Spell checking when working online.
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Spell checking when working online.

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A very short evaluation of some spell checkers carried out in 2010 - the results should NOT be taken as totally accurate and are just to show how different all the checkers are in the way they work. ...

A very short evaluation of some spell checkers carried out in 2010 - the results should NOT be taken as totally accurate and are just to show how different all the checkers are in the way they work. They have all been updated since 2010.

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  • Guildford College – 15 students being assessed on their blogs, 11 said they spell checked their work, 6 depended on using MS Word with ‘Cut and Paste’. LexDis participants http://www.lexdis.org anecdotal evidence - some used assistive technologies, others said ‘not sure it is right’ ask a human, others cut and pasted from Word, used Google etc… 34 Post graduate students only 2 used automatic spell checking in email but did proof read if used for formal occasions, no one usually checked their social networking communication - if it was going to be assessed 4 suggested use of Word, Google search and toolbar or Safari on Mac –only 2 in this group had English as their first language.
  • Not only should it be simple but also the instructions and strategies to use them.
  • Recorded location of correct spelling within suggestion list. Looking for correct spelling to be presented in top3. Public list covers a variety of words that Note – accuracy and results will change over time for checkers that provide results via server queries (Ginger, Ghotit)
  • Data not definitive and always changing!
  • Form / from most common error according to Pedler thesis
  • Unlike standard spell checkers that need to check whether a word is in it’s database and then suggest alternatives if it is not, contextual spell checkers have a more complicated task. First they have to identify words that are not correct within the given context. Then they have to suggest words to make the context of the sentence correct.
  • Most errors corrected but not all! Missed words and grammar still a problem but when does proofing become re-drafting?
  • Most errors corrected but not all! Missed words and grammar still a problem but when does proofing become re-drafting?
  • LexDis 27/01/12 E.A. Draffan

Spell checking when working online. Spell checking when working online. Presentation Transcript

