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Manuale AutoCAD 2009.

  1. 1. AUTOCAD® 2009 ANDAUTOCAD LT® 2009NO EXPERIENCE REQUIRED™ Jon McFarland Wiley Publishing, Inc.
  2. 2. AUTOCAD 2009 AND ® ®AUTOCAD LT 2009NO EXPERIENCE REQUIRED ™
  3. 3. AUTOCAD® 2009 ANDAUTOCAD LT® 2009NO EXPERIENCE REQUIRED™ Jon McFarland Wiley Publishing, Inc.
  4. 4. Acquisitions Editor: Willem KnibbeDevelopment Editor: James A. ComptonTechnical Editor: John EvanscoProduction Editor: Christine O’ConnorCopy Editor: Kathy Grider-CarlyleProduction Manager: Tim TateVice President and Executive Group Publisher: Richard SwadleyVice President and Executive Publisher: Joseph B. WikertVice President and Publisher: Neil EddeBook Designer and Compositor: Franz BaumhacklProofreader: Jen Larsen, Word OneIndexer: Jack LewisCover Designer: Ryan SneedCover Image: © Dieter Spannknebel / Digital Vision / gettyimagesCopyright © 2008 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Indianapolis, IndianaPublished simultaneously in CanadaISBN: 978-0-470-26058-6No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by anymeans, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, scanning or otherwise, except as permitted under Sec-tions 107 or 108 of the 1976 United States Copyright Act, without either the prior written permission of thePublisher, or authorization through payment of the appropriate per-copy fee to the Copyright Clearance Center,222 Rosewood Drive, Danvers, MA 01923, (978) 750-8400, fax (978) 646-8600. Requests to the Publisher for per-mission should be addressed to the Legal Department, Wiley Publishing, Inc., 10475 Crosspoint Blvd., Indi-anapolis, IN 46256, (317) 572-3447, fax (317) 572-4355, or online at http://www.wiley.com/go/permissions.Limit of Liability/Disclaimer of Warranty: The publisher and the author make no representations or warrantieswith respect to the accuracy or completeness of the contents of this work and specifically disclaim all warranties,including without limitation warranties of fitness for a particular purpose. No warranty may be created orextended by sales or promotional materials. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable forevery situation. This work is sold with the understanding that the publisher is not engaged in rendering legal,accounting, or other professional services. If professional assistance is required, the services of a competent pro-fessional person should be sought. Neither the publisher nor the author shall be liable for damages arising here-from. The fact that an organization or Website is referred to in this work as a citation and/or a potential source offurther information does not mean that the author or the publisher endorses the information the organization orWebsite may provide or recommendations it may make. Further, readers should be aware that Internet Websiteslisted in this work may have changed or disappeared between when this work was written and when it is read.For general information on our other products and services or to obtain technical support, please contact ourCustomer Care Department within the U.S. at (800) 762-2974, outside the U.S. at (317) 572-3993 or fax (317)572-4002.Wiley also publishes its books in a variety of electronic formats. Some content that appears in print may not beavailable in electronic books.Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data is available from the publisher.TRADEMARKS: Wiley, the Wiley logo, and the Sybex logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of John Wiley& Sons, Inc. and/or its affiliates, in the United States and other countries, and may not be used without writtenpermission. [Insert any third-party trademark language.] All other trademarks are the property of their respec-tive owners. Wiley Publishing, Inc., is not associated with any product or vendor mentioned in this book.10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
  5. 5. Dear Reader,Thank you for choosing AutoCAD 2009 and AutoCAD LT 2009: No ExperienceRequired. This book is part of a family of premium-quality Sybex graphics books,all written by outstanding authors who combine practical experience with a giftfor teaching. Sybex was founded in 1976. More than thirty years later, we’re still committedto producing consistently exceptional books. With each of our titles we’re work-ing hard to set a new standard for the industry. From the paper we print on, tothe authors we work with, our goal is to bring you the best books available. I hope you see all that reflected in these pages. I’d be very interested to hearyour comments and get your feedback on how we’re doing. Feel free to let meknow what you think about this or any other Sybex book by sending me an emailat nedde@wiley.com, or if you think you’ve found a technical error in this book,please visit http://sybex.custhelp.com. Customer feedback is critical to ourefforts at Sybex. Best regards, NEIL EDDE Vice President and Publisher Sybex, an Imprint of Wiley
  6. 6. To my lovely wife, Lucy, and our two sons, Zach and Jacob
  7. 7. A C K N OW L E D G M E N T S am grateful to the many people who contributed to the publication of thisI update of the book. For those involved in this project at Sybex and Wiley, I extend my thanks. First off, I would like to thank David Frey. He created this book 10 years agoand faithfully revised it for every new release of AutoCAD until deciding to handit over to me last year. Maintaining his high quality standard is an awesomeresponsibility that I hope to meet with this edition. Sandy Jaffe clarified the nuances of the contract, and Janet Chang helped withthe logistics around the signing. Thanks to Willem Knibbe who brought me intothis project and has served as acquisitions editor for this and previous updates.He has continued to rally support for its publication; and he has maintained aconstructive relationship with Jim Quanci and Denis Cadu of the AutodeskDeveloper Network. Thanks to Shaan Hurley, Nate Bartley, and Robb Bittnerfrom Autodesk, who provided me with access to the software in development andanswered many of my questions. Thanks to John Evansco, who provided his expertise to do the technical edit-ing. I very much appreciate his lending his teaching and engineering expertisein checking the text and figures for technical accuracy. Jim Compton served wellas Developmental Editor and quickly responded to issues that arose. The Produc-tion Editor was Christine O’Connor; she kept track of the submissions and allthe changes, and, thanks to her, the work progressed at a rate to meet the sched-ule. Kathy Grider-Carlyle served as Copy Editor and, in doing so, helped updatethe language and syntax to keep the book very readable, and she was also anasset in this project. Thanks to Andre Evans for providing the excellent hand-drawn graphics in Chapter 16. Finally, I want to thank the production team at Wiley. Franz Baumhackl hasagain served skillfully as compositor and designer. Jen Larsen took on the ardu-ous task of Proofreader, and Jack Lewis was the Indexer. They have all performedvery well. Everyone involved has been successful in maintaining standards ofhigh quality, and I appreciate their work on this book. —Jon McFarland
  8. 8. ABOUT THE AUTHOR on McFarland manages the CAD department for a company that owns, devel-J ops, and manages retail, office and residential properties. He has written and contributed to several books on AutoCAD, Autodesk VIZ and 3ds Max andteaches AutoCAD and VIZ at the college level.
