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Windows 7 Inside Out, Deluxe Edition
 

Windows 7 Inside Out, Deluxe Edition

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Dive deeper into Windows 7 - with new content. The Deluxe Edition of the ultimate, in-depth reference to Windows 7 has been fully updated for SP1 and Internet Explorer 9, and features 300+ pages of ...

Dive deeper into Windows 7 - with new content. The Deluxe Edition of the ultimate, in-depth reference to Windows 7 has been fully updated for SP1 and Internet Explorer 9, and features 300+ pages of additional coverage and advanced topics. It's now packed with even more timesaving solutions, troubleshooting tips, and workarounds from the experts - and includes a fully searchable eBook and other online resources. Topics include installation, configuration, and setup; network connections and troubleshooting; remote access; managing programs; controlling user access and accounts; advanced file management; working with Internet Explorer 9; managing security features and issues; using Windows Live Essentials 2011; performance monitoring and tuning; backups and maintenance; sharing networked resources; hardware and device drivers.

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    Windows 7 Inside Out, Deluxe Edition Windows 7 Inside Out, Deluxe Edition Document Transcript

    • www.it-ebooks.info
    • PUBLISHED BYMicrosoft PressA Division of Microsoft CorporationOne Microsoft WayRedmond, Washington 98052-6399Copyright © 2011 by Ed Bott, Carl Siechert, Craig Stinson, and Ed WilsonAll rights reserved. No part of the contents of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by anymeans without the written permission of the publisher.Library of Congress Control Number: 2011928844ISBN: 978-0-7356-5692-5Printed and bound in the United States of America.First PrintingMicrosoft Press books are available through booksellers and distributors worldwide. If you need support relatedto this book, email Microsoft Press Book Support at mspinput@microsoft.com. Please tell us what you think ofthis book at http://www.microsoft.com/learning/booksurvey.Microsoft and the trademarks listed at http://www.microsoft.com/about/legal/en/us/IntellectualProperty/Trademarks/EN-US.aspx are trademarks of the Microsoft group of companies. All other marks are property oftheir respective owners.The example companies, organizations, products, domain names, email addresses, logos, people, places, andevents depicted herein are fictitious. No association with any real company, organization, product, domain name,email address, logo, person, place, or event is intended or should be inferred.This book expresses the authors’ views and opinions. The information contained in this book is provided withoutany express, statutory, or implied warranties. Neither the authors, Microsoft Corporation, nor its resellers ordistributors will be held liable for any damages caused or alleged to be caused either directly or indirectly bythis book.Acquisitions Editor: Jeff KochDevelopmental and Project Editor: Valerie WoolleyEditorial Production: Curtis PhilipsTechnical Reviewer: Mitch Tulloch; Technical Review services provided by Content Master, a member of CM Group, Ltd.Copyeditor: John PierceIndexer: Jan C. WrightCover: Twist Creative • Seattle www.it-ebooks.info
    • In memory of Jean Varven Stinson 1952    2010 –  www.it-ebooks.info
    • www.it-ebooks.info
    • Contents at a GlancePart 1: Getting Started Part 3: Digital MediaChapter 1 Chapter 13What’s New in Windows 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Playing and Organizing DigitalChapter 2 Media Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 475Installing and Configuring Windows 7. . . . . . . 23 Chapter 14Chapter 3 Sharing and Syncing Digital Media. . . . . . . . . 511 .Obtaining Help and Support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Chapter 15Chapter 4 Using Windows Media Center. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 537Personalizing Windows 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Chapter 16Chapter 5 Digital Media for Enthusiasts. . . . . . . . . . . . . 569 .Adding, Removing, and ManagingPrograms. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171 Part 4: Security and NetworkingChapter 6 Chapter 17Using Internet Explorer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209 . Security Essentials. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 593Chapter 7 Chapter 18Internet Explorer Compatibility, Security, Managing User Accounts, Passwords,and Privacy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247 and Logons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 641Chapter 8 Chapter 19Adding Windows Live Programs Setting Up a Small Office orand Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 279 Home Network. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 683 . Chapter 20Part 2: File Management Sharing and Managing NetworkChapter 9 Resources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 719 .Organizing Files and Information. . . . . . . . . . . 325 Chapter 21Chapter 10 Advanced Windows Networking . . . . . . . . . . . 755Using Windows Search. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 367 Chapter 22Chapter 11 Fixing and Tweaking Your Network. . . . . . . . . 795Advanced File Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 397Chapter 12Backup, Restore, and Recovery. . . . . . . . . . . . . 435 v www.it-ebooks.info
    • vi Contents at a GlancePart 5:  Tuning, Tweaking, Part 6: Windows 7 and PC Hardwareand Troubleshooting Chapter 29Chapter 23 Setting Up and Configuring Hardware . . . . 1055Tuning Up and Monitoring Chapter 30Performance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 833 Managing Disks and Drives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1099Chapter 24 Chapter 31Performing Routine Maintenance. . . . . . . . . . 871 Using Pen, Touch, and Voice Input. . . . . . . . 1133Chapter 25Using Advanced System Management AppendixesTools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 899 Appendix AChapter 26 Windows 7 Editions at a Glance . . . . . . . . . . 1157Deployment and Migration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 949 Appendix BChapter 27 Working with the Command Prompt. . . . . 1165 .Automating Windows 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 965 Appendix CChapter 28 Fixes Included in Windows 7Troubleshooting Windows Errors Service Pack 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1185and Crashes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1007 Appendix D Windows 7 Certifications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1235 Appendix E Some Useful Accessory Programs. . . . . . . . 1243 . www.it-ebooks.info
