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Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors
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Ready, Set, Resilience: Understanding and Supporting Infant and Toddler Protective Factors

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This webinar will give participants information on key milestones indicative of typical and atypical social emotional health. Simple strategies for promoting awareness of these important social …

This webinar will give participants information on key milestones indicative of typical and atypical social emotional health. Simple strategies for promoting awareness of these important social emotional skills will also be explored.

Presented by Mary Mackrain, IMH-E® (IV)
Infant Mental Health Mentor (Policy)
Early Childhood Consultant

Published in: Health & Medicine, Technology
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  • Good afternoon, everyone.  Thank you for joining today’s webinar.  We will start in 1 minute. While you are waiting, check you knowledge with our trivia questions. <go to next slide reveal answers>
  • Hi Everyone: I am Cori Hill and I am joined by Mary Mackrain, an infant child mental health consultant and level IV endorsed infant mental health provider from Michigan.
  • Thanks you for joining us for our May Talks on Tuesday, sponsored by Virginia’s Integrated Training Collaborative funded by the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services.
  • Since its been a while since our last webinar, lets take care of a few housekeeping pointers. Lines will be muted throughout the call.  You will be able to ask questions and interact during the webinar using the chat feature on your screen. As a reminder, to use the chat feature, click the mouse in the box in the lower right corner of your screen, type a message and hit enter. Take a minute to give it a try.  Remember anything you type in the chat box is public and will be seen by all. We will try to answer as many questions as possible and similar questions may be grouped together.  
  • Another feature you might want to take advantage of, is the ability to view these slides in full screen. They are best viewed in this format. To go into full screen mode locate the button with 4 arrows on it. You can find it on the bar below this slide. When you’ve found the button, click it. When you go into full screen mode you do lose the view of chat, but we will always guide you back to chat when necessary. To get out of slide view, hit the escape key on your keyboard.
  • Ask this question to the audience and let them throw out some words- could flip chart answers. Typically ask the participants if they notice anything that the words have in common, The bottom line is that answers almost always relate back to social-emotional health- this begins the flow of the talk- that in order to support infants and toddlers to have healthy relationships, success and fulfillment we need to begin by understanding and supporting social and emotional health the critical foundation for building bright futures.
  • Purpose To set the stage for understanding the importance of the DECA Program in a time of increased risk in our society. Key points (Not all P’s feel comfortable closing there eyes, so you may say,”If you feel comfortable please close your eyes). Close your eyes and think back to your life at 4 years old. Take 30 seconds to think about where you lived, who you spent your days with, how you played, how you felt, who was around? (Ask 1-3 P’s to share their memories by asking…) How many of you in your 4 year old memory remember being cared for by a family member for the majority of your day? How many of you remember spending 8 plus hours in a childcare setting outside of the home? How many of you remember feeling free to play about your neighborhoods safely? Would it be the same for 4 years old today? (Some participants may choose to share sad stories, be prepared!) (While the majority of people will have a different experience than a 4 year old today, the younger our audiences get the more likely their lives will be similar to the 4 year old of today. So, be sure you clarify that this is the case for MOST, but certainly not ALL and that although times are changing it doesn’t have to mean that they are bad). Summary/Transition The world for children today is a much different place then most of our world’s at age 4. The next statistics from the Children’s Defense Fund paint a picture of the impact that risks have on our children today. As you view the following slides, I’d like you to think about the children and families with whom you work. Think about how these statistics impact the work you do everyday.
  • Purpose To paint a picture of the realities of our nation’s children and how things have changed for children and families. Key points (Participants will notice that they do not have these stats in their manuals, but you can direct them to the children’s defense fund website) (The next 31 slides will play automatically, along with music).
