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Music Experiences for Children Birth Through 3: Making Connections for Life-Long Learning
Music Experiences for Children Birth Through 3: Making Connections for Life-Long Learning
Music Experiences for Children Birth Through 3: Making Connections for Life-Long Learning
Music Experiences for Children Birth Through 3: Making Connections for Life-Long Learning
Music Experiences for Children Birth Through 3: Making Connections for Life-Long Learning
Music Experiences for Children Birth Through 3: Making Connections for Life-Long Learning
Music Experiences for Children Birth Through 3: Making Connections for Life-Long Learning
Music Experiences for Children Birth Through 3: Making Connections for Life-Long Learning
Music Experiences for Children Birth Through 3: Making Connections for Life-Long Learning
Music Experiences for Children Birth Through 3: Making Connections for Life-Long Learning
Music Experiences for Children Birth Through 3: Making Connections for Life-Long Learning
Music Experiences for Children Birth Through 3: Making Connections for Life-Long Learning
Music Experiences for Children Birth Through 3: Making Connections for Life-Long Learning
Music Experiences for Children Birth Through 3: Making Connections for Life-Long Learning
Music Experiences for Children Birth Through 3: Making Connections for Life-Long Learning
Music Experiences for Children Birth Through 3: Making Connections for Life-Long Learning
Music Experiences for Children Birth Through 3: Making Connections for Life-Long Learning
Music Experiences for Children Birth Through 3: Making Connections for Life-Long Learning
Music Experiences for Children Birth Through 3: Making Connections for Life-Long Learning
Music Experiences for Children Birth Through 3: Making Connections for Life-Long Learning
Music Experiences for Children Birth Through 3: Making Connections for Life-Long Learning
Music Experiences for Children Birth Through 3: Making Connections for Life-Long Learning
Music Experiences for Children Birth Through 3: Making Connections for Life-Long Learning
Music Experiences for Children Birth Through 3: Making Connections for Life-Long Learning
Music Experiences for Children Birth Through 3: Making Connections for Life-Long Learning
Music Experiences for Children Birth Through 3: Making Connections for Life-Long Learning
Music Experiences for Children Birth Through 3: Making Connections for Life-Long Learning
Music Experiences for Children Birth Through 3: Making Connections for Life-Long Learning
Music Experiences for Children Birth Through 3: Making Connections for Life-Long Learning
Music Experiences for Children Birth Through 3: Making Connections for Life-Long Learning
Music Experiences for Children Birth Through 3: Making Connections for Life-Long Learning
Music Experiences for Children Birth Through 3: Making Connections for Life-Long Learning
Music Experiences for Children Birth Through 3: Making Connections for Life-Long Learning
Music Experiences for Children Birth Through 3: Making Connections for Life-Long Learning
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Music Experiences for Children Birth Through 3: Making Connections for Life-Long Learning

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his webinar will focus on the developmental areas that can be supported through music, and will provide clinicians, educators, and caregivers with ideas that can be incorporated throughout a child's …

his webinar will focus on the developmental areas that can be supported through music, and will provide clinicians, educators, and caregivers with ideas that can be incorporated throughout a child's daily routine to encourage these important connections!

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  • Dana: Welcome to today’s webinar. As usual we will do a quick orientation of the Blackboard Collaborate, the tool we are using to host today’s webinar. Effective Strategies for the Transition Process Gooden, NECTC, 2012
  • Dana: Today’s webinar is delivered through the telephone, but we do need you to make sure your computer sound is on and the volume is turned up because we will be watching/listening to a video later today. Effective Strategies for the Transition Process Gooden, NECTC, 2012
  • Dana: Today we will be asking you to respond to questions through polls. Poll questions will appear on the screen along with the list of options. To respond to the poll look to the left side of your screen, and below your name in the participant list you will see the letter A in a box. Click that box to get the drop-down list of options. On-screen you can see the red arrow pointing to the box. When you see the drop-down list appear, make your selection. Go ahead and try doing this now. Dana: Pause for poll responses Dana: Once most of you have responded we will then publish the responses on the screen. Rebecka to publish responses.
  • Dana: We will continue to use chat as a way for you to ask questions and to respond to questions, but there are some things you need to know. First, unless you moved the chat window in previous Talks on Tuesdays the chat window is located on the lower left side of your screen and it is quite small. Here’s how you can enlarge it. The first step to enlarging it is to actually move the chat window to another location on the screen so that it is it’s own window. To do that, click the top of the chat window and while holding your mouse button down, just drag and drop the it anywhere on your screen. The red arrow on screen is pointing to where you will click your mouse so that you can drag the window. Once you’ve moved the chat window you will then want to enlarge it. To do that hover your mouse over the side or top of the chat window until you see a two-way arrow. There’s an example what that looks like on screen although some of you may see a white arrow. Once you see the two-way arrow, click your mouse and while holding your mouse button down, drag the bar up or sideways to expand the chat window. Go ahead a take a moment now to expand the chat window or to move it. To actually chat, click your mouse into the white box , type your message and then hit enter/return on your keyboard. Keep in mind that chat is public and that the moderators can also see all private chats. Go ahead an test out typing a message into chat. Cori Pause before moving on. Effective Strategies for the Transition Process Gooden, NECTC, 2012
  • Dana: Today we will be asking you to use the sunburst pointer tool on the slide, and we are going to practice using that tool now. Each of you has a tool bar found on the left side of your slide. If you’re not sure what it looks like, take look at the middle of the slide to see an example of what it looks like. Once you’ve located the tool bar, click the second box down---it looks like a grey sun. In the example on-screen we’ve highlighted it in yellow. Once you’ve located your toolbar and the sunburst box, click on the sunburst and then practice leaving sunburst on the notes on-screen by moving your mouse to each note and then clicking your mouse. Please try this task now. Dana: Wait
  • Dana: At certain points during the webinar we do want to hear from you through the phone. When we want this to happen we will ask you to raise your using Blackboard’s raise hand feature. The raise hand feature is located below your name and it looks like a hand. On-screen you can see the red arrow pointing to what it looks like. So look to the left of your screen and just below your name under the participant’s list you will find the hand icon. Go ahead and test that out now. Dana: Pause while people raise their hands (rebecka to clear raised hands). Dana: When we call your name, we will then ask you to press *6 to unmute your line and speak. Effective Strategies for the Transition Process Gooden, NECTC, 2012
  • Dana: Today’s speaker is Trish Winter. Trish is an assistant professor of music therapy at Radford University and a doctoral candidate in music therapy at Temple University, in Philadelphia, PA. Ms. She is a board-certified music therapist with 13 years of clinical music therapy experience with children and adults with a variety of diagnoses. The title of today’s Talks on Tuesday is “ Music Experiences for Children Birth-3: Making Connections for Life-Long Learning”.
  • Rebecka Clear Polls
  • Rebecka use pointer
  • We are going to open up a browser window on your computer which will take you to a youtube video. When the video concludes, close the window so you are seeing this slide again. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=to7uIG8KYhg&feature=share
  • Rebecka use pointer
  • Rebecka: Set Timer 60 Seconds
  • Transcript