  9. 9. CONTENTS AT A GLANCE Introduction xixCHAPTER 1 Getting to Know AutoCAD 1CHAPTER 2 Learning Basic Commands to Get Started 29CHAPTER 3 Setting Up a Drawing 63CHAPTER 4 Developing Drawing Strategies: Part 1 87CHAPTER 5 Developing Drawing Strategies: Part 2 151CHAPTER 6 Using Layers to Organize Your Drawing 209CHAPTER 7 Combining Objects into Blocks 269CHAPTER 8 Controlling Text in a Drawing 331CHAPTER 9 Using Dynamic Blocks and Tables 393CHAPTER 10 Generating Elevations 447CHAPTER 11 Working with Hatches, Gradients, and Tool Palettes 493CHAPTER 12 Dimensioning a Drawing 529CHAPTER 13 Managing External References 581CHAPTER 14 Using Layouts to Set Up a Print 615CHAPTER 15 Printing an AutoCAD Drawing 653CHAPTER 16 Creating 3D Geometry 691CHAPTER 17 Rendering and Materials 753 Glossary 779 Index 792
  10. 10. CONTENTS Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xixC HAPTER 1 Getting to Know AutoCAD 1 Starting AutoCAD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Exploring the New Features Workshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 The Customer Involvement Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Exploring the AutoCAD User Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Introducing the AutoCAD Graphics Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Working in the Command Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Using the Ribbon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Displaying the Ribbon Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Using the Ribbon Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Customizing the Ribbon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Using the Menu Browser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Opening a Drawing with the Menu Browser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Switching Between Open Drawings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Using the Drop-Down Menus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Using the Toolbars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Accessing the Toolbar Fly-Out Menus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Workspaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Using the Keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Using the Mouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Are You Experienced? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28C HAPTER 2 Learning Basic Commands to Get Started 29 Using the Line Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Using Coordinates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Using Relative Coordinates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Using the Direct Distance Method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Drawing the Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Using Relative Cartesian Coordinates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Erasing Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Controlling How the Selection Tools Are Displayed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Using Relative Polar Coordinates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
  11. 11. Contents x i Using Direct Input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Using The Offset Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Using the Fillet Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Completing the Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Offsetting Lines to Mark an Opening . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Extending Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Trimming Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 If You Would Like More Practice… . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Are You Experienced? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62C HAPTER 3 Setting Up a Drawing 63 Setting Up the Drawing Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Setting Up the Drawing Size . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 The Grid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Setting Up Drawing Limits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Drawing with Grid and Snap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 A Closer Look at Dynamic Input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Saving Your Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 A Summary of AutoCAD’s Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Linear Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Angular Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Are You Experienced? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86C HAPTER 4 Developing Drawing Strategies: Part 1 87 Laying Out the Walls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Create a Polyline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Edit a Polyline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Creating the Exterior Wall Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Creating the Interior Walls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Cutting Openings in the Walls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Creating Doors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 Drawing Swinging Doors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 Copying Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 Mirroring Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128 Scaling the Bathroom Door . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130 Drawing a Sliding Glass Door . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132 Drawing the Bi-Fold Doors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
  12. 12. x i i Contents If You Would Like More Practice… . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146 An Alternative Sliding Glass Door . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146 An Addition to the Cabin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147 Draw Three Views of a Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148 Are You Experienced? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150C HAPTER 5 Developing Drawing Strategies: Part 2 151 Drawing the Thresholds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154 Drawing the Front Threshold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154 Drawing the Back Threshold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158 Drawing the Decks and Stairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159 Drawing the Front Deck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 Laying Out the Kitchen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174 Drawing the Counter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175 Drawing the Stove and Refrigerator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179 Completing the Stove . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180 Drawing the Kitchen Sink . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186 Constructing the Bathroom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189 Setting Running Object Snaps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190 Drawing a Shower Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192 Drawing the Bathroom Sink and Mirror . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194 Positioning the Toilet and Shelves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196 Drawing the Hot Tub . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199 If You Would Like More Practice… . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202 Drawing the Cabin Again . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202 Drawing Something Else . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203 Drawing Some Furniture for the Cabin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203 Drawing a Gasket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204 Drawing a Parking Lot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206 Are You Experienced? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208C HAPTER 6 Using Layers to Organize Your Drawing 209 Using Layers as an Organizing Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210 Setting Up Layers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212 Assigning Linetypes to Layers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221 Assigning Objects to Layers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226 Using the Quick Properties Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 230
  13. 13. Contents x i i i Selecting the Doors and Swings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231 Turning Off and Freezing Layers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 238 Drawing the Headers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241 Drawing the Roof . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245 Setting a Linetype Scale Factor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251 Assigning an Individual Linetype Scale Factor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 252 Setting Properties of Layers and Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 257 Selecting Colors for Layers and Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 257 Assigning a Color or a Linetype to an Object Instead of a Layer . . . . . . 258 Making a Color or a Linetype Current . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258 Using the Action Recorder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259 Creating Layer States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262 If You Would Like More Practice… . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 266 Experimenting with Linetypes and Linetype Scales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 266 Setting Up Layers for Your Own Trade or Profession . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267 Are You Experienced? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 268C HAPTER 7 Combining Objects into Blocks 269 Making a Block for a Door . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 270 Inserting the Door Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 275 Using Dynamic Blocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282 Finding Blocks in a Drawing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 284 Using Grips to Detect a Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 284 Using the List Command to Detect a Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 285 Using the Properties Palette to Examine a Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 287 Creating a Window Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 288 Inserting the Window Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293 Rotating a Block During Insertion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 294 Using Snap Tracking to Set the Insertion Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 297 Changing a Block’s Scale Factor Using Object Properties . . . . . . . . . . . 299 Finishing the Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300 Revising a Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 304 Sharing Information Between Drawings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 309 Dragging and Dropping Between Two Open Drawings . . . . . . . . . . . . . 309 Using AutoCAD’s DesignCenter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 313 Other Ways to Share Information between Drawings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 321 If You Would Like More Practice... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 328 Are You Experienced? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 330
  14. 14. x i v ContentsC HAPTER 8 Controlling Text in a Drawing 331 Setting Up Text Styles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 332 Determining Text and Drawing Scale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 332 Defining a Text Style for Room Labels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 334 Using Single-Line Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 338 Placing Titles of Views in the Drawing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 338 Placing Room Labels in the Floor Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 341 Using Text in a Grid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 347 Creating a Title Block and Border . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 357 Using Multiline Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 372 Using the Spell Check Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 383 Exploring Other Aspects of Multiline Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 387 If You Would Like More Practice… . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 391 Are You Experienced? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 392C HAPTER 9 Using Dynamic Blocks and Tables 393 Using Attributes for a Grid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 394 Defining Blocks with Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 399 Inserting Blocks with Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 400 Editing Attribute Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 402 Setting Up Multiple Attributes in a Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 404 Defining a Block with Multiple Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 407 Inserting the Room_Info Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 411 Editing Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 415 Controlling the Visibility of Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 418 Exploring Other Uses for Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 422 Creating a Dynamic Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 422 Setting Up Parameters and Actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 424 Fine-Tuning the Dynamic Block with the Properties Palette . . . . . . . . . 427 Inserting a Dynamic Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 429 Creating a Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 434 Defining a Table Style . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 435 Designing a Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 438 If You Would Like More Practice… . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 445 Are You Experienced? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 446
