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Painting Your Words With Brushstrokes
Painting Your Words With Brushstrokes
Painting Your Words With Brushstrokes
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Painting Your Words With Brushstrokes

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  • 1. Painting Your Words With Brushstrokes
    DIRECTIONS: Read the definitions of Noden’s 5 Brushstrokes, then write a sentence that models each one.
    • PARTICIPLES: A participle is an “ing” word or phrase tagged on the beginning or end of a sentence. It can also be an “ed” word. Present participles end in “ing,” while past participles end in “ed.”
    Ex: Barking loudly, the dog scared off the intruder.
    Ex: Sprinting down the field, the running back outran the defense.
    Ex: Badly bruised, the man climbed from the car wreck.
    Now write a sentence about something you did this morning. Make sure your sentence contains a participle!
    • ABSOLUTES: An absolute adds description to a noun, a subject, or a phrase acting as a noun by adding a two-word phrase that creates more vivid description. Simply put, it’s a noun with a “ing” participle.
    Ex: Motors revving, the cars prepared to race.
    Ex: The boy ran as fast as he could, feet racing, arms pumping.
    Ex: The cat, teeth biting, claws scratching, was clearly in a bad mood.
    Now write a sentence about something funny that once happened to you. Make sure your sentence contains an absolute!
    • APPOSITIVES: A noun or a nominative phrase that adds a second description, image, or idea to a previous noun. Simply put, it’s when you rename a noun.
    Ex: Stephen King, one of the most famous horror writers of all time, wrote my favorite novel, Dreamcatcher.
    Ex: His bedroom, a sloppy pigsty, was a scary place to visit!
    Ex: My car, a rusty piece of junk, still gets me around town just fine.
    Now write a sentence about your favorite teacher from elementary school. Make sure you describe your teacher with an appositive!
    • ADJECTIVES OUT OF ORDER: This is an easy one! Simply shift the order in which you describe something.
    Boring Example: The short, nerdy teacher is trying to get us to write.
    Better Example: The teacher, short and nerdy, is trying to get us to write.
    Boring Example: The growling, menacing dog was ready to pounce.
    Better Example: The dog, growling, menacing, was ready to pounce.
    Now write a sentence about your favorite room in your house. Make sure you describe the room with out of order adjectives!
    • Painting with Action Verbs: When writing, you should show, not tell! Write with verbs that paint powerful pictures of actions. Avoid boring verbs!
    Boring Example: I held onto the wheel for dear life.
    Better Example: I clung to the wheel for dear life.
    Boring Example: The boy jumped off the couch and flew through the air.
    Better Example: The boy leaped off the couch and soared through the air.
    Now write a sentence about something your did over the summer. Make sure your sentence contains at least one powerful action verb.

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