Industry (3º ESO)

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Industry (3º ESO)

  1. 1. Industry<br />I.E.S. Alonso de Covarrubias<br />
  2. 2. Industry: a secondary activity<br />Secondary activities, like industry, are also called manufacturing industries, because they are a form of employement in which things are made, assembled or produced.<br />
  3. 3. Inputs<br />Raw materials<br />Energy supplies<br />Transport<br />Labour<br />Capital<br />Government policies<br />
  4. 4. Processes<br />Processing<br />Assembling<br />Packaging<br />Administration<br />
  5. 5. Outputs<br /><ul><li>Finishedproduct
  6. 6. Profit (feed back orreinvestment)
  7. 7. Waste</li></li></ul><li>Location of industry<br />Before building a factory or opening a business, the best possible site has to be found for its location.<br />A food processing factory uses fruit and vegetables from nearby farms. These must be fresh so they need to be processed soon after they have been harvested.<br />A clothing manufacturer must be located near the towns where the workers live.<br />Newspaper printing works have to reach their markets quickly, so need good transport links, then these industry must be near the towns.<br />Bakery may be quite small but must be in, or close to, a town where many people live. Fresh bread is easily damaged and quickly goes stale. Bakeries <br />
  8. 8. Industrial location factors<br />Physical:<br />Raw materials: The factory needs to be close to these if the are heavy and bulky to transport.<br />Energy supply: This is needed to work the machines in a factory. Early industries were near coalfields.<br />Natural routes: River valleys and flat areas were essential in the days before railways and lorries made the movement of materials easier.<br />Site and land: Most industries require large areas of cheap, flat land on which to build their factories. Well-drained land is also an advantage.<br />
  9. 9. Industrial location factors<br />Human and economic:<br />Labour: A suitable labour force is essential. Cost and skill levels are important.<br />Capital: All industries require some money to set up and start manufacturing. This may be available from banks, government or local authorities.<br />Markets: An accesible place to sell the goods is needed. This may be in the local area, within the country or abroad as export markets.<br />Transport: A good transport network helps reduces cost and makes the movement of materials easier.<br />Government policies: Industrial development is encouraged in some areas and restricted in others. Subsidies may be available in developing areas.<br />Enviroment: Pleasant surroundings with good leisure facilities help attract and retain the workforce.<br />

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