  15. 15. Contents x vC HAPTER 10 Generating Elevations 447 Drawing the South Elevation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 448 Setting Up Lines for the Heights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 451 Using Grips to Copy Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 452 Trimming Lines in the Elevation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 456 Drawing the Decks in Elevation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 461 Generating the Other Elevations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 471 Making the Opposite Elevation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 471 Revising the New South Elevation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 474 Making the Front and Back Elevations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 479 Considering Drawing Scale Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 489 Drawing Interior Elevations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 490 If You Would Like More Practice… . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 491 Are You Experienced? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 492C HAPTER 11 Working with Hatches, Gradients, and Tool Palettes 493 Hatching the South Elevation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 494 Looking at Hatch Patterns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 499 Hatching the Rest of the South Elevation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500 Adding Special Effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 507 Using Hatches in the Floor Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 511 Hatching the Floors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 511 Finishing the Hatches for the Floors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 515 Modifying the Shape of Hatch Patterns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 517 Creating and Managing Tool Palettes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 519 Creating a New Tool Palette . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 519 Setting Up a Palette for Hatches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 521 Creating a Palette for Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 523 If You Would Like More Practice… . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 524 Creating the Hatch Patterns for the Other Elevations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 525 Creating Your Hatch Palette . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 527 Are You Experienced? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 528
  16. 16. x v i ContentsC HAPTER 12 Dimensioning a Drawing 529 Introducing Dimension Styles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530 Making a New Dimension Style . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530 Placing Dimensions on the Drawing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 547 Placing Horizontal Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 547 Using Other Types of Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 555 Using Radial Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 556 Using Aligned and Angular Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 560 Using Leader Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 564 Modifying Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 568 Modifying Dimension Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 569 Using Dimension Overrides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 572 Dimensioning Short Distances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 573 If You Would Like More Practice… . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 576 Dimensioning the Garage Addition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 576 Dimensioning to a Centerline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 577 Doing Other Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 580 Are You Experienced? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 580C HAPTER 13 Managing External References 581 Drawing a Site Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 582 Using Surveyor’s Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 582 Drawing the Driveway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 587 Setting Up an External Reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 593 Using the External References Palette . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 594 Moving and Rotating an Xref . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 597 Modifying an Xref Drawing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 598 Modifying an Xref by Making It the Current Drawing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 598 Modifying an Xref from Within the Host Drawing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 601 Adding an Image to a Drawing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 606 Putting Xrefs to Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 607 Exploring Additional Xref Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 609 Setting the Xref Path . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 609 Binding Xrefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 611 Exploring Other Xref Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 613 If You Would Like More Practice… . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 614 Are You Experienced? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 614
  17. 17. Contents x v i iC HAPTER 14 Using Layouts to Set Up a Print 615 Setting Up Layouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 616 Setting the Layout Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 620 Creating the Paper Space Viewport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 625 Moving the Border to the Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 627 Setting the Viewport Scale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 629 Copying the Layouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 631 Adjusting a Viewport’s Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 635 Setting the Linetype Scale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 637 Adjusting the Other Viewports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 638 Setting Up the Site Plan Viewport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 645 Locking and Turning Viewports Off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 648 If You Would Like More Practice… . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 651 Are You Experienced? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 652C HAPTER 15 Printing an AutoCAD Drawing 653 Using the Plot Dialog Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 654 Printer/Plotter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 657 Paper Size and Number of Copies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 657 Plot Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 657 Plot Scale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 663 Plot Offset and Plot Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 664 The Expanded Plot Dialog Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 666 Printing a Drawing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 667 Determining Lineweights for a Drawing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 667 Setting Other Properties of Layers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 670 Setting Up the Other Parameters for the Print . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 671 Previewing a Print . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 672 Printing a Drawing Using Layouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 674 Printing a Drawing with Multiple Viewports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 677 Publishing Multiple Layouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 679 A Few Words about Plot Styles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 681 Introducing Plot-Style Table Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 681 Are You Experienced? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 690
  18. 18. x v i i i ContentsC HAPTER 16 Creating 3D Geometry 691 Modeling in 3D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 692 Setting Up a 3D Workspace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 692 Making the Walls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 697 Creating the Door and Window Block-Outs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 701 Moving and Rotating in 3D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 705 Cutting the Openings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 708 Creating the Floor, Foundation, and Thresholds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 710 Creating the Foundation and Supports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 712 Building the Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 713 Navigating with the ViewCube . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 725 Building the Decks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 729 Putting a Roof on the Cabin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 739 Getting Further Directions in 3D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 747 Using Other Solids Modeling Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 748 Using Surface-Modeling Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 751 Are You Experienced? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 752C HAPTER 17 Rendering and Materials 753 Creating Cameras to Reproduce Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 754 Using the Loft Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 754 Creating the Cameras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 757 Tweaking the Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 761 Creating a Lighting Scheme . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 762 Creating a Light Source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 762 Enabling Shadows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 765 The First Render . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 766 Controlling the Background of the Rendering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 769 Adding Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 772 Rendering to a File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 775 Are You Experienced? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 778 Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 779 Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 792
  19. 19. INTRODUCTION his book was born of the need for a simple, yet engaging tutorial that wouldT help beginners step into the world of AutoCAD or AutoCAD LT without feel- ing intimidated. That tutorial has evolved over the years into a full intro- duction to the ways in which architects and civil and structural engineersuse AutoCAD to increase their efficiency and ability to produce state-of-the-artcomputerized production drawings and designs. Because AutoCAD and AutoCAD LT are so similar, it makes sense to cover thebasics of both programs. For most of the book, the word AutoCAD stands forboth AutoCAD and AutoCAD LT. When you come to a section of a chapter that applies to AutoCAD only, an icon (shown here) is displayed in the margin to alert you. When appropriate,extra information for AutoCAD LT users is provided to give you a workaround orotherwise keep you in step with the tutorial. The last two chapters, which are an introduction to drawing in 3D, apply onlyto AutoCAD, because AutoCAD LT doesn’t have the 3D commands and features.But LT users can be assured that LT is much the same program as AutoCAD, withonly minor differences. You’ll be prompted when those differences, most of whichare 3D features, come along. This book is directed toward AutoCAD and AutoCAD LT novices—users whoknow how to use a computer and perform basic file-managing tasks, such as creat-ing new folders and saving and moving files, but who know nothing or little aboutAutoCAD or LT (as we’ll call AutoCAD LT throughout the book). If you’re new tothe construction and design professions, this book will be an excellent companionas you learn AutoCAD. If you’re already practicing in those fields, you’ll immedi-ately be able to apply the skills you’ll pick up from this book to real-world projects.The exercises have been successfully used to train architects, engineers, and con-tractors, as well as college and high-school students, in the basics of AutoCAD. For those of you in other trades and professions, the project that runs throughthe book—drawing a small cabin—has been kept simple so that it doesn’t requirespecial training in architecture or construction. Also, most chapters have addi-tional information and exercises specifically designed for non-AEC users. Anyonewanting to learn AutoCAD will find this book helpful.
