Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Immigrants and cities
Immigrants and cities
Immigrants and cities
Immigrants and cities
Immigrants and cities
Immigrants and cities
Immigrants and cities
Immigrants and cities
Immigrants and cities
Immigrants and cities
Immigrants and cities
Immigrants and cities
Immigrants and cities
Immigrants and cities
Immigrants and cities
Immigrants and cities
Immigrants and cities
Immigrants and cities
Immigrants and cities
Immigrants and cities
Immigrants and cities
Immigrants and cities
Immigrants and cities
Immigrants and cities
Immigrants and cities
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Immigrants and cities

522

Published on

Published in: Education, Travel, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
522
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
22
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. IMMIGRANTS AND URBANIZATION AMERICA IN THE LATE 19 TH CENTURY
  • 2. EUROPEANS <ul><li>1870-1920: About 20 million Europeans arrived in the U.S. </li></ul><ul><li>Before 1890- W. and N. European </li></ul><ul><li>After 1890- S. and E. Eur </li></ul><ul><li>Reasons: Escape religious persecution, rising population, few jobs </li></ul>
  • 3. CHINESE <ul><li>1851-1882, about 300,000 Chinese arrived on the West Coast </li></ul><ul><li>attracted by the Gold Rush, work on the railroads, to start own business </li></ul>Many Chinese men worked for the railroads
  • 4. JAPANESE <ul><li>Japanese workers were recruited by Hawaiian planters & higher wages </li></ul><ul><li>The U.S. annexation of Hawaii in 1898 increased Japanese immigration to the west coast </li></ul><ul><li>By 1920, more than 200,000 Japanese lived on the west coast </li></ul>
  • 5. Left Side Activity <ul><li>Push Factors </li></ul><ul><li>What are they? </li></ul><ul><li>Pull Factors </li></ul><ul><li>What are they? </li></ul>
  • 6. LIFE IN THE NEW LAND <ul><li>Most immigrants arrived via boats </li></ul><ul><li>The trip from Europe took about a month, while it took about 3 weeks from Asia </li></ul><ul><li>Many died along the way – crowded, disease spread, unsanitary </li></ul>
  • 7. ELLIS ISLAND, NEW YORK <ul><li>arrival point for European immigrants </li></ul><ul><li>had to pass inspection at the immigration stations </li></ul><ul><li>Processing took hours, and the sick were sent home </li></ul><ul><li>had to show that they were not criminals, had some money ($25), and able to work </li></ul><ul><li>1892-1924, 17 million immigrants passed through Ellis Island </li></ul><ul><li>Statue of Liberty Clip </li></ul>
  • 8. ELLIS ISLAND, NEW YORK HARBOR
  • 9.  
  • 10. ANGEL ISLAND, SAN FRANCISCO <ul><li>Asians, primarily Chinese, arriving on the West Coast gained admission at Angel Island in the San Francisco Bay </li></ul><ul><li>Processing much harsher than Ellis Island: tough questioning, long detentions in filthy conditions </li></ul>
  • 11.  
  • 12. FRICTION DEVELOPS <ul><li>Assimilation v. Maintaining Culture </li></ul><ul><li>Nativism </li></ul>Chinatowns found in many major cities
  • 13. <ul><li>In 1882 - Chinese Exclusion Act </li></ul><ul><li>Gentlemen’s Agreement – Japan would limit immigration of unskilled workers – U.S. agreed not to segregate schools in San Francisco </li></ul>
  • 14. THE CHALLENGES OF URBANIZATION <ul><li>Urbanization - Growth in cities </li></ul><ul><li>Rapid urbanization-late 19 th </li></ul><ul><li>Most immigrants settled in cities - available jobs & affordable housing </li></ul><ul><li>By 1910, immigrants more than half the population of 18 major American cities </li></ul>
  • 15. MIGRATION FROM COUNTRY TO CITY <ul><li>improvements in farm technology (tractors, reapers, steel plows) made farming more efficient in the late 19 th century </li></ul><ul><li>less labor was needed to do the job </li></ul><ul><li>rural population moved to cities for work- including almost ¼ million African Americans </li></ul>
  • 16. URBAN PROBLEMS <ul><li>Housing: overcrowded tenements were unsanitary </li></ul><ul><li>Sanitation : garbage not collected, polluted air </li></ul>Jacob Riis
  • 17. Housing <ul><li>Tenements – multiple families sharing a one family house – often crowded and unsanitary </li></ul><ul><li>Row houses – single family dwellings that shared two walls with others, packed many families onto a single block </li></ul>
  • 18. URBAN PROBLEMS CONTINUED <ul><li>Transportation: Cities struggled to provide adequate transit systems </li></ul><ul><li>Water: Without safe drinking water cholera and typhoid fever was common </li></ul><ul><li>Crime: As populations increased thieves flourished </li></ul><ul><li>Fire: Limited water supply and wooden structures combined with the use of candles led to many major urban </li></ul>Harper’s Weekly image of Chicagoans fleeing the fire over the Randolph Street bridge in 1871
  • 19. Jacob Riis
  • 20. Jacob Riis
  • 21. Jacob Riis
  • 22. Jacob Riis
  • 23. Jacob Riis
  • 24. Jacob Riis
  • 25. REFORMERS MOBILIZE <ul><li>The Social Gospel Movement preached salvation through service to the poor </li></ul><ul><li>established Settlement Homes </li></ul><ul><li>place to stay, classes, health care and other social services </li></ul><ul><li>Jane Addams, most famous reformers (founded Hull House in Chicago) </li></ul>Jane Addams and Hull House

×