    • Table of Contents Foreword to Windows 7 Inside Out . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxiii Foreword . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxv Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxvii Who This Book Is For . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxvii Features and Conventions Used In This Book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxix About the CD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxx Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxxiii Support and Feedback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxxivPart 1: Getting StartedChapter 1: What’s New in Windows 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Introducing the Windows 7 Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Adjusting to the Windows 7 Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Organizing and Finding Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Saving, Sharing, and Playing Digital Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Networking in New Ways . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Keeping Your PC Speedy and Safe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Using Internet Explorer 9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Updating to Service Pack 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22Chapter 2: Installing and Configuring Windows 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Before You Start . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Understand the Licensing Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Know Your Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Avoiding Software Compatibility Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Backing Up Data and Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Setting Up Windows 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Performing a Clean Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Setup and Your Hard Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Upgrading a Previous Windows Version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 What do you think of this book? We want to hear from you! Microsoft is interested in hearing your feedback so we can continually improve our books and learning resources for you. To participate in a brief online survey, please visit: www.microsoft.com/learning/booksurvey/ vii www.it-ebooks.info
    • viii Table of Contents Creating and Configuring a Multiboot System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Upgrading from Another Windows 7 Edition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Installing and Updating Drivers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Activating and Validating Windows 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Entering a Product Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Activating a Retail Copy of Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Activation Requirements for OEM Installations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Product Activation and Corporate Licensing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Dealing with Product Validation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Transferring Files and Settings from Another Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Making a Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Choosing What to Transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Restoring Files and Settings on Your New Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Tweaking and Tuning Your Windows Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Adjust Basic Display Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Update the Windows Experience Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Check Your System’s Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Test Network and Internet Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Adjust Windows Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Choose Default Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Personalize Power and Sleep Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Fine-Tune System Protection Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Create Additional User Accounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Set Up a Regular Backup Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83Chapter 3: Obtaining Help and Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Using Windows Help And Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Ensuring Access to Online Help Topics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Browsing Through Windows Help And Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Searching for Help Topics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Connecting to Another PC with Windows Remote Assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 How Remote Assistance Works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Asking for Assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Offering Remote Assistance via DCOM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 Working in a Remote Assistance Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 Using Remote Assistance with Earlier Windows Versions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Maintaining Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Improving Remote Assistance Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 Help and Support Resources for IT Professionals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106Chapter 4: Personalizing Windows 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Working with the New Taskbar and Start Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 Opening and Monitoring Programs from Taskbar Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 Opening Programs from the Start Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 Using Jump Lists on the Taskbar and Start Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 Personalizing the Taskbar and Start Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 Changing the Taskbar’s Appearance and Behavior . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 Controlling How Notifications Appear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 www.it-ebooks.info
    • Table of Contents ix Personalizing the Start Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128 Mastering Window Management with Windows 7 Tricks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 Resizing and Moving Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 Viewing the Desktop and Gadgets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 Switching Between Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 Personalizing Theme Elements: Visuals and Sounds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138 Customizing the Desktop Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140 Selecting Colors and Modifying Color Schemes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143 Selecting Sounds for Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146 Choosing a Screen Saver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147 Customizing Mouse Pointers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148 Configuring Desktop Icons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150 Saving, Sharing, and Finding Theme Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152 Configuring Your Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154 Configuring Screen Resolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154 Configuring a Multimonitor Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155 Making Text Easier to Read . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157 Using Font Smoothing to Make Text Easier on the Eyes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159 Calibrating Your Display’s Colors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 Using and Customizing Desktop Gadgets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 Setting Power and Sleep Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162 Selecting a Power Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163 Customizing a Power Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164 Understanding Sleep States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165 Setting Power Options with Powercfg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165 Working with Fonts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166 Adjusting Ease of Access Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167Chapter 5: Adding, Removing, and Managing Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171 Dealing with User Account Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172 Dealing with Compatibility Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174 Running Legacy Applications in Windows XP Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178 Downloading and Installing Windows XP Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178 Running Windows XP Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179 Installing Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181 Sharing Data with Windows 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183 Sharing Devices with Windows 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183 Configuring Windows Virtual PC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184 Installing Programs on 64-Bit Editions of Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184 Managing Startup Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186 Controlling Startup Programs with the System Configuration Utility . . . . . . . . . . . . 187 Using Autoruns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190 Managing Running Programs and Processes with Windows Task Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . 191 Running a Program as an Administrator or Another User . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194 Uninstalling Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195 Setting Default Programs, File-Type Associations, and AutoPlay Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195 Setting Default Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196 www.it-ebooks.info
    • x Table of Contents Changing File-Type Associations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198 Setting Program Access and Computer Defaults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203 Turning Windows Features On or Off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204 Setting AutoPlay Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205Chapter 6: Using Internet Explorer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209 What’s New in Internet Explorer 9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210 Installing and Uninstalling Internet Explorer 9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212 Browsing with Internet Explorer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214 Using the Address Bar for Faster Navigation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215 Using Tabs and Tab Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217 Setting the Home Page(s) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222 Unhiding the Command Bar and Other Missing Interface Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223 Zooming In or Out to Make Text Readable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223 Managing Favorite Sites and Recent History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227 Adding, Editing, and Organizing Favorites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229 Working with Pinned Sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231 Using Your Browser History to Revisit Familiar Sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233 Managing and Troubleshooting Add-Ons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 234 Managing Toolbars and Extensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 235 Adding, Removing, and Managing Search Providers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237 Configuring Accelerators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239 Troubleshooting Problems Caused by Add-Ons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 240 Working with RSS Feeds and Web Slices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242Chapter 7: Internet Explorer Compatibility, Security, and Privacy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247 Dealing with Compatibility Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248 Using the Compatibility View List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251 Using the Compatibility View Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251 Monitoring and Maintaining Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 252 Working with Protected Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 252 Controlling ActiveX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254 Using and Customizing Internet Security Zones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256 Using Scripts Wisely . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 261 Identifying Deceptive (Phishing) Websites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 261 Protecting Your Privacy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 263 Protecting Yourself from Online Tracking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 264 Managing Cookies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 270 Clearing Personal Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 272 Browsing Privately . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 273 Managing Downloads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 274Chapter 8: Adding Windows Live Programs and Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 279 Getting Started with Windows Live Programs and Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 280 Installing and Configuring Windows Live Essentials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 280 Using Windows Live Web Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283 Managing Your Windows Live ID and Profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 292 www.it-ebooks.info
    • Table of Contents xi Synchronizing Files and Favorites with Windows Live Mesh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 295 Using Windows Live Mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300 Managing Mail Accounts and Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303 Working with Contacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 307 Using the Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 308 Using Windows Live Photo Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310 Using Windows Live Messenger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 321Part 2: File ManagementChapter 9: Organizing Files and Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 325 Mastering Windows Explorer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 326 Navigating in Windows Explorer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 330 What’s What and Where in a User Profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 332 Common Profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 340 Customizing the Toolbar in Windows Explorer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 340 Working with Libraries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 343 Using Compressed (Zipped) Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 348 Arranging Data in Windows Explorer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 350 Managing File Properties and Metadata . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 360Chapter 10: Using Windows Search . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 367 Configuring Search and Indexing Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 368 Which Files and Folders Are in the Index? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 369 Monitoring the Index, and Tuning Indexer Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 375 Other Index Maintenance Tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 377 Basic Search Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 378 Searching from the Start Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 379 Refining a Search in Windows Explorer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 383 Advanced Search Tools and Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 386 Searching by Item Type or Kind . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 388 Changing the Scope of a Search . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 389 Searching for Item Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 390 Using Multiple Criteria for Complex Searches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 392 Using Wildcards and Character-Mode Searches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 392 Searching with Natural Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 393 Searching Nonindexed Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 394 Saving Searches and Clearing Search History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 395Chapter 11: Advanced File Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 397 Recovering Lost, Damaged, and Deleted Files and Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 397 Recovering Files and Folders with the Recycle Bin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 398 Restoring Previous Versions of Files and Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 401 Staying in Sync with Offline Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 403 Setting Caching Options on the Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 412 Relocating Personal Data Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 416 Encrypting Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 418 Using the Encrypting File System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 418 www.it-ebooks.info
    • xii Table of Contents Encrypting with BitLocker and BitLocker To Go . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 421 Industrial-Strength File Management with Robocopy and Robocopy GUI . . . . . . . . . . . . . 424 Opening Shell Folders with the Shell Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 426 Using GUIDs to Open Control Panel Items and System Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 431Chapter 12: Backup, Restore, and Recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 435 Using the Windows Backup Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 436 Customizing a Backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 441 Creating a System Image Backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 444 Restoring Files from a Backup Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 446 Restoring a System Image Backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 448 Managing Saved Backups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 451 Implementing a Backup Strategy in a Server-Based Environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 453 Configuring Computers for Backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 454 Backing Up the Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 457 Restoring Files from a Backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 459 Restoring a System Image . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 460 Configuring System Protection Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 461 Rolling Back to a Stable State with System Restore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 466 Using System Restore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 467 System Restore Dos and Don’ts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 470Part 3: Digital MediaChapter 13: Playing and Organizing Digital Media Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 475 Which File Formats and Codecs Does Windows 7 Support? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 477 Using Windows Media Player . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 481 Playing Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 484 Watching Videos and DVDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 486 Customizing the Navigation Pane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 488 Working with Playlists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 490 Ripping CDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 496 Choosing an Audio Format and Bit Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 497 Deciding How to Name Your Files and Where to Store Them . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 501 Managing Your Media Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 503 Using Ratings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 503 Managing Metadata and Album Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 504 Working with (and Around) Digital Rights Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 507Chapter 14: Sharing and Syncing Digital Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 511 Sharing Digital Media over a Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 512 Sharing Media Libraries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 514 Streaming Digital Media to Other PCs or Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 516 Remote Streaming over the Internet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 519 Synchronizing Digital Media with Portable Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 520 Managing Digital Media on an iPod, iPhone, or iPad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 520 Synchronizing with a Zune Player or Windows Phone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 521 www.it-ebooks.info
    • Table of Contents xiii Syncing with Portable MP3 Players and Removable Storage Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . 523 Burning Music and Other Media to CDs and DVDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 529 Using DVDs to Share Pictures and Videos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 533Chapter 15: Using Windows Media Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 537 Setting Up and Customizing Media Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 538 Mastering the Media Center Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 543 Navigating and Entering Text with a Remote Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 546 Using Media Center with a Mouse or Keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 548 