  20. 20. x x Introduction What Will You Learn from This Book? Learning AutoCAD, like learning any complex computer program, requires a significant commitment of time and attention and, to some extent, a tolerance for repetition. You must understand new concepts to operate the program and to appreciate its potential as a drafting and design tool. But to become profi- cient at AutoCAD, you must also use the commands enough times to gain an intuitive sense of how they work and how parts of a drawing are constructed. At the end of most chapters, you’ll find one or more additional exercises and a checklist of the tools you have learned (or should have learned.) The steps in the tutorial have a degree of repetition built into them that allows you to work through new commands several times and build up confidence before you move on to the next chapter. Progressing through the book, the chapters fall into five general areas of study: Chapters 1 through 3 familiarize you with the organization of the AutoCAD user interface, go over a few of the basic commands, and equip you with the tools necessary to set up a new drawing. Chapters 4 and 5 introduce the basic drawing commands and develop drawing strategies that will help you use commands efficiently. Chapters 6 through 11 work with AutoCAD’s major features. Chapters 12 through 15 examine intermediate and advanced Auto- CAD features. Chapters 16 and 17 cover the 3D modeling tools and the methods for applying materials in AutoCAD. In the process of exploring these elements, you’ll follow the steps involved in laying out the floor plan of a small cabin. You’ll then learn how to generate eleva- tions from the floor plan and, eventually, how to set up a title block and layouts to print your drawing. Along the way, you’ll also learn how to do the following: Use the basic drawing and modify commands in a strategic manner Set up layers Put color into your drawing Define and insert blocks Generate elevation views Place hatch patterns and fills on building components Use text in your drawing
  21. 21. Introduction x x i Chapters in the last part of the book touch on more advanced features of Auto-CAD, including: Dimension the floor plan Drawing a site plan Using external references Setting up a drawing for printing with layouts Making a print of your drawing Working in 3D, for AutoCAD users All these features are taught using the cabin as a continuing project. As a result,you’ll build a set of drawings that document your progress through the project andthat you can use later as reference material if you need to refresh yourself withmaterial in a specific skill. At the end of the book is a glossary of terms that are used in the book and arerelated to AutoCAD and building design, followed by an index.Files on the WebsiteIf you’re already somewhat familiar with AutoCAD and you’re reading only someof the chapters, or if you want to check your work on the cabin against mine atdifferent stages, you can pull accompanying files from this book’s page on Wiley’swebsite at www.sybex.com/go/autocad2009ner. Click the Downloads button onthat page.Hints for SuccessBecause this book is essentially a step-by-step tutorial, it has a side effect in com-mon with any tutorial of this type. After you finish a chapter and see that youhave progressed further through the cabin project, you may wonder exactly whatyou just did and whether you could do it again without the help of the step-by-step instructions. This feeling is a natural result of this kind of learning tool, and you can do acouple of things to get beyond it: You can work through the chapter again. Doing so may seem tedious, but it will help you draw faster. You’ll be able to accomplish the same task in half the time it took you the first time. If you do a chapter a third time, you’ll halve your time again. Each time you repeat a chap- ter, you can skip more and more of the explicit instructions, and even- tually you’ll be able to execute the commands and finish the chapter
  22. 22. x x i i Introduction by just looking at the figures and glancing at the text. In many ways, this process is like learning a musical instrument. You must go slowly at first, but over time and through practice, your pace will pick up. Another suggestion for honing your skills is to follow the course of the book but apply the steps to a different project. You might draw your own living space or design a new one. If you have a real-life design pro- ject that isn’t too complex, that’s even better. Your chances for success in learning AutoCAD or any computer program are greatly increased when you’re highly motivated, and a real project of an appropriate size can be the perfect motivator. Ready, Set… When I started learning AutoCAD about 18 years ago, I was surprised by a level of frustration that I never thought I was capable of feeling. When I finally got over the hump and began feeling that I could successfully draw with this pro- gram after all, I told myself that I would someday figure out a way to help others get past that initial frustration. That was the primary motivating force for my writing this book. I hope it works for you and that you too get some enjoyment while learning AutoCAD. As the title says, there is “no experience required,” only an interest in the subject and a willingness to learn!
  23. 23. CHAPTER 1Getting to KnowAutoCADOpening a new drawingGetting familiar with the AutoCAD and AutoCAD LTgraphics windowsModifying the displayDisplaying and arranging AutoCAD tools
  24. 24. 2 Chapter 1 • Getting to Know AutoCAD our introduction to AutoCAD and AutoCAD LT begins with a tour of the Y user interfaces of the two programs. In this chapter, you’ll also learn how to use some tools that help you control their appearance and how to find and start commands. For the material covered in this chapter, the two applications are almost identical in appearance. Therefore, as you tour AutoCAD, I’ll point out any differences between AutoCAD and AutoCAD LT. In general, LT is a 2D program, so it doesn’t have most of the 3D features that come with Auto- CAD, such as solids modeling and rendering. The AutoLISP programming lan- guage found in AutoCAD is also absent from LT, as is the Action Recorder. The other differences are minor. As mentioned in this book’s introduction, when I say AutoCAD, I mean both AutoCAD and AutoCAD LT. I’ll also specifically refer to AutoCAD LT as LT throughout this chapter and the rest of the book. Starting AutoCAD is the first task at hand. Starting AutoCAD If you installed AutoCAD using the default settings for the location of the program files, start the program by choosing Start ➣ Programs ➣ Autodesk ➣ AutoCAD 2009 ➣ AutoCAD 2009 or by choosing Start ➣ Programs ➣ Autodesk ➣ AutoCAD LT 2009 ➣ AutoCAD LT 2009, depending on your program. (This command path might vary depending on the Windows scheme you are using.) You can also find and click the AutoCAD 2009 icon or the AutoCAD LT 2009 icon on your desktop. Exploring the New Features Workshop The New Features Workshop welcome screen opens when you first start Auto- CAD and leads to several animated demonstrations and explanations of the new features included in the latest release of AutoCAD (see Figure 1.1). This is a quick and easy way to see how AutoCAD 2009 has improved over AutoCAD 2008 and which tools you can use to augment any skills you already have. Choosing Maybe Later on the left side of the dialog box causes it to reappear every time you start AutoCAD. Choosing the No, Don’t Show This To Me Again option dis- misses the dialog box indefinitely. If you chose that option, you must then access the New Features Workshop through the Help option in the Menu Browser, the menu system that you access by clicking on the large red A in the top-left corner of the AutoCAD user interface. Selecting the Yes radio button on the left side of the dialog box opens the New Features Workshop dialog box (see Figure 1.2). Here, you navigate and select the feature you want to investigate in the left pane and observe the selection in the right pane. The drop-down list in the upper-left corner provides access to the New Features Workshops for other Autodesk products installed on your system.
