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Big Society & Harnessing The Power Of The Uk
Big Society & Harnessing The Power Of The Uk
Big Society & Harnessing The Power Of The Uk
Big Society & Harnessing The Power Of The Uk
Big Society & Harnessing The Power Of The Uk
Big Society & Harnessing The Power Of The Uk
Big Society & Harnessing The Power Of The Uk
Big Society & Harnessing The Power Of The Uk
Big Society & Harnessing The Power Of The Uk
Big Society & Harnessing The Power Of The Uk
Big Society & Harnessing The Power Of The Uk
Big Society & Harnessing The Power Of The Uk
Big Society & Harnessing The Power Of The Uk
Big Society & Harnessing The Power Of The Uk
Big Society & Harnessing The Power Of The Uk
Big Society & Harnessing The Power Of The Uk
Big Society & Harnessing The Power Of The Uk
Big Society & Harnessing The Power Of The Uk
Big Society & Harnessing The Power Of The Uk
Big Society & Harnessing The Power Of The Uk
Big Society & Harnessing The Power Of The Uk
Big Society & Harnessing The Power Of The Uk
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Big Society & Harnessing The Power Of The Uk

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Recent survey on the awareness and perception of the Big Society in the UK

Recent survey on the awareness and perception of the Big Society in the UK

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  • 1. Big Society & Harnessing the Power of the UKA State of the Nation Survey: Society and attitudes to contributing– the views of the UK workforce and the role business can play 1
  • 2. What we didThere were 2.3 million registeredbusinesses in the UK and just over 29million people in full and part timeemployment in the UK in 2010. We wantedto explore the potential for engaging themin Big Society. We wanted to understandthe appetite, the potential and the barriersto engagement.In October and November 2010, we conducted astudy of individuals’ views on being active in theirlocal community, or being a part of the ’Big Society’ –whether acting as part of their employer’s corporateresponsibility programme or on their own initiative asindividuals.The first step was exploratory qualitative researchwhich took the form of four discussion groups withindividuals from routine and manual positionsthrough to senior management. We used thesediscussions to tease out the issues and design a wideronline survey of 2,004 members of the British publicthat was carried out in November 2010. Results wereweighted to reflect the population as a whole. Thispaper outlines the main findings.Contents:Summary 3-6Recommendations 8-9Findings 11 - 21 February 2011 2
  • 3. SummaryThe following is a snapshot of the top line findings:14 million employees are willing to become involved in activity which benefits societyor the community, provided that their employer is fully committed to helping them make adifference.LanguageSociety seems less relevant and too distant – community is ‘closer to home’ and hasgreater resonance.51% are most interested in making a contribution to community compared to 20%interested in contributing to society.‘Charity begins at home’ and wanting to ‘benefit and help local people’ were the drivers.The feel good factorEmotional reward is the biggest incentive67% said ‘Just feeling personally that I am making a difference’ was the single biggestmotivator for making a contribution.18 – 34 year olds were more motivated by tangible/material benefits.Support and beliefPeople believe its important and for many its personal54% think ‘it is important that as an individual, I make a contribution to my localcommunity’.54% have a preference for getting involved in something that means a lot to thempersonally.? Q: When it comes to communicating all things big society - are we taking the above into account? 3
  • 4. Its a duty - not a nice to doPeople believe companies have a duty to engage and helpthem get involved too64% were clear that companies have a duty to give something back to their localcommunities.54% felt that employers also have a duty to make it easy for the employees to givesomething back.49% want their employer to support them in getting involved – but with the caveat that thisactivity is for its own ends rather than as marketing activity.Communicate and engageEmployers are not communicating effectively31% don’t really know how their company would feel about getting them involved duringwork time.23% said their company does not offer opportunities for them to get involved.17% believe their organisation would not allow them to.Only 28% said their company did offer opportunities in work time.Theres a lot more going on than you might think72% provided a myriad of examples of how they got involved in supporting their localcommunity/society. The most common themes include:• 26% with community projects (e.g. helping neighbours or the elderly with things they may have difficulty with)• 20% with local schools• 12% with local hospitalsOne size doesnt fit allPeople play different roles for different reasons and we needto take this in to account when we consider engaging peoplein supporting society or their local communities.We found six distinct types of idividual. (See next page) 4
