Erinaceomorpha
Emma McGaffney
General Information
The order Erinaceomorpha contains one family
Erinaceidae, and two sub-families Erinaceinae more
common...
Location
Hedgehogs can be found in Africa, Asia, and Europe, but are not
native to North or South America. These animals h...
Food Webs
Hedgehogs and Moonrats are omnivores and are found in the 3rd
trophic level. They feed on small rodents, reptile...
Competition
Hedgehogs that were introduced to New Zealand (Figure 3) are
having to compete with native species for food. T...
Biodiversity
People often think that Hedgehogs are related to
Porcupines(Figure 4) because of their spines, but they actua...
Adaptive Radiation
Hedgehogs and Moonrats were
once part of an order called
Insectivora. Later a few species
were removed ...
Adaptations
Hedgehog
The hedgehog has sharp spines (Figure 6) that are about 5mm
long used to defend itself from predators...
Adaptations
Moonrats
Moonrats have the ability to produce a scent in
order to mark it’s territory. The scent is said be be...
Evolution
Eutheria is an ancestor of the order Erinaceomorpha.
Eutheria was divided into two subgroups, Stem eutherians,
a...
Succession
Primary and Secondary Succession can negatively affect
Hedgehogs and Moonrats. Succession can destroy the
ecosy...
Sources
• http://www.planet-mammiferes.org/Photos/Insectiv/Erinace/HyloSin3.jpg
• http://www.google.ca/imgres?imgurl&imgre...
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Erinaceomorpha

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A brief slide show on Erinaceomorpha more commonly known as Hedgehogs.

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Erinaceomorpha

  1. 1. Erinaceomorpha Emma McGaffney
  2. 2. General Information The order Erinaceomorpha contains one family Erinaceidae, and two sub-families Erinaceinae more commonly known as a Hedgehog (Figure 1), and Galericinae known as a Gymnure or Moonrat (Figure 2). Figure 1 Figure 2
  3. 3. Location Hedgehogs can be found in Africa, Asia, and Europe, but are not native to North or South America. These animals have been introduced and become invasive in New Zealand and the islands of Scotland. Moonrats can be found in Southeast Asia. Both of these animals are mainly found in the biome temperate rainforest.
  4. 4. Food Webs Hedgehogs and Moonrats are omnivores and are found in the 3rd trophic level. They feed on small rodents, reptiles, earthworms and bits of plant materials such as vegetables and fruits. Some animals that feed on hedgehogs are owls, hawks, foxes, and badgers.
  5. 5. Competition Hedgehogs that were introduced to New Zealand (Figure 3) are having to compete with native species for food. They were first introduced there in the 1870’s by European settlers as a reminder of their homeland but have become a pest. Figure 3
  6. 6. Biodiversity People often think that Hedgehogs are related to Porcupines(Figure 4) because of their spines, but they actually are not. Porcupines are rodents and Hedgehogs are Insectivores. Also Porcupines spines are barbed a characteristic that Hedgehogs lack. Moonrats more closely resemble large rats. Figure 4
  7. 7. Adaptive Radiation Hedgehogs and Moonrats were once part of an order called Insectivora. Later a few species were removed leaving the remaining species in the order Eulipotyphla. This order was then split again for the last time into the orders Erinaceomorpha and Soricomorpha. Soricomorpha is compromised of the Soricidae family (Shrews) and the Talpidae family (Moles). Figure 5 is a picture of a Shrew
  8. 8. Adaptations Hedgehog The hedgehog has sharp spines (Figure 6) that are about 5mm long used to defend itself from predators. When a hedgehog feels it’s being threatened it will curl up into a ball causing these spines to point outward. Figure 6
  9. 9. Adaptations Moonrats Moonrats have the ability to produce a scent in order to mark it’s territory. The scent is said be be very strong with an s mellsimilar to that of rancid garlic or onion.
  10. 10. Evolution Eutheria is an ancestor of the order Erinaceomorpha. Eutheria was divided into two subgroups, Stem eutherians, and Placentals which contains the Clade Laurasiatheria where Erinaceomorpha are found. These animals have been around for up to 60 million years, but have changed little in the last 15 million.
  11. 11. Succession Primary and Secondary Succession can negatively affect Hedgehogs and Moonrats. Succession can destroy the ecosystems where these species live. If there is no grass in the area there will be no rodents which could lead to a decline in the population of hedgehogs.
  12. 12. Sources • http://www.planet-mammiferes.org/Photos/Insectiv/Erinace/HyloSin3.jpg • http://www.google.ca/imgres?imgurl&imgrefurl=http%3A%2F%2Fhebhogs.wordpress.com%2Fab out%2F&h=0&w=0&tbnid=X1iJm2bpc7nCkM&tbnh=194&tbnw=259&zoom=1&q=hedgehogs&doc id=XpT2CcTPX6Yy9M&ei=3WomU_GdBIv7oASJnoCgAw&ved=0CAUQsCUoAQ • http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_biome_do_hedgehogs_live_in?#slide=3 • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hedgehog • http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/391430/moonrat • http://www.hedgehogworld.com/content.php?130-Hedgehogs-in-the-Wild • http://www.whateats.com/what-eats-a-hedgehog • http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7147/6797473439_6802a73d1e_z.jpg • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Insectivora • http://www.google.ca/search?q=shrews&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=To4mU6XuFcryoASazI HoAw&ved • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hedgehogs_in_New_Zealand • http://www.hdpaperwall.com/world-maps-countries/ • http://leavingcert.net/skoool/examcentre_sc.asp?id=1944 • http://www.hunterporcupine.com/ • http://www.lonelyplanet.com/maps/pacific/new-zealand/

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