  25. 25. Starting AutoCAD 3F I G U R E 1 . 1 : The AutoCAD welcome screen provides access to the New Features Workshop.F I G U R E 1 . 2 : The New Features Workshop dialog boxThe Customer Involvement ProgramNearly all the latest releases of Autodesk products include the opportunity toparticipate in the customer involvement program (CIP). The CIP is designed tocollect nonpersonal information about your Autodesk products and computersystem to help the product programmers and developers design software that
  26. 26. 4 Chapter 1 • Getting to Know AutoCAD best meets their customers’ needs. If you haven’t yet agreed or declined to par- ticipate, when you first start AutoCAD, the Customer Involvement Program dia- log box might prompt you to join. Participation is strictly voluntary, and if you choose to participate, AutoCAD will periodically send a small file to Autodesk containing information such as your software name and version, the commands you use, and your system con- figuration information. An Internet connection is required, and you must ensure that your firewall settings don’t prevent the information from being transmitted. Exploring the AutoCAD User Interface After bypassing the initial dialog boxes that AutoCAD provides, the program opens to display the AutoCAD user interface, also called the graphics window.AutoCAD and LT AutoCAD provides many methods for creating and editing objects, changing theoffer numerous dia-log boxes with vari- view of a drawing, or executing AutoCAD file maintenance or other utilities. Inous combinations of LT, your screen looks similar to Figure 1.3. For AutoCAD, your monitor displaysbuttons and text one of three workspaces:boxes. You’ll learnmany of their func- The 2D Drafting & Annotation workspace (shown in Figure 1.3)tions as you progressthrough the book. The AutoCAD Classic workspace For AutoCAD users only, the 3D Modeling workspace (see Figure 1.4) You’ll be using the 2D Drafting and Annotation workspace for the first 15 chapters in this book. In the final two chapters, you’ll switch to the 3D Model- ing workspace, but for now, you need to get your AutoCAD user interface to look like Figure 1.3. N O T E The figures and graphics is this book show the drawing area of the AutoCAD user interface with a white background, but the default, and pre- ferred, method is to use a black background to reduce eyestrain. The color choice in the book is simply for readability.
  27. 27. Starting AutoCAD 5F I G U R E 1 . 3 : The AutoCAD graphics window using the 2D Drafting & Annotation workspace Tool Palettes ViewCubeF I G U R E 1 . 4 : The AutoCAD graphics window using the 3D Modeling workspace
  28. 28. 6 Chapter 1 • Getting to Know AutoCAD If your screen looks like Figure 1.4 or isn’t at all like Figure 1.3, you need to make a few changes: 1. Click the Workspace Switching button in the status bar and choose 2D Drafting & Annotation. Alternately, you can choose Tools ➣ Workspaces ➣ 2D Drafting & Annotation. 2. The 2D Drafting & Annotation workspace may display the tool palettes on the screen. If the palettes are displayed, you need to turn them off for now by clicking the X in the upper-right corner. Your workspace might have different palettes displayed than those shown in Figure 1.5. If other palettes are still visible, click the X in the upper-right or upper- left corner of each palette to close them.LT users can skip F I G U R E 1 . 5 : The tool palettesstep 3 and move onto step 4 3. The large area in the middle of the screen is called the drawing area. It might need adjusting. Enter visualstyles↵ to open the Visual Styles Manager, and then click the 2D Wireframe option (see Figure 1.6). Close the Visual Styles Manager.
  29. 29. Starting AutoCAD 7 F I G U R E 1 . 6 : Selecting the 2D Wireframe visual style 4. Enter plan↵ and then world↵ or click the World option in the pop-up menu if it appears. If dots appear in the drawing area, the grid is turned on. 5. Move the cursor to the left side of the status bar at the bottom of the screen, and click the Grid Display button so it’s in the off (unpushed) position and the dots disappear. Be sure all the other readout buttons except Dynamic Input are in their off (unpushed) positions. You can pause your cursor over each button to reveal its name in a tooltip.Your screen should look similar enough to Figure 1.3 to continue.
  30. 30. 8 Chapter 1 • Getting to Know AutoCAD Introducing the AutoCAD Graphics Window At the top of the graphics window sit the Ribbon, the Quick Access toolbar to the left, and the InfoCenter and related tools on the right.The title bar andmenu bar at the top Quick Accessof the LT screen are Toolbaridentical to those inAutoCAD except thatAutoCAD LT appearsin the title bar ratherthan AutoCAD. The title bar is analogous to the title bar in any Windows program. It contains the program name (AutoCAD or AutoCAD LT) and the title of the current draw- ing with its path, as long as any drawing other than the default Drawingn.dwg is open. Below the title bar is the Ribbon, where you’ll find most of the AutoCAD commands and tools needed to complete any drawing task. Related tasks are found under the different tabs, which are further segmented into panels contain- ing similar tools. To the far right of the title bar are the InfoCenter, Communications Center, Favorites, and Help buttons. You can enter a question in the field to the left of the InfoCenter button to quickly access information from the Help system through the InfoCenter’s drop-down panel. With the Communications Center, you can determine what type of information, such as software updates, product support, or RSS feeds, Autodesk sends directly to your system. With the Favorites tool, you can define a list of help or informational topics that can be quickly accessed whenever you need them. The Help button is a direct link to the AutoCAD help system. The blank middle section of the screen is called the drawing area. Notice the movable crosshair cursor. The crosshairs on your cursor might extend com- pletely across the screen. Later in this chapter, I will show you how to modify the length of the crosshairs as well as make a few other changes. Notice the little box at the intersection of the two crosshair lines. This is one of several forms of the AutoCAD cursor. When you move the cursor off the draw- ing area, it changes to the standard Windows pointing arrow. As you begin using
  31. 31. I n t ro d u c i n g t h e Au t o CA D G ra p h i c s Wi n d ow 9commands, it will take on other forms, depending on which step of a commandyou’re performing. The icon with a double arrow in the lower-left corner of the drawing area is theUCS icon (UCS stands for user coordinate system). It indicates the positivedirection for the x- and y-axes. You won’t need it for most of the chapters in thisbook, so you’ll learn how to turn it off in Chapter 3. Below the drawing area is the Command window. When you enter commands in addition to using the Ribbon or pop-up menus,the Command window is where you tell the program what to do and where theprogram tells you what’s happening. It’s an important area, and you’ll need tolearn how it works in detail. Four lines of text should be visible. You’ll learn howto increase the number of visible lines later in this chapter in the section “Work-ing in the Command Window.” When the Dynamic Input feature is active, muchof the Command window information is displayed at the cursor as well. Below the Command window is the status bar. On the left end of the status bar, you’ll see a coordinate readout window. In themiddle are 10 buttons (LT has only 9) that activate various drawing modes. It’simportant to learn about the coordinate system and most of these drawing aids(Snap Mode, Grid Display, Ortho Mode, Object Snap, etc) early on as you learn todraw in AutoCAD. They will help you create neat and accurate drawings. PolarTracking and Object Snap Tracking are advanced drawing tools and will be intro-duced in Chapter 5. Dynamic UCS stands for Dynamic User Coordinate System; it’s
  32. 32. 1 0 Chapter 1 • Getting to Know AutoCAD used in 3D drawings. The Dynamic Input button is an on/off toggle that activates or suppresses the dynamic display of information next to the crosshair cursor when it’s in the drawing area. For now, keep it in the on (pushed) mode. The Show/Hide Lineweight button toggles the display of lineweights (discussed in Chapter 14) in the drawing area. When active, the Quick Properties tool displays the most com- mon properties for the selected object(s) in a dialog box where they can be edited. If you prefer text-based buttons rather than icons, you can right-click on any of the tools mentioned here and uncheck the Use Icons option. At the right side of the status bar are tools for controlling the appear- ance of annotation objects in AutoCAD, tools for navigating in the draw- ing area and controlling the display, and tools to control access to other drawings or features within the current drawing. The padlock icon controls which types of toolbars and windows are locked in their current positions on the screen. Leave it in the unlocked mode for now. To conclude this quick introduction to the various parts of the graphics window, I need to mention a couple of items that might be visible on your screen. You might have scroll bars below and to the right of the drawing area; although these can be useful, they can take up precious space in the drawing area. They won’t be of any use while working your way through this book, so I suggest you remove them for now. To remove these features temporarily, follow these steps: 1. Enter options↵ to open the Options dialog box (shown in Figure 1.7). It has 10 tabs (LT has only 8) across the top that act like tabs on file folders. F I G U R E 1 . 7 : The Options dialog box
  33. 33. I n t ro d u c i n g t h e Au t o CA D G ra p h i c s Wi n d ow 1 1 2. Click the Display tab, which is shown in Figure 1.8. Focus on the Window Elements section. If scroll bars are visible on the lower and right edges of the drawing area, the Display Scroll Bars In Drawing Window check box will be selected. F I G U R E 1 . 8 : The Options dialog box open at the Display tab 3. Click the check box to turn off the scroll bars. Also be sure the check boxes for Display Screen Menu and, in the Layout Elements section, Display Layout And Model Tabs are not selected. Don’t click the OK LT doesn’t have the Screen menu, so button yet. the option to turn it off isn’t on LT’s Another display setting that you might want to change at this point controls Display tab.the color of the cursor and the drawing area background. The illustrations inthis book show a white background and black crosshair cursor, but you’re proba-bly seeing the AutoCAD default, which features a black background and a whitecrosshair cursor. If you want to change the colors, follow these steps: 1. In the Window Elements area of the Display tab, click the Colors but- ton to open the Drawing Window Colors dialog box (see Figure 1.9). In the upper-left corner of the dialog box, in the Context list box, 2D Model Space should be selected. If it’s not, select it.