  • 5. Activist (19%) Typically this is a person who is good at garnering initial support for a given cause or activity and in making others aware of a particular issue and engaging them in a cause or activity. “I like to take a really active role and encourage others to participate even if I am not leading an initiative myself” • More likely to be motivated by the emotional reward of feeling personally that they are making a difference (80%) but with 14% motivated by being publicly recongnised in their local community Leader (10%) Typically this is a person who is (and may like to be recognised as) an active facilitator and organiser of activities, whom others tend to rely on for organisational initiative and logistical support. “I tend to take a leadership role, coming up with ideas and organising people myself” • Most likely of all segments to be motivated by ‘just personally feeling like I am making a difference,’ but like Activists, some want to be recognised in their local community (14%) Follower (19%) Typically this is a person that is aware of the importance of contributing to community, but needs a catalyst to become motivated and wants to be organised by others to take part. “I tend to get involved in organising activities if somebody else is there to lead it” • Typically employed by larger companies, and more likely to be working part time Joiner (25%) Typically, a Joiner lags in taking up a new activity or cause and is more likely to join once a group has already been established and an activity is underway. “I tend to get involved in helping out with activities once a group of people have set up something that I can easily join in with” • Joiners are less likely than Activists, Leaders or Followers to be involved, currently or recently in activities that make a contribution to society or their local community. They are most likely to take part in very local community projects such as helping neighbours For hire (10%) This is a person who is not typically an active contributor and may require incentivisation (mainly social) or peer pressure to inspire them to join and participate. “I tend to join in only if I am pushed or when friends or colleagues get involved” • Are more likely to be motivated by some form of formal recognition or the offer of additional benefits Disinterested (6%) Typically this is a person who is plagued by apathy and disinterest in contributing to society/community and would require significant convincing around the benefits and rationale for doing so. “I tend not to be interested in joining in with activity that makes a contribution to my local community”? Q: When it comes to engagement, are we considering the roles people play, their motivations and incentives?For more details see pages 13-14. 5
  • 6. When it comes to Corporate Responsibility (CR)an emotional and local connection seem keyWhen challenged as to whether cynicism meansthat CR is a ‘bad’ thing, people were reluctant toagree, but CR didn’t often provide a cause with “Down the line they’ve got their... sinisterwhich people felt they could ally themselves. They little plan of how they’re going to benefit...often didn’t connect emotionally. but for now it’s actually benefiting whoever it is that they’re working with.”Time, knowledge and emotional Middle managementconnectionDespite some cynicism about self-aggrandisingcorporate activities; many understood that CR “My company promotes climate changeactivities could be beneficial to the recipients. The to local stakeholders, for example, just toappetite for making a contribution through their bring down the carbon footprint. It givesemployers’ activities was hampered by three main ideas to companies how to actually reducefactors that did not include cynicism: their carbon footprint by, such as, saving1 Time pressures of the job itself, as well as busy water from their roofs, you know, using daily lives products that are recyclable or things like this. So provide free consultancy advice to2 A surprising lack of knowledge about the local companies.” opportunities offered by employers (or a Middle management straight lack of opportunities)3 Causes supported by an employer do not necessarily elicit the emotional connection that provides the core motivation for employees to “I work for a firm in the City, we’ve had get involved quite a lot of stick recently for not really contributing to society and stealing everyone’s money. We do have a volunteer scheme. They give us two days to work as a volunteer to be honest they’re put quite a lot of in, it’s not just about PR they’ve actually got people out doing stuff, so it’s! Q: Are the right been pretty good. Skilled manual opportunities not being communicated or offered to employees? A: It could be as much about how initiatives are communicated and supported as the issue itself. 6
  • 7. Thoughts andrecommendations 7
  • 8. Thoughts and recommendationsBased on the findings, the following outlines what we think areimportant issues to consider. Its not exhaustive or detailed - its astarting point.1. Community not Society - Use the right languageUse the language of ‘community’, make issues relevant to individuals and ‘close to home’.Localising communications is key. Let local leaders and local people tell their stories. Peopleseem to relate most to the idea of ‘better communities’ not ‘big society’.2. Get involvedThe public believe there is a duty for everyone to contribute(including business). So make ita priority. Like ‘Fair Trade’ – this will increasingly be important to consumers and employeesalike.3. Emotional engagement and feel good factorEngage people in the issues they care about, and ensure they can see the difference theircontribution makes. Facts and figures don’t move head and heart. Communications needs tofocus on the tangible real life benefits. Show not tell.4. Apply the X and the F factors.Simon Cowells X Factor ticks the boxes of relevance, emotion and celebration of local peopleand their aspirations. The ‘target audience’ watches, laughs, cries, cares and thinks ‘that couldbe me or someone I know. I can vote and see the difference’.F is for ‘fun’ – don’t underestimate its power.5. Communicate, communicate, communicateEngage employees in designing your approach. Tell them: what you do, why you do it – therelevance and the benefits for everyone, how they can get involved, who is doing what andhow you can support them.6. Acitivists to followers – know your audienceTo make a real difference, organisations should understand the motivators for different groups.They should take a ‘behaviour change’ and engagement approach. For example:Younger groups want more tangible benefits – so make it worth it. 8
