How Do You Stack Up? Online Marketing Benchmarks

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What’s an average conversion rate? …

What’s an average conversion rate?
What are the top eCommerce websites converting at?
What tactics are other marketing VPs using?
My newsletter open rate is 20%. Is that good?
My Facebook ads have a low CTR. What’s the average?

Our clients always want to know what other clients are investing in and how they are performing. We thought you would too. So press CTRL+T and open those tabs for AdWords, Analytics, your email service provider, ad networks, etc and let’s see how you stack up.

We’ve sourced data across our clients and beyond to provide you benchmark statistics on:
• Online Marketing Tactics
• Online Marketing Budgets
• Paid Search
• SEO
• Email Marketing
• Website Performance
• Media Buys

Speaker:
Nick Urbani is Managing Director at eBoost Consulting. He works with clients for strategy consulting and persona development. Nick has spoken across the country about digital marketing at associations and events, including the Women’s Presidents Organization, iMarketer’s Beyond Search Summit, Cal Polytechnic University, and SDSIC.

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  • Poor permission or opt-in processes. This includes pre-checked boxes, not making it clear what type of email they will be receiving, automatically adding someone to receive your email marketing when they've actually signed up for something else such as a whitepaper, etc. Poorly written email subject lines that do not direct and motivate recipients to take an action. Poor email delivery rates. If a lot of your email messages are getting blocked or filtered and you don't know it, your CTR will obviously be affected. Poor email open rates. If few people open your email, fewer recipients have a chance to click. Poor email design and layout. If they can't easily find where to click through or aren't motivated to by your layout - you've got trouble in River City. Lack of links. Quite simply, the more links the better. Make it so that email readers are continuously stumbling over text and graphic links like they do signage in a retail store. No reason to click. If your email newsletter has a single or multiple articles in their entirety, then don't expect them to click. You haven't given them any reason. If you are sending a promotional email and you don't include a deadline for the offer, or convey a discount, special offer, limited supply, etc., few people are probably going to take action.
  • The email click-through rate (CTR) is important because without it, you don't get conversions. However, there's no single benchmark click-through rate, because CTRs depend on many factors: whether you send to a business or consumer audience, the kind of email messages you send, how relevant the message is to your audience, how often you send, your email opt-in process, your use of personalization and email list segmentation , and dozens of other factors. And most significantly, how many links you have in your email and if you are providing content such as articles, whether you include the entire article within the body of the email or you have a teaser or snippet that requires email subscribers to click through to a Web site to read. Beyond that, many companies calculate and report email click through rates  differently - using total versus unique clicks. Many email subscribers will click on multiple links, which means that CTRs based on "total" clicks are typically about two times higher than those based on "unique" clicks Poor permission or opt-in processes. This includes pre-checked boxes, not making it clear what type of email they will be receiving, automatically adding someone to receive your email marketing when they've actually signed up for something else such as a whitepaper, etc. Poorly written email subject lines that do not direct and motivate recipients to take an action. Poor email delivery rates. If a lot of your email messages are getting blocked or filtered and you don't know it, your CTR will obviously be affected. Poor email open rates. If few people open your email, fewer recipients have a chance to click. Poor email design and layout. If they can't easily find where to click through or aren't motivated to by your layout - you've got trouble in River City. Lack of links. Quite simply, the more links the better. Make it so that email readers are continuously stumbling over text and graphic links like they do signage in a retail store. No reason to click. If your email newsletter has a single or multiple articles in their entirety, then don't expect them to click. You haven't given them any reason. If you are sending a promotional email and you don't include a deadline for the offer, or convey a discount, special offer, limited supply, etc., few people are probably going to take action.
  • If your CTRs are consistently below that level then among other things, you are probably providing content of little value to your email subscribers. Or you may have most of the content within your email, not giving subscribers a reason or means to click-through to your Web site.
  • Email campaigns with less than a 2% CTR may be a result of over mailing and questionable email opt-in processes.
  • Also, email messages with very strong content but sent to unsegmented lists, like many news or trend-type e-newsletters, are often in the 10%-15% range.
  • Trigger or behavior-based email campaigns (emails that are sent to recipients based on some behavior they showed, such as clicking on a product link, visiting a specific Web page, etc.) are often in the 15% to 50% range.
  • Email campaigns with less than a 2% CTR may be a result of over mailing and questionable email opt-in processes.

Transcript

  • 1.  
  • 2. how do you stack up? benchmark your online marketing performance in 30 minutes
  • 3. budget allocation email marketing paid search media buys conversion rates agenda
  • 4. increasing marketing budget in 2010? Source: Econsultancy & ExactTarget
  • 5. increasing digital marketing budget in 2010? Source: Econsultancy & ExactTarget
  • 6. okay, by how much? Source: Econsultancy & ExactTarget average increase in digital marketing budget is 17%
  • 7. what % of budget is digital? Source: Econsultancy & ExactTarget average = 24%
  • 8. most effective tactics? Source: eMarketer
  • 9. where will you spend more? Source: eMarketer
  • 10. 2009 SEO budget Source: SEMPO & EngineReady 12.3% of site visits
  • 11. email marketing math Source: Bronto
  • 12. deliverability Source: Bronto
  • 13. open rates Source: Bronto
  • 14. click through rates (unique clicks/delivered) Source: Bronto
  • 15. B2B email newsletter CTRs Source: Lyris HQ { } 5% 15%
  • 16. B2C promotion email CTRs Source: Lyris HQ { } 2% 12%
  • 17. segmented (B2B & B2C) CTRs Source: Lyris HQ { } 10% 20% more on this in a sec…
  • 18. trigger based email (B2B & B2C) CTRs Source: Lyris HQ { } 15% 50%
  • 19. unsubscribe rates Source: MailChimp { } .11% .74% media and publishing social networks and online communities
  • 20. when you segment Source: MailChimp 14.44% above average open rate 14.99% above average click through rate
  • 21. paid search – search vs. content Source: Google
  • 22. paid search – average CTR Source: AccuraCast 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 average 9 10 7.94% 5.00% 2.47% 1.96% 0.90% 0.81% 0.91% 0.74% 0.75% 0.20% 3.16%
  • 23. paid search – average CTR Source: AccuraCast & Fireclick 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 average 9 10 7.94% 5.00% 2.47% 1.96% 0.90% 0.81% 0.91% 0.74% 0.75% 0.20% 3.16% average conversion rate 3.15%
  • 24. paid search - retail Source: Engine Ready average order value $117.06 percentage of site visits 19.8% average conversion rate 2.03%
  • 25. media buys (display) lift search Source: Specific Media
  • 26. Source: Specific Media media buys (display) lift search
  • 27. media buy performance Source: DoubleClick
  • 28. CTR correlated with creative size Source: DoubleClick
  • 29. video completion rates Source: DoubleClick
  • 30. facebook advertising Source: eBoost Consulting { } .01% .05% CTRs { } $0.01 $0.19 eCPM { } $0.05 $0.25 CPC
  • 31. wouldn’t it be nice… Source: Marketing Charts
  • 32. Now back down to earth Source: Fireclick
  • 33. Now back down to earth Source: Fireclick
  • 34. how did you stack up? questions? nick urbani 619.567.3493 [email_address]