  • Summary: The purpose of this slide isTo outline the longitudnal study completed by Emmy Werner in an effort to understand what makes people resilient. Details: This study is a 30 year study ending in 1985. Children of the pineapple farmers in Kauai, Hawaii is the population involved in this study. Emmy Werner followed a subset of these 500 children (30%) who were born into families with 4 or more severe risk factors such as parental mental illness, drug/alcohol abuse, severe poverty, low birth weight, etc. She followed these children into adulthood, curious to see who would develop problems and who had positive outcomes. Though two-thirds had negative life problems, one-third did not! Emmy Werner wanted to understand – what are the characteristics of these people that helped them to “bounce back” and “overcome the odds”? If we could then tap into these qualities, we could then find a way to support these things in early childhood, thereby helping to foster resilience. The reason this study was groundbreaking was because Emmy looked at the risk from the ground-up and saw that a subset of children did succeed despite risk. Prior to this, adolescents and adults in juvenile detention/criminal justice systems were examined to see if they had risk in their childhood (which they almost always did). Thus, this study helps to change the belief that risk in childhood always leads to negative life outcomes. Children can succeed in lieu of risk- if it is offset by protective factors which will be explained next. A classic definition of resilience is the ability to bounce back, cope and/or deal with stressful or challenging situations. It also means that as a human being we adapt and change to these situations or challenges in a way that will not leave us with lasting consequences, either, physically, emotionally or psychological. Developing a greater level of resilience won’t stop bad or stressful things from happening, but can reduce the level of disruption a stressor has and the time taken to recover. Whether the experience be everyday occurrences like late trains or faulty computers, or longer term stressors such as illness, loss, relationship breakdown, changing jobs or being the victim of a crime; our ability to be resilient can help us cope and bounce back from the experience. Transition: What we know about risk and protection is… Notes:
  • Summary: The purpose of this slide is to illustrate different categories of risk and protective factors so that participants will eventually see the area of focus for the DECA - I/T Program (within-child protective factors). Details: Introduce the 3 categories in which risk and protective factors fall The last area where we can find risk and protection is with-in the child. Ask participants if they can think of some examples of with-in child risk, or things that a child carries already packed in their suitcase (P’s usually generate ideas related to disabilities, temperament, attractiveness) etc. Transition: Tell participants you’re going to next gather their protective factors (previously written on post-its) and see which categories they fall into Notes: 11
  • Study points to the fact that children need well developed SE skills to be able to learn to their potential once they hit kindergarten-
  • Do you see anything beside the obvious?
  • Answer Revealed- social and emotional skills need to be observed over time, often times we as caregivers are not sure what to look for, if we do look closely and watch and listen there is a lot to see related to social-emotional behavior that can often be overlooked.
  • Just review the common behaviors that caregivers may see in children to show that they are developing capacity in experiencing and regulating emotions
  • What really helps Jaime to regulate- his familiar caregiver. How do you see Jaime’s ability to calm as being important later in life? Shore said- “attachment theory is in essence a regulatory theory in the first year of life”
  • Bring home the idea that if we recognize these skills now and nurture them they can help children later in life as well- Just use on of the examples
  • Summary: The purpose of this slide is for participants will be able to identify the relationship between relationships and brain development Fun fact: a toddlers brain is working at twice the rate of their caregivers (Butterfield, Martin and Prairie, 2004)
  • Just read one or two examples
  • Now that we have explored what social, emotional health is, why it is so important and what it looks like- lets talk about what you can do to support SE health for the infants and toddlers in your care
  • Where do you see your practice on this continuum? Where is your center or child care site? Do families need us to be on different levels of the continuum at different times?
  • If we work from a strength based approach- it can lead to strength based partnerships and more enriching relationships
  • Play video from CSEFEL website: Module 2 video clip # 11 You can download the video clip from the website or by the DVD- if you cannot do either just hide this slide or actually read one of the stories out loud so participants can get a taste for the story.
  • Summary: Details: In other words, adults need to be resilient too! Resilient adults can bounce back from life’s ups and downs. We have spent MOST of our time talking about building resilient children, but we also have to talk about building and maintaining resilient adults. Transition: Children need continuity of care at this point in life- so lets talk about what we can do for the adult. Notes:
  • Transcript

    • 1. Mackrain, 2011 Please Call: 866-842-5779 Enter Code: 463 661 9330# Trivia While You Wait Welcome to May’s Talks on Tuesdays Webinar While you wait you will experience periods of silence. How many hours of sleep do parents lose in the first year of a baby’s life? What generates more electrical impulses per day than all of the world’s telephones? What can a baby do up until 7 months that an adult cannot? How high can a penguin jump? Across the world, how often is a new baby born? What is Anatidaephobia? What are the most surviving multiple births for one pregnancy? What is the least popular month for U.S Weddings?