    • 1. Call:1-866-842-5779Code: 463-661-9330# Music Experiences for Children Birth-3: Making Connections for Life-Long Learning presented by Trish Winter, MMT, MT-BC Assistant Professor of Music Therapy Radford University
    • 2. Black boardCo l l aborate Please Call 1-866-842-5779 Code: 463-661-9330#
    • 3. Today’s webinar is delivered through thephone, but you will ALSO need to turn up the volume on your computer.
    • 4. Choose the statement that is MOST correct from the options below: A. Listening to Mozart makes children smarter. B. Listening to Mozart ensures that children will be musicians. C. Listening to Mozart is better than listening to the Wiggles. D. Listening to a wide variety of music experiences supports learning and development. t k lef loo
    • 5. Chat ple xa mEType in this white box
    • 6. Raise Hand This is located on the left side of the screen under your name.Example *6 to unmute when called upon
    • 7. Assistant Professor of Music Therapy Radford University
    • 8. Music Therapyphotos courtesy of Richard Karp, Williamsport PA  www.rikkisan.com
    • 9. Why Music?Grab a piece of paper and something to write with! Jot down a fewdevelopmental areas addressed in this picture. LET’S CHAT
    • 10. Use the sunburst tool to mark when, on the timeline, you think children first begin to respond to musical stimuli.In Utero At Birth 3 Months 6 Months 9 Months
    • 11. Music and the BrainCopyright 2002, 2009, C. George Boeree
    • 12. How many of you are musicians? A. Yes! I have taken lessons and currently play an instrument or Publish Poll Results sing in an ensemble. B. Yes! I took lessons in school and I still play now and then. C. Yes! I am the reigning champ at the office Karaoke competition. D. Yes! When I’m in my car/shower Beyoncé has NOTHING on me. E. Yes! I sing with my clients and with my own children/relatives.
    • 13. Recall a song from YOUR childhood! Let’s Chat! What are you remembering? Qualities of Children’s Music
    • 14. Use the “raise hand” tool and volunteer to share your song with the group!*6 to unmute phone
    • 15. 0-3: months sedative music3-6: months vocalizing, high-pitched voices calm baby4-6: months respond to musicwith repetitive movements6-9: months descending pitches9-12 months recognize familiarmelodies12-18 months matchmovements to musicSchwartz (2008)
    • 16. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=to7uIG8KYhg audio will play for recording
    • 17. 18-24 months: dance andsing spontaneously24-36 months: sing standardand spontaneous songsSchwartz (2008)
    • 18. Lullabies Interventions Let’s Chat!
    • 19. Lullabies Musical Elements Use sunburst tool to indicate the musical elements • Fast • Slow • With a rocking feel • Energizing • Gentle • Soft • Loud • Encouraging movements • Using a higher voice • Smooth • Bouncy • Pauses in singing to encourage baby to respond
    • 20. Success
    • 21. Play Songs Interventions Let’s Chat!
    • 22. Play Songs Musical Elements Use sunburst tool to indicate the musical elements • Fast • Slow • With a rocking feel • Energizing • Gentle • Soft • Louder • Encourage moving • Using a higher voice • Smooth • Bouncy • Pauses in singing to encourage baby to respond
    • 23. example (not exact replica) of what presenter was showing on video
    • 24. example (not exact replica) of what presenter was showing on video
    • 25. example (not exact replica) of what presenter was showing on video
    • 26. example (not exact replica) of what presenter was showing on video
    • 27. example (not exact replica) of what presenter was showing on video
    • 28. example (not exact replica) of what presenter was showing on video
    • 29. example (not exact replica) of what presenter was showing on video
    • 30. Encouraging Caregivers
    • 31. American Music Therapy Association: www.musictherapy.orgCustodero, L.A., & Johnson-Green, E.A. (2003). Passing the culturaltorch: Musical experiences and musical parenting of infants. Journal ofResearch in Music Education, 51(2) pp. 102-114.Fox, D.B. (2000). Music and the baby’s brain. Music Educators Journal, 82(2).Jensen, E. (2001). Arts with the brain in mind. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum DevelopmentSchwartz, E. (2008). Music therapy, and early childhood: A developmentalapproach. Gilsum, NH: Barcelona Publishers.Weinberger, N.M. (2000). Music and the Brain: A broad perspective. MusicEducators Journal, 87(2).
    • 32. Trish Winter MMT, MT-BCpwinter3@radford.edu540-831-6160

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