  • Spell checking: working online and working in context E.A. Draffan and Abi James
  • Not all spell checkers are equal
    • In accuracy and functionality!
  • Possible Strategies to consider for spelling support ….
    • Specialist software with phonetic spelling and homophone checkers: e.g. TextHelp Read and Write, ClaroRead, VeritySpell
    • Browser spell checkers – built in or add-ons e.g. Google toolbar, ieSpell, Firefox British Dictionary
    • Spell checkers built into an application – MS Office, part of a web page or integrated into the text editor e.g. Facebook etc.
    • Web based ‘content sensitive checkers’ e.g. Ginger and Ghotit.
  • Which spell checking approach to choose?
  • Toolkit approach – Ira David Socol
  • The right tool Online or offline Spelling, homophones grammar? While writing or as part of proofing? What support is included in the checker? What “type” of error? How easy to correct? TEST – for spell checkers
  • No one spell checking solution will fit ALL the environments & tasks that a student will encounter during their course
    • So we must give them the skills to choose the appropriate tool at the appropriate time in line with their learning preferences.
  • How are the students spell checking blogs, wikis etc?
    • Guildford College – 15 students 6 depended on using MS Word with ‘Cut and Paste’.
    • 32 LexDis participants http://www.lexdis.org some used assistive technologies, others said ‘not sure it is right’ ask a human, others cut and pasted from Word, used Google etc…
    • 34 Post graduate students 4 suggested use of Word, Google search and toolbar or Safari on Mac
  • Is online word processing here?
    • Who would win in a fight: Microsoft Office or Google Docs?
    • Microsoft Office 51% (1365 votes)
    • Google Docs 37% (994 votes)
    • Tie: They're Both Good 12% (315 votes)
    • Total Votes: 2674 (Mashable Nov. 09)
    • Office 2010 ??
  • The message from students – Keep it simple!
  • So how accurate are spell checkers?
  • Non-word error test
    • Why? assess the accuracy of spell checkers and how close to the top of a suggestion list the target word occurs.
    • Used database and tests from James & Draffan (2005) of errors made by dyslexic adults and children in free writing and spelling tests
    • Random sample of 96 errors, includes duplicate errors for the same target word
    • Random sample of 30 miss-spelling for 30 words from publically available sub-section of the James & Draffan database.
  • Single non-word error accuracy No updates Results may be updated from users errors Results may be updated from server database 4 7 1 6 (1) 1 1 0 0 7
  • Some checkers can also correct real word errors
    • Real word errors can be a caused by a…
      • Homophone e.g. piece / peace
      • Typing error, e.g. form / from
      • Spelling error creating a real-word which a poor reader is unable to detect e.g. told / fold
    • Homophone checkers identify homophone and suggest alternatives spellings
    • Contextual spell checkers claim to be able to identify and correct any real-word errors.
  • What is the difference between grammar checkers and contextual checkers?
    • Similarities:
      • Can both change the context of a sentence
      • Can both change correct text
    • Differences:
      • Contextual checkers look for words out of place
      • Grammar checkers try to apply grammatical rules & correct ALL errors.
  • Grammar and contextual checking in Word 2007
  • How do we test contextual spell checkers
    • Not based on a wordlist or lexicon. Need to:
      • Identifying the real word error
      • Suggest correct word
      • Reasons for failure, in order of magnitude:
      • Not identifying the real-word error (false negative)
      • Identifying a correct word as an error (false positive)
      • Identifying a real-word error but not suggesting the correct word
  • Test 1: Controlled data
    • Created 30 sentences, each containing a non-word error from the James & Draffan (2005) database.
    • Then added a real-word error to each sentence.
    • Real word error could be:
      • A homophone e.g. need / knead
      • Letter transposition, addition or removal to produce a real word e.g. bank / blank
      • Similar looking or sounding word e.g. involved / evolved
  • Results of controlled data
  • Test 2: Free writing example 74 word paragraph by a dyslexic learner:
    • He duse this at the begen by saying about this purson “sat in a wheeled chair, wating for dark,” now Owen in this poem starts off if he was fare away from the solder like he is looken on to the solder . Then leter on in the poem he get moor clowser to him and sturts to discrid his amosins and even get the reader in the amoshen like if you where the solder .
    • 11 non-word errors 7 real-word errors
  • Word 2007 corrected version
    • He does this at the begen by saying about this person “sat in a wheeled chair, waiting for dark,” now Owen in this poem starts off if he was fare away from the solder like he is looking on to the solder . Then later on in the poem he get moor closer to him and starts to discrid his amosins and even get the reader in the amoshen like if you where the solder .
    • 4 non-word errors 7 real-word errors remain
    • 7 errors corrected
  • IE Spell corrected version
    • He duse this at the begen by saying about this person “sat in a wheeled chair, waiting for dark,” now Owen in this poem starts off if he was fare away from the solder like he is looking on to the solder . Then later on in the poem he get moor closer to him and starts to discrid his emotions and even get the reader in the amoshen like if you where the solder .
    • 4 non-word errors 7 real-word errors remain
    • 7 errors corrected
  • Google toolbar corrected version
      • He duse this at the begen by saying about this person “sat in a wheeled chair, waiting for dark,” now Owen in this poem starts off if he was fare away from the solder like he is looking on to the solder . Then later on in the poem he get moor closer to him and starts to discrid his amosins and even get the reader in the amoshen like if you where the solder .
      • 5 non-word errors 7 real-word errors remain
      • 6 errors corrected
  • VeritySpell corrected version
    • He does this at the begen by saying about this person “sat in a wheeled chair, waiting for dark,” now Owen in this poem starts off if he was far away from the solder like he is looking on to the solder . Then later on in the poem he get moor closer to him and starts to describe his emotions and even get the reader in the emotion like if you were the solder .
      •  
      • 1 non-word error 5 real-word errors remain
      • 13 errors corrected
  • Ginger corrected version
    • He does this at the begen by saying about this person “sat in a wheeled chair, waiting for dark,” now Owen in this poem starts off if he was far away from the soldier like he is looking onto the solder . Then later on in the poem he gets more closer to him and starts to describe his emotions and even get the reader in the emotions like if you where the solder .
      • 1 non-word error 4 real-word errors remain
      • 14 errors corrected
  • Read & Write 9 toolbar corrected version
    • He does this at the beginning by saying about this person “sat in a wheeled chair, waiting for dark,” now Owen in this poem starts off if he was fare away from the solder like he is looking on to the solder . Then later on in the poem he get more closer to him and starts to describe his amosins and even get the reader in the emotion like if you were the solder .
      • 1 non-word error 4 real-word errors remain
      • 13 errors corrected
  • Summary Non-word errors remaining Real-word errors remaining Errors corrected Word 2007 4 7 7 IE Spell 4 7 7 Google Toolbar 5 7 6 VeritySpell 1 5 13 Ginger 1 4 14 Read & Write 1 5 13
  • Conclusions
    • Online working is a reality but learners don’t adopt the same proofing strategies as off line working
    • There are many spell-checking tools that can be used with online work
      • But their usability and accuracy vary
      • Who knows of their existence?
    • Contextual correction has arrived
    • REMEMBER – keep it simple & personal
  • Personalisation
    • Will this do for all of you? Showing one size t-shirt
    • No that won’t fit me
    • We are all unique with individual needs and requirements
  • Useful Links
    • LexDis Project website: www.lexdis.org
    • James and Draffan (2004):
    • www.dyslexic.com/accuracy
  • Contact Details
    • E.A. Draffan
    • Learning Societies Lab, Electronics and Computer Science, University of Southampton. Mobile 07976 289103 E-mail: [email_address]
    • Abi James
    • Iansyst Ltd
    • Cambridge
    • 01223 420101
    • E-mail:
    • [email_address]
    • www.dyslexic.com