    • 2. Mackrain, 2011 Please Call: 866-842-5779 Enter Code: 463 661 9330# Trivia Answers Welcome to May’s Talks on Tuesdays Webinar While you wait you will experience periods of silence. How many hours of sleep do parents lose in the first year of a baby’s life? 400-750 What generates more electrical impulses per day than all of the world’s telephones? human brain What can a baby do up until 7 months that an adult cannot? breathe and swallow at the same time How high can a penguin jump? 6ft Across the world, how often is a new baby born? every 3 seconds What is Anatidaephobia? Fear of being watched by a duck What are the most surviving multiple births for one pregnancy? 8 What is the least popular month for U.S Weddings? January
    • 3. Mackrain, 2011 Welcome! Cori Hill Mary Mackrain
    • 4. Mackrain, 2011 Talks on Tuesdays
    • 5. Mackrain, 2011 Communication Phones Are Muted Chat For Communication
    • 6. Mackrain, 2011 locate this button on bar below slides click to view slides in full screen Full Screen Mode Esc. Key to Return to Normal View
    • 7. Mary Mackrain, MI Department of Community Health Ready, Set, Resilience! Supporting Infant Toddler Protective Factors Mackrain, 2011
    • 8.
      • Define Social and Emotional Health
      • Discuss Key Research Findings
      • Review Critical Indicators of Social and Emotional Health
      • Learn About What Caregivers Can do to Support Social and Emotional Health
      Mackrain, 2011 Agenda
    • 9. What are Your Hopes and Dreams for the Infants and Toddlers that you support? They have Friends They are Happy They are successful Mackrain, 2011 For Now and Forever
    • 10. Mackrain, 2011 Think About the Children You Know
    • 11. The Facts Children’s Defense Fund, The State of America’s Children Yearbook Year: November 2007, Source: www.childrensdefensefund.org Kidscount, 2010 & SAMHSA Mackrain, 2011
    • 12. Each Day In America 4 children are killed by abuse or neglect.
    • 13. Each Day In America 5 children or teens commit suicide.
    • 14. Each Day In America 8 children or teens are killed by firearms.
    • 15. Each Day In America 192 children are arrested for violent crimes.
    • 16. Each Day In America 383 children are arrested for drug abuse.
    • 17. Each Day In America 1,153 babies are born to teen mothers.
    • 18. Each Day In America 2,383 children are confirmed as abused or neglected.
    • 19. Young children are being expelled from child care at 3 times the rate of children expelled from K-12 (Gilliam, 2005)
    • 20. 1 in 5 children experience mental health problems, 1 in 5 get help
    • 21. Mackrain, 2011
    • 22. Resilience Theory: Ray of Hope
      • Emmy Werner – Hawaii- Study began in 1955
      • Selected 500 plus children born at risk that year
      • Further examined 30% of the children who were at high risk (with 4 or more significant risk factors)
        • 2/3 had significant negative life problems
        • but 1/3 did not! They had positive outcomes!
        • described as children who… “lived well, loved well, played well & expected well”
      • What did these children who “made it” despite the odds have in their lives?
      Mackrain, 2011 Resilience Theory
    • 23. Mackrain, 2011
    • 24. Mackrain, 2011 Within-Child Protective Factors
    • 25. Within the context of one’s family, community and cultural background it is the child’s developing capacity to: Experience and regulate emotions, Form secure relationships and Explore and learn Definition from www.Zero to Three.org Mackrain, 2011 Social & Emotional Health Defined
    • 26. What Do Children Need? Mackrain, 2011
    • 27. What Does Social and Emotional Behavior Look Like? Mackrain, 2011
    • 28. Careful Observation is Key! Mackrain, 2011
    • 29. Mackrain, 2011
    • 30.
      • INFANT Behaviors:
      • Smiling
      • Cooing and Babbling
      • Fussing when hungry or tired
      • Kicking legs when excited
      • Quieting when held by a familiar adult
      • TODDLER Behaviors:
      • Laughing
      • Goes to familiar adult for comforting
      • Able to move from one activity to the next
      • Growing ability to focus
      • Calms with help from a familiar caregiver
      Mackrain, 2011 Experience and Regulate Emotions
    • 31. Look for expressing and regulating of emotions Mackrain, 2011 Let’s Watch
    • 32. Mackrain, 2011 Expressing & Regulating Emotions For Now and Forever…
    • 33.
