or human- created objects only (styro, plastics, footwear & rubber, etc. -- should be segregated accordingly) -All biodegradable objects or natural debris such as wood, driftwood, leaves, weeds, kelp, algae, etc. should be left on the beach. -Shake-off the sand before putting the trash in the garbage bag. (Sands & stones are important in the marine ecosystem, too.) -Dont pull the weeds. They are part of the ecosystem, not trash.
  • 34. 2nd STEP FOR COASTAL CLEAN-UP GROUPS:CLEANING UP THE ASSIGNED AREA: Much of the trash you will find is small, so keep your eyes out for smaller pieces of trash. The smaller pieces can be mistaken for food by marine animals. - Don’t pick up sharp objects (broken glass, fluorescent bulbs, discarded knife, needles, etc) and hospital/infectious wastes (such as syringes, sanitary napkin, diapers) by your hands (even if you are wearing gloves). Use thongs, instead, for those. -Follow the command of your marshal / group coordinator. Dont roam around in the area alone. - No one should ever go in the water (unless you are assigned to) -Marshalls must report to the over-all commander if there are injuries among the team.
  • 35. 2nd STEP FOR COASTAL CLEAN-UP GROUPS:CLEANING UP THE ASSIGNED AREA: Be cautious and aware of sensitive habitat areas (i.e. sand dunes). Ecologically sensitive areas can’t always take the stress of human activity. The small organisms that inhabit a sand dune (hill of sand) and its vegetation are easily killed by footsteps alone. Precautions should therefore be instituted for such areas.
  • 36. 2nd STEP FOR COASTAL CLEAN-UP GROUPS:CLEANING UP THE ASSIGNED AREA: - Avoid over- exertion, sunburn, heat exhaustion, and dehydration. - Don’t lift anything too heavy; when in doubt, don’t try!
  • 37. 2nd STEP FOR COASTAL CLEAN-UP GROUPS:CLEANING UP THE ASSIGNED AREA:  - When documenting the kind of trash found in the shore while cleaning up, count items in groups (sticks) of five to avoid confusion, and record the total in the box. Do not write the words “lots” or “many.” Count every piece and be specific. Only actual numbers of items can be used. If you get tired of counting, even an estimate with a real number is better than nothing.
  • 38. 3rd STEP FOR COASTAL CLEAN-UP GROUPS:DOCUMENTATION AND DISPOSAL: -If sacks are full, bring it to the weighing area. Do data collection. Concentrate your efforts on collecting trash and recyclables first. Bring the collected trash to the meeting location and catalogue data for data cards. -Document unusual finds, too. Those were trash not categorized as plastic, styrofoam, foam, met al, glass or rubber. It could also be unusual in size. The item should be photographed if possible.
  • 39.  -After documenting the trash, bring it to the garbage truck. - Documenter should tabulate the amount of trash and recyclables collected, list the most unusual items, and report it. The information needed immediately are the following:  The number of participants at your site  The weight of trash and recyclables  The number of miles cleaned (estimated).  The most unusual items found - Data cards and any unusual items they found shall be collected by the event organizers or the over-all commander. - After the clean-up, wash your hands thoroughly at the designated washing area, freshen up, relax, and enjoy the view.
  • 40. STEP 2 FOR MANGROVE PLANTING: Proceed to the site in group. It is best to wear long sleeves as you will pass by a forest to get to the site. It is usually near the sea or tidal river/creek and slightly shaded from the sun, so you may need to wear boots for this. Push the pointed stick downwards the soft soil to make a hole/ Plant undamaged, mature propagules or seeds in the hole, then press the soil around it with your feet to let the propagule stand firmly. For protection from waves, you may fence off the area (with bamboo sticks) Planting distance - 2m x 2m (need 2500 seedlings/ha) Record the number of propagules planted and the estimated square area. Take pictures.
  • 41. STEP 2 FOR TREE PLANTING: Proceed to the site in group. Remember the GENERAL GUIDELINES and Safety Measures. Your event organizers selected a site and particular species of trees for the site based on ecological needs of the tree such as shade, moisture, and soil preferences. Provide good pre-planting care. Keep trees shaded, cool, and moist before planting. Be gentle when handling the root ball. Remove all labels, wires, etc. from the trees stem. Dig a shallow hole, as wide as possible. The hole should be at least 3X the root ball diameter, bowl-shaped, and as deep as the root ball is high or 1-2" shallower. The root ball should be placed on undisturbed soil, with the root collar at or just above the level of the surrounding soil. Remove plastics, burlap, pots, wire baskets, etc. from the root ball. Removing these materials with the root ball in the hole minimizes root system disturbance. Backfill with native soil and water the entire root zone Document the trees planted by recording the species, numbers and the total area planted. Take pictures.

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