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Q1 2009 Earning Report of Green Mountain Coffee Roasters

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  • 1. Form 10-Q GREEN MOUNTAIN COFFEE ROASTERS INC - GMCR Filed: May 07, 2009 (period: March 28, 2009) Quarterly report which provides a continuing view of a company's financial position
  • 2. U.S. SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Washington, D.C. 20549 FORM 10-Q (Mark One) x QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934. For the thirteen weeks ended March 28, 2009 OR ¨ TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934. For the transition period from to Commission file number 1-12340 GREEN MOUNTAIN COFFEE ROASTERS, INC. (Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter) Delaware 03-0339228 (State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization) (I.R.S. Employer Identification No.) 33 Coffee Lane, Waterbury, Vermont 05676 (Address of principal executive offices) (zip code) (802) 244-5621 (Registrants’ telephone number, including area code) (Former name, former address and former fiscal year, if changed since last report.) Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has (1) filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. YES x NO ¨ Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). YES ¨ NO ¨ Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. Large accelerated fil er ¨ Accelerated filer x Non-accelerated filer ¨ Smaller Reporting Company ¨ Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a shell company (as defined in rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act) YES ¨ NO x As of April 30, 2009, 25,049,061 shares of common stock of the registrant were outstanding.
  • 3. Part I. Financial Information Item 1. Financial Statements GREEN MOUNTAIN COFFEE ROASTERS, INC. Unaudited Consolidated Balance Sheets (Dollars in thousands) March 28, 2009 September 27, 2008 Assets Current assets: Cash and cash equivalents $ 2,639 $ 804 Restricted cash and cash equivalents 414 161 Receivables, less uncollectible accounts and return allowances of $5,116 and $3,002 at March 28, 2009 and September 27, 2008, respectively 71,13 5 54,78 2 Inventories 71,59 7 85,31 1Other current assets 4,783 4,886 Deferred income taxes, net 9,899 6,146 Total current assets 160,4 67 152,0 90 Fixed assets, net 105,1 52 97,67 8Intangibles, net 39,39 0 29,39 6Goodwill 99,72 7 73,95 3Other long-term assets 4,172 4,531 Total assets $ 408,9 08 $ 357,6 48 Liabilities and Stockholders’ Equity Current liabilities: Current portion of long-term debt $ 93 $ 33 Accounts payable 49,54 2 43,82 1Accrued compensation costs 10,65 8 11,66 9Accrued expenses 20,61 4 14,64 5Income tax payable 5,427 2,079 Other short-term liabilities 4,147 673 Total current liabilities 90,48 1 72,92 0 Long-term debt 118,6 50 123,5 17Deferred income taxes, net 22,29 2 21,69 1 Commitments and contingencies Stockholders’ equity: Preferred stock, $0.10 par value: Authorized—1,000,000 shares; No shares issued or outstanding — — Common stock, $0.10 par value: Authorized—60,000,000 shares; Issued—26,096,888 and 25,478,536 shares at March 28, 2009 and September 27, 2008, respectively 2,612 2,549 Additional paid-in capital 76,33 5 63,60 7Retained earnings 108,6 47 81,28 0Accumulated other comprehensive loss (2,61 2 (419 ESOP unallocated shares, at cost—18,129 shares (161 (161 Treasury shares, at cost—1,157,554 shares (7,33 6 (7,33 6Total stockholders’ equity 177,4 85 139,5 20Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity $ 408,9 08 $ 357,6 48 The accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements are an integral part of these financial statements. 2
  • 4. GREEN MOUNTAIN COFFEE ROASTERS, INC. Unaudited Consolidated Statements of Operations (Dollars in thousands except per share data) Thirteen weeks ended March 28, 2009 Thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2008 Net sales $ 193,35 1 $ 120,87 7Cost of sales 131,37 0 76,164 Gross profit 61,981 44,713 Selling and operating expenses 28,094 21,841 General and administrative expenses 11,245 10,246 Patent litigation (settlement) expense — 1,030 Operating income 22,642 11,596 Other expense (242 (89 Interest expense (1,032 (1,495 Income before income taxes 21,368 10,012 Income tax expense (8,385 (4,055 Net income $ 12,983 $ 5,957 Basic income per share: Weighted average shares outstanding 24,750, 025 23,856, 362Net income $ 0.52 $ 0.25 Diluted income per share: Weighted average shares outstanding 26,013, 372 25,467, 448Net income $ 0.50 $ 0.23 The accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements are an integral part of these financial statements. 3
  • 5. GREEN MOUNTAIN COFFEE ROASTERS, INC. Unaudited Consolidated Statements of Operations (Dollars in thousands except per share data) Twenty-six weeks ended March 28, 2009 Twenty-six weeks ended March 29, 2008 Net sales $ 390,33 1 $ 247,32 2Cost of sales 275,00 0 159,32 0 Gross profit 115,33 1 88,002 Selling and operating expenses 64,275 48,875 General and administrative expenses 20,456 19,505 Patent litigation (settlement) expense (17,000 1,495 Operating income 47,600 18,127 Other expense (285 (203 Interest expense (2,414 (3,039 Income before income taxes 44,901 14,885 Income tax expense (17,534 (6,003 Net income $ 27,367 $ 8,882 Basic income per share: Weighted average shares outstanding 24,601, 756 23,737, 160Net income $ 1.11 $ 0.37 Diluted income per share: Weighted average shares outstanding 25,882, 738 25,445, 994Net income $ 1.06 $ 0.35 The accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements are an integral part of these financial statements. 4
  • 6. GREEN MOUNTAIN COFFEE ROASTERS, INC. Unaudited Condensed Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income (Dollars in thousands) Thirteen weeks e nded March 2 8, 2009 Thirteen weeks end ed March 29, 2008 Twenty- six weeks e nded March 2 8, Twenty-six weeks end ed March 29, 2008 Net income $ 12, 98 $ 5,957 $ 27, 36 $ 8,882 Other comprehensive loss, net of tax: Deferred gain (losses) on derivatives designated as cash flow hedges 12 7 (788 (2, 28 (1,12 8Losses on derivatives designated as cash flow hedges included in net income 79 — 89 — Other comprehensive gain (loss) 20 6 (788 (2, 19 (1,12 8Comprehensive income $ 13, 18 $ 5,169 $ 25, 17 $ 7,754 The accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements are an integral part of these financial statements. 5
  • 7. GREEN MOUNTAIN COFFEE ROASTERS, INC. Unaudited Consolidated Statement Of Changes In Stockholders’ Equity For the Period Ended March 28, 2009 (Dollars in thousands) Common stock Additional paid-in capital Retained earnings Accumulate d other compr e- hensive (loss) Treasury stock ESOP unallocated shares Stockholders’ Equity Shares Amount Shares Amount Share s Amount Ba l a n 2 5 , 4 $ 2 , 5 4 $ 6 3 , 6 $ 8 1 , 2 $ ( 4 1 9 ) ( 1 , 1 ) $ ( 7 , 3 ) ( 1 8 , ) $ ( 1 6 1 ) $ 1 3 9 , O p t 5 7 7 5 8 2 , 9 — — — — — — 3 , 0 Is s u a n c e 4 1 , 0 1 9 5 1 , 3 2 9 1 , 3 3 4 St o c k — — 2 , 9 5 — — — — — — 2 , 9 5 Ta x b — — 5 , 3 9 — — — — — — 5 , 3 9 De f e — — 7 1 — — — — — — 7 1 Ot h e r c — — — — ( 2 , 1 9 3 ) — — — — ( 2 , 1 9 3 ) N e — — — 2 7 — — — — — 2 7Ba l a n 2 6 , 0 $ 2 , 6 1 $ 7 6 , 3 $ 1 0 8 , $ ( 2 , 6 ) ( 1 , 1 ) $ ( 7 , 3 ) ( 1 8 , ) $ ( 1 6 1 ) $ 1 7 7 , The accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements are an integral part of these financial statements. 6
  • 8. GREEN MOUNTAIN COFFEE ROASTERS, INC. Unaudited Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows (Dollars in thousands) Twenty-six weeks end ed March 28, 2009 Twenty-six weeks end ed March 29, 2008 Cash flows from operating activities: Net income $ 27,36 7 $ 8,882 Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities: Depreciation and amortization 8,477 6,423 Amortization of intangibles 2,406 2,406 Loss on disposal of fixed assets 144 124 Provision for doubtful accounts 131 346 Loss on futures derivatives 89 — Tax expense (benefit) from exercise of non-qualified options and disqualified dispositions of incentive stock options 21 (86 Deferred income taxes (1,96 0 138 Deferred compensation and stock compensation 3,027 2,934 Changes in assets and liabilities: Receivables (16,4 84 (4,48 1Inventories 16,00 1 (11,5 01Income tax payable 3,348 876 Other current assets (150 (880 Other long-term assets, net 359 179 Accounts payable 5,576 (2,04 7Accrued compensation costs (1,01 1 1,588 Accrued expenses 5,642 1,840 Net cash provided by operating activities 52,98 3 6,741 Cash flows from investing activities: Acquisition of Tully’s Coffee Corporation (41,4 51 — Capital expenditures for fixed assets (14,5 16 (21,8 16Proceeds from disposal of fixed assets 93 129 Net cash used for investing activities (55,8 74 (21,6 87 Cash flows from financing activities: Net change in revolving line of credit (5,00 0 7,800 Proceeds from issuance of common stock 4,372 3,024 Windfall tax benefit 5,371 2,687 Deferred financing fees — (794 Repayment of long-term debt (17 (42 Net cash provided by financing activities 4,726 12,67 5 Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents 1,835 (2,27 1Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period 804 2,818 Cash and cash equivalents at end of period $ 2,639 $ 547 Fixed asset purchases included in accounts payable and not disbursed at the end of each period: $ 5,348 $ 2,016 Noncash financing activity: Debt assumed in conjunction with acquisition $ 210 $ — The accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements are an integral part of these financial statements. 7
  • 9. Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements 1. Basis of Presentation The accompanying unaudited consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles for interim financial information, the instructions to Form 10-Q, and Rule 10-01 of Regulation S-X. Accordingly, they do not include all of the information and footnotes required by generally accepted accounting principles for complete consolidated financial statements. In the opinion of management, all adjustments considered necessary for a fair presentation of the interim financial data have been included. Results from operations for the thirteen and twenty-six week periods ended March 28, 2009 are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected for the fiscal year ending September 26, 2009. The September 27, 2008 balance sheet data was derived from audited financial statements but does not include all disclosures required by accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. For further information, refer to the consolidated financial statements and the footnotes included in the Annual Report on Form 10-K for Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. for the fiscal year ended September 27, 2008. Throughout this presentation, we refer to the consolidated company as the “Company”. The Company has revised the classification of certain information presented in its fiscal 2008 Consolidated Statement of Operations to conform to its fiscal 2009 presentation. 2. Segment Reporting The Company manages its operations through two operating segments: Specialty Coffee Business Unit (“SCBU”) formerly referred to as Green Mountain Coffee (“GMC”) and Keurig Business Unit (“Keurig”). SCBU sells whole bean and ground coffee, coffee, hot cocoa and tea in K-Cups, Keurig single-cup brewers and other accessories mainly in domestic wholesale and retail channels. Keurig sells their single-cup brewers, coffee, hot cocoa and tea in K-Cups produced by a variety of licensed roasters and related accessories mainly in domestic wholesale and retail channels. Throughout this report, unless otherwise noted, the information provided is on a consolidated basis. The Company evaluates performance based on several factors, including business segment income before taxes. The operating segments do not share manufacturing or distribution facilities, except for brewer fulfillment at our Knoxville facility, and most administrative functions such as accounting and information services are decentralized. In the event any materials and/or services are provided to one segment by the other, the transaction is valued at market price and eliminated in consolidation. The costs of the Company’s manufacturing operations are captured within the SCBU segment while the Keurig segment does not have manufacturing facilities and purchases their saleable products from third parties, including the SCBU. The Company’s property, plant and equipment, inventory and accounts receivable are captured and reported discretely within each operating segment. Expenses not specifically related to either operating segment are shown separately as “Corporate”. Corporate expenses are comprised mainly of the compensation and other related expenses of the Company’s Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer, Chief Information Officer, General Counsel and Secretary, Vice President Human Resources and Vice President of Corporate Social Responsibility and other selected employees who perform duties related to our entire enterprise. Corporate expenses also include interest expense, amortization of identifiable intangibles, as well as certain corporate legal expenses and compensation of the board of directors. All of the Company’s goodwill and intangible assets are included in Corporate assets. 8
  • 10. Selected financial data for segment disclosures for the thirteen weeks ended March 28, 2009 and March 29, 2008 are as follows: Thirteen weeks ended March 28, 2009 (Dollars in thousands) SCBU Keurig Corporate Elimination s Consolidate dSales to unaffiliated customers $ 91,1 77 $ 102,1 74 $ — $ — $ 193,3 51Intersegment sales $ 22,0 88 $ 17,59 0 $ — $ (39,6 78 $ — Net sales $ 113, 265 $ 119,7 64 $ — $ (39,6 78 $ 193,3 51Income before taxes $ 12,8 35 $ 14,72 5 $ (5,95 6 $ (236 $ 21,36 8Total assets $ 331, 134 $ 88,11 5 $ 139,1 17 $ (149, 458 $ 408,9 08Stock compensation $ 498 $ 458 $ 570 $ — $ 1,526 Interest expense $ 17 $ — $ 1,015 $ — $ 1,032 Property additions $ 10,5 92 $ 258 $ — $ — $ 10,85 0Depreciation and amortization $ 3,80 1 $ 518 $ 1,203 $ — $ 5,522 Thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2008 (Dollars in thousands) SCBU Keurig Corporate Elimination s Consolidate dSales to unaffiliated customers $ 69,65 1 $ 51,22 6 $ — $ — $ 120,8 77Intersegment sales $ 11,37 4 $ 9,513 $ — $ (20,8 87 $ — Net sales $ 81,02 5 $ 60,73 9 $ — $ (20,8 87 $ 120,8 77Income before taxes $ 7,158 $ 10,10 2 $ (6,21 3 $ (1,03 5 $ 10,01 2Total assets $ 185,3 96 $ 57,37 7 $ 105,6 42 $ (60,2 59 $ 288,1 56Stock compensation $ 426 $ 620 $ 488 $ — $ 1,534 Interest expense $ — $ — $ 1,495 $ — $ 1,495 Property additions $ 7,364 $ 1,033 $ — $ — $ 8,397 Depreciation and amortization $ 2,845 $ 442 $ 1,203 $ — $ 4,490 9
  • 11. Selected financial data for segment disclosures for the twenty-six weeks ended March 28, 2009 and March 29, 2008 are as follows: Twenty-six weeks ended March 28, 2009 (Dollars in thousands) SCBU Keurig Corporate Elimination s Consolidate dSales to unaffiliated customers $ 182, 802 $ 207,5 29 $ — $ — $ 390,3 31Intersegment sales $ 36,2 71 $ 33,17 1 $ — $ (69,4 42 $ — Net sales $ 219, 073 $ 240,7 00 $ — $ (69,4 42 $ 390,3 31Income before taxes $ 22,3 65 $ 17,42 9 $ 6,151 $ (1,04 4 $ 44,90 1Total assets $ 331, 134 $ 88,11 5 $ 139,1 17 $ (149, 458 $ 408,9 08Stock compensation $ 1,03 1 $ 883 $ 1,042 $ — $ 2,956 Interest expense $ 17 $ — $ 2,397 $ — $ 2,414 Property additions $ 15,1 85 $ 1,003 $ — $ — $ 16,18 8Depreciation and amortization $ 7,46 9 $ 1,008 $ 2,406 $ — $ 10,88 3 Twenty-six weeks ended March 29, 2008 (Dollars in thousands) SCBU Keurig Corporate Elimination s Consolidate dSales to unaffiliated customers $ 141,8 66 $ 105,4 56 $ — $ — $ 247,3 22Intersegment sales $ 16,99 3 $ 19,13 0 $ — $ (36,1 23 $ — Net sales $ 158,8 59 $ 124,5 86 $ — $ (36,1 23 $ 247,3 22Income before taxes $ 13,34 4 $ 13,83 5 $ (11,0 99 $ (1,19 5 $ 14,88 5Total assets $ 185,3 96 $ 57,37 7 $ 105,6 42 $ (60,2 59 $ 288,1 56Stock compensation $ 905 $ 1,164 $ 818 $ — $ 2,887 Interest expense $ — $ — $ 3,039 $ — $ 3,039 Property additions $ 13,70 7 $ 2,298 $ — $ — $ 16,00 5Depreciation and amortization $ 5,577 $ 846 $ 2,406 $ — $ 8,829 10
  • 12. 3. Acquisition of Tully’s Coffee Corporation On September 15, 2008, the Company entered into an Asset Purchase Agreement (the “Agreement”) with Tully’s Coffee Corporation, a Washington corporation, and its wholly-owned subsidiary, Tully’s Bellaccino, LLC, a Washington limited liability company (collectively “Tully’s”) to acquire the Tully’s coffee brand and certain assets of its wholesale business. The transaction was completed on March 27, 2009. Tully’s wholesale business division distributes handcrafted coffees and related products via office coffee services, food service distributors, and over 5,000 supermarkets located primarily in the western states. The Company expects the geographic region encompassed by the Tully’s brand to create an advantaged opportunity for the Company to accelerate growth in the west coast by capitalizing on Tully’s brand recognition and the loyalty of its customer base. Total consideration under the terms of the Agreement amounted to approximately $40,300,000 in cash. The Agreement contained customary representations, warranties and covenants given by the parties. Under the terms of the Agreement, $3,500,000 of the purchase price was placed in escrow at the closing and will be available to satisfy indemnification claims by the Company under the Agreement for a period of up to 12 months from the completion date. The total net cash disbursement associated with the Agreement was $41,451,000. This includes $40,300,000 of cash consideration paid to Tully’s for the assets associated with its wholesale business and brand and direct acquisition costs of approximately $1,151,000. The Company also assumed approximately $210,000 in debt which was recorded as a noncash transaction. The unaudited Consolidated Balance Sheets of the Company as of March 28, 2009 reflect the acquisition of Tully’s under the purchase method of accounting. Since the Agreement was consummated concurrent to the end of Company’s interim reporting period, Tully’s results of operations are not included in the Consolidated Statements of Operations for this interim report. The preliminary allocation of the purchase price based on fair value of the acquired assets less liabilities assumed is as follows: Inventories 2,287,0 00Fixed assets 1,527,0 00Intangible assets 12,400, 000Goodwill 25,237, 000Total 41,451, 000 In addition, the Company recorded goodwill related to assumed debt of $210,000 and exit and transition related accruals of $327,000. Exit and transition related accruals include the costs associated with the plan to relocate the Tully’s manufacturing facility to a new location which is expected to be completed no later than one year from the acquisition date. The purchase price and its allocation could change as a result of changes in the estimates and assumptions used in determining certain acquisition related accruals. Any change to these estimates and assumptions in the year following the acquisition would result in an offsetting adjustment to the acquired goodwill. This acquisition was recorded in accordance with Statements of Financial Accounting Standards No. 141 (“SFAS 141”) “Business Combinations” and No. 142 (“SFAS 142”) “Goodwill and Other Intangibles”. In December 2007, the FASB issued SFAS No. 141 (Revised 2007), (“SFAS 141R”) effective for the Company beginning in fiscal year 2010. The guidance proposed by SFAS 141R applies prospectively, except that acquisitions consummated prior to adoption are required to adjust changes in deferred tax asset valuation allowances and acquired income tax uncertainties through earnings rather than as an adjustment to the cost of the acquisition. 11
  • 13. Amortizable intangible assets acquired on March 27, 2009 include approximately $10,300,000 for identifiable customer relationships with an average life of 13 years, approximately $2,000,000 for the Tully’s trade name with an average life of 10 years and approximately $100,000 for non- compete agreements with an average life of 5 years. The weighted-average amortization period for these assets is 12.5 years and will be amortized on a straight-line basis over their respective useful lives. Amortization of intangibles expense (gross of tax) is anticipated to be approximately $506,000 in fiscal 2009 and $1,012,000 in each of the fiscal years 2010 through fiscal 2014. The cost of the acquisition in excess of the fair market value of assets acquired less liabilities assumed represents acquired goodwill of approximately $25,774,000. Goodwill is reported in the Corporate segment of the Company. Under the terms of the Agreement, the Company has granted to the remaining retail operations of the former Tully’s business an exclusive, world-wide, perpetual, fully paid up, non-transferable license for use of the acquired trademarks in association with the operation of retail locations and the sale of related retail products. In addition, as defined in the Agreement, the Company entered into a Supply Agreement to provide Tully’s with all coffee requirements for use in the operation of Tully’s retail locations. 4. Warranty Reserve The Company offers a one-year warranty from the date of the consumer purchase on all Keurig brewers it sells. Keurig provides for the estimated cost of product warranties, primarily using historical information and repair or replacement costs, at the time product revenue is recognized. The changes in the carrying amount of product warranties for the twenty-six weeks ended March 28, 2009 and March 29, 2008 are as follows: Twenty-six weeks ended March 28, 2009 Balance at September 27, 2008 648,00 0Provision charged to income 2,087, 000Usage (1,711, 000Balance at March 28, 2009 1,024, 000 Twenty-six weeks ended March 29, 2008 Balance at September 29, 2007 815,00 0Provision charged to income 892,00 0Usage (1,090, 000Balance at March 29, 2008 617,00 0 5. Inventories Inventories consisted of the following at: March 28, 2009 September 27 , 2008 Raw materials and supplies $ 18,118, 000 $ 19,494, 000Finished goods 53,479, 000 65,817, 000 $ 71,597, 000 $ 85,311, 000 Inventory values above are presented net of $852,000 and $440,000 of obsolescence reserves at March 28, 2009 and September 27, 2008, respectively. At March 28, 2009, the Company had approximately $50.0 million in green coffee purchase commitments, of which approximately 61% had a fixed price. These commitments extend through 2011. The value of the variable portion of these commitments was calculated using an average “c” 12
  • 14. price of coffee (the price per pound quoted by the Coffee, Sugar and Cocoa Exchange) of $1.20 per pound. In addition to its green coffee commitments, the Company had approximately $103.7 million in fixed-priced brewer inventory purchase commitments and $73.2 million in variable-priced production raw materials commitments at March 28, 2009. The Company believes based on relationships established with its suppliers that the risk of non-delivery on such purchase commitments is remote. 13