      • INFANT Behaviors:
      • Smile at and back to a familiar caregiver
      • Anticipates being held
      • Likes to look at and be near familiar caregiver
      • Shows preference for parent or caregivers face and voice
      • Stretches arms up to be held
      • TODDLER Behaviors:
      • Explores but checks in with familiar caregiver
      • Shows affection for familiar caregivers
      • Responds to his/her name
      • Makes needs known to a familiar caregiver
      Mackrain, 2011 Form Secure Relationships
    • 34. Relationships Affect Brain Development
      • The physical architecture of the brain is developed
      • after birth.
      • Responsive relationships directly affect how the brain is wired.
      • At birth there are 50 trillion connections between
      • brain cells, by age three there are 1,000 trillion.
      Mackrain, 2011 Human Brain at Birth 6 Years Old 14 Years Old
    • 35. Mackrain, 2011 Relationships For Now and Forever…
    • 36.
      • INFANT Behaviors:
      • Reaches for and grasps things
      • Enjoys simple games like peek-a-boo
      • Imitates others actions
      • Smiles or plays with self in the mirror
      • TODDLER Behaviors:
      • Keeps looking for a toy
      • Tries new things
      • Shows interest in other people
      • Imitates others actions
      Mackrain, 2011 Explore and Learn
    • 37. Mackrain, 2011 Explore and Learn For Now and Forever…
    • 38. Mackrain, 2011 Caregiver Strategies You are an Important Person in the Life of an Infant or Toddler
    • 39.
              • Families have the most continuous and emotionally charged relationship with the child. Infants and toddlers learn what people expect of them and what they can expect of other people through early experiences with parents and other caregivers . (Day & Parlakian, 2004)
              • Learn about a families culture, traditions, beliefs and dreams for their child.
              • Share positive experiences
              • Affirm parents, use reflective listening
      Mackrain, 2011 1. C onnect With Families
    • 40. Professionally Centered Family Allied Family Focused Family Centered Professional is the EXPERT Parent is the PROBLEM Professional "partners" with the parent, but is still the "expert" & decides the rules & roles Parent is COLLEAGUE with expertise, knowledge & choice Professionals viewed as agents to help parents achieve goals (parents as the "employers") Mackrain, 2011 Family Centered Continuum
    • 41.
      • “ A good example has twice the value of good advice” - author unknown
      Mackrain, 2011
    • 42.
      • Use routines as a time to connect with children
      • Maintain a predictable schedule
      • Plan routines around each child’s needs and abilities
      • Ensure time for quiet and active play
      • Talk, read and sing with children every day
      Mackrain, 2011 2. Provide A ctivities and Routines
    • 43. Mackrain, 2011
    • 44.
      • Hold, cuddle and rock children
      • Respond to cues (coos, smiles, cries, etc)
      • Talk to infants and toddlers about their emotions
      • Stay close by as children interact with one another
      • Observe each child’s skills
      Mackrain, 2011 3. Provide R esponsive Caregiving
    • 45.
      • Create a homelike environment
      • Have duplicates of favored toys
      • Display toys within reach
      • Allow children to have and use comfort items
      • Keep the room and materials safe
      • Make sure there are enough adults to safely care for children
      Mackrain, 2011 4. Provide Safe and Nurturing Learning E nvironments
    • 46. Photos graciously provided by Michigan Family Resources, Grand Rapids, MI Mackrain, 2011
    • 47.
      • 1 out of every three child care providers leaves their job every year- children need stability. How full is your pitcher?
      Mackrain, 2011 Take Care of Yourself…
    • 48. Resilience Bouncing back from life’s ups and downs. Mackrain, 2011
    • 49. Mackrain, 2011 "A hundred years from now, it will not matter what kind of car I drove, what kind of house I lived in, how much money I had in the bank... but the world may be a better place because I made a difference in the life of a child." -- Forest Witchcraft
    • 50.
      • What is one thing you might do (or already do!) to support the social and emotional health of infants and toddlers?
      Mackrain, 2011 Question for the Group
    • 51. Mary Mackrain [email_address] Mackrain, 2011 Thank You For Supporting Infants and Toddlers!

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