  • 9. For those who want recognition - invest in celebrating success and recognising them –personally and publically.For maximum impact develop your strategies according to the audience and their behaviouralprofiles. Get the mix right too. Ask yourself: What are the profiles of your employees or theaudiences/population you want to engage? What motivates them, what is local to them andwhat reward are they looking for? What skills might they need? See pages 13-14.For example, based on the profiles we have identified, the following should be considered:First - you need ‘Activists’ to get things going and build enthusiasm, your ‘Leaders’ to get thingsdone and bring the ‘Followers’ and ‘Joiners’ with them.Followers and Joiners make up 44% of the population and could (according to theirtypical profiles) play valuable roles in supporting people and initiatives in their immediatecommunities.7. Joiners are untapped potentialJoiners make up 25% of the population and are a largely untapped resource of over 3.5million people. They are the group least likely to have been engaged in supporting theircommunity or society. The mixture of full time, part time and the unemployed means there isflexibility too. They are most likely to get involved in their immediate communities – helpingneighbours and local initiatives. Understanding, engaging and supporting them is important.Engage them once something is set up and make it easy for them to get involved. They couldplay a key role in building supportive and empowered communities.! One size doesn’t fit all. You need the right mix of people and skills. As well as understanding how to motivate people – we need to understand how we then equip them for the roles they are best suited to. Do all three and you could have the secret to success. 9
  • 10. FindingsSociety and attitudes to contributing 10
  • 11. There’s a lot more going onthan you might thinkOne of the most encouraging things highlighted by findings from the survey was the extent towhich individuals are already involved in delivering value in their local neighbourhood orthrough activities organised by their employer. In the qualitative research, we found that manydo so without thinking of it as community action or getting involved. A surprising number ofpeople told us initially that they didn’t really get involved ‘in that sort of thing’, butsubsequently talked about running a neighbourhood watch scheme or helping out by coachinga young football team, for example! “Well I did the marathon, in that way it’s helping; I did it for Children with Leukaemia.” Non-skilled manual “Well actually, we do like charity dinners at work so say I’d organised an event and it cost say £30 a ticket, half of that money would go to the charity. So we’d do the dinner at like cost price basically but half of the money was going towards that charity and then they sell the tickets for that.” Non-skilled manual “Also, just thinking, I don’t even know if this is on the same lines, it’s just come into my head, my friend’s baby had a really bad kidney problem and it wasn’t like a benefit, but we raised a huge amount of money for her family to get the equipment, so that was another helping kind of thing.” Skilled Manual Management28% claim not to have been involved in any activity that makes a contribution to society or the community.72% provided a myriad of examples of such activity. The most common activities include:26%Being involved in 20% Being involved in 12% Getting involvedcommunity projects local schools in local hospitalsHelping neighboursor the elderly withthings they may havedifficulty with 11
  • 12. Belief in the importanceof getting involvedThere was a strong agreement from citizens that individuals should play a part in society andtheir local community, and there was support for being involved in an employer’s CSR activity ifthere were genuine benefits to be had by the local area.There were also many who were undecided or ‘neutral’ about how important it was to getinvolved, typically, they are those who were younger or working for large companies. Eventhose who were undecided or neutral about the importance of getting involved would considermaking a contribution if their employer was to get involved in providing opportunities or offerpaid time off to do work in the community. This is explored later in this document. ‘I think it is important that as an individual, I make a contribution to my local community’3% 9% 34% 33% 21% ‘I don’t mind if my voluntary contribution is part of a wider company marketing activity as long as the main beneficiary is the local community’ 4% 10% 38% 32% 16%Strongly disagree Strongly agreeBase: 2,004 British adults54% More than half have a preference for getting involved in something that means a lot them personally.69% are happy to be involved with one-off activities that make a contribution to society or the community. 12