  34. 34. 1 2 Chapter 1 • Getting to Know AutoCAD F I G U R E 1 . 9 : The Drawing Window Colors dialog box N O T E The screen-captured images in this book are taken from AutoCAD sessions using the Dark Color Scheme. You can set the Color Scheme at the top of the Window Elements area and choose either the Light or Dark scheme. 2. Move to the Color drop-down list, which is in the upper-right corner. If your drawing area background is currently white, a square followed by the word White is displayed. Open the Color drop-down list, and select Black (or the background color you want). The drawing area will now be that color, and the cursor color will change to white, as shown in the Preview window below. 3. Click the Apply & Close button to close the Drawing Window Colors dialog box. The background and cursor colors change. 4. If you want to change the length of the lines of your crosshair cursor, go to the lower-right corner of the Display tab (the middle of the right side for LT), and move the slider to change the Crosshair Size setting. The crosshair length changes as a percentage of the drawing area. 5. Click OK to apply any remaining changes and close the Options dia- log box.
  35. 35. Wo r k i n g i n t h e C o m m a n d Wi n d o w 1 3 T I P If you choose a color other than black as the drawing area back- ground color, the color of the crosshair cursor remains the same as it was. To change the crosshair color, in the Drawing Window Colors dialog box, go to the Interface Element list box, and select Crosshairs. Then, select a color from the Color drop-down list.Working in the Command WindowJust below the drawing area is the Command window. This window is separatefrom the drawing area and behaves like a Windows window—that is, you can dragit to a different place on the screen and resize it, although I don’t recommend youdo this at first. If you currently have fewer than four lines of text in the window,you should increase the window’s vertical size. To do so, move the cursor to thehorizontal boundary between the drawing area and the Command window until itchanges to an up-and-down arrow broken by two parallel horizontal lines. Hold down the left mouse button, drag the cursor up by approximately theamount that one or two lines of text would take up, and then release the mousebutton. You should see more lines of text, but you might have to try this a fewtimes to display exactly four lines. A horizontal line will separate the top twolines of text from the bottom line of text. When you close the program, AutoCADwill save the new settings. The next time you start AutoCAD, the Command win-dow will display four lines of text. The Command window is where you give information to AutoCAD and whereAutoCAD prompts you for the next step in executing a command. It’s good prac-tice to keep an eye on the Command window as you work on your drawing. Manyerrors can occur when you don’t check it frequently. If the Dynamic Input but-ton on the status bar is in the on position, some of the information in the Com-mand window will appear in the drawing area next to the cursor. I’ll cover thisfeature when you start drawing. Before you begin to draw in the next chapter, take a close look at the Ribbon,Menu Browser, toolbars, and keyboard controls. N O T E In many cases, you can start AutoCAD commands in a number of ways: from the Ribbon, the Menu Browser, from the Command window, and from menus that appear when you right-click. When you get used to drawing with AutoCAD, you’ll learn some shortcuts that start commands quickly, and you’ll find the way that is most comfortable for you.
  36. 36. 1 4 Chapter 1 • Getting to Know AutoCAD Using the Ribbon New to AutoCAD 2009 is the Ribbon, a consolidated location for nearly all the Auto- CAD tools in the form of easily recognizable buttons. A set of tabs delineates the dif- ferent collections of tools by their purposes: creating and editing objects, adding notes and dimensions, sending the drawing to a printer or plotter, and so on. Displaying the Ribbon Tools The Ribbon self-adjusts according to the width of the AutoCAD window. The pan- els have the most commonly used command as a button, larger than the others, centered on the left side (see the top of Figure 1.10). When the width is too nar- row to fully display each panel, the panels will begin to collapse first by replacing the large buttons with smaller buttons and then by replacing the panels with a single button bearing the name of the panel. The collapsed panel’s tools are dis- played by clicking this single button, as shown at the bottom of Figure 1.10. F I G U R E 1 . 1 0 : The Ribbon fully displaying all panels (top) and with partially and com- pletely collapsed panels (bottom) Collapsing, Moving, and Hiding the Ribbon Available drawing area is always at a premium, and you can regain some of it by collapsing the Ribbon. When you click the Minimize button to the right of the Ribbon tabs once, the panels are collapsed vertically and only show their titles. Clicking it a second time collapses the Ribbon further until only the tabs show. When the Ribbon is in either of these states, you can expand any panel or tab by clicking its visible panel or tab name. Clicking the Minimize button a third time returns the Ribbon to its default state.
