Integrated food security programme south gonder (gtz) [compatibility mode]

  • 713 views
Uploaded on

 

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
713
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
7
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. BoABureau of Agriculture – Amhara RegionIntegrated Food SecurityProgramme South Gonder German Development Co-operation
  • 2. IFSP SOUTH GONDERTECHNOLOGICAL INNOVATIONS INMICRO WATERSHED MANAGEMENT Gully Rehabilitation & Management
  • 3. IFSP SOUTH GONDERTECHNOLOGICAL INNOVATIONS INMICRO WATERSHED MANAGEMENT Vetiver Grass Contour Hedges
  • 4. IFSP SOUTH GONDERTECHNOLOGICAL INNOVATIONS INMICRO WATERSHED MANAGEMENT Forage Bunds and Hedges
  • 5. IFSP SOUTH GONDERTECHNOLOGICAL INNOVATIONS INMICRO WATERSHED MANAGEMENT Tenkara Kend Sub-Cultivator
  • 6. IFSP SOUTH GONDERTECHNOLOGICAL INNOVATIONS INMICRO WATERSHED MANAGEMENT Triticale
  • 7. Gully Rehabilitation & Cultivation Tsegur Eyesus April 2000 to October 2004Apr. 2000 Nov. 2000
  • 8. Gully Rehabilitation & Cultivation Tsegur Eyesus April 2000 to October 2004April 2000 August 2002
  • 9. Gully Rehabilitation & Cultivation Tsegur Eyesus April 2000 to October 2004April 2000 October 2004
  • 10. Gully Rehabilitation & Cultivation Magera May 2003 to October 2004June 2003 October 2004
  • 11. Gully Rehabilitation & Cultivation Magera May 2003 to October 2004September 2003 October 2004
  • 12. Gully Rehabilitation & Cultivation Kanat February 2004 to October 2004February 2004 October 2004
  • 13. Gully Rehabilitation & Cultivation Kanat February 2004 to October 2004June 2004 October 2004
  • 14. Gully Rehabilitation & Cultivation Kanat February 2004 to October 2004February 2004 October 2004
  • 15. Free Grazing vs. Cut & carry systemFebruary 2004 October 2004July 2004
  • 16. Vetiver GrassA large area treated in Tach Gayint Woreda
  • 17. Vetiver Grass• Highly effective control of soil erosion• Lower establishment costs than stone bunds• No maintenance after establishment• Very drought resistant• Increased water infiltration (water harvesting effect)• Repellent effect against rodents• Tolerant to waterlogging• No slope restriction• Multi-purpose utilization (forage, thatching, bio-insecticide and mulch)
  • 18. Vetiver Grass Contour Hedge RowsEffective Soil and Water Harvesting
  • 19. Vetiver is a good forage The nutritional value of vetiver is between maize stalks and elephant grass
  • 20. Vetiver for road embankment stabilisation
  • 21. Forage Bunds / Bana GrassSoil erosion control and forage development onarable land
  • 22. Forage Bunds / Multipurpose TreesSoil erosion control and forage development onarable landThe image cannot be display ed. Your computer may not hav e enough memory to open the image, or the image may hav e been corrupted. Restart y our computer, and then open the file again. If the red x still appears, y ou may hav e to delete the image and then insert it again.
  • 23. Improved plough Tenkara KendContribution to water harvesting
  • 24. Improved plough Tenkara KendContribution to water harvesting
  • 25. Improved plough Tenkara KendContribution to water harvesting
  • 26. Improved plough Tenkara KendContribution to water harvesting
  • 27. Improved plough Tenkara KendContribution to water harvesting
  • 28. Improved plough Tenkara KendContribution to water harvesting• Increased water infiltration• Reduced surface run-off• Increased water holding capacityLeading to:• Lower susceptibility to dry spells• Improved crop growth• Higher yields (grain, biomass, etc.)
  • 29. Improved plough Tenkara Kend
  • 30. Triticale
  • 31. History of triticale in Ethiopia Triticale• First introduction to Ethiopia in 1970.• Research discontinued due to poor properties such as shrivelled seeds, etc.• 7 varieties obtained in 1997 by courtesy of University of Stellenbosch (South Africa)• Two varieties released by the National Seed Release Committee in Jan. 2002: Var. Sinan: short vegetation period Var. Maynet: long vegetation period• More than 25,000 farmers cultivate triticale countrywide (cropping season 2004)
  • 32. A cereal crop with Triticaleimpressive properties• Cross between wheat and rye• Seed can be re-used/ re-planted• High yielding• High nutritional value• Wide environmental adaptability (from lowland to above 3,500 meters)• Can replace maize and sorghum in „Striga“ affected areas• High tolerance to drought, frost, and hail• Low susceptibility to diseases, especially rust
  • 33. A cereal crop with impressive properties Triticale18 stems per plant High tillering capacity
  • 34. A cereal crop with impressiveproperties Triticale Deep rooting
  • 35. A cereal crop with impressiveproperties Triticale 6 rows of grain per spike
  • 36. A cereal crop with impressiveproperties Triticale High tolerance to hail
  • 37. Results of On-Farm TrialsBy GTZ / IFSP South Gonder Triticale Low Input Improved Seed rate 150 kg/ha 150 kg/ha Fertilizer 1 qt UREA/ha application 1 qt DAP/ha Weeding 2 2 frequency Yield 18 - 25 qt/ha 24 - 32 qt/ha
  • 38. Utilization of Triticale• Readily accepted by the local population• Utilised for injera, kitta, pasta, tella, areke, genfo, kollo, and kinche