  • 13. What roles do people play?Our qualitative research showed that a number of segments were evident when people explainedhow and why they got involved in community activity. We then used the survey to test ourhypotheses about the attitudes, motivations and demographic characteristics that defined thesesegments, to put some flesh on the bones. Activist (19%) Typically this is a person who is good at garnering initial support for a given cause or activity and in making others aware of a particular issue and engaging them in a cause or activity. “I like to take a really active role and encourage others to participate even if I am not leading an initiative myself” • More likely to be senior managers or modern professionals whose work involves supervising other employees • More likely than average to want to stay involved in ongoing rather than one-off activities undertaken for their local community • Like Leaders, Activists are significantly more likely than average to be motivated by the emotional reward of feeling that they are personally making a difference (80%) but the proportion who are motivated by the thought of being publicly recognised in their local community (14%) is greater than it is among Followers, Joiners and those classified as being For Hire • Are usually involved in local school and community projects, generally supporting younger people in career ambitions or hobbies Leader (10%) Typically this is a person who is (and may like to be recognised as) an active facilitator and organiser of activities, whom others tend to rely on for organisational initiative and logistical support. “I tend to take a leadership role, coming up with ideas and organising people myself” • More likely than average to be self-employed (29% for Leaders vs. 12% for Activists) • More likely than other segments to have post-graduate degree or have attained NVQ Level 5 or equivalent (24%) • Are most likely to engage in fund raising for big charities or community projects • Most likely of all segments to be motivated by ‘just personally feeling like I am making a difference,’ but like Activists, some want to be recognised in their local community (14%) and almost as many strongly agree that “it is important to me to receive some form of recognition for any voluntary contribution that I make to society or the community” (13% for Leaders vs. 6% for Activists) • Think that it is important for everyone to make a contribution to the local community • More likely than other segments to be aged 65 or over Follower (19%) Typically this is a person that is aware of the importance of contributing to society/ community, but needs a catalyst to become motivated and wants to be organised by others to take part in a given activity or cause. “I tend to get involved in organising activities if somebody else is there to lead it” • A predominantly female group (60%) that is somewhat younger than Leaders, Joiners or those classified as For Hire • Typically employed by larger companies, and more likely than Leaders or Joiners (but not Activists) to be working part time; less likely than either Activists or Leaders to supervise other employees at work, but more likely to do so than Joiners or those classified as For Hire • Generally, they are only involved with their close community; e.g. helping out neighbours • Almost equally likely to get involved in one-off activities and ongoing activities, in contrast to Activists and Leaders who prefer ongoing activities 13
  • 14. Joiner (25%) Typically, a Joiner lags in taking up a new activity or cause and is more likely to join once a group has already been established and an activity is underway. “I tend to get involved in helping out with activities once a group of people have set up something that I can easily join in with” • Although most members of this group are in full-time or part-time employment (50% and 18% respectively), more are unemployed (14%) than in any other group except for the Disinterested (31%) • At work, Joiners are less likely to supervise other employees than are Activists, Leaders or Followers • Like Followers, most Joiners are women (56% among Joiners and 60% among Followers) • Joiners are less likely than Activists, Leaders or Followers to be currently or recently involved in projects and activities that make a contribution of society or the community; when involved, Joiners are most likely to take part in very local community projects such as helping neighbours For hire (10%) This is a person who is not typically an active contributor and may require incentivisation (mainly social) or peer pressure to inspire them to join and participate. “I tend to join in only if I am pushed or when friends or colleagues get involved” • This group is less inclined than Activists, Leaders, Joiners or Followers to think it is personally important to make a contribution to the local community or to think that everyone has a duty to make a contribution to society or the local community • They are less inclined than other groups, except for the Disinterested, to consider giving up some of their time to make a voluntary contribution to society or the community • Are more likely to be motivated by some form of formal recognition or the offer of additional benefits in the workplace such as time off in lieu of community activity • Are more ‘as and when’ in terms of contribution and don’t value remaining involved with projects over time Disinterested (6%) Typically this is a person who is plagued by apathy and disinterest in contributing to society/community and would require significant convincing around the benefits and rationale for doing so. “I tend not to be interested in joining in with activity that makes a contribution to my local community” • Although most of this group is employed, more are unemployed (31%) than in any other group • Most of the Disinterested who are in work are employed by organisations with 250 employees or more (61%) and more than any other group, they are highly likely to work for a public sector organisation (72%) • They don’t believe that making a contribution to society is personally important • Nor do they believe that UK companies have a duty to give something back to communities or to encourage employees to contribute • 75% of the Disinterested say they have not been involved recently in any projects or activities that make a contribution to society or the community; the most frequently reported exception is giving to a large charity • For those who are employed, additional benefits in the workplace, such as time off in lieu, would be most likely to motivate involvement in social or community activitiesThese figures correspond relatively well with figures reported by TNS-BMRB in October 2010 on‘What the citizen wants’. They report that a fifth of the population are the ‘community organisers’that tend to make things happen – this is reflective of our 29% of ‘Activists’ and ‘Leaders’.The fifth that they report as not typically being involved is also reflective of our ‘disinterested’and ‘for hire’ categories (16% in total).! This segmentation starts to help us to identify how we might engage and motivate different groups more effectively. 14
  • 15. The question of reward or recognitionis a personal oneBut do individuals expect anything in return for their contribution? Can anything be done toencourage, recognise and reward them for their time?Emotional connectionSurvey data reflected the qualitative discussions. The majority of people (67%) indicated thatthe single biggest motivation for making a contribution to society or the community was ‘justfeeling personally like I have made a difference’. Activists and Leaders were particularly likelyto feel this way. In addition, those motivated in this way were more likely than average to includepeople who were self-employed or worked part time, as well as those who were over the age of54 and female.67% are motivated by feeling they have made a personal difference.18-34year olds are more motivated by tangible/ material benefits.There are however, a number of other more tangible options for motivating individuals. Lookingat the segments and demographics, we found that:• Those who were most likely to be motivated by more tangible and material things were those in the younger age groups, generally the 18-34 bracket.• The ‘for hire’ and ‘disinterested’ segments were also more likely to be motivated by something tangible in return, most typically formal recognition in the form of a certificate or similar, or additional benefits in the workplace such as time of in lieu of activity. 15
  • 16. ? Which one of the following things would be most likely to motivate you when contributing to society or the community?Just feeling personally that I am 67%making a differenceGetting additional benefits atmy workplace e.g. time of in lieu 12%Some form of formal recognition,such as a recognised certificate that is 11%valued by employers and society alikeA scheme whereby you can build 11%up ‘credit’ for the work that you doNone of the above 9%Being publicly recognised 8%in my local community 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% Base: 2,004 British adults! This highlights that there is no one-size-fits-all model. Motivation is determined by both demographic and attitudinal factors. So there is perhaps a need to offer a variety of routes to involvement, as well as different schemes for reward and recognition through community channels and through the workplace. 16
  • 17. And how we talk about gettinginvolved is important in getting buy-in from citizens: community is keyWhen we explored how people talk about society and community, ‘community’ had greaterresonance that ‘community’ when they talked about getting involved and giving somethingback.When we asked people to give us an example of what came to mind when they thought ofmaking a contribution to society and the community, community activities were much morepersonal and established an emotional connection. Society-focused Community-focused“In terms of contributing to society, I suppose “ The one you go for is not all sponsored, it’s I’m like a lot of people, I’m kind of selfish about stuff that’s really relevant like new really, I don’t really do as much as I should, in planning applications, just people locally fact I can’t really think of anything I do other sponsoring it because it’s a resource for the than pay my taxes and bills and things like that.” community.” Non-skilled Manual Skilled Manual Management “We have a community hall near my“Saving lives.” house and I would say have meetings there and try and have little community Middle Management functions like barbecues.” Middle Management “I’ve come up with, if you live down “Contributing towards the law… I don’t by the sea, because I do a lot of fishing know how to say it, protecting the as well, do the old coastguard, that’s all innocent?” voluntary, I give quite a bit of money to Middle Management them… you could always help do the old Neighbourhood Watch.” Non-skilled Manual “We’ve got a patch of land at the back of where we live, the property developers want it, we don’t want them to go on it, so we organise barbecues, bonfires and coffee mornings for the ladies.” Junior ManagementOur survey findings reflected thisstrongly. When asked for examplesof what best represented their ideasof contributing to both society and tocommunity, there was a much strongerappetite for getting involved in workto benefit the local community thansociety as a whole. 17