  37. 37. Using the Ribbon 1 5 The Ribbon’s default location is at the top of the screen, but it can be undocked,or floating over the drawing area, or it can be moved to a second monitor ordocked on either side of the drawing area. To undock the Ribbon, right-click tothe right of the tab names and choose Undock from the pop-up menu. The Ribbon detaches from the top of the drawing area and floats on the screenas shown in Figure 1.11. To dock it, click the title bar on the side of the floatingRibbon and drag it to the side or the top of the drawing area. Experiment withdetaching the Ribbon, but when you are finished, dock it back at the top so thatyou can more easily follow the graphics in this book.F I G U R E 1 . 1 1 : The Ribbon after undocking it from the top of the drawing area If you don’t want the Ribbon at all, you can turn it off by right-clicking to theright of the Ribbon tabs and choosing Close. To turn it on, enter ribbon↵. You’lluse the Ribbon throughout this book.Using the Ribbon ToolsEach panel contains tools from a related family of functions. For example, all thecommon tools for editing objects in the drawing area are consolidated in theModify panel. When more tools are available than will fit on the panel, an arrowis displayed on the panel’s title bar. Clicking the title bar expands the panel and
  38. 38. 1 6 Chapter 1 • Getting to Know AutoCAD exposes the additional tools. Follow these steps to learn how the Ribbon tools work and how they display information. 1. Click the Home tab on the Ribbon to expose the Home tab’s panels. 2. Move the cursor over the Modify panel. The panel and panel title bar change from light gray to white to indicate that that panel has the program’s focus. 3. Pause the cursor over the Explode button to expose the button’s tooltip as shown at the top of Figure 1.12. This tooltip displays the name of the tool, a brief description of its function, the command- line equivalent of clicking the tool, and instructions to click the F1 key to open the AutoCAD Help file to the current tool’s Help page. F I G U R E 1 . 1 2 : The tooltip for the Explode command (top) and the extended tooltip (bottom) 4. After a few seconds of hovering over the Explode button, the tooltip expands to display the extended tooltip (see the bottom of Figure 1.12) with a more complete description. 5. Pause the cursor over the Copy button in the Modify panel. This time, after a few seconds, the tooltip is replaced with a cue card, as shown in Figure 1.13, instead of an extended tooltip. Cue cards show the step-by-step implementation of the tool.
  39. 39. Using the Ribbon 1 7 F I G U R E 1 . 1 3 : The cue card for the Copy tool 6. Click the Modify panel’s title bar to expand the panels and expose all of the Modify tools. 7. Often, you may find yourself returning to the same tool on an expanded Ribbon panel. When that happens, you can pin the panel open by click- ing the pushpin-shaped button in the bottom-right corner. When the panel is pinned open, it remains open even when the cursor is not hov- ering over it. 8. Click the button again to unpin the panel and then move the cursor off the panel to collapse it.Customizing the RibbonYou can customize each panel of the Ribbon, and you can build your own customtabs and panels to display only the buttons you use frequently. You can even designyour own buttons for commands that aren’t already represented by buttons on thetoolbars. These activities are for more advanced users, however, and aren’t coveredin this book. To find out more about how to customize toolbars, see MasteringAutoCAD 2009 and AutoCAD LT 2009 by George Omura (Wiley, 2008).
  40. 40. 1 8 Chapter 1 • Getting to Know AutoCAD Using the Menu Browser The Menu Browser has replaced the traditional row of drop-down menus that reside at the top of many programs. The menus now project from the upper-left corner of the AutoCAD Window and cover the drawing area, and any open dialog boxes, only when the Menu Browser is open. 1. Click the large, red A button in the top-left corner of the AutoCAD window to open the Menu Browser. 2. The left pane of the Menu Browser displays the different menus. Hov- ering over a menu displays the commands and submenus in the right pane, as shown in Figure 1.14. F I G U R E 1 . 1 4 : The Menu Browser
  41. 41. Using the Menu Browser 1 9 3. Submenus are identified by the pale, right-facing arrows to the left of their names. Click this arrow, or the name of a submenu, to expand it and display the tools. Click in the same location again to collapse the submenu.Opening a Drawing with theMenu BrowserThe Menu Browser offers a quick method for opening drawings. You can evensee a thumbnail preview of the drawings and arrange drawings that you fre-quently edit so that they are easily accessible. Here’s how: 1. To open a new AutoCAD file from the Menu Browser, click File ➣ New. This opens the Select Template dialog box, where you select a tem- plate to base the new drawing on. Opening a file with a template is covered in Chapter 2. 2. To open an existing file from the Menu Browser, click File ➣ Open. This opens the Select File dialog box where you can navigate to and select the desired drawing file. T I P You can open new or existing files using the QNew or Open buttons in the Quick Access toolbar. Existing drawings can also be opened by drag- ging them from a Windows Explorer window to the AutoCAD title bar.
  42. 42. 2 0 Chapter 1 • Getting to Know AutoCAD 3. To open a file that you’ve worked on recently, hover over the Recent Documents option in the lower-left corner of the Menu Browser. This displays the most recent files opened in AutoCAD in the right pane, as shown in Figure 1.15. F I G U R E 1 . 1 5 : Displaying the recent documents in the Menu Browser The Recent Documents list is updated whenever a new drawing is opened. Clicking the pushpin icon next to a drawing name, in the right pane, pins that drawing to its current location in the list. Pinned documents don’t scroll off the list when newer files are opened. 4. Hover over a file name in the right pane to display a thumbnail pre- view of the drawing and additional information, including the draw- ing location and AutoCAD drawing format.
  43. 43. Using the Menu Browser 2 1 N O T E AutoCAD 2009 drawing files use the same drawing format as AutoCAD versions 2008 and 2007. This means that the files are compatible between versions without requiring any type of conversion.Switching Between Open DrawingsAs in many programs, you can have multiple drawing files open in the samesession of AutoCAD. Each drawing is stacked behind the drawings in front of it.There are several ways to switch between the open file including using the MenuBrowser, as shown here. 1. Start or open two or more AutoCAD files. 2. Open the Menu Browser and then hover over the Open Documents option in the lower-left corner. The open drawings are displayed in the right panel, and the current drawing is marked with a blue dot to the left of its name, as shown in Figure 1.16. F I G U R E 1 . 1 6 : Displaying the open drawings in the Menu Browser 3. Click on any drawing to bring it to the front of the AutoCAD window.
  44. 44. 2 2 Chapter 1 • Getting to Know AutoCAD Another option for switching between open drawings is to click the Quick View Drawings button in the status bar. This displays thumb- nails for the open drawings, and you can click any thumbnail to make that drawing active. Using the Drop-Down Menus If you prefer to use drop-down menus, they’re still available in AutoCAD 2009, although they are turned off by default in the 2D Drafting & Annotation and 3D Modeling workspaces. You can display them by switching to the AutoCAD Classic workspace, by right-clicking on the Quick Access toolbar and choosing Show Menu Bar, or by entering menubar↵ 1↵. The menu bar isn’t used in the exer- cises in this book, but I’ll cover the menus here in case you want to use them in the future. The left end of the menu bar, just below the title bar (see Figure 1.17), consists of an icon and 12 (11 if you don’t have the Express Tools installed or are using LT) menus. Click any of these to display a drop-down menu. The icon and the File and Edit menus are included with all Windows-compliant applications, although they are somewhat customized to work with AutoCAD. The drop-down menu associ- ated with the icon contains commands to control the appearance and position of the drawing area. F I G U R E 1 . 1 7 : The AutoCAD user interface showing the menu bar Commands in the File menu are for opening and saving new and existing draw- ing files, printing, exporting files to another application, choosing basic utility options, and exiting the application. The Edit menu contains the Undo and Redo commands, the Cut and Paste tools, and options for creating links between Auto- CAD files and other files. The Help menu works like most Windows Help menus and contains a couple of AutoCAD-specific entries as well, including some online resources and a link to the New Features Workshop.
