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Writing Business Letters
 

Writing Business Letters

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    Writing Business Letters Writing Business Letters Presentation Transcript

    • Writing Business Letters
    • Letter Style
      • Determined by visual factors such as
        • Paper quality, weight, & color
        • Letterhead & logo design
        • Ink colors used in printing
        • Style & size of font
        • format
    • Format Types
      • Block format: each line begins at the left margin
      • Modified Block format: the date line, the closing, & the writer’s identification being in the middle of the page
      • Modified Block with indented paragraphs: same as modified block format except the first paragraph of each line in the body is indented five spaces.
    • Parts of the business letter
      • Heading
      • Opening
      • Body
      • Closing
    • The Heading
      • Letterhead: name, address, telephones numbers etc. of the company
      • Letterhead projects the company’s image
      • Date line: must be written out
        • February 27, 2011
    • The Opening
      • Directs the letter to a specific individual, company or department
      • Most importantly—greets the reader
      • Consists of the inside address (address of the person you are writing to)
      • Attention line (optional) speeds the handling of a letter or used when a specific person is not being address. Needs to be typed in all caps!
      • The salutation comes next.
    • The Salutation
      • AKA the greeting
      • If you know the person’s name that you are writing to, you should use it.
        • Dear Dr. Jones:
        • Dear Mrs. Smith:
      • If you don’t know the person’s name, you should use the generic form salutation.
        • Dear Sir or Madam:
      • The salutation is always followed by a colon (:)!
    • The Body
      • This the message & the most important part of the business letter.
      • May include a subject line which tells the reader in advance what the letter is about.
        • SUBJECT:
        • RE:
      • The body should contain at least 2 paragraphs.
    • The Closing
      • The complimentary closing should match your salutation.
      • Some commonly used closing include
        • Yours very truly, Sincerely,
        • Very truly yours, Cordially,
        • Very sincerely yours, Sincerely yours,
        • Respectfully yours, Best regards,
        • Very cordially yours, Cordially yours,
      • The closing also includes the writer’s signature which is the handwritten signature of the letter writer.
      • The writer’s identification is the letter writer’s name & job title TYPED below the signature.
      • Reference initials are the initials of the person who prepared the letter; typed in lower case letters after the writer’s identification
        • Example: KLC:xx
      • Enclosure notation is optional if there would happened to be enclosures
      • Delivery notation is optional if there is special mail service used.
      • Copy notation is also optional; this is used when the letter is sent to more than one person.
        • Example: cc: John Doe
        • “ CC” stands for carbon copy;
    • Why write a business letter?
      • In a era of instant electronic communication, it is still necessary to write some form of business letter.
      • You may need to
        • Request information
        • Send information
        • Correct & apologize for an error
        • Refuse a request
        • Explain a procedure or present a problem
        • Sell a product or service.
    • The Personal Business Letter
      • A letter written by someone for himself as part of a business situation. This type of letter is not written as a representative for a company.
      • This type of letter is written to
        • Correct or clarify personal credit or accounts
        • Establish credit
        • Present claims to a manufacturer for defective products.
    • Social Business Letter
      • This type of letter is written can be written as part of the business setting.
      • This letter may express thanks to a vendor for a favor, congratulate a colleague who has been promoted, or express sympathy to a colleague who has experienced a death or some other negative situation.
    • Some tips to remember….
      • Pay attention to details.
      • Be concise with your information.
      • Use a combination of long & short sentences.
      • Always thank the reader for their time & any assistance that can be given.
      • Include any documentation that will help clarify or rectify a situation.