  • 18. ? Where do you feel you are most interested in making a contribution?60%50%40%30% 51%20%10% 20%0% Society CommunityBase: 2,004 British adultsAsked why they gave the answers they did, almost half of those who talked about gettinginvolved in the community gave reasons such as ‘charity begins at home’ and wanting to‘benefit and help local people’.! There is a very real sense that the language and sentiment of community is powerful when used to encourage people to get involved in formal or informal volunteering. 18
  • 19. What roles should UK businessesbe playing?Turning to the role of UK businesses, almost two in three (64%) survey respondents were clearthat companies have a duty to give something back to the communities local to where they dobusiness. This sentiment is strengthened by the fact that over half (54%) felt that employersalso have a duty to make it easy for employees to give something back to the community. actively agree that they want their employer49% to support them in getting involved – but with the caveat that this activity is for its own ends rather than as marketing activity. ‘UK companies have a duty to give something back to the communities local to where they do business’4% 6% 26% 37% 27% ‘Employers have a duty to make it easy for the employees to give something back’ 5% 10% 31% 36% 18% ‘Employers should recognise employees who make a voluntary contribution to society or the community’ 6% 11% 34% 34% 15% ‘I would like my employer to support me in getting involved in society or community activities but they should not use these activities for marketing purposes’ 6% 11% 34% 34% 15%Strongly disagree Strongly agreeBase: 1,372 British adults in full or part-time employment! Our qualitative research highlighted the importance of an organisation being honest about the fact that CSR activity benefits both the organisation and the recipients. Employers will need to take this into account when they organise and communicate opportunities to employees. 19
  • 20. Employers are not communicatingeffectively enough about theopportunities they offer forcontributing to society or thecommunity, or they simply aren’toffering themAnother striking finding that reinforces the need to communicate opportunities more effectively.Almost one employee in every three reported not knowing how his or her company would feel aboutthe use of work time to make a contribution to society or the community. Of all the options tested,this was the one that collected most responses. The options that ranked second and third, whentaken together, collected 40 per cent of all responses: • The company I work for does not offer opportunities to contribute to society or the community in work time (23%) • The company I work for would not allow me to contribute to society or the community in work time (17%)In contrast, 28 per cent reported that the company they worked for offered opportunities inwork time to make a contribution and actively encouraged employees to do so (13%) or left it toindividuals to decide whether to get involved (15%). Senior managers and administrators were morelikely to state that their employers offers opportunities to get involved. are not aware of whether their employer31% ? would approve of them using work time to make a contribution to society or the community. As an employee, which of the following statements best describes the opportunities that you have at work to make a contribution to society or the community outside of your normal, day-to-day duties? The company I work for offers opportunities in work time for me to make a contribution 13% to society or the community and actively encourages employees to do so The company I work for offers opportunities in work time for me to make a contribution to society or 15% the community although it is up to the individual as to wether they take these opportunities The company I work for does not really offer opportunities in work time for employees to 23% make a contribution to society or the community The company I work for would not allow me in work time to undertake activities that make a 17% contribution to society or the community I don’t really know how my company would feel about me using work time to make a contribution 31% to society or the community 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 20
  • 21. With enhancedopportunities andcommunication, theworkforce could be amajor player in deliveringvalue to communitiesPerhaps one of the most encouraging findingswas that for those in employment, 48%agreed that “I would like my employer tosupport me in getting involved in society orcommunity activities, but they should not usethese activities for marketing purposes”Based on labour market statisticspublished in November 2010, this equatesto approximately 14 million employeeswho would be willing to become involvedin activity to the benefit of society or thecommunity, provided that their employerwas fully committed to helping them make adifference. 21
  • 22. Building social capital, representing social purpose and changing behaviour.Specialising in: internal and external communications, branding, corporateresponsibility, public affairs, 3rd generation research and engagement, stakeholderrelations, consumer relations to marketing, behaviour change and service design.Bringing together the best of The Bell Pottinger GroupFor more information contact:Claire CaterDirector brand democracybrand democracy 6th floor Holborn Gate+44 (0)20 7861 3869 330 High Holborn Londonccater@bell-pottinger.co.uk WC1V 7QG 22

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