  45. 45. U s i n g t h e To o l b a r s 2 3 The other eight (or nine) menus contain the most frequently used AutoCADcommands. You’ll find that if you master the logic of how the commands areorganized by menu, you can quickly find the command you want. Here is a shortdescription of each of the other AutoCAD drop-down menus:View Contains tools for controlling the display of your drawing file.Insert Contains commands for placing drawings and images or parts of theminside other drawings.Format Contains commands for setting up the general parameters for a newdrawing or changing the entities in a current drawing.Tools Contains special tools for use while you’re working on the current draw-ing, such as those for finding the length of a line or for running a special macro.Draw Contains commands for creating new objects (such as lines or circles) onthe screen.Dimension Contains commands for dimensioning and annotating a drawing.Modify Contains commands for changing existing objects in the drawing.Window Contains commands for displaying currently open drawing windowsand lists currently open drawing files.Express Contains a library of productivity tools that cover a wide range ofAutoCAD functions. Express Tools are widely used but unsupported directly byAutodesk. They might or might not be installed on your computer. You can turn off the menu bar by right-clicking on the Quick Access toolbarand choosing Show Menu Bar or by entering menubar↵ 0↵.Using the ToolbarsThe AutoCAD toolbars have essentially been replaced by the Ribbon, so I’ll onlytouch on them briefly here. Toolbars, like the Ribbon panels, are collections oftools grouped by similar tasks. Like the Ribbon itself, any toolbar can be dis-played or hidden without affecting the others, and they can all be docked to aside or the top of the drawing area or float freely. To display a toolbar, right-
  46. 46. 2 4 Chapter 1 • Getting to Know AutoCAD click on the Quick Access toolbar, click Toolbars, click a toolbar category, and then click the toolbar that you want to open. Take a few minutes to explore the available toolbars, and then open the Stan- dard toolbar from the AutoCAD or AutoCAD LT category. The icons on the AutoCAD toolbars look like flat images and don’t appear as raised buttons until you point to them. The Standard toolbar has 25 icons, andLT has only 23 they are arranged into seven logical groups. The icons on the left half of theStandard toolbarbuttons. It doesn’t Standard toolbar are mostly for commands used in all Windows-compatiblehave the Sheet Set applications, so you might be familiar with them. The icons on the right half ofManager and Block the Standard toolbar are AutoCAD commands that you use during your regularEditor buttons drawing activities. You can use these commands to take care of a number ofbecause LT doesn’toffer these features. tasks, including the following: Changing the view of the drawing on the screen Changing the properties of an object, such as color or linetype Borrowing parts of an unopened drawing to use in your current drawing Displaying a set of palettes that contain objects you can use in your drawing Accessing the Toolbar Fly-Out Menus Notice that one icon on the Standard toolbar has a little triangular arrow in the lower-right corner. This arrow indicates that clicking this icon displays more than one command. Follow these steps to see how this special icon works: 1. Move the cursor to the Standard toolbar, and point to the icon that has a magnifying glass with a rectangle in it. 2. Rest the arrow on the button for a moment without clicking to dis- play the tooltip. Notice the small arrow in the lower-right corner of the icon. This is the multiple-command arrow mentioned earlier.
  47. 47. U s i n g t h e To o l b a r s 2 5 3. Place the arrow cursor on the button, and hold down the left mouse button. A column of nine buttons opens vertically below the original button (see Figure 1.18). The top button in the column is a duplicate of the button you clicked. This column of buttons is called a toolbar fly-out menu. In this example, you’re working with the Zoom toolbar fly-out menu. F I G U R E 1 . 1 8 : A toolbar fly-out menu 4. To dock a floating toolbar, click the grab bar and drag the toolbar to either side of the drawing area or to just below the AutoCAD title bar Grab bars are the two and release. lines at the left end of a horizontal toolbar 5. To detach a docked toolbar, click the grab bar and drag the toolbar or at the top of a ver- into the drawing area. tical one. They repre- sent the one place to 6. Close any open toolbars by undocking them then clicking the X in grab a docked toolbar the upper-right corner of each. to move it.You can also change a docked The toolbar fly-out menus are regular toolbars that have been attached to toolbar into a floatinganother toolbar. AutoCAD has 38 toolbars in all, but only a few have fly-out toolbar by double-menus—the Zoom fly-out menu I just discussed and the Insert fly-out menu on clicking its grab bars.the Draw toolbar, for example.
  48. 48. 2 6 Chapter 1 • Getting to Know AutoCAD N O T E LT has 27 toolbars compared with AutoCAD’s 38. The additional toolbars in AutoCAD are almost all for 3D and rendering tools. Workspaces You haven’t been directed to make any significant changes to the workspace, but when you do, you can save this setup as a new workspace. Using this feature, you can always return to your preferred layout by activating the saved layout. Follow these steps: 1. Click the Workspace Switching button on the right side of the status bar and choose Save Current As. This opens the Save Workspace dia- log box. 2. Enter a name for the workspace and click Save. The dialog box closes, and you are returned you to your workspace. Until you change it or select a different workspace, the new workspace setup will remain as it is now. When you make changes to the new workspace—by adding a toolbar or chang- ing the background color of the drawing area—you can easily update the current workspace to accommodate those changes. Follow steps 1 and 2 previously, nam- ing the workspace again with the same name. You’ll get a warning window telling you that a workspace by that name already exists and asking you whether you want the new arrangement to replace the old one. Click Yes. Using the Keyboard The keyboard is an important tool for entering data and commands. If you’re a good typist, you can gain speed in working with AutoCAD by learning how to enter commands from the keyboard. AutoCAD provides what are called alias keys—single keys or key combinations that start any of several frequently used
  49. 49. Using the Mouse 2 7commands. You can add more or change the existing aliases as you get morefamiliar with the program. In addition to the alias keys, you can use several of the F keys (function keys)on the top row of the keyboard as two-way or three-way toggles to turn AutoCADfunctions on and off. Although buttons on the screen duplicate these functions(Snap, Grid, and so on), it’s sometimes faster to use the F keys. While working in AutoCAD, you’ll need to enter a lot of data, such as dimen-sions and construction notes; answer questions with “yes” or “no,” and use thearrow keys. You’ll use the keyboard constantly. It might help to get into thehabit of keeping your left hand on the keyboard and your right hand on themouse if you’re right-handed, or the other way around if you’re left-handed.Using the MouseYour mouse most likely has two buttons and a scroll wheel. So far in this chap-ter, you have used the left mouse button to choose menus, commands, andoptions, and you’ve held it down to drag menus, toolbars, and windows. The leftmouse button is the one you’ll be using most often, but you’ll also use the rightmouse button. While drawing, you’ll use the right mouse button for the following threeoperations: To display a menu containing options relevant to the particular step you’re in at the moment To use in combination with the Shift or Ctrl key to display a menu containing special drawing aids called object snaps To display a menu of toolbars when the pointer is on any icon of a toolbar that is currently open If you have a three-button mouse, the middle button is usually programmedto display the Object Snap menu, instead of using the right button with theShift key. If you have a mouse with a scroll wheel, you can use the wheel in sev-eral ways to control the view of your drawing. I’ll cover those methods in subse-quent chapters. AutoCAD makes extensive use of toolbars and the right-click menu feature.This makes your mouse an important input tool. The keyboard is necessary forinputting numeric data and text, and it has hot keys and aliases that can speedup your work; however, the mouse is the primary tool for selecting options andcontrolling toolbars.

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