  • 15. 6. Earnings Per Share The following table illustrates the reconciliation of the numerator and denominator of basic and diluted earnings per share computations as required by Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 128 Earnings per Share (dollars in thousands, except per share data): Thirteen weeks ended March 28, 2009 Thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2008 Twenty-six weeks ended March 28, 2009 Twenty-six weeks ended March 29, 2008 Numerator—basic and diluted earnings per share: Net income $ 12,983 $ 5,957 $ 27,367 $ 8,882 Denominator: Basic earnings per share—weighted average shares outstanding 24,750, 025 23,856, 362 24,601, 756 23,737, 160 Effect of dilutive securities—stock options 1,263,3 47 1,611,0 86 1,280,9 82 1,708,8 34Diluted earnings per share—weighted average shares outstanding 26,013, 372 25,467, 448 25,882, 738 25,445, 994 Basic earnings per share $ 0.52 $ 0.25 $ 1.11 $ 0.37 Diluted earnings per share $ 0.50 $ 0.23 $ 1.06 $ 0.35 For the thirteen and twenty-six weeks ended March 28, 2009, options to purchase 461,000 and 525,000 shares of common stock, respectively, were excluded in the calculation of diluted earnings per share because they were antidilutive. For the thirteen and twenty-six weeks ended March 29, 2008, options to purchase 103,000 and 59,000 shares of common stock, respectively, were excluded in the calculation of diluted earnings per share because they were antidilutive. 7. Financial Instruments In March of 2008, the FASB issued Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 161, “Disclosures about Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities, an amendment of FASB Statement No. 133” (SFAS 161). SFAS 161 requires entities to provide greater transparency about how and why the entity uses derivative instruments, how the instruments and related hedged items are accounted for under SFAS 133, and how the instruments and related hedged items affect the financial position, results of operations, and cash flows of the entity. The Company adopted SFAS 161 effective March 28, 2009. The Company is exposed to certain risks relating to ongoing business operations. The primary risks that are mitigated by financial instruments are interest rate risk and commodity price risk. The Company uses interest rate swaps to mitigate interest rate risk associated with the Company’s variable- rate borrowings and regularly enters into coffee futures contracts to hedge price-to-be-established coffee purchase commitments of green coffee with the objective of minimizing cost risk due to market fluctuations. The Company does not hold or issue derivative financial instruments for trading purposes. The Company designates the swap agreements and coffee futures contracts as cash flow hedges in accordance with Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 133, “Accounting for Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activity” (“SFAS 133”). The Company measures the effectiveness of these derivative instruments at each balance sheet date. The changes in the fair value of these instruments are classified in accumulated other comprehensive income (“AOCI”). Gains and losses on these instruments are reclassified into earnings in the same period or periods during which the hedged transaction affects earnings. If it is determined that a derivative is not highly effective, the gains and losses will be reclassified into earnings upon determination. 14
  • 16. The Company has interest rate swap agreements with Bank of America N.A. (“Bank of America”) and Sovereign Bank. For the thirteen and twenty- six weeks ended March 28, 2009, the Company paid $632,000 and $813,000, respectively, pursuant to the swap agreements, which increased interest expense. The following table summarizes the interest rate swaps outstanding at March 28, 2009: Hedged Transaction Notional Amount of Underlying Debt Fixed Rate Recei ved Matu rity Fair Value of Swap 30-day LIBOR $ 30,000, 000 2.35 % 201 0 $ (557,0 0030-day LIBOR $ 25,700, 000 5.44 % 201 1 $ (2,030, 00030-day LIBOR $ 20,000, 000 3.87 % 201 3 $ (1,536, 000 $ 75,700, 000 $ (4,123, 000 The following table summarized the coffee futures contracts outstanding at March 28, 2009: Coffee Pounds Average Contract Price “C” Price Maturity Fair Value o f Futures Co ntract750,000 $ 1.2 3 $ 1.18 July 2009 $ (41, 000750,000 $ 1.2 0 $ 1.23 December 2009 $ 17,0 001,500,000 $ (24, 000 The following table discloses the fair value of the Company’s financial instruments included in the Consolidated Balance Sheets: Fair Value of Derivative Instruments March 28, 2009 September 27, 2008 Balance Sheet Classification Coffee Futures $ (24,00 0 $ (39,0 00 Other short-term liabilities Interest Rate Swaps $ (4,123, 000 $ (634, 000 Other short-term liabilities Total $ (4,147, 000 $ (673, 000 15
  • 17. The following table discloses the effect of the Company’s financial instruments included in the Consolidated Statement of Operations: Effect of Derivatives Instruments on Earnings (Gross of Tax) for the Twenty-Six Weeks Ended March 28, 2009 Amount of Gain or (Los s) in AOCI Location of Gain or (Loss) Reclassified from AOCI i nto Income Amount of G ain or (Loss) Reclassified from AOCI into Income Coffee Futures $ (186,0 00 Cost of Sale s $ (145, 000Interest Rate Swaps $ (3,676, 000 Interest Exp ense $ — Total Derivatives $ (3,862, 000 $ (145, 000 The Company estimates the deferred losses of coffee futures will be reclassified to net income within the next nine months, which is consistent with the period over which the Company hedges its exposure to the variability in future cash flows. The Company hedges a portion of its exposure to the variability in interest rates through the maturity date of its credit facility. 8. Fair Value Measurements On September 28, 2008, the Company adopted Financial Accounting Standards No. 157 Fair Value Measurement (“SFAS 157”) for financial assets and liabilities. This standard defines fair value and establishes a hierarchy for reporting the reliability of input measurements used to access fair value for all assets and liabilities. SFAS 157 defines fair value as the selling price that would be received for an asset, or paid to transfer a liability, in the principal or most advantageous market on the measurement date. The hierarchy established prioritizes fair value measurements based on the types of inputs used in the valuation technique. The inputs are categorized into the following levels: Level 1 — Observable inputs such as quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities Level 2 — Directly or indirectly observable inputs for quoted and other than quoted prices for identical or similar assets and liabilities in active or non- active markets Level 3 — Unobservable inputs not corroborated by market data, therefore requiring the entity to use the best available information, including managements assumptions Fair Value Measurements Using Balance Sheet ClassificationLevel 1 Level 2 Level 3 Derivatives $ — $ (4,147, 000 $ — Other short-term liabilities Total $ — $ (4,147, 000 $ — Derivative financial instruments include coffee futures contracts and interest rate swap agreements. To determine fair value, the Company utilizes the market approach valuation technique for the coffee futures contracts and the income approach for the interest rate swap agreements. The Company uses Level 2 inputs that are based on market data of identical (or similar) instruments that are in observable markets. All derivatives on the balance sheet are recorded at fair value with changes in fair value recorded in accumulated other comprehensive income for temporary valuation adjustments and in the statement of operations for settlement of contracts. 16
  • 18. 9. Compensation Plans The Company accounts for stock compensation under Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 123 (revised 2004) “Share-Based Payments” (“FAS123R”). The grant-date fair value of employee share options and similar instruments is estimated using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model with the following assumptions for grants issued in the twenty-six weeks ended March 28, 2009: an expected life averaging 6 years; an average volatility of 52%; no dividend yield; and a risk-free interest rate averaging 2.0%. The weighted-average fair value of options granted during the twenty- six ended March 28, 2009 was $20.29 per share. For grants issued in the twenty-six weeks ended March 29, 2008, the following assumptions were used: an expected life averaging 6 years; an average volatility of 45%; no dividend yield; and a risk-free interest rate averaging 3.1%. The weighted-average fair value of options granted during the twenty- six weeks ended March 29, 2008 was $13.27 per share. The grant-date fair value of employees’ purchase rights under the Company’s Employee Stock Purchase Plan is estimated using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model with the following assumptions for the purchase rights granted in the twenty-six weeks ended March 28, 2009: an expected life averaging 6 months; an average volatility of 59%; no dividend yield; and a risk-free interest rate averaging 1.5%. The weighted-average fair values of purchase rights granted during the twenty-six weeks ended March 28, 2009 was $12.05 per share. For the purchase rights granted in the twenty-six weeks ended March 29, 2008, the following assumptions were used: an expected life averaging 6 months; an average volatility of 60%; no dividend yield; and a risk-free interest rate averaging 4.2%. The weighted-average fair values of purchase rights granted during the twenty-six weeks ended March 29, 2008 was $10.01 per share. For the thirteen and twenty-six weeks ended March 28, 2009, income before income taxes was reduced by a stock compensation expense of $1,526,000 and $2,956,000 (gross of tax), respectively. For the thirteen and twenty-six weeks ended March 29, 2008, income before income taxes was reduced by a stock compensation expense of $1,534,000 and $2,887,000 (gross of tax), respectively. The Company maintains an Employee Stock Ownership Plan (the “ESOP”). The ESOP is qualified under sections 401(a) and 4975(e)(7) of the Internal Revenue Code. In the twenty-six week periods ended March 28, 2009 and March 29, 2008, the Company recorded compensation costs of $118,000 and $110,000 to accrue for anticipated stock distributions under the ESOP, respectively. On March 28, 2009, the ESOP held 18,129 unearned shares at an average cost of $9.03. The Company also maintains a Deferred Compensation Plan, which is not subject to the qualification requirements of Section 401(a) of the Internal Revenue Code and which allows participants to defer compensation until a future date. Only non-employee directors and certain highly compensated employees of the Company selected by the Company’s board of directors are eligible to participate in the Plan. In the twenty-six week periods ended March 28, 2009 and March 29, 2008, $70,500 and $47,000 of compensation expense was recorded under this Plan, respectively. 10 . Income Taxes The Company utilizes the asset and liability method of accounting for income taxes, as set forth in Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 109, “Accounting for Income Taxes” (“SFAS 109”). SFAS 109 requires the recognition of deferred tax assets and liabilities for the expected future tax consequences of temporary differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates in effect for the year in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. 17
  • 19. The Company is currently under audit by the Internal Revenue Service for its fiscal year ending September 30, 2006. However, the Company does not expect a significant change to its FIN 48 reserve within the next 12 months. “FIN 48” relates to the accounting for uncertainty in income taxes and is an interpretation of SFAS 109. 11 . Fixed Assets Fixed assets consist of the following: Useful Life in Years March 28, 2009 September 27, 2008 Production equipment 1-15 $ 77,487,0 00 $ 68,783,0 00Equipment on loan to wholesale customers 3-7 12,236,0 00 12,269,0 00Computer equipment and software 1-10 29,038,0 00 24,020,0 00Land Indefinite 1,391,00 0 1,391,00 0Building and building improvements 4-30 15,134,0 00 14,744,0 00Furniture and fixtures 1-15 6,946,00 0 6,598,00 0Vehicles 4-5 1,123,00 0 1,070,00 0 Leasehold improvements 1-20 or remaining lif e of lease, whichever is 7,702,00 0 7,135,00 0 Construction-in-progress 12,005,0 00 11,843,0 00Total fixed assets 163,062, 000 147,853, 000Accumulated depreciation (57,910, 000 (50,175, 000 $ 105,152, 000 $ 97,678,0 00 Total depreciation expense relating to all fixed assets was $4,319,000 and $8,477,000 for the thirteen and twenty-six weeks ended March 28, 2009, respectively. Total depreciation expense relating to all fixed assets was $3,287,000 and $6,423,000 for the thirteen and twenty-six weeks ended March 29, 2008. Assets classified as construction-in-progress are not depreciated, as they are not ready for production use. All assets classified as construction-in- progress on March 28, 2009 are expected to be in production use in the next twelve months. In the thirteen and twenty-six weeks ended March 28, 2009, the Company capitalized $80,000 and $153,000 of interest expense, respectively. In the thirteen and twenty-six weeks ended March 29, 2008, the Company capitalized $122,000 and $217,000 of interest expense, respectively 12 . Patent Litigation Settlement On October 23, 2008, Keurig entered into a Settlement and License Agreement with Kraft Foods, Inc., Kraft Foods Global, Inc., and Tassimo Corporation (collectively “Kraft”) providing for a complete settlement of Keurig’s previously filed lawsuit against Kraft. Pursuant to the terms of the Settlement and License Agreement, Kraft paid to Keurig a lump sum of $17,000,000 and Keurig grants to Kraft and its affiliates a limited, non-exclusive, perpetual, worldwide, fully paid up license of certain Keurig patents. The settlement is recorded as a non-recurring item in operating income in the first quarter of fiscal 2009. 13 . Related Party Transactions The Company uses travel services provided by Heritage Flight, a charter air services company owned by Mr. Stiller, the Company’s former CEO and current Chairman of the Board. During the twenty-six weeks ended March 28, 2009 and March 29, 2008, Heritage Flight billed the Company the amount of $73,000 and $173,000, respectively, for travel services to various employees of the Company. 18
  • 20. 14 . Recent pronouncements In December 2007, the FASB issued SFAS No. 141 (Revised 2007), “Business Combinations” (SFAS 141R). This Statement retains the fundamental requirements in Statement 141 that the acquisition method of accounting (which Statement 141 called the purchase method) be used for all business combinations and for an acquirer to be identified for each business combination. SFAS 141R requires an acquirer to recognize the assets acquired, the liabilities assumed, and any noncontrolling interest in the acquiree at the acquisition date, measured at their fair values as of that date, with limited exceptions specified in the Statement. This replaces Statement 141’s cost-allocation process, which required the cost of an acquisition to be allocated to the individual assets acquired and liabilities assumed based on their estimated fair values. The Statement retains the guidance in Statement 141 for identifying and recognizing intangible assets separately from goodwill. SFAS 141R will now require acquisition costs to be expensed as incurred, restructuring costs associated with a business combination must generally be expensed prior to the acquisition date and changes in deferred tax asset valuation allowances and income tax uncertainties after the acquisition date generally will affect income tax expense. Statement 141 applies prospectively to business combinations for which the acquisition date is on or after the beginning of the first annual reporting period beginning on or after December 15, 2008, which is fiscal year 2010 for the Company. For acquisitions completed prior to September 27, 2009, the new standard requires that changes in deferred tax asset valuation allowances and acquired income tax uncertainties after the measurement period must be recognized in earnings rather than as an adjustment to the cost of the acquisition. We do not expect this new guidance to have a significant impact on our consolidated financial statements. In February 2008, the FASB issued FASB Staff Position No. FAS 157-2 (“FSP 157-2”). FSP 157-2 delays the implementation of Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 157, “Fair Value Measurements” (“SFAS 157”) for nonfinancial assets and nonfinancial liabilities, except for items that are recognized or disclosed at fair value in the financial statements on a recurring basis. This statement defers the effective date to fiscal years beginning after November 15, 2008 and interim periods within those fiscal years, which is fiscal year 2010 for the Company. The Company adopted SFAS 157 for financial assets and liabilities for the first quarter of fiscal 2009. The Company is currently reviewing FSP 157-2 but does not expect it to have a material impact on its financial statements. In December 2007, the FASB issued SFAS 160, “Noncontrolling Interests in Consolidated Financial Statements – An amendment of ARB No. 51”. SFAS 160 amends ARB 51 to establish accounting and reporting standards for the noncontrolling interest in a subsidiary and for the deconsolidation of a subsidiary. It clarifies that a noncontrolling interest in a subsidiary is an ownership interest in the consolidated entity that should be reported as equity in the consolidated financial statements. The amount of net income attributable to the noncontrolling interest will be included in consolidated net income on the face of the income statement. Statement 160 clarifies that changes in a parent’s ownership interest in a subsidiary that do not result in deconsolidation are equity transactions if the parent retains its controlling financial interest. In addition, this Statement requires that a parent recognize a gain or loss in net income when a subsidiary is deconsolidated. SFAS 160 is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning on or after December 15, 2008, which is fiscal 2010 for this Company. The effect of adoption on the Company’s financial statements will depend primarily on the materiality of non-controlling interests arising in future transactions. 19
  • 21. Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations The following discussion and analysis is intended to help you understand the results of operations and financial condition of Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. (together with its subsidiary, the “Company”). You should read the following discussion and analysis in conjunction with our consolidated financial statements and related notes included elsewhere in this report. Overview We are a leader in the specialty coffee industry and the overall coffee maker industry. We roast high-quality Arabica coffees and offer over 100 coffee selections, including single-origins, estates, certified organics, Fair Trade CertifiedBusiness Segments The Company manages its operations through two operating segments, Specialty Coffee business unit (“SCBU”) formerly referred to as Green Mountain Coffee (“GMC”) and Keurig business unit (“Keurig”). We evaluate performance primarily based on segment operating income. Expenses not specifically related to either operating segment are recorded as “Corporate”. SCBU sells whole bean and ground coffee, hot cocoa, teas and coffees in K-Cups, and to a lesser extent, Keurig single-cup brewers and other accessories mainly in domestic wholesale and retail channels, and directly to consumers. The majority of SCBU’s revenue is derived from its North American wholesale channels. Additionally, on March 27, 2009, we acquired certain assets of the Tully’s Coffee Corporation (“Tully’s”) which will be included in the SCBU. We began selling whole bean and ground coffee and coffee in K-Cups under the Tully’s brand in the third quarter of fiscal 2009. Keurig is a pioneer and leading manufacturer of gourmet single-cup brewing systems and markets its premium patented single-cup brewing systems for consumers at home (“AH”) or away-from-home (“AFH”) mainly in North America. Keurig sells its AFH single-cup brewers to distributors for offices and its AH single-cup brewers to select retailers such as department stores and club stores. Keurig sells coffee, tea and hot cocoa in K-Cups produced by a variety of roasters, including the SCBU, and related accessories to select retailers such as department stores and club stores and also directly to consumers. Keurig earns royalty income from K-Cups shipped by its licensed roasters. Keurig also earns income from the K-Cups manufactured and sold under its trademark license arrangement with Caribou. Cost of sales for the Company consists of the cost of raw materials including coffee beans, flavorings and packaging materials; a portion of our rental expense; the salaries and related expenses of production; distribution and merchandising personnel; depreciation on production equipment; the cost of brewers manufactured by suppliers, and freight, duties and delivery expenses. Selling and operating expenses consist of expenses that directly support sales, including media and advertising expenses; a portion of the rental expense; and the salaries and related expenses of employees directly supporting sales and marketing as well as research and development. General and administrative expenses consist of expenses incurred for corporate support and administration, including a portion of the rental expense and the salaries and related expenses of personnel not elsewhere categorized. Historically, the SCBU and Keurig operating segments have not shared manufacturing or distribution facilities, and administrative functions such as accounting and information services have been decentralized. Throughout this presentation, we refer to the consolidated company as “the Company” and we refer to our operating segments as “SCBU” and “Keurig”. Expenses not specifically related to 20
  • 22. either operating segment are shown separately as “Corporate”. Corporate expenses are comprised mainly of the compensation and other related expenses of the Company’s Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer, Chief Information Officer, General Counsel and Secretary, Vice President Human Resources and Vice President of Corporate Social Responsibility and other selected employees who perform duties related to our entire enterprise. Corporate expenses also include interest expense, amortization of identifiable intangibles, as well as certain corporate legal expenses and compensation of the board of directors. All of the Company’s goodwill and intangible assets are included in Corporate assets. Basis of Presentation Included in this presentation are discussions and reconciliations of net income in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”) to net income excluding certain expenses and losses, which we refer to as non-GAAP net income. These non-GAAP measures exclude amortization of identifiable intangibles and one time operating income related to the Company’s patent litigation settlement and the related legal expenses. Non-GAAP net income is not in accordance with, or an alternative to, GAAP. The Company’s management uses these non-GAAP measures in discussing and analyzing its results of operations because it believes the non-GAAP measures provide investors with greater transparency by helping to illustrate the underlying financial and business trends relating to the Company’s results of operations and financial condition and comparability between current and prior periods. Management uses the non-GAAP measures to establish and monitor budgets and operational goals and to evaluate the performance of the Company. These non-GAAP financial measures should be considered in addition to, and not as a substitute or superior to, the other measures of financial performance prepared in accordance with GAAP. Using only the non-GAAP financial measures to analyze our performance would have material limitations because their calculation is based on the subjective determination of management regarding the nature and classification of events and circumstances that investors may find significant. Management compensates for these limitations by presenting both the GAAP and non-GAAP measures of its results. Results of Operations Summary financial data of the Company The following table presents certain financial data of the Company expressed as a percentage of net sales for the periods denoted below: 21
  • 23. Thirtee n weeks ended March 28, Thirtee n weeks ended March 29, Twenty- six weeks ended March 28, Twenty- six weeks ended March 29,Net sales 100.0 % 100.0 % 100.0 % 100.0 % Cost of sales 68.0 % 63.0 % 70.5 % 64.4 % Gross profit 32.0 % 37.0 % 29.5 % 35.6 % Selling and operating expenses 14.5 % 18.1 % 16.5 % 19.8 % General and administrative expenses 5.8 % 8.5 % 5.2 % 7.9 % Patent litigation (settlement) expense — 0.9 % -4.4 % 0.6 % Operating income 11.7 % 9.5 % 12.2 % 7.3 % Other expense -0.1 % -0.1 % -0.1 % -0.1 % Interest expense -0.6 % -1.1 % -0.6 % -1.2 % Income before income taxes 11.0 % 8.3 % 11.5 % 6.0 % Income tax expense -4.3 % -3.4 % -4.5 % -2.4 % Net income 6.7 % 4.9 % 7.0 % 3.6 % 22
  • 24. Segment Summary Net sales and income before taxes for each of our operating segments are summarized in the tables below: Net sales (in millions) Thirteen weeks end ed March 28, 2009 Thirteen weeks end ed March 29, 2008 Twenty-six weeks ended March 28, 2009 Twenty-six weeks ended March 29, 2008 SCBU $ 113.3 $ 81.0 $ 219.1 $ 158.9 Keurig $ 119.8 $ 60.7 $ 240.7 $ 124.5 Corporate $ — $ — $ — $ — Inter-company eliminations $ (39.7 $ (20.8 $ (69.5 $ (36.1 Total Company $ 193.4 $ 120.9 $ 390.3 $ 247.3 Income before taxes (in millions) Thirteen weeks ended March 28, 2009 Thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2008 Twenty-six weeks end ed March 28, 2009 Twenty-six weeks end ed March 29, 2008 SCBU $ 12.8 $ 7.1 $ 22.4 $ 13.3 Keurig $ 14.8 $ 10.1 $ 17.4 $ 13.8 Corporate $ (6.0 $ (6.2 $ 6.2 $ (11.1 Inter-company eliminations $ (0.2 $ (1.0 $ (1.0 $ (1.1 Total Company $ 21.4 $ 10.0 $ 44.9 $ 14.9 Thirteen weeks ended March 28, 2009 versus thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2008 Revenue Company Summary Net sales for the second quarter of fiscal 2009 increased 60% to $193.4 million, up from $120.9 million reported in the prior fiscal year’s second quarter. Total K-Cup shipments of coffee, hot cocoa and tea increased 62% in the second quarter of fiscal 2009 as compared to the second quarter of fiscal 2008 (the “prior year period”). SCBU SCBU segment net sales increased by $32.3 million or 40%, to $113.3 million in the second quarter of fiscal 2009 (including $22.1 million of inter- company K-Cup sales) as compared to $81.0 million reported in the second quarter of fiscal 2008 (including $11.4 million of inter-company K-Cup sales). The primary driver for the increase in sales is the continued growth in K-Cup sales. Coffee, tea and hot cocoa pounds shipped by the SCBU segment increased 19% over the prior year period. As previously announced, the Company increased prices in May 2008 by 8% to 12% on average across business channels and package types for coffee products sold by the SCBU segment. The net impact of the price increase in the second quarter of fiscal 2009 was an increase in net sales of approximately 10% over the prior year period. Keurig Keurig segment net sales increased by $59.0 million, or 97%, to $119.8 million in the second quarter of fiscal 2009 (including $17.6 million of inter- company brewer sales and royalty revenue) as compared to $60.7 million reported in the prior year period (including $9.5 million of inter-company 23
  • 25. brewer sales and royalty revenue). The increase in Keurig segment net sales was primarily due to higher K-Cup sales of approximately $29.7 million which increased 129.1% over the prior year period as well as an increase in brewer and accessories sales of approximately $18.0 million or 72.0% over the prior year period. Royalty income from K-Cups shipped by licensed roasters increased approximately $12.1 million or 85.2% over the prior year period. Keurig announced a royalty rate increase of a penny on all system-wide K-Cup portion packs that went into effect on August 1, 2008. This increase contributed to an approximate $4.0 million or 5% increase in Keurig segment’s second quarter of fiscal 2009 net sales over the prior year period. Company-wide Keurig brewer and K-Cup portion pack shipments (In thousands) Q2 FY0 9 13 wks end ed 03/2 Q2 FY0 8 13 wks end ed 03/2 Q2 Y/Y Incr ease Q2 % Y/Y Incre ase FY 09 26 wks end ed 03/2 8/09 FY 08 26 wks end ed 03/2 9/08 FY 09 Y/Y Incre ase FY 09% Y/Y Increas e Total Keurig brewers shipped(1) 479 193 286 148 % 1,19 0 515 675 131 % Total K-Cups shipped(system-wide)(2) 432, 341 266, 694 165, 647 62 % 785, 942 496, 887 289,0 55 58 % (1) Total Keurig brewers shipped means brewers shipped by Keurig to customers in the U.S./Canada. (2) Total K-Cups shipped (system-wide) means K-Cup shipments by all Keurig licensed roasters to customers in the U.S./Canada. These shipments form the basis upon which royalties are calculated by licensees for payments to Keurig. Gross Profit Company gross profit for the second quarter of fiscal 2009 totaled $62.0 million, or 32.1% of net sales, as compared to $44.7 million, or 37.0% of net sales, in the prior year period. The margin decline is due primarily to the increase in sales of AH single-cup brewers, which are sold approximately at cost as part of the Company’s strategy to increase the installed base of Keurig brewers. Selling, General and Administrative Expenses Company selling, general and administrative expenses (S,G&A) increased 23% to $39.3 million in the second quarter of fiscal 2009 from $32.1 million in the prior-year period. As a percentage of sales, S,G&A improved to 20.3% in the second quarter of fiscal 2009 from 26.6% in the prior year period. This improvement in S,G&A margin was mainly due to leveraging selling and organizational resources on a higher sales base. Interest Expense Company interest expense decreased to $1.0 million in the second quarter of fiscal 2009, down from $1.5 million in the prior year period. Income before taxes Company income before taxes increased to $21.4 million in the second quarter of fiscal 2009, up from $10.0 million in the prior year period, and, as a percentage of net sales, 11.1% and 8.3%, respectively. Excluding the non-cash amortization expenses related to the identifiable intangibles of $1.2 million in each period and $1.0 million of patent litigation expense in the prior year period, the Company’s non-GAAP income before taxes was $22.6 million, or 11.7% of net sales as compared to $12.2 million, or 10.1% of net sales in the prior year period. 24
  • 26. The SCBU segment contributed $12.8 million in income before taxes in the second quarter of fiscal 2009, up from $7.2 million in the prior year period. The Keurig segment contributed $14.7 million in income before taxes in the second quarter of fiscal 2009, up from $10.1 million in the prior year period. The Corporate segment accounted for a reduction of $(6.0) million from income before taxes in the second quarter of fiscal 2009, as compared to a reduction of ($6.2) million in the prior year period. Taxes The effective income tax rate for the Company was 39.2% in the second quarter of fiscal 2009, as compared to 40.5% in the prior year period. The difference was primarily due to higher research and development tax credits. Net Income and Diluted EPS Company net income in the second quarter of fiscal 2009 was $13.0 million, up 118% from $6.0 million in the prior year period. Company diluted EPS increased $0.27 to $0.50 per share in the second quarter of fiscal 2009, as compared to $0.23 per share in the prior year period. Twenty-six weeks ended March 28, 2009 versus twenty-six weeks ended March 29, 2008 Revenue Company Summary Net sales for the twenty-six weeks ended March 28, 2009 (the “2009 YTD period”) totaled $390.3 million as compared to $247.3 million reported for the twenty-six weeks ended March 29,2008 (the “prior YTD period”). SCBU SCBU segment net sales increased to $219.1 million, or 38%, in the 2009 YTD period (including $36.3 million of inter-company K-cup sales) as compared to $158.9 million reported in the prior YTD period (including $17.0 million of inter-company K-cup sales). The primary driver for the increase in sales is the continued growth in K-Cup sales. Coffee, tea and hot cocoa pounds shipped by the SCBU segment increased 16.6% over the prior YTD period. As previously announced, the Company increased prices in May 2008 by 8% to 12% on average across business channels and package types for coffee products sold by the SCBU segment. The net impact of the price increase in the 2009 YTD period was an increase in net sales of approximately 10.5% over the prior YTD period. Keurig Keurig segment net sales increased to $240.7 million, or 93%, in the 2009 YTD period (including $33.2 million of inter-company brewer sales and royalty revenue) as compared to $124.6 million reported in the prior YTD period (including $19.1 million of inter-company brewer sales and royalty revenue). The increase in Keurig segment net sales was primarily due to higher K-Cup sales of 25
  • 27. approximately $49.6 million which increased 129.0% over the prior YTD period as well as an increase in brewer and accessories sales of approximately $48.1 million or 77.6% over the prior YTD period. In addition, royalty income from K-Cups shipped by licensed roasters increased approximately $21.3 million or 80.5% over the prior YTD period. Keurig announced a royalty rate increase of a penny on all system-wide K-Cup portion packs that went into effect on August 1, 2008. This increase contributed to an approximate $7.1 million or 5.7% increase in Keurig segment’s 2009 YTD net sales over the prior YTD period. Shipments of AFH single-cup brewers declined from the prior YTD period due to the downturn in the economy. Gross Profit Company gross profit for the 2009 YTD period totaled $115.3 million, or 29.5% of net sales, as compared to $88.0 million, or 35.6% of net sales, in the prior YTD period. The margin decline is due primarily to the increase in sales of AH single-cup brewers, which are sold approximately at cost as part of the Company’s strategy to increase the installed base of Keurig brewers. Selling, General and Administrative Expenses Company selling, general and administrative expenses (S,G&A) increased 23.9% to $84.7 million in the 2009 YTD period from $68.4 million in the prior YTD period. As a percentage of sales, S,G&A improved to 21.7% in the 2009 YTD period from 27.6% in the prior YTD period. This improvement in S,G&A margin was the result of leveraging selling and organizational resources on a higher sales base. Patent Litigation Settlement On October 23, 2008, Keurig entered into a Settlement and License Agreement with Kraft Foods, Inc., Kraft Foods Global, Inc., and Tassimo Corporation (collectively “Kraft”) providing for a complete settlement of Keurig’s previously filed lawsuit against Kraft during the first quarter of fiscal 2009. Accordingly, the Company recognized the receipt of a patent litigation settlement of $17.0 million as a non-recurring item included in operating income for the Company’s first quarter of fiscal 2009. The Company incurred $1.5 million in litigation expenses during the comparable prior YTD period. Interest Expense Company interest expense decreased to $2.4 million in the 2009 YTD period, down from $3.0 million in the prior YTD period, due to a decrease in interest rates. Income before taxes Company income before taxes increased to $44.9 million in the 2009 YTD period, up from $14.9 million in the prior YTD period, and, as a percentage of net sales, 11.5% and 6.0%, respectively. This increase is mainly attributable to the $17.0 million (pretax) patent litigation settlement as described above. Excluding the non-cash intangibles amortization expense of $2.4 million in each period, the patent litigation income of $17.0 million in the 2009 YTD period, and the patent litigation expense of $1.5 million in the prior YTD period, non-GAAP income before taxes increased to $30.3 million in the 2009 YTD period from $18.8 million in the prior YTD period. The SCBU segment contributed $22.4 million in income before taxes in the 2009 YTD period, up from $13.3 million in the prior YTD period. The Keurig segment contributed $17.4 million in income before taxes in the 2009 YTD period, up from $13.8 million in the prior YTD period. 26
  • 28. The Corporate segment contributed $6.2 million in income before taxes in the 2009 YTD period, as compared to a reduction of $(11.1) million in the prior YTD period. This increase is mainly attributable to the $17.0 million (pretax) patent litigation settlement as described above. Taxes The effective income tax rate for the Company was 39.1% in the 2009 YTD period, as compared to 40.3% in the prior YTD period. Net Income and Diluted EPS Company net income in the 2009 YTD period was $27.4 million, up 208% from $8.9 million in the prior YTD period. Company diluted EPS increased $0.71 to $1.06 per share in the 2009 YTD period, as compared to $0.35 per share in the prior YTD period. Liquidity and Capital Resources Working capital decreased to $70.0 million at March 28, 2009, down from $79.2 million at September 27, 2008. The decrease was primarily due to lower inventory levels following strong holiday sales. Net cash provided by operating activities was $53.0 million in the 2009 YTD period as compared to $6.7 million in the prior YTD period. The increase in operating cash flow was primarily due to a decrease in inventory of $27.0 million and an improvement in net income of $18.5 million as described above. During the 2009 YTD period we had capital expenditures of $14.5 million, as compared to $21.8 million in the prior YTD period. In the 2009 YTD period, cash flows from financing activities included $4.4 million generated from the exercise of employee stock options and the issuance of shares under the employee stock purchase plan, up from $3.0 million in the prior YTD period. In addition, cash flows from operating and financing activities included a $5.4 million tax benefit from the exercise of non-qualified options and disqualifying dispositions of incentive stock options, up from $2.6 million in the prior YTD period. As stock options we have granted are exercised, we will continue to receive proceeds and a tax deduction where applicable; however, we cannot predict either the amounts or the timing of any such proceeds or tax benefits. On March 27, 2009, we purchased certain assets of the Tully’s Coffee Corporation for $40.3 million. Total cash disbursed was $41.5 million which includes direct acquisition costs of $1.2 million. We financed this transaction through our existing senior revolving credit facility. Despite the cash outflow from the Tully’s acquisition, long-term debt decreased to $118.7 million at March 28, 2009 from $123.5 million at September 27, 2008 reflecting strong free cash flows during that period. We are party to interest rate swap agreements with Bank of America N.A. (“Bank of America”) and Sovereign Bank. The total notional amount of the swap agreements at March 28, 2009 and September 27, 2008 was $75.7 million and $78.5 million, respectively. The swap agreements terminate between June 2010 and December 2012. At March 28, 2009 and September 27, 2008, we estimate that we would have paid $4.1 million and $0.6 million (gross of tax), respectively, had we terminated our swap agreements. We designate the swap agreements as a cash flow hedges and the changes in the fair value of the swaps are classified in accumulated other comprehensive income. 27
  • 29. The credit facility is subject to the following financial covenants: a funded debt to adjusted EBITDA ratio, a fixed charge coverage ratio, and a capital expenditures covenant. We were in compliance with these covenants at March 28, 2009. We expect to spend between $55.0 million and $60.0 million in capital expenditures in fiscal 2009. Capital expenditures are anticipated to be funded from operating cash flows and availability under our credit facility. We believe that our cash flows from operating activities, existing cash and our credit facility will provide sufficient liquidity to pay all liabilities in the normal course of business, fund anticipated capital expenditures and service debt requirements through the next 12 months. However, several risks and uncertainties could cause us to need to raise additional capital through equity and/or debt financing. From time to time we consider acquisition opportunities which, if pursued, could also result in the need for additional financing. We also may consider from time to time engaging in stock buyback plans or programs. The availability and terms of any such financing would be subject to prevailing market conditions and other factors at that time. A summary of cash requirements related to our outstanding long-term debt, future minimum lease payments and inventory purchase commitments is as follows: Fiscal Year Long-Term Debt (1) Operating Lease Obligations Purchase Obligations Total 2009 $ 49,000 $ 2,475,0 00 $ 150,808, 000 $ 153,332, 0002010 86,000 4,552,0 00 41,241,0 00 $ 45,879,0 002011 67,000 4,128,0 00 35,421,0 00 $ 39,616,0 002012 41,000 3,438,0 00 — $ 3,479,00 02013 118,500, 000 2,611,0 00 — $ 121,111, 000Thereafter — 7,583,0 00 — $ 7,583,00 0Total $ 118,743 ,000 $ 24,787 ,000 $ 227,470 ,000 $ 371,000 ,000 (1) Fiscal 2009 and fiscal 2010 long-term debt obligations are comprised of capital lease obligations. Critical Accounting Policies This discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations is based upon our consolidated financial statements, which we prepare in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. The preparation of these financial statements requires us to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements, and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period (see Note 2 to our Consolidated Financial Statements included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the period ended September 27, 2008). Actual results could differ from those estimates. We believe the following accounting policies and estimates require us to make the most difficult judgments in the preparation of our consolidated financial statements and accordingly are critical. We have identified the following as critical accounting policies based on the significant judgment and estimates used in determining the amounts reported in our consolidated financial statements: Cash and cash equivalents The Company considers all highly liquid investments purchased with a maturity of three months or less to be cash equivalents. Cash and cash equivalents include overnight repurchase agreements which are carried at cost and approximate market value. The Company does not believe that it is subject to any unusual credit or market risk. 28
  • 30. Inventories Inventories are stated at the lower of cost or market. Cost is being measured using an adjusted standard cost method which approximates FIFO (first-in first-out). We regularly review whether the realizable value of our inventory is lower than its book value. If our valuation shows that the realizable value is lower than book value, we take a charge to expense and directly reduce the value of the inventory. The Company estimates its reserves for inventory obsolescence by examining its inventories on a quarterly basis to determine if there are indicators that the carrying values exceed net realizable value. Indicators that could result in additional inventory write downs include age of inventory, damaged inventory, slow moving products and products at the end of their life cycles. While management believes that the reserve for obsolete inventory is adequate, significant judgment is involved in determining the adequacy of this reserve. Inventories consist primarily of green and roasted coffee, including coffee in portion packs, purchased finished goods such as coffee brewers and packaging materials. Financial Instruments The Company enters into various types of financial instruments in the normal course of business. Fair values are estimated based on assumptions concerning the amount and timing of estimated future cash flows and assumed discount rates reflecting varying degrees of perceived risk. The fair values of cash, cash equivalents, accounts receivable, accounts payable, accrued expenses and debt approximate their carrying value at March 28, 2009 and September 27, 2008. Fair Value of Financial Instruments The Company adopted Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 157, Fair Value Measurements (“SFAS 157”) during the first quarter of fiscal 2009. This standard provides guidance for using fair value to measure all assets and liabilities. SFAS 157 applies where other standards require, or permit, assets or liabilities to be measured at fair value but does not expand the use of fair value in any new circumstances. Under SFAS 157, fair value refers to the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants in the principal or most advantageous market. In accordance with Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Staff Position FAS 157-2 (“FSP 157-2”), the effective date for fair value measurement of nonfinancial assets and liabilities, except for items recognized at fair value on a recurring basis, was deferred until the Company’s 2010 fiscal year. The Company is currently reviewing this accounting standard for nonfinancial assets and liabilities, however does not expect it to have a material impact on its financial statements. During the first quarter of fiscal 2009, the Company also adopted Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 159, The Fair Value Option for Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities Including an amendment of FASB Statement No. 115 (“SFAS 159”). SFAS 159 permits entities to choose to measure certain financial instruments and certain other items at fair value. As of December 27, 2008, the Company has not elected the fair value option for any additional assets and liabilities. Hedging We enter into coffee futures contracts to hedge against price increases in price-to-be-fixed coffee purchase commitments and anticipated coffee purchases. The Company also enters into interest rate swaps to hedge against unfavorable changes in interest rates. These derivative instruments qualify for hedge accounting under SFAS No. 133, “Accounting for Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities.” Hedge accounting is permitted if the hedging relationship is expected to be highly effective. Effectiveness is determined by how closely the changes in the fair value of the derivative instrument offset the changes in the fair value of the hedged item. If the derivative is determined to qualify for hedge accounting, the effective portion of the change in the fair value of the derivative instrument is recorded in other comprehensive income and recognized in earnings when the related hedged item is sold. The ineffective portion of the change in the fair value of the derivative 29
  • 31. instrument is recorded directly to earnings. If these derivative instruments do not qualify for hedge accounting, we would record the changes in the fair value of the derivative instruments directly to earnings. See “Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk” and Note 7 in the “Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements,” included elsewhere in this report. The Company formally documents hedging instruments and hedged items, and measures at each balance sheet date the effectiveness of its hedges. When it is determined that a derivative is not highly effective, the derivative expires, or is sold or terminated, or the derivative is discontinued because it is unlikely that a forecasted transaction will occur, the Company discontinues hedge accounting prospectively for that specific hedge instrument. The Company does not engage in speculative transactions, nor does it hold derivative instruments for trading purposes. Other long-term assets Other long-term assets consist of deposits and debt issuance costs. Debt issuance costs are being amortized over the respective life of the applicable debt. Goodwill and intangibles In accordance with Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 142, “Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets” (SFAS 142), goodwill and indefinite- lived intangibles are tested for impairment annually using a market capitalization approach, and more frequently if indication of impairment arises. Based on the impairment tests performed, there was no impairment of goodwill in fiscal 2008, 2007 and 2006. All intangible assets are being amortized using the straight-line method over their useful lives. Impairment of Long-Lived Assets When facts and circumstances indicate that the carrying values of long-lived assets, including fixed assets, may be impaired, an evaluation of recoverability is performed by comparing the carrying value of the assets to projected future cash flows in addition to other quantitative and qualitative analyses. Upon indication that the carrying value of such assets may not be recoverable, the Company recognizes an impairment loss as a charge against current operations. Long-lived assets to be disposed of are reported at the lower of the carrying amount or fair value, less estimated costs to sell. The Company makes judgments related to the expected useful lives of long-lived assets and its ability to realize undiscounted cash flows in excess of the carrying amounts of such assets which are affected by factors such as the ongoing maintenance and improvements of the assets, changes in economic conditions and changes in operating performance. As the Company assesses the ongoing expected cash flows and carrying amounts of its long-lived assets, these factors could cause the Company to realize a material impairment charge. Provision for Doubtful Accounts Periodically, management reviews the adequacy of its provision for doubtful accounts based on historical bad debt expense results and current economic conditions using factors based on the aging of its accounts receivable. The Company does not require collateral from customers as ongoing credit evaluations of customers’ payment histories are performed. Additionally, the Company may identify additional allowance requirements based on indications that a specific customer may be experiencing financial difficulties. Bad debt expense and changes in the provision for doubtful accounts are reported as a component of selling and operating expenses. Actual bad debts could differ materially from the recorded estimates. Advertising costs The Company expenses the costs of advertising the first time the advertising takes place, except for direct mail campaigns targeted directly at consumers, which are expensed over the period during which they are expected to generate sales. 30
  • 32. Fixed assets Fixed assets are carried at cost, net of accumulated depreciation. Expenditures for maintenance, repairs and renewals of minor items are expensed as incurred. Depreciation is calculated using the straight-line method over the assets’ estimated useful lives. The cost and accumulated depreciation for fixed assets sold, retired, or otherwise disposed of are relieved from the accounts, and the resultant gains and losses are reflected in income. The Company follows an industry-wide practice of purchasing and loaning coffee brewing and related equipment to wholesale customers. These assets are also carried at cost, net of accumulated depreciation. Depreciation costs of manufacturing and distribution assets are included in cost of sales. Depreciation costs of other assets, including equipment on loan to customers, are included in selling and operating expenses. Revenue recognition Revenue from wholesale and consumer direct sales is recognized upon product delivery, and in some cases upon product shipment. The Company has no contractual obligation to accept returns for damaged product nor does it guarantee product sales. Title, risk of loss, damage and insurance responsibility for the products pass from the Company to the buyer upon accepted delivery of the products from the Company’s contracted carrier. The Company will at times agree to accept returns or issue credits for products that are clearly damaged in transit. Sales of single-cup coffee brewers are recognized net of an estimated allowance for returns. Royalty revenue is recognized upon shipment of K-Cups by roasters as set forth under the terms and conditions of various licensing agreements. In addition, the Company’s customers can earn certain incentives, which are netted against sales in the consolidated income statements. These incentives include, but are not limited to, cash discounts, funds for promotional and marketing activities, and performance based incentive programs. Warranty We provide for the estimated cost of product warranties, primarily using historical information and repair or replacement costs, at the time product revenue is recognized. Cost of Sales The Company records external shipping and handling expenses in cost of sales. Income taxes The Company utilizes the asset and liability method of accounting for income taxes, as set forth in Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 109, “Accounting for Income Taxes” (“SFAS 109”). SFAS 109 requires the recognition of deferred tax assets and liabilities for the expected future tax consequences of temporary differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities, and their respective tax bases. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates in effect for the year in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. In July, 2006, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) issued Interpretation No. 48, “Accounting for Uncertainty in Income Taxes, an interpretation of FASB Statement 109” (“FIN 48”). This statement clarifies the criteria that an individual tax position must satisfy for some or all of the benefits of that position to be recognized in a company’s financial statements. FIN 48 prescribes a recognition threshold of more-likely-than-not, and a measurement attribute for all tax positions taken or expected to be taken on a tax return in order for those tax positions to be recognized in the financial statements. The Company adopted the provisions of FIN 48 in its first quarter of fiscal 2008. 31
  • 33. Stock-based compensation The Company accounts for transactions in which it exchanges its equity instruments for goods or services in accordance with Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 123 (revised 2004) Share-Based Payments (“FAS123(R)”). FAS123(R) requires us to measure the cost of employee services received in exchange for an award of equity instruments (usually stock options) based on the grant-date fair value of the award. That cost is recognized over the period during which an employee is required to provide service in exchange for the award. The Company measures the fair value of stock options using the Black-Scholes model and certain assumptions, including the expected life of the stock options, an expected forfeiture rate and the expected volatility of its common stock. The expected life of options is estimated based on options vesting periods, contractual lives and an analysis of the Company’s historical experience. The expected forfeiture rate is based on the Company’s historical experience. The Company uses a blended historical volatility to estimate expected volatility at the measurement date. Research & Development Research and development expenses are charged to income as incurred. These costs primarily consist of salary and consulting expenses and are recorded in selling and operating expenses in the Keurig segment of the Company. Recent Accounting Pronouncements In December 2007, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued SFAS No. 141 (Revised 2007), “Business Combinations” (SFAS 141R). This Statement retains the fundamental requirements in Statement 141 that the acquisition method of accounting (which Statement 141 called the purchase method) be used for all business combinations and for an acquirer to be identified for each business combination. SFAS 141R requires an acquirer to recognize the assets acquired, the liabilities assumed, and any noncontrolling interest in the acquiree at the acquisition date, measured at their fair values as of that date, with limited exceptions specified in the Statement. That replaces Statement 141’s cost-allocation process, which required the cost of an acquisition to be allocated to the individual assets acquired and liabilities assumed based on their estimated fair values. The Statement retains the guidance in Statement 141 for identifying and recognizing intangible assets separately from goodwill. SFAS 141R will now require acquisition costs to be expensed as incurred, restructuring costs associated with a business combination must generally be expensed prior to the acquisition date and changes in deferred tax asset valuation allowances and income tax uncertainties after the acquisition date generally will affect income tax expense. Statement 141 applies prospectively to business combinations for which the acquisition date is on or after the beginning of the first annual reporting period beginning on or after December 15, 2008, which is fiscal year 2010 for the Company. We are not able to predict the impact this guidance will have on the accounting for acquisitions we may complete in future periods. For acquisitions completed prior to September 27, 2009, the new standard requires that changes in deferred tax asset valuation allowances and acquired income tax uncertainties after the measurement period must be recognized in earnings rather than as an adjustment to the cost of the acquisition. We do not expect this new guidance to have a significant impact on our consolidated financial statements. In February 2008, the FASB issued FASB Staff Position No. FAS 157-2 (“FSP 157-2”). FSP 157-2 delays the implementation of Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 157, “Fair Value Measurements” (“SFAS 157”) for nonfinancial assets and nonfinancial liabilities, except for items that are recognized or disclosed at fair value in the financial statements on a recurring basis. This statement defers the effective date to fiscal years beginning after November 15, 2008 and interim periods within those fiscal years, which is fiscal year 2010 for the Company. The Company adopted SFAS 157 for financial assets and liabilities for the first quarter of fiscal 2009. The Company is currently reviewing FSP 157-2 but does not expect it to have a material impact on its financial statements. In December 2007, the FASB issued SFAS 160, “Noncontrolling Interests in Consolidated Financial Statements – An amendment of ARB No. 51”. SFAS 160 amends ARB 51 to establish accounting and 32
  • 34. reporting standards for the noncontrolling interest in a subsidiary and for the deconsolidation of a subsidiary. It clarifies that a noncontrolling interest in a subsidiary is an ownership interest in the consolidated entity that should be reported as equity in the consolidated financial statements. The amount of net income attributable to the noncontrolling interest will be included in consolidated net income on the face of the income statement. Statement 160 clarifies that changes in a parent’s ownership interest in a subsidiary that do not result in deconsolidation are equity transactions if the parent retains its controlling financial interest. In addition, this Statement requires that a parent recognize a gain or loss in net income when a subsidiary is deconsolidated. SFAS 160 is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning on or after December 15, 2008, which is fiscal 2010 for this Company. The effect of adoption on the Company’s financial statements will depend primarily on the materiality of non-controlling interests arising in future transactions. Factors Affecting Quarterly Performance Historically, the Company has experienced variations in sales and earnings from quarter to quarter due to the holiday season and a variety of other factors, including, but not limited to, general economic trends, the cost of green coffee, competition, marketing programs, weather and special or unusual events. Because of the seasonality our business, results for any quarter are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be achieved for the full fiscal year. Forward-Looking Statements Certain statements contained herein are not based on historical fact and are “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the applicable securities laws and regulations. Owing to the uncertainties inherent in forward-looking statements, actual results could differ materially from those stated here. Factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those in the forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, the impact on sales and profitability of consumer sentiment in this difficult economic environment, the Company’s success in efficiently expanding operations and capacity to meet growth, the Company’s success in efficiently and effectively integrating Tully’s wholesale operations and capacity into its Specialty Coffee business unit, the ability of our lenders to honor their commitments under our credit facility, competition and other business conditions in the coffee industry and food industry in general, fluctuations in availability and cost of high-quality green coffee, any other increases in costs including fuel, Keurig’s ability to continue to grow and build profits with its roaster partners in the office and at home businesses, the impact of the loss of major customers for the Company or reduction in the volume of purchases by major customers, delays in the timing of adding new locations with existing customers, the Company’s level of success in continuing to attract new customers, sales mix variances, weather and special or unusual events, as well as other risks described more fully in the Company’s filings with the SEC. Forward-looking statements reflect management’s analysis as of the date of this press release. The Company does not undertake to revise these statements to reflect subsequent developments, other than in its regular, quarterly earnings releases. Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk Market risks relating to our operations result primarily from changes in interest rates and the commodity “c” price of coffee (the price per pound quoted by the Coffee, Sugar and Cocoa Exchange). To address these risks, we enter into hedging transactions as described below. We do not use financial instruments for trading purposes. For purposes of specific risk analysis, we use sensitivity analysis to determine the impacts that market risk exposures may have on our financial position or earnings. 33
  • 35. Interest rate risks The table below provides information about our debt obligations that are sensitive to changes in interest rates. The table presents principal cash flows and related weighted average interest rates by expected maturity dates. Expected maturity date 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Total Long-term debt: Variable rate (in thousands) $ — $ — $ — $ — $ 42, 80 $ 42, 80Average interest rate — — — — 1.6 % 1.6 % Fixed rate (in thousands) $ 49 $ 86 $ 67 $ 41 $ 75, 70 $ 75, 94Average interest rate 7.2 % 7.8 % 10.9 % 10.9 % 4.8 % 4.8 % At March 28, 2009, we had $118.7 million outstanding under our Credit Facility subject to variable interest rates. However, the interest rate on $75.7 million of this debt was fixed through interest rate swap agreements, as discussed further below. Therefore, $43.0 million outstanding under our Credit Facility remains subject to variable interest rates. Should interest rates (LIBOR and Prime rates) increase by 100 basis points, we would incur additional interest expense of $430,000 annually. At September 27, 2008 we had $45.0 million subject to variable interest rates. On March 28, 2009, the effect of our interest rate swap agreements was to limit the interest rate exposure on the outstanding balance of the Credit Facility to a fixed rate versus the 30-day Libor rate as follows: 5.4% on $25.7 million; 2.4% on $30 million; and 3.9% on $20 million. The total notional amount covered by these swaps will decrease progressively in future periods and terminates on various dates from June 2010 through December 2012. Commodity price risks The “c” price of coffee is subject to substantial price fluctuations caused by multiple factors, including weather and political and economic conditions in coffee-producing countries. Our gross profit margins can be significantly impacted by changes in the “c” price of coffee. We enter into fixed coffee purchase commitments in an attempt to secure an adequate supply of coffee. These agreements are tied to specific market prices (defined by both the origin of the coffee and the time of delivery) but we have significant flexibility in selecting the date of the market price to be used in each contract. We generally fix the price of our coffee contracts three to nine months prior to delivery, so that we can adjust our sales prices to the market. At March 28, 2009, the Company had approximately $50.0 million in green coffee purchase commitments, of which approximately 61% had a fixed price. At September 27, 2008, the Company had approximately $73.2 million in green coffee purchase commitments, of which approximately 59% had a fixed price. In addition, we regularly use commodity-based financial instruments to hedge price-to-be-established coffee purchase commitments with the objective of minimizing cost risk due to market fluctuations. These hedges generally qualify as cash flow hedges. Gains and losses are deferred in other comprehensive income until the hedged inventory sale is recognized in earnings, at which point they are added to cost of sales. At March 28, 2009 we held outstanding futures contracts covering 1,500,000 pounds of coffee with a fair market value of ($24,000), gross of tax. At September 27, 2008, we held outstanding futures contracts covering 1,162,500 pounds of coffee with a fair market value of $(39,000), gross of tax. If we had terminated these contracts on March 27, 2009, we estimate that we would have incurred a loss of $24,000, gross of tax, which represented the fair market value on such date. The average contract price used to calculate the fair value of the contracts outstanding was $1.22 per pound as compared to the weighted average “c” price of $1.21 at March 28, 2009. If the “c” price were to drop on average by 10%, the loss incurred in fiscal 2009 will be approximately $180,000, gross of tax. However, this loss, if realized, would be offset by lower costs of coffee purchased during fiscal 2010. 34
  • 36. Item 4. Controls and Procedures As of March 28, 2009, the Company’s management with the participation of its Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer conducted an evaluation of the effectiveness of the design and operation of the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures pursuant to Rule 13a-15 and 15d-15 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the “Exchange Act”). Based on that evaluation, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded that the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rule 13a-15 of the Exchange Act) are effective. Part II. Other Information Item 1A. Risk Factors. There have been no material changes from the risk factors disclosed in our fiscal 2008 Form 10-K. Item 4. Submission of Matters to a Vote of Security Holders (a) The Registrant held its 2009 Annual Meeting of Stockholders on March 12, 2009 at the Company’s offices located at 81 Demerrit Place in Waterbury, Vermont. The Board of Directors of the Registrant solicited proxies for this meeting pursuant to a proxy statement filed under regulation 14A. (b-c) At the Annual Meeting the stockholders voted as follows on the following matters: VOTES Proposal 1 – Election of Directors Nominee For Withh eld William D. Davis (Class I) 21,985, 716 602,2 47Jules A. del Vecchio (Class I) 21,887, 469 700,4 94Robert P. Stiller (Class I) 21,885, 080 702,8 83 The term of office of the following directors continued after the Meeting: Lawrence J. Blanford, Barbara D. Carlini, Hinda Miller, David E. Moran and Michael J. Mardy. Proposal 2 – To ratify the appointment of PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP as our independent public accounting firm for 2009. For Against Abstain 22,306,082 250,728 31,153 35
  • 37. Item 6. Ex hibits (a) Exhibits: 1 0 Offer Letter between Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. and Howard Malovany dated as of January 8, 2009. * 1 0 . Offer Letter between Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. and Michelle Stacy dated as of September 23, 2008 and revised as March 16, 2009. * 1 0 . Letter Amendment between Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. and R. Scott McCreary dated as December 29, 2008, to comply with Section 409(A) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1984, as amended. * 1 0 . Letter Amendment between Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. and Kathy Brooks dated December 29, 2008, to comply with Section 409(A) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1984, as amended. * 1 0 . Letter Amendment between Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. and Steve Sabol dated December 30, 2008, to comply with Section 409(A) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1984, as amended. * 1 0 . Employment Agreement between Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. and Frances Rathke dated October 31, 2003 and amended as of May 7, 2009, to comply with Section 409(A) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1984, as amended. * 3 1 . Principal Executive Officer Certification Pursuant to Securities Exchange Act Rules 13a-14 and 15d-14 as Adopted Pursuant to the Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. 3 1 . Principal Financial Officer Certification Pursuant to Securities Exchange Act Rules 13a-14 and 15d-14 as Adopted Pursuant to the Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. 3 2 . Principal Executive Officer Certification Pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350 as Adopted Pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. 3 2 . Principal Financial Officer Certification Pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350 as Adopted Pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. * Management contract or compensatory plan. 36
  • 38. SIGNATURES Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized. GREEN MOUNTAIN COFFEE ROASTERS, INC. Date: 05/07/2009 B y: /s/ Lawrence J. Blanford Lawrence J. Blanford, President and Chief Executive Officer Date: 05/07/2009 B y /s/ Frances G. Rathke Frances G. Rathke, Chief Financial Officer 37
  • 39. Exhibit 10.1 January 8, 2009 Howard Malovany 1771 Princeton Court Lake Forest, Illinois 60045 Dear Howard, It is my pleasure to extend this offer to you for the position of Vice President, General Counsel, located in Waterbury, Vermont. In this capacity, you will report directly to me and be part of our Enterprise Leadership Team. We anticipate your first day of employment to be on February 9, 2009. Your compensation is comprised of an annual base salary of $310,000, paid in bi-weekly increments. You will also be entitled to participate in the Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. Senior Executive Officer Short-Term Incentive Plan (the “STIP”). Your target bonus for FY09 will equal 50% of your base salary. Your target bonus for subsequent years will be determined annually by a subcommittee of outside members of Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc.’s board of directors. Your annual performance metrics under the STIP will be mutually agreed upon and will be based on specific financial and individual targets, determined in accordance with the terms of the STIP. You will be eligible to participate in the STIP on a pro-rata basis for FY09. Bonuses under the STIP shall be subject to and payable in accordance with the terms set forth in the STIP. Additionally, you will be eligible to participate in the Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. 2006 Incentive Plan, as amended (the “2006 Plan”) with a target of 80% of your base salary. Awards under this plan are paid out in a combination of equity (stock options and/or restricted stock) and/or cash. You will be eligible to participate in the 2006 Plan for FY10 subject to the 2006 Plan’s terms and limitations. Plan documents for both the STIP and 2006 Plan have been sent to you under separate cover. As an inducement to your accepting this position, and subject only to approval by the Board of Directors (the “Board”), on or promptly following your first day of employment, you will be granted an option to purchase 35,000 shares of Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. common stock at the market value as of the close of business on the date of grant (the “Inducement Option”). The Inducement Option is a non-qualified option and will vest ratably over 4 years at 25% a year. The Inducement Option, and any other options or other equity that you may receive during your employment shall be subject to any applicable stock option plan, option certificate and shareholder and/or option holder agreements and other restrictions and limitations generally applicable to equity held by our executives or otherwise required by law. You will only be eligible to receive stock options or other equity, as expressly provided in this letter or as otherwise expressly authorized by the Board. Prior to issuing the Inducement Option or any other equity to you, we may require that you provide reasonable representations regarding your sophistication, investment intent and other such matters.
  • 40. You are also eligible for a one time sign-on bonus of $25,000 (gross) to be paid to you in the first payroll of your employment. Should you leave the company, voluntarily, within six months of your date of hire, you must reimburse the sign on bonus to GMCR on a prorated basis. GMCR will reimburse you for the reasonable and customary moving expenses incurred in moving your household to Vermont, including lease breakage costs and temporary housing in an amount not to exceed $75,000 (substantiated with receipts). You will be eligible to participate in all benefit programs offered to our executives generally from time to time in accordance with plan terms. Our benefits offerings currently include health, dental, vision and life insurance, a flexible spending plan, 401(k) and an Employee Stock Purchase Plan. You will be eligible for medical benefits the first of the month following 30 days of employment. Kathy Brooks would be happy to answer any additional questions you might have regarding your benefits. A full benefits information packet will be sent under separate cover. Subject only to Board approval, you will also be designated a Participant in the Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. 2008 Change-In-Control Severance Benefit Plan (the “CIC Plan”). The CIC Plan provides certain severance benefits in connection with a qualifying termination during the three months preceding and the twelve months following a change in control as defined in the CIC Plan (a “Change in Control Period”). A copy of the CIC Plan is enclosed. While we look forward to a mutually beneficial employment relationship, either you or we may end your employment at any time upon notice to the other. If we terminate your employment outside of a Change in Control Period for any reason other than gross misconduct, you will be eligible to receive the “Severance Benefits,” as defined below. For purposes of this letter agreement, “Severance Benefits” means the following: (A) twelve (12) months of base salary continuation as severance; (B) continued contributions by the Company to the premium cost of your participation in the Company’s group medical and dental plans under the federal law known as “COBRA” at the same rate the Company was contributing to the premium cost of such coverage immediately prior to your termination, subject to your timely election to continue such participation for yourself and your eligible dependents and to your payment of any employee contribution to the premium cost of such participation applicable to you immediately prior to termination by withholding from your severance payments, until the earlier of 12 months from the termination of your employment and the date you become eligible for coverage under the medical and/or dental plan of another employer; and (C) a pro-rata portion of the bonus you would have earned under the STIP, if any, for the fiscal year in which termination occurs calculated by multiplying the bonus you would have received had your employment continued until the end of such fiscal year by a fraction, the numerator of which is the number of calendar days from the first day of the fiscal year (or the first day of the applicable portion of such year) through the date of termination and the denominator of which is the number of calendar days in the fiscal year (or applicable portion of such year), which shall be paid at the time bonuses for the fiscal year in which the termination occurs are paid to other STIP participants generally, provided that any payment under this clause (C) shall be subject to and payable in accordance with the terms set forth in the STIP. 2
  • 41. To receive the Severance Benefits, you will be required to sign and return to us a general release of claims in a form we will provide within 5 business days following such termination of employment (the “Release”). The Company will provide you with a period to sign the Release that is at least as long as the time period required by law to render it fully effective, but that period shall not exceed forty-five (45) days. You must deliver the Release to us within 2 business days after you sign it. Your salary continuation will begin on the next regular pay date that is up to seven (7) days later than the expiration of any period of revocation that we must provide you to render the Release fully effective, provided that you do not revoke it, and provided that your salary continuation shall begin no later than fourteen (14) business days following your delivery of the Release to the Company. The first payment will be retroactive to the date of termination. To qualify as an “involuntary separation” a termination by the Company of your employment must constitute an involuntary “separation from service” (as defined at Section 1.409A-1(h) of the Treasury Regulations) from the Company and from all other corporations and trades or businesses, if any, that would be treated as a single “service recipient” with the Company under Section 1.409A-1(h)(3) of the Treasury Regulations. If at the time of your separation from service you are a specified employee as hereinafter defined, any and all amounts payable in connection with such separation from service that constitute deferred compensation subject to Section 409A of the Code, as determined by the Company in its sole discretion, and that would (but for this sentence) be payable within six months following such separation from service, shall instead be paid on the date that follows the date of such separation from service by six (6) months. For purposes of the preceding sentence, the term “specified employee” means an individual who is determined by the Company to be a specified employee as defined in subsection (a)(2)(B)(i) of Section 409A of the Code. This offer and your right to accept it are expressly conditioned upon your compliance with the requirements of the Immigration and Reform and Control Act of 1986, your successful completion of the pre-employment physical. All payments made to you pursuant to this letter will be payable in accordance with our general payroll practices and subject to all applicable withholdings and deductions. Howard, I look forward to working with you and am very pleased that you will be joining the Green Mountain Coffee Roasters team. I am confident that with your leadership we can be even more successful. If you have any questions, please contact Kathy Brooks at 802-882-2101. Sincerely, /s/ Larry Blanford Larry Blanford Chief Executive Officer 3
  • 42. Exhibit 10.2 September 23, 2008 (Revised 3/16/09) Michelle Stacy 10 LongMeadow Drive Ipswich, MA 01938 Dear Michelle, It is my pleasure to extend this offer to you for the position of President of Keurig, Inc. (together with its parent Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc., the “Company”), located in Reading, MA. In this capacity, you will report directly to me and be part of our Enterprise Leadership Team. We anticipate your first day of employment to be on November 3, 2008. We acknowledge that you will require three days between November 10, 2008 and January 1, 2009 to fulfill previous commitments. Your compensation is comprised of an annual base salary of $335,000, paid in bi-weekly increments. You will also be entitled to participate in the Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. Senior Executive Officer Short-Term Incentive Plan (the “STIP”). Your target bonus for FY09 will equal 50% of your base salary. Your target bonus for subsequent years will be determined annually by a subcommittee of outside members of Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc.’s board of directors. Your annual performance metrics under the STIP will be mutually agreed upon and will be based on specific financial and individual targets, determined in accordance with the terms of the STIP. You will be eligible to participate in the STIP on a pro-rata basis for FY09. Bonuses under the STIP shall be subject to and payable in accordance with the terms set forth in the STIP. Additionally, you will be eligible to participate in the Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. 2006 Incentive Plan, as amended (the “2006 Plan”) with a target of 80% of your base salary. Awards under this plan are paid out in a combination of equity (stock options and/or restricted stock) and/or cash. You will be eligible to participate in the 2006 Plan for FY09 on a pro-rata basis subject to the 2006 Plan’s terms and limitations. Plan documents for both the STIP and 2006 Plan have been sent to you under separate cover. As an inducement to your accepting this position, and subject only to approval by the Board of Directors (the “Board”), on or promptly following your first day of employment, you will be granted an option to purchase 35,000 shares of Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. common stock at the market value as of the close of business on the date of grant (the “Inducement Option”). The Inducement Option is a non-qualified option and will vest ratably over 4 years at 25% a year. The Inducement Option, and any other options or other equity that you may receive during your employment shall be subject to any applicable stock option plan, option certificate and shareholder and/or option holder agreements and other restrictions and limitations generally applicable to equity held by our executives or otherwise required by law. You will only be eligible to receive stock options or other equity, as expressly provided in this letter or as otherwise
  • 43. expressly authorized by the Board. Prior to issuing the Inducement Option or any other equity to you, we may require that you provide reasonable representations regarding the your sophistication, investment intent and other such matters. You will be eligible to participate in all benefit programs offered to our executives generally from time to time in accordance with plan terms. Our benefits offerings currently include health, dental, vision and life insurance, a flexible spending plan, 401(k) and an Employee Stock Purchase Plan. You will be eligible for medical benefits the first of the month following 30 days of employment. You will immediately be eligible for four weeks vacation. Kathy Brooks would be happy to answer any additional questions you might have regarding your benefits. A full benefits information packet will be sent under separate cover. Subject only to Board approval, you will also be designated a Participant in the Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. 2008 Change-In-Control Severance Benefit Plan (the “CIC Plan”). The CIC Plan provides certain severance benefits in connection with a qualifying termination during the three months preceding and the twelve months following a change in control as defined in the CIC Plan (a “Change in Control Period”). A copy of the CIC Plan is enclosed. While we look forward to a long and mutually beneficial employment relationship, either you or we may end your employment at any time upon notice to the other. If we terminate your employment outside of a Change in Control Period for any reason other than gross misconduct, you will be eligible to receive the “Severance Benefits,” as defined below. In addition, if you terminate your employment for Good Reason, as defined below, outside of a Change in Control Period, you will be eligible to receive the Severance Benefits, provided (A) you give notice to the Company within ninety (90) days of the initial occurrence of the event or condition constituting Good Reason, setting forth in reasonable detail the nature of such Good Reason; (B) the Company fails to cure within thirty (30) days following such notice; and (C) you terminate your employment within thirty days following the end of the 30- day cure period (if the Company fails to cure). For purposes of this letter agreement, “Severance Benefits” means the following: (A) twelve (12) months of base salary continuation as severance; (B) payment by the Company of up to a total of Ten Thousand Dollars ($10,000) toward the cost of outplacement services actually provided by an outplacement firm selected by the Company not later than December 31 of the second calendar year following the year in which such termination occurs, such payment to be made directly to the outplacement firm following receipt of its invoice but in no event later than December 31 of the third calendar year following the year in which termination occurs; (C) continued contributions by the Company to the premium cost of your participation in the Company’s group medical and dental plans under the federal law known as “COBRA” at the same rate the Company was contributing to the premium cost of such coverage immediately prior to your termination, subject to your timely election to continue such participation for yourself and your eligible dependents and to your payment of any employee contribution 2
  • 44. to the premium cost of such participation applicable to you immediately prior to termination by withholding from your severance payments, until the earlier of 12 months from the termination of your employment and the date you become eligible for coverage under the medical and/or dental plan of another employer; and (D) an additional amount determined as follows: (i) in the event that you are eligible for a “162(m) Bonus” (as defined below) for the fiscal year in which the termination occurs, the Company shall pay you a prorata portion of the bonus you would have earned under the STIP, if any, for the fiscal year in which termination occurs, calculated by multiplying the bonus you would have received had your employment continued until the end of such fiscal year by a fraction, the numerator of which is the number of calendar days from the first day of the fiscal year (or the first day of the applicable portion of such year) through the date of termination and the denominator of which is the number of calendar days in the fiscal year (or applicable portion of such year), which shall be paid at the time bonuses for the fiscal year in which the termination occurs are paid to other STIP participants generally, provided that any payment under this clause (D)(i) shall be subject to and payable in accordance with the terms set forth in the STIP; or, (ii) in the event that you are eligible for a bonus that is not a 162(m) Bonus for the fiscal year in which termination occurs, the Company shall pay to you the greater of (x) the amount described in (D)(i) of this sentence or (y) a pro rata portion of your target incentive bonus for the fiscal year during which your employment is terminated, calculated by multiplying your target incentive bonus for the fiscal year by a fraction, the numerator of which is the number of calendar days from the first day of the fiscal year (or the first day of the applicable portion of such year) through the date of termination and the denominator of which is the number of calendar days in the fiscal year (or applicable portion of such year). As used herein, “162(m) Bonus” for any fiscal year or performance period shall mean the bonus, if any, intended to qualify for the performance-based compensation exemption under Section 162(m) of the Internal Revenue Code, based on actual performance for such year but without regard to any discretionary reduction in the bonus amount as so determined. For purposes of this letter agreement, “Good Reason” means (i) failure of the Company to continue you in the position of President of Keurig, Inc., unless you consent to such removal; (ii) material diminution in the nature or scope of your responsibilities, duties, or authority; (iii) material failure of the Company to provide you with the base salary and benefits in accordance with the terms of this letter agreement; or (iv) relocation of your office more than fifty (50) miles from the then-current location of Keurig, Inc.’s principal offices without your consent. To receive the Severance Benefits, you will be required to sign and return to us a general release of claims in a form we will provide within 5 business days following such termination of employment (the “Release”). The Company will provide you with a period to sign the Release that is at least as long as the time period required by law to render it fully effective, but that period shall not exceed forty-five (45) days. You must deliver the Release to us within 2 business days after you sign it. Your salary continuation will begin on the next regular pay date that is up to seven (7) days later than 3
  • 45. the expiration of any period of revocation that we must provide you to render the Release fully effective, provided that you do not revoke it, and provided that your salary continuation shall begin no later than fourteen (14) business days following your delivery of the Release to the Company. The first payment will be retroactive to the date of termination. To qualify as an “involuntary separation” a termination by the Company of your employment must constitute an involuntary “separation from service” (as defined at Section 1.409A-1(h) of the Treasury Regulations) from the Company and from all other corporations and trades or businesses, if any, that would be treated as a single “service recipient” with the Company under Section 1.409A-1(h)(3) of the Treasury Regulations. If at the time of your separation from service you are a specified employee as hereinafter defined, any and all amounts payable in connection with such separation from service that constitute deferred compensation subject to Section 409A of the Code, as determined by the Company in its sole discretion, and that would (but for this sentence) be payable within six months following such separation from service, shall instead be paid on the date that follows the date of such separation from service by six (6) months. For purposes of the preceding sentence, the term “specified employee” means an individual who is determined by the Company to be a specified employee as defined in subsection (a)(2)(B)(i) of Section 409A of the Code. This offer and your right to accept it are expressly conditioned upon your compliance with the requirements of the Immigration and Reform and Control Act of 1986, your successful completion of the pre-employment physical, and your execution of the enclosed Keurig Incorporated Confidentiality Agreement. All payments made to you pursuant to this letter will be payable in accordance with our general payroll practices and subject to all applicable withholdings and deductions. Michelle, I look forward to working with you and am very pleased that you will be joining the Keurig/Green Mountain Coffee Roasters team. I am confident that with your leadership we can be even more successful. If you have any questions, please contact Kathy Brooks at 802-882-2101. Sincerely, /s/ Larry Blanford Larry Blanford Chief Executive Officer 4
  • 46. Exhibit 10.3 LETTER AMENDMENT December 29, 2008 Scott McCreary Dear Mr. McCreary, This letter agreement (the “Amendment”) supplements and amends the offer letter (the “Letter”), dated as of September 10, 2004, that you received from Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. (the “Company”), to clarify its terms in conformity to the requirements of, or if applicable the requirements for exemption from, Section 409A of the Internal Revenue code of 1986, as amended. Except as modified by this Amendment, the Letter shall remain in full force and effect. By signing this Amendment, you agree and acknowledge that: 1 . The intent of the parities is to clarify the meaning of certain provisions of the Letter so that payments and benefits provided for in the Letter will comply with or be exempt from Section 409A of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, and the regulations and guidance promulgated thereunder (collectively “Section 409A”). The Letter shall be interpreted in a manner that is consistent with that intent. In no event, however, shall the Company be liable for any tax, interest or penalty that my be imposed on you by Section 4069A. All reimbursements payable to you, or in-kind benefits, if any, provided to you by the Company shall be governed by the Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. 409A Reimbursement Policy. Where the Letter provides for payments to you upon the termination of your employment, those provisions shall be subject to the following terms of construction and the following Section 409A-related conditions: 3.1. Any entitlement to severance (12 months of salary continuation) shall require an involuntary “separation from service” by the Company, subject to the exception for cause contained in the Letter. For this purpose, separation from service means a “separation from service” (as that term is defined at Section 1.409A-1(h) of the Treasury Regulations under Section 409A) from the Company and from all other trades or businesses that are treated as one employer with the Company under Section 409A’a separation from service rules. 3.2. If at the time of your separation from service you are a specified employee (as that term is defined in subsection (a)(2)(B)(i) of Section 409A), any and all amounts payable in connection with such separation from service that constitute deferred compensation subject to Section
  • 47. 409A, as determined by the Company in its sole discretion, and that would (but for this sentence) be payable within six months following such separation from service, shall instead by paid on the date that follows the date of such separation from service by six (6) months. Sincerely, Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. /s/ Kathryn Brooks A duly authorized signatory ACCEPTED AND AGREED: /s/ Scott McCreary Scott McCreary Date: December 29, 2008 2
  • 48. Exhibit 10.4 LETTER AMENDMENT December 29, 2008 Kathryn S. Brooks Dear Ms. Brooks, This letter agreement (the “Amendment”) supplements and amends the offer letter (the “Letter”), dated as of March 13, 2000, that you received from Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. (the “Company”), to clarify its terms in conformity to the requirements of, or if applicable the requirements for exemption from, Section 409A of the Internal Revenue code of 1986, as amended. Except as modified by this Amendment, the Letter shall remain in full force and effect. By signing this Amendment, you agree and acknowledge that: 1 . The intent of the parities is to clarify the meaning of certain provisions of the Letter so that payments and benefits provided for in the Letter will comply with or be exempt from Section 409A of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, and the regulations and guidance promulgated thereunder (collectively “Section 409A”). The Letter shall be interpreted in a manner that is consistent with that intent. In no event, however, shall the Company be liable for any tax, interest or penalty that my be imposed on you by Section 4069A. All reimbursements payable to you, or in-kind benefits, if any, provided to you by the Company shall be governed by the Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. 409A Reimbursement Policy. Where the Letter provides for payments to you upon the termination of your employment, those provisions shall be subject to the following terms of construction and the following Section 409A-related conditions: 3.1. Any entitlement to severance (12 months of salary continuation) shall require an involuntary “separation from service” by the Company, subject to the exception for cause contained in the Letter. For this purpose, separation from service means a “separation from service” (as that term is defined at Section 1.409A-1(h) of the Treasury Regulations under Section 409A) from the Company and from all other trades or businesses that are treated as one employer with the Company under Section 409A’a separation from service rules. 3.2. If at the time of your separation from service you are a specified employee (as that term is defined in subsection (a)(2)(B)(i) of Section 409A), any and all amounts payable in connection with such separation from service that constitute deferred compensation subject to Section
  • 49. 409A, as determined by the Company in its sole discretion, and that would (but for this sentence) be payable within six months following such separation from service, shall instead by paid on the date that follows the date of such separation from service by six (6) months. Sincerely, Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. /s/ Frances Rathke A duly authorized signatory ACCEPTED AND AGREED: /s/ Kathryn S. Brooks Kathryn S. Brooks Date: December 29, 2008 2
  • 50. Exhibit 10.5 AGREEMENT AMENDMENT December 30, 2008 Stephen J. Sabol Dear Mr. Sabol, This letter agreement (the “Amendment”) supplements and amends the Employment Agreement (the “Agreement”), dated as of July 1, 1993, between you and Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. (the “Company”), to clarify its terms in conformity to the requirements of, or if applicable the requirements for exemption from, Section 409A of the Internal Revenue code of 1986, as amended. Except as modified by this Amendment, the Agreement shall remain in full force and effect. By signing this Amendment, you agree and acknowledge that: 1 . The intent of the parities is to clarify the meaning of certain provisions of the Agreement so that payments and benefits provided for in the Agreement will comply with or be exempt from Section 409A of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, and the regulations and guidance promulgated thereunder (collectively “Section 409A”). The Agreement shall be interpreted in a manner that is consistent with that intent. In no event, however, shall the Company be liable for any tax, interest or penalty that my be imposed on you by Section 4069A. All reimbursements payable to you, or in-kind benefits, if any, provided to you by the Company shall be governed by the Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. 409A Reimbursement Policy. Where the Agreement provides for payments to you upon the termination of your employment, those provisions shall be subject to the following terms of construction and the following Section 409A-related conditions: 3.1. Section 7.2(b) of the Agreement provides, among other things, that the “Non-Compete Period” shall include the six (6) month period following your voluntary resignation, provided that the Company shall continue to pay you your then Base Compensation (as defined the Agreement) during such six-month period. Any right (conditional or otherwise) to payment from the Company arising under Section 7.2(b) of the Agreement shall require a “separation from service” (as that term is defined at Section 1.409A- 1(h) of the Treasury Regulations under Section 409A) from the Company and from all other trades or businesses that are treated as one employer with the Company under Section 409A’a separation from service rules.
  • 51. 3.2. If at the time of your separation from service you are a specified employee (as that term is defined in subsection (a)(2)(B)(i) of Section 409A), any and all amounts payable in connection with such separation from service that constitute deferred compensation subject to Section 409A, as determined by the Company in its sole discretion, and that would (but for this sentence) be payable within six months following such separation from service, shall instead by paid on the date that follows the date of such separation from service by six (6) months. If you have any questions, please contact Kathy Brooks at (802) 882-2101. To signify your acceptance, please return a signed copy of this Amendment to Kathy Brooks no later than December 31, 2008. This document does not affect the intentions of the original agreement. Sincerely, Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. /s/ Kathryn S. Brooks A duly authorized signatory ACCEPTED AND AGREED: /s/ Stephen Sabol Stephen Sabol Date: December 31, 2008 2
  • 52. Exhibit 10.6 EXECUTIVE EMPLOYMENT AGREEMENT THIS EXECUTIVE EMPLOYMENT AGREEMENT (the “Agreement”) is made and delivered as of October 31, 2003, between Frances G. Rathke (the “Executive”) and Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc., a Delaware corporation (the “Company”). PRELIMINARY STATEMENT The Company is a leader in the specialty coffee industry, with a wholesale operation that serves supermarkets, convenience stores, offices and other locations, and operates a direct mail operation and an e-commerce website. The Company desires to employ Executive, and Executive desires to become an employee of the Company, pursuant to the terms of this Agreement. NOW, THEREFORE, in consideration of the foregoing and the mutual promises herein contained, and in order to provide an incentive to Executive to enter into the employ of the Company, the parties hereby agree as follows: ARTICLE I TERM 1.01 Term. The term of this Agreement shall begin on October 31, 2003, and shall continue upon the terms and conditions hereinafter set forth. ARTICLE II SERVICES 2.01 Employment. The Company hereby agrees to employ Executive and Executive hereby agrees to be employed by the Company pursuant to the terms of this Agreement. During working hours, Executive shall devote her full time, attention, knowledge and skills to the business and interests of the Company, as shall be mutually agreed upon by Executive and the Company from time-to-time. 2.02 Reporting. Executive shall report to the Company’s President and Chief Executive Officer (CEO). 2.03 Title. The title of Executive shall be Vice President, Chief Financial Officer, Treasurer and Secretary. 2.04 Duties and Responsibilities. Executive’s duties and responsibilities shall be as set forth in Exhibit A.
  • 53. ARTICLE III COMPENSATION 3.01 Company Base Salary. For all services rendered by Executive pursuant to the terms of this Agreement, Executive shall receive through the Company payroll system the Company Base Salary, which shall mean an annual salary in the dollar amount set forth in Exhibit B . In addition, the Executive shall be entitled to annual or other bonuses starting in fiscal year 2003, commensurate with the bonus program (including “discretionary” bonuses) used to pay other Executive and Senior Leadership members. It is expected that the annual bonuses will be based upon meeting or exceeding performance criteria to be mutually agreed upon by the Executive and the CEO or Board of Directors. 3.02 Periodic Payment. The Company shall pay the Company Base Salary in twenty-six (26) equal bi-weekly payments, less all applicable payroll and other taxes required by law to be withheld. ARTICLE IV FRINGE BENEFITS 4.01 Holidays. Executive shall be entitled to all paid holidays that are annually observed at the Company. 4.02 Other Benefits and Reimbursements. Executive shall also be entitled to participate in (i) group medical, dental, disability and life insurance programs, (ii) retirement plans, (iii) vacation, (iv) expense reimbursement programs, and (v) such other benefit programs as shall be made available to the Company’s senior executives during the term of this Agreement. All reimbursements made by the Company under such plans and programs shall be governed by the Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. 409A Reimbursement Policy. Executive shall be entitled to a minimum of four weeks’ paid vacation per year starting in fiscal year 2004. Any payments of benefits payable to Executive hereunder in respect to any fiscal year during which the Executive is employed by the Company for less than the entire year shall, unless otherwise provided in the applicable plan or arrangement or required by applicable law, be prorated in accordance with the number of days in such calendar year during which Executive is employed. 4.03 Stock Options. The Executive shall be granted stock options as set forth in Exhibit B. ARTICLE V INDEMNIFICATION AND INSURANCE 5.01 Bylaw Indemnification. The Company shall indemnify Executive against all liabilities incurred by Executive resulting from Executive’s performance of this Agreement, all pursuant to and only to the extent provided in Article VI of the Company’s By-laws. 2
  • 54. 5.02 D&O Insurance. The Company, at its expense, may, in addition, provide director and officer liability insurance covering Executive, among others. ARTICLE VI TERMINATION 6.01 Death. Executive’s employment shall terminate upon her death. 6.02 Company Termination. The Company may terminate Executive’s employment hereunder: (a) For Cause. The Company shall be deemed to have cause to terminate Executive’s employment hereunder upon Executive’s: (i) failure to perform and discharge, faithfully, diligently, and to the best of her abilities, the duties and responsibilities set forth herein and on Exhibit A and such other duties and responsibilities as may be assigned to her from time to time, or (ii) conduct that violates a material policy or procedure applicable to or adopted by the Company, or (iii) dishonest or unethical conduct which is injurious to the Company, monetarily or otherwise, or (iv) willful misconduct or gross negligence that is injurious to the Company, monetarily or otherwise, or (v) conviction of a misdemeanor involving moral turpitude or of a felony under the laws of the United States or any state or political subdivision thereof, or (vi) continued unauthorized absence from work, or (vii) material breach of any of the provisions of this Agreement if such breach is not cured within thirty (30) days after written notice thereof is delivered to Executive by the CEO. The decision to discharge Executive “for cause” shall be made by the CEO and Board of Directors. (b) Without Cause. The Company may terminate Executive’s employment without cause upon ten (10) business days advance notice to Executive. 6.03 Executive Termination. Executive may terminate Executive’s employment without cause upon ten (10) business days advance notice to the Company. 6.04 Change of Control. Executive may terminate her employment hereunder within the first year following a Change of Control for Good Reason (as such terms are defined herein), upon ninety (90) days’ notice, or such shorter period as the Company may approve or require, by delivering a Notice of Termination to the Company pursuant to Section 6.05 hereof. In the event of any such termination, Executive shall continue to render services throughout said ninety (90) day period or such shorter period as the Company approves or requires, if requested by the Company. Regardless of whether the Company requests that Executive render services to the Company during such period, Executive shall be entitled to continue to receive the Company Base Salary during such period. As used herein, a “Change of Control” shall mean the occurrence of any one or more of the following events: i. (i) A sale, transfer or other conveyance by the Company of all or substantially all of its assets whereby any person is or becomes Beneficial Owner , directly or 3
  • 55. indirectly, of securities of the Company representing 35% or more of the combined voting power of the Company’s then outstanding securities (except if such Beneficial Owner is Mr. Robert P. Stiller or his affiliates, directly or indirectly), ii. (ii) a merger or consolidation by or with the Company in which the Company is not the surviving corporation following such merger or consolidation other than (A) a merger or consolidation which would result in the voting securities of the Company outstanding immediately prior thereto continuing to represent (either by remaining outstanding or being converted into voting securities of the surviving entity) 60% or more of the combined voting power of the voting securities of the Company or such surviving entity outstanding immediately after such merger or consolidation, or (B) a merger or consolidation affected to implement a recapitalization of the Company (or similar transaction) in which Mr. Robert P. Stiller or his affiliates, directly or indirectly, continues to beneficially own at least 10% or more of the combined voting power of the Company’s then outstanding securities, iii. (iii) the implementation of any plan or proposal for the liquidation or dissolution or other winding up of the Company, or iv. (iv) Mr. Robert P. Stiller or his affiliates, directly or indirectly, fails to continue to beneficially own securities of the Company representing 10% or more of the combined voting power of the Company’s then outstanding securities. As used herein, “Good Reason” shall mean (i) failure of the Company to continue the Executive in the position the Executive had prior to the date of Change of Control, (ii) diminution in the nature or scope of the Executive’s responsibilities, duties or authority existing prior to the date of the Change of Control, or (iii) failure of the Company to provide the Executive with the base salary, bonus, and benefits and perquisites in accordance with the terms of this Agreement, as in effect immediately prior to the Change of Control. 6.05 Notice of Termination. Any termination of employment, by the Company or Executive, except termination pursuant to Section 6.01, shall be communicated by delivery of a written notice of termination to the other party (a “Notice of Termination”). 6.06 Date of Termination. For purposes of this Agreement, the date of termination (the “Date of Termination”) is defined as (i) the date of death if the employment is terminated by death; or (ii) if employment is terminated pursuant to Section 6.02, 6.03 or 6.04 hereof, the date specified in the Notice of Termination. 6.07 Consequences of Termination. (a) Death. If Executive’s employment terminates pursuant to Section 6.01 hereof, the Company shall pay to Executive’s executor, administrator or other legal representative (i) the portion of the Company Base Salary earned but unpaid prior to the Date of Termination, (ii) the Executive’s accrued vacation through the date of termination, (iii) any business expenses incurred by the Executive but un-reimbursed as of the date of termination, provided that such expenses and required substantiation and documentation are known to the Company and that such expenses are 4
  • 56. reimbursable under Company policy (all of the foregoing, “Accrued Obligations”). Accrued obligations shall be paid no later than sixty (60) days after termination. Additionally, if Executive’s employment terminates pursuant to Section 6.01 hereof, the Company shall pay to Executive’s executor, administrator or other legal representative any target incentive bonus owed to Executive for a fiscal year or other performance period preceding that in which the termination occurs, but unpaid as of the date of termination. The Company shall have no further obligation to Executive’s executor, administrator or legal representative under this Agreement or on account of, or arising out of, the termination of Executive’s employment, except to the extent provided under the terms of any benefit plans, and as required by Section 4980B of the Internal Revenue Code (“COBRA”) as it relates to the continuation of coverage under group health plan(s) maintained by the Company. (b) For Cause Termination by the Company. If Executive’s employment terminates pursuant to Section 6.02(a) hereof, the Company shall pay to Executive (i) Accrued Obligations, which shall be paid within sixty (60) days of such termination, and (ii) any target incentive bonus owed to Executive for a fiscal year or other performance period preceding that in which the termination occurs, but unpaid as of the date of termination. The Company shall have no further obligation to Executive and/or Executive’s executor, administrator or other legal representative under this Agreement or on account of, or arising out of, the termination of Executive’s employment, except to the extent provided under the terms of any benefit plans and as required by COBRA. (c) Without Cause Termination by the Company. If Executive’s employment terminates pursuant to Section 6.02(b) hereof, the Company shall pay to Executive (i) Accrued Obligations, which shall be paid within sixty (60) days of such termination, and (ii) any target incentive bonus owed to Executive for a fiscal year or other performance period preceding that in which the termination occurs, but unpaid as of the date of termination, provided that such amount is approved by the Compensation Committee of the Company’s Board of Directors in accordance with the policies and procedures generally applicable to all senior executives, except that the Compensation Committee shall not discretionarily reduce any such bonus payment. The Company shall have no further obligation to Executive and/or Executive’s executor, administrator or other legal representative under this Agreement or on account of, or arising out of, the termination of Executive’s employment, except to the extent provided under the terms of any benefit plans and as required by COBRA. Notwithstanding the foregoing, Executive will receive the following additional benefits upon Executive’s execution of the Release, attached hereto as Exhibit C , which Release shall be signed and effective as of the Date of Termination, (i) the Company shall pay to Executive her Company Base Salary for a period of twelve (12) months from the Date of Termination at the rate then in effect (subject to any employee contribution for the group medical and dental insurance plan applicable to Executive on the Date of Termination), (ii) the Company shall continue Executive’s employee participation in the Company’s group medical and dental insurance plans under COBRA at then existing employee contribution rates, which Executive shall pay, for a period up to twelve (12) months from the Date of Termination, or until the Employee secures other comparable employment, whichever is sooner, (iii) the Company shall provide, or arrange for, up to $10,000.00 in outplacement services, (iv) unless provisions in some other agreement between the Executive and the Company or provisions in the stock option plan under which options held by the Executive as of the Date of Termination were granted are more favorable to the Executive, in which case those 5
  • 57. provisions shall govern, unvested stock options that would have vested in the first six-month period after the Date of Termination shall be accelerated by the Company and become vested as of the Date of Termination, and all vested options as of such date may be exercised by the Executive for up to three months thereafter (unless exercised, such options shall terminate at the end of such three-month period), and all unvested stock options remaining unvested on the Date of Termination shall terminate as of such date, and (v) the Company shall pay to Executive an additional amount determined as follows: (a) in the event that the Executive is eligible for a “162(m) Bonus” (as defined below) for the fiscal year or other performance period in which the termination occurs, the Company shall pay to Executive a pro rata portion of the Executive’s 162(m) Bonus, if any, that would have otherwise been payable to Executive but for the termination (if and as approved by the Compensation Committee of the Company’s Board of Directors in accordance with the policies and procedures generally applicable to all senior executives); (b) in the event that Executive is eligible for a bonus that is not a 162(m) Bonus, the Company shall pay to Executive the next annual cash bonus that would have otherwise been payable to Executive but for the termination (if and as approved by the Compensation Committee of the Company’s Board of Directors in accordance with the policies and procedures generally applicable to all senior executives), which amount shall be no less than Executive’s annual cash bonus in the immediately preceding fiscal year. As used herein, “162(m) Bonus” for any fiscal year or performance period shall mean the bonus, if any, intended to qualify for the performance-based compensation exemption under Section 162(m) of the Internal Revenue Code, based on actual performance for such year but without regard to any discretionary reduction in the bonus amount as so determined. (d) Without Cause Termination by Executive. If Executive’s employment terminates pursuant to Section 6.03 hereof, the Company shall pay to Executive (i) Accrued Obligations, which shall be paid within sixty (60) days of such termination, and (ii) any target incentive bonus owed to Executive for a fiscal year or other performance period preceding that in which the termination occurs, but unpaid as of the date of termination. The Company shall have no further obligation to Executive and/or Executive’s executor, administrator or other legal representative under this Agreement or on account of, or arising out of, the termination of Executive’s employment, except to the extent provided under the terms of any benefit plans and as required by COBRA. (e) Change of Control. If Executive’s employment terminates pursuant to Section 6.04 hereof, the Company shall pay to Executive (i) Accrued Obligations, which shall be paid within sixty (60) days of such termination, and (ii) any target incentive bonus owed to Executive for a period preceding that in which the termination occurs, but unpaid as of the date of termination, provided that such amount is approved by the Compensation Committee of the Company’s Board of Directors in accordance with the policies and procedures generally applicable to all senior executives, except that the Compensation Committee shall not discretionarily reduce any such bonus. The Company shall have no further obligation to Executive and/or Executive’s executor, administrator or other legal representative under this Agreement or on account of, or arising out of, the termination of Executive’s employment, except to the extent provided under the terms of any benefit plans and as required by COBRA. Notwithstanding the foregoing, Executive will receive the following additional benefits upon Executive’s execution of the Release, attached hereto as Exhibit C , which Release shall be signed and effective as of the Date of Termination, (i) the Company shall pay to Executive a single lump sum equal to the greater of: 6
  • 58. (I) the sum of (a) one and a half times (i.e., 18 months) Executive’s annual Base Salary in effect immediately prior to the date of the Change in Control or immediately prior to the date of termination (whichever is greater) and (b) an amount equal to one and a half times the last year’s annual cash bonus paid to the Executive (subject to any employee contribution for the group medical and dental insurance plan applicable to Executive on the Date of Termination), or (II) the sum of (a) Executive’s target incentive bonus, if any, for the fiscal year in which termination occurs, multiplied by a fraction, the numerator of which is the number of days elapsed between the beginning of such year and the date of termination and the denominator of which is 365; and (b) an amount equal to the sum of (x) the Executive’s Base Salary and (y) the greater of (1) the annual average of the annual bonuses or other annual incentive compensation amounts paid in cash to the Executive (or that would have been so paid absent deferral) by the Company in its three most recent fiscal years ended prior to the date of the date of termination or the three most recent fiscal years ended prior to the Change in Control if greater, or (2) the Executive’s target incentive bonus for the fiscal year in which the Change in Control occurs, (ii) the Company shall continue Executive’s employee participation in the Company’s group medical and dental insurance plans under COBRA at then existing employee contribution rates, which Executive shall pay, for a period up to twelve (12) months from the Date of Termination, (iii) the Company shall provide, or arrange for, up to $10,000.00 in outplacement services, (iv) unless provisions in some other agreement between the Executive and the Company or provisions in the stock option plan under which options held by the Executive as of the Date of Termination under a Change of Control were granted are more favorable to the Executive, in which case those provisions shall govern, unvested stock options that would have vested after the Date of Termination shall be accelerated by the Company and become vested immediately prior to the Change of Control and shall continue to be exercisable for six months. In the event that Executive’s employment with the Company is terminated under Section 6.04 of this Agreement and such termination is not preceded by a “change in control event” as defined in Section 1.409A-3(i)(5) of the Treasury Regulations, then (i) the amount of the payment to Executive payable under Section 6.07(e)(i) of this Agreement that would have been paid under Section 6.07(c) of this Agreement if the Executive’s employment had been terminated pursuant to Section 6.02(b) of this Agreement rather than Section 6.04 of this Agreement shall, subject to Section 6.07(f) of this Agreement, be paid in the form and at the time specified in Section 6.07(c) of this Agreement, and (ii) the remaining amount to be paid to the Executive under Section 6.07(e)(i) of this Agreement shall, subject to Section 6.07(f) of this Agreement, be paid in the time and form described in Section 6.07(e)(i) of this Agreement. (f) Termination of Employment and Separation from Service. All references in this Agreement to “termination of employment,” a “termination,” “separation from service,” and similar and correlative terms, that result in the payment or vesting of any amounts or benefits that constitute “nonqualified deferred compensation” within the meaning of Section 409A of the Internal Revenue Code (“Section 409A”) shall be construed to require a Separation from Service, and the date of such termination in any such case shall be construed to mean the date of the Separation 7
  • 59. from Service. “Separation from Service” shall mean a “separation from service” (as that term is defined at Section 1.409A-1(h) of the Treasury Regulations under Section 409A) from the Company and from all other corporations and trades or businesses, if any, that would be treated as a single “service recipient” with the Company under Section 1.409A-1(h)(3) of such Treasury Regulations. Notwithstanding anything to the contrary provided for herein, if, at the time of the Executive’s Separation from Service, the Executive is a “specified employee,” as hereinafter defined, any and all amounts payable under this Agreement in connection with such Separation from Service that constitute deferral of compensation subject to Section 409A, as determined by the Company in its sole discretion, and that would (but for this sentence) be payable within six months following such Separation from Service, shall instead be paid on the earlier of the date that follows the date of such Separation from Service by six (6) months or the date of the Executive’s death. For purposes of the preceding sentence, the term “specified employee” shall mean an individual determined by the Company to be a specified employee as defined in subsection (a)(2)(B)(i) of Section 409A. ARTICLE VII NON-COMPETITION 7.01 Restricted Activities. Executive agrees that some restrictions on her activities during and after her employment are necessary to protect the goodwill, Proprietary Information (as defined in Section 8.02 hereof) and other legitimate interests of the Company, and that the agreed restrictions set forth below will not deprive the Executive of the ability to earn a livelihood: (a) Non-Competition Period. While the Executive is employed by the Company and, after her employment terminates, for one year from the Date of Termination (the “Non-Competition Period”), the Executive shall not, directly or indirectly, whether as owner, partner, investor, consultant, agent, employee, co-venturer or otherwise, compete with the business of the Company within the United States, or undertake any planning for any business competitive with the Company. For the purposes of this Article VII, the “business of the Company” shall mean the roasting, distribution, or sale of coffee, either through wholesale, retail, direct mail or e-commerce channels and any other activities engaged in by the Company at the Date of Termination. (b) Non-Solicitation of Employees or Customers. The Executive further agrees that during the Non-Competition Period or in connection with the Executive’s termination of employment, the Executive will not hire or attempt to hire any employee of the Company, assist in such hiring by any person or entity, encourage any such employee to terminate his or her relationship with the Company, or solicit or encourage any customer or vendor of the Company to terminate its relationship with it, or, in the case of a customer, to conduct with any person or entity any business or activity which such customer conducts or could conduct with the Company. (c) Unrelated Activities. The provisions of this Article VII shall not be deemed to preclude the Executive from employment or engagement during the Non- Competition Period following termination of employment hereunder by a person or entity, some of the activities of which are competitive with the business of the Company, if the Executive’s activities do not relate to such 8
  • 60. competitive business, and nothing contained in this Article VII shall be deemed to prohibit the Executive, during the Non-Competition Period following termination of employment hereunder, from acquiring or holding, solely as an investment, publicly traded securities of any competitor of the Company so long as such securities do not, in the aggregate, constitute one-half of 1% or more of the outstanding voting securities of such competitor. (d) Cessation of Payments. Without restricting any other remedies available to the Company under this Agreement or at law or in equity, it is understood that the Company shall not be obligated to continue to make the payments specified in this Agreement in the event of a material breach by the Executive of the provisions of Articles VII or VIII of this Agreement, which breach continues without having been cured within 30 days after written notice to the Executive specifying the breach in reasonable detail. ARTICLE VIII CONFIDENTIALITY 8.01 Recognition of Company’s Rights; Nondisclosure. At all times during Executive’s employment and thereafter, Executive shall hold in strictest confidence and shall not disclose, use, lecture upon or publish any of the Company’s Proprietary Information (defined below), except as such disclosure, use or publication may be required in connection with Executive’s work for the Company, or unless an officer of the Company expressly authorizes such in writing. Executive hereby assigns to the Company any rights she may have or acquire in such Proprietary Information and recognize that all Proprietary Information shall be the sole property of the Company and its successors and assigns. 8.02 Proprietary Information. The term “Proprietary Information” shall mean any and all confidential or proprietary knowledge, data or information of the Company. By way of illustration but not limitation, “Proprietary Information” includes (a) trade secrets, inventions, ideas, processes, formulas, source and object codes, data, programs, other works of authorship, know-how, improvements, discoveries, developments, designs and techniques (hereinafter collectively referred to as “Inventions”); (b) information regarding plans for research, development, new products, marketing and selling, business plans, budgets and unpublished financial statements, licenses, prices and costs, suppliers and customers; and (c) information regarding the skills and compensation of other Company employees. Notwithstanding the foregoing, it is understood that, at all such times, Executive is free to use information which is generally known in the trade or industry, which is not gained as a result of a breach of this Agreement, and may use my her own skill, knowledge, know-how and experience to whatever extent and in whichever way she wishes. 8.03 No Improper Use of Information of Prior Employers and Others. During Executive’s employment by the Company, Executive will not improperly use or disclose any confidential information or trade secrets, if any, of any former employer or any other person to whom Executive has an obligation of confidentiality, and Executive will not bring onto the premises of the Company any unpublished documents or any property belonging to any former employer or any other person to whom Executive has an obligation of confidentiality unless consented to in 9
  • 61. writing by that former employer or person. Executive will use in the performance of her duties only information which is generally known and used by persons with training and experience comparable to her own, which is common knowledge in the industry or otherwise legally in the public domain, or which is otherwise provided or developed by the Company. 8.04 Assignment of Inventions. (a) Proprietary Rights. The term “Proprietary Rights” shall mean all trade secret, patent, copyright, and other intellectual property rights throughout the world. (b) Assignment of Inventions. Executive hereby assigns and agrees to assign in the future (when any such Inventions or Proprietary Rights are first reduced to practice or first fixed in a tangible medium, as applicable) to the Company all her right, title and interest in and to any and all Inventions (and all Proprietary Rights with respect thereto) whether or not patentable or registrable under copyright or similar statutes, made or conceived or reduced to practice or learned by her, either alone or jointly with others, during the period of her employment with the Company, to the extent such Inventions and Proprietary Rights relate to the actual or anticipated business or research and development of Company, or result from or are suggested by work that Executive performs for Company. Inventions assigned to the Company are referred to herein as “Company Inventions.” (c) Works for Hire. Executive acknowledges that all original works of authorship which are made by her (solely or jointly with others) within the scope of her employment and which are protectable by copyright are “works made for hire,” pursuant to United States Copyright Act (17 U.S.C., Section 101). (d) Enforcement of Proprietary Rights. Executive will assist the Company in every proper way to obtain, and from time to time enforce, United States and foreign Proprietary Rights relating to Company Inventions in any and all countries. To that end Executive will execute, verify and deliver such documents and perform such other acts (including appearances as a witness) as the Company may reasonably request for use in applying for, obtaining, perfecting, evidencing, sustaining and enforcing such Proprietary Rights and the assignment thereof. In addition, Executive will execute, verify and deliver assignments of such Proprietary Rights to Company or its designee. Executive’s obligation to assist the Company with respect to Proprietary Rights relating to such Company Inventions in any and all countries shall continue beyond the termination of her employment, but the Company shall compensate her at a reasonable rate after her termination for the time actually spent by her at the Company’s request on such assistance. 8.05 Return of Company Documents. When Executive leaves the employ of the Company, Executive will deliver to the Company any and all drawings, notes, memoranda, specifications, devices, formulas, and documents, together with all copies thereof, and any other material containing or disclosing any Company Inventions or Proprietary Information of the Company. Executive further agrees that any property situated on the Company’s premises and owned by the Company, including disks and other storage media, filing cabinets or other work areas, is subject to inspection by Company personnel at any time with or without notice. 10
  • 62. ARTICLE IX MISCELLANEOUS 9.01 No Conflicting Agreements. Executive warrants and represents that, to the best of Executive’s knowledge, the execution and performance of this Agreement does not and will not violate, conflict with, or constitute a default under any contract, commitment, agreement, understanding, arrangement, restriction or any adjudication, order, injunction or finding of any kind by any court or agency to which Executive may be a party or by which Executive may be bound. 9.02 Specific Performance. The parties hereby declare that it is impossible to measure in money alone the damages that will or may accrue to the parties bound by and entitled to the benefit of this Agreement by reason of a failure of the parties to comply with Articles VII, VIII or X hereof. It is hereby declared to be the intention of the parties that the provisions of Articles VII, VIII or X hereof may be required to be specifically performed. The non- prevailing party in any proceeding brought to specifically perform Articles VII, VIII or X hereof shall be required to pay the prevailing party’s costs incurred in such proceeding, including reasonable attorneys’ fees. 9.03 General Provisions. This Agreement, together with its Exhibits: (a) may be executed in any number of counterparts, each of which, when executed by all parties to this Agreement, shall be deemed to be an original, and all of which counterparts together shall constitute one and the same instrument; (b) shall be governed by and construed under the laws of the State of Vermont without regard to principles of conflicts of laws; (c) constitutes the entire agreement between the parties with respect to its subject matter, superseding all prior oral and written communications, proposals, negotiations, representations, understandings, courses of dealing, agreements, contracts, and the like between or among any or all of the parties in such respect; (d) may be amended, modified, or terminated only by a writing signed by all parties; (e) contains headings only for convenience, which headings shall not be used in construction of this Agreement; (f) shall bind and enure to the benefit of the parties and their respective successors and assigns, except that no obligation under this Agreement may be delegated, nor may this Agreement be assigned, without the prior written consent of all parties; and (g) shall y be judicially enforced only in courts located within the State of Vermont, and the parties herein agree that such courts shall have exclusive venue and exclusive subject matter and personal jurisdiction, and such parties consent to service of process by registered mail, return-receipt requested, or by any other manner provided by law. Any notice or other communication required or permitted hereunder shall be in writing, and shall be deemed to have been given when placed in the United States mail, postage pre-paid, addressed to the last known address of the party to be notified. ARTICLE X ALTERNATE DISPUTE RESOLUTION 10.01 Subject to Section 10.12, Executive and the Company agree that they will submit any and all disputes directly or indirectly related to recruitment, employment or the termination of employment, except for constitutional or civil rights and worker’s compensation claims, disputes 11
  • 63. relating to benefits, and disputes concerning confidentiality, nondisclosure and non-competition agreements (“any dispute covered by this Agreement”) to final and binding arbitration before a neutral arbitrator according to the procedure set out below. The Company and Executive agree that it is their intention that arbitration is to be the sole method for resolving any dispute, except as noted above, covered by this Agreement, and that there will be no resort to court action except to compel arbitration, to enforce the arbitrator’s award, or pursuant to Section 10.12 below. 10.02 If there is any dispute covered by this Agreement, the disputing party shall give written notice of such dispute to the other party no later than ninety (90) days after the party knew or should have known that the dispute existed. Within ten (10) days after notice of the dispute is given, the parties will meet to attempt to resolve the dispute. If the parties fail to meet within ten (10) days after the notice of dispute is given or if the parties fail to resolve the dispute within forty-five (45) days after they first meet, either party may initiate arbitration of the dispute as provided hereinafter and in accordance with the American Arbitration Association National Rules for the Resolution of Employment Disputes. 10.03 The party seeking arbitration shall send written notice to the other party of the intention to arbitrate no later than one hundred eighty (180) days after the party knew or should have known that the dispute existed. If the dispute involves statutory rights, the party seeking arbitration shall send written notice to the other party of its intention to arbitrate no later than three hundred (300) days after the party knew or should have known that the dispute existed or within the time limit established by the applicable statute of limitations, whichever is later. This written notice shall contain a description of the dispute, the amount involved, if any, and the remedy sought. 10.04 The Company and Executive shall select an arbitrator by mutual agreement within thirty (30) days after the written notice of intention to arbitrate is received. If the parties fail to select an arbitrator by mutual agreement, the party seeking arbitration shall notify the American Arbitration Association (“AAA”) of the demand for arbitration and obtain a list of arbitrators from the AAA’s Employment Dispute Resolution Roster. If the parties fail to agree on an arbitrator, the AAA Administrator or his/her delegate shall select an arbitrator, who is a member of the AAA’s Employment Dispute Resolution Roster. 10.05 The Arbitrator shall have the authority to resolve all issues in dispute, including the Arbitrator’s own jurisdiction, and to award compensatory remedies and other remedies permitted by law. The Arbitrator shall have no authority to alter, add to or modify the terms of the Employment Agreement. The Arbitrator shall decide the matters in dispute in accordance with the laws of the State of Vermont, without reference to the conflict of laws rules, except that the parties agree that this agreement to arbitrate shall be governed by the Federal Arbitration Act, 9 U.S.C. Section 1, et seq . 10.06 The place of arbitration shall be Waterbury, Vermont or at such other place as agreed by the Company and Executive. The Company and Executive may be represented by the attorney of their choice. 10.07 The award of the Arbitrator shall be final and shall be the sole and exclusive remedy between the parties regarding any claims, counterclaims, issues, or accountings. Any monetary 12
  • 64. award shall include interest, as necessary, at the highest domestic prime rate published by The Wall Street Journal on the date of the award. 10.08 Judgment upon the award rendered by the Arbitrator may be entered by any court of competent jurisdiction. For purposes of the enforcement of any arbitration award, the parties submit to the non-exclusive jurisdiction of the United States federal district court for the district of Vermont, and the courts of the State of Vermont. Each of the parties consents to service of process by registered mail at its address set forth herein and agrees that its submission to jurisdiction and its consent to service of process by mail is made for the express benefit of the other party 10.09 The Company shall pay the arbitrators’ compensation (expenses and fees). The Executive and the Company shall pay their own attorneys’ fees and costs, and all administrative fees of the AAA shall be divided equally between the parties, unless the arbitrator determines that applicable law requires otherwise. If the Arbitrator finds that the claim sought to be arbitrated was frivolous or presented in bad faith, he may award attorneys’ fees to the prevailing party. Should either party request a transcript of the proceedings, then that party will bear the full cost for that transcript. 10.10 Any claim by either party shall be time-barred unless (i) the time period outlined in Section 10.03 is met, and (ii) an arbitrator has been selected and a hearing has been scheduled within 90 calendar days after providing the written notice of intention to arbitrate required under Section 10.03. 10.11 This agreement to arbitrate shall be binding upon the heirs, successors, and assigns and any trustee, receiver, or executor of each party. 10.12 The agreement to arbitrate shall in no way limit the Company’s right to seek an injunction from any court of competent jurisdiction to enforce the provisions of Articles VII and VIII of the Executive Employment Agreement. 10.13 In the event that any provision regarding arbitration is held to be in conflict with a mandatory provision of applicable law, the conflicting provision shall be modified to conform to applicable law. 10.14 The Company and Executive agree that it is impossible to measure in money alone the damages that will or may accrue to the parties bound by and entitled to the benefit of this agreement to arbitrate because of a failure of a party to comply with it. The Company and Executive hereby declare that it is their intention that the agreement to arbitrate may be required to be specifically performed. The non-prevailing party in any proceeding brought to specifically perform the agreement to arbitrate shall be required to pay the prevailing party’s costs incurred in such proceeding, including reasonable attorneys’ fees. 10.15 The Executive should consult with a lawyer prior to signing this agreement to arbitrate. The Executive has twenty-one (21) days in which to consider this agreement to arbitrate and seven (7) days after signing to revoke the agreement to arbitrate. 13
  • 65. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the parties hereto have duly executed this Agreement as of the date first above written. GREEN MOUNTAIN COFFEE ROASTERS, INC. By: /s/ Lawrence J. Blanford Lawrence J. Blanford President and CEO /s/ Frances G. Rathke Frances G. Rathke Exhibits: A — Duties and Responsibilities B — Company Base Salary C — Form of Release 14
  • 66. EXHIBIT A DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES The Chief Financial Officer serves as a company officer managing the Company’s accounting, reporting and control policies and practices; financial planning and analysis; treasury, tax planning, reporting and compliance; strategic planning and development, capital planning, credit and accounts receivables, accounts payables, risk management, and investor relations. The CFO will play an integral role in driving the financial performance in the business units, channels and teams. The CFO reports directly to the President and CEO. The CFO will participate directly as a member of the Company’s senior management team in setting short and medium-range goals and objectives, and in identifying, analyzing and implementing specific acquisition, reworking and divestiture initiatives and balance sheet driven opportunities. Key Responsibilities: The Chief Financial Officer of the Company is responsible to: Plan, develop, organize, implement, direct and evaluate the Company’s fiscal function and performance. Participate in the development of the company’s strategic plans and programs. Ensure the timely and accurate preparation, analysis and presentation of financial reports and statements at the Company and to the SEC. Perform timely and insightful financial and operational analyses, and present the related data and information to the Company for decision-making and action. Develop and implement cash management programs, revenue and expense forecasting techniques, financial leverage approaches, and cost savings initiatives. Staff and motivate the accounting, financial analysis, budget, treasury, tax and investor relations’ functions with talented, competent and committed employees. Assist in the evaluation and execution of potential alliances, acquisitions or divestitures. Work with the auditors and advisors to complete consolidated annual reports, implement tax strategies, and develop and complete strategic plans and key projects. Be an advisor from the financial perspective on any contracts into which the Company may enter. 15
  • 67. EXHIBIT B COMPANY BASE SALARY AND STOCK OPTION GRANT BASE SALARY: For the first six months of employment $190,000 After six months of employment for the remainder of the first year $200,000 After the first year of employment, the Executive may be eligible for annual increases in Company Base Pay commensurate with performance and economic conditions of company. STOCK OPTIONS: The Executive shall be granted nonqualified stock options for 25,000 shares of the Company’s Common Stock in accordance with the Company’s 2000 Stock Option Plan. The exercise price of shall be the lower of the price as of the date of the Executive’s employment start date or the date upon which the Executive started as the Interim Chief Financial Officer on April 7, 2003. The options shall vest 25% after the first year of employment and 1/48 16
  • 68. EXHIBIT C FORM OF RELEASE SEPARATION AGREEMENT AND GENERAL RELEASE This Separation Agreement is entered into by and between Employee and Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc., (hereinafter “GMCR”) in order to set out their agreement on the terms and conditions under which the employment of Employee with GMCR will end. It is agreed that Employee’s employment with GMCR ended on _________________ (insert date). GMCR, hereby agrees to provide Employee with the following: a. Bi-weekly salary payments of $_______________ (less appropriate federal, state, FICA and other deductions) for --— calendar days following the expiration of the 7-day revocation period set out in paragraph 5 below. It is agreed that these payments include amounts that Employee is not otherwise entitled to. 1. In exchange for the actions to be taken by GMCR, set out above, Employee agrees to the following general release: a. Employee for herself, her successors, administrators, heirs and assigns, hereby agrees to release, waive and forever discharge GMCR, any affiliated company or subsidiary, their predecessors, successors, affiliates, assigns, shareholders, directors, officers, agents, employees and/or representatives, whether past, present or future (hereinafter “the Released Parties”), from any and all actions, suits, debts, demands, damages, claims, judgments, or liabilities, including costs and attorneys’ fees, whether known or unknown, including, but not limited to, all claims based on the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967, as amended, 29 U.S.C.A. Section 621, et seq. , Vermont’s Fair Employment Practices Act, any other applicable state laws, including New York, and any applicable Federal Laws. This release applies to claims that arose during the course of and as a result of Employee’s employment with GMCR. b. Further, except where prohibited by law, Employee agrees that she will not file any statutory, civil or administrative claim, action, complaint, or grievance or charge of any kind against the Released Parties, relating to the separation of employment. If Employee asserts such a claim, GMCR shall be entitled to cease 17
  • 69. making any payments under this Agreement. Employee further understands that, if, after having signed this Agreement, Employee files or causes to be filed, any lawsuit, charge, complaint, grievance, claim, including but not limited to, an administrative action asserting any claim or demand which is within the scope of this Agreement, GMCR shall retain all rights and benefits of this Agreement, and GMCR may recoup the value of all payments and benefits paid pursuant to this Agreement, whether or not the claim made by Employee, or on Employee’s behalf is valid. This provision shall not apply to a claim for unemployment compensation. 1. Employee has waived rights or claims pursuant to this Agreement in exchange for consideration, the value of which exceeds payment or remuneration to which she was already entitled. 2. Employee has been provided twenty-one (21) days within which to consider whether she would sign this agreement. Employee understands that should she decide to execute the Agreement in fewer than 21 days, she has done so after having the opportunity of consulting with an attorney and with the express understanding that she has been given and has freely and voluntarily declined the opportunity to consider the agreement for a full twenty-one (21) days. 3. Employee has been advised that she may consult with an attorney of her choosing prior to executing this Agreement. 4. Employee may revoke this Agreement within seven (7) days after it is executed by giving written notice to Kathy Brooks, Vice-President of Human Resources, Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc., 33 Coffee Lane, Waterbury, Vermont 05676-1529. 5. This Agreement contains the entire understanding between Employee and GMCR relating to the subject matter of Employee’s separation and Employee agrees that GMCR has not made any oral or written promises to Employee that are not fully or accurately set forth in this Agreement. 6. The provisions of this Agreement shall be construed in accordance with the internal laws of the State of Vermont. 7. In the event that any paragraph, subparagraph or provision of this Agreement shall be determined to be partially contrary to governing law or otherwise partially enforceable, the paragraph, subparagraph, or provision and this Agreement shall be enforced to the maximum extent permitted by law, and if any paragraph, subparagraph, or provision of this Agreement shall be determined to be totally contrary to governing law or otherwise totally unenforceable, the paragraph, subparagraph, or provision shall be severed and disregarded and the remainder of this Agreement shall be enforced to the maximum extent permitted by law. 8. The parties acknowledge by signing this Agreement that they have read and understand this document, that they have conferred with or had opportunity to confer with an attorney regarding the terms and meaning of this Agreement, that they have had sufficient time to consider the terms provided for in this Agreement, that no representation or inducements have been made to them except as set forth herein, and that they have signed the same KNOWINGLY AND VOLUNTARILY. 9. This Agreement may not be modified, altered or changed except upon written consent of both parties. 18
  • 70. PLEASE READ THIS AGREEMENT CAREFULLY. This separation agreement and general release includes releases of all known and unknown claims. Date Received by Employee: Date executed: Employee Date: Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. By: Kathy Brooks, Vice-President of Human Resources 19
  • 71. Exhibit 31.1 CERTIFICATION PURSUANT TO SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT RULES 13a-14 and 15d-14 AS ADOPTED PURSUANT TO SECTION 302 OF THE SARBANES-OXLEY ACT OF 2002 I, Lawrence J. Blanford, Chief Executive Officer, certify that: 1. I have reviewed this quarterly report on Form 10-Q of Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc.; 2. Based on my knowledge, this report does not contain any untrue statement of a material fact or omit to state a material fact necessary to make the statements made, in light of the circumstances under which such statements were made, not misleading with respect to the period covered by this report; 3. Based on my knowledge, the financial statements, and other financial information included in this report, fairly present in all material respects the financial condition, results of operations and cash flows of the registrant as of, and for, the periods presented in this report; 4. The registrant’s other certifying officer(s) and I are responsible for establishing and maintaining disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e)) and internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f)) for the registrant and have: a. Designed such disclosure controls and procedures, or caused such disclosure controls and procedures to be designed under our supervision, to ensure that material information relating to the registrant, including its consolidated subsidiaries, is made known to us by others within those entities, particularly during the period in which this report is being prepared; b. Designed such internal control over financial reporting, or caused such internal control over financial reporting to be designed under our supervision, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles;
  • 72. c. Evaluated the effectiveness of the registrant’s disclosure controls and procedures and presented in this report our conclusions about the effectiveness of the disclosure controls and procedures, as of the end of the period covered by this report based on such evaluation; and d. Disclosed in this report any change in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the registrant’s most recent fiscal quarter (the registrant’s fourth fiscal quarter in the case of an annual report) that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting; and 5. The registrant’s other certifying officer(s) and I have disclosed, based on our most recent evaluation of internal control over financial reporting, to the registrant’s auditors and the audit committee of the registrant’s board of directors (or persons performing the equivalent functions): a. All significant deficiencies and material weaknesses in the design or operation of internal control over financial reporting which are reasonably likely to adversely affect the registrant’s ability to record, process, summarize and report financial information; and b. Any fraud, whether or not material, that involves management or other employees who have a significant role in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting. Date: May 7, 2009 /s/ Lawrence J. Blanford Lawrence J. Blanford President and Chief Executive Officer 2
  • 73. Exhibit 31.2 CERTIFICATION PURSUANT TO SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT RULES 13a-14 and 15d-14 AS ADOPTED PURSUANT TO SECTION 302 OF THE SARBANES-OXLEY ACT OF 2002 I, Frances G. Rathke, Chief Financial Officer, certify that: 1. I have reviewed this quarterly report on Form 10-Q of Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc.; 2. Based on my knowledge, this report does not contain any untrue statement of a material fact or omit to state a material fact necessary to make the statements made, in light of the circumstances under which such statements were made, not misleading with respect to the period covered by this report; 3. Based on my knowledge, the financial statements, and other financial information included in this report, fairly present in all material respects the financial condition, results of operations and cash flows of the registrant as of, and for, the periods presented in this report; 4. The registrant’s other certifying officer(s) and I are responsible for establishing and maintaining disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e)) and internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f)) for the registrant and have: a. Designed such disclosure controls and procedures, or caused such disclosure controls and procedures to be designed under our supervision, to ensure that material information relating to the registrant, including its consolidated subsidiaries, is made known to us by others within those entities, particularly during the period in which this report is being prepared; b. Designed such internal control over financial reporting, or caused such internal control over financial reporting to be designed under our supervision, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles;
  • 74. c. Evaluated the effectiveness of the registrant’s disclosure controls and procedures and presented in this report our conclusions about the effectiveness of the disclosure controls and procedures, as of the end of the period covered by this report based on such evaluation; and d. Disclosed in this report any change in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the registrant’s most recent fiscal quarter (the registrant’s fourth fiscal quarter in the case of an annual report) that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting; and 5. The registrant’s other certifying officer(s) and I have disclosed, based on our most recent evaluation of internal control over financial reporting, to the registrant’s auditors and the audit committee of the registrant’s board of directors (or persons performing the equivalent functions): a. All significant deficiencies and material weaknesses in the design or operation of internal control over financial reporting which are reasonably likely to adversely affect the registrant’s ability to record, process, summarize and report financial information; and c. Any fraud, whether or not material, that involves management or other employees who have a significant role in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting. Date: May 7, 2009 /s/ Frances G. Rathke Frances G. Rathke Chief Financial Officer 2
  • 75. Exhibit 32.1 CERTIFICATION PURSUANT TO 18 U.S.C. SECTION 1350, AS ADOPTED PURSUANT TO SECTION 906 OF THE SARBANES-OXLEY ACT OF 2002 In connection with the Quarterly Report of Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. (the “Company”) on Form 10-Q for the period ending March 28, 2009 as filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on the date hereof (the “Report”), I, Lawrence J. Blanford, as the Chief Executive Officer of the Company, certify, pursuant to 18 U.S.C. 1350, as adopted pursuant to section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, that, to the best of my knowledge: (1) The Report fully complies with the requirements of section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934; and (2) The information contained in the Report fairly presents, in all material respects, the financial condition and result of operations of the Company. Date: May 7, 2009 /s/ Lawrence J. Blanford Lawrence J. Blanford* President and Chief Executive Officer * A signed original of this written statement required by Section 906 has been provided to Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. and will be retained by Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. and furnished to the Securities and Exchange Commission or its staff upon request. The foregoing certification is being furnished solely pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (subsections (a) and (b) of Section 1350, Chapter 63 of Title 18, United States Code) and is not being filed as part of the Form 10-Q or as a separate disclosure document.
  • 76. Exhibit 32.2 CERTIFICATION PURSUANT TO 18 U.S.C. SECTION 1350, AS ADOPTED PURSUANT TO SECTION 906 OF THE SARBANES-OXLEY ACT OF 2002 In connection with the Quarterly Report of Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. (the “Company”) on Form 10-Q for the period ending March 28, 2009 as filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on the date hereof (the “Report”), I, Frances G. Rathke, as the Chief Financial Officer of the Company, certify, pursuant to 18 U.S.C. 1350, as adopted pursuant to section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, that, to the best of my knowledge: (1) The Report fully complies with the requirements of section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934; and (2) The information contained in the Report fairly presents, in all material respects, the financial condition and result of operations of the Company. Date: May 7, 2009 /s/ Frances G. Rathke Frances G. Rathke* Chief Financial Officer * A signed original of this written statement required by Section 906 has been provided to Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. and will be retained by Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. and furnished to the Securities and Exchange Commission or its staff upon request. The foregoing certification is being furnished solely pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (subsections (a) and (b) of Section 1350, Chapter 63 of Title 18, United States Code) and is not being filed as part of the Form 10-Q or as a separate disclosure document. _______________________________________________ Created by 10KWizard www.10KWizard.comΣουρχε: ΓΡΕΕΝ ΜΟΥΝΤΑΙΝ ΧΟΦΦΕ, 10−Θ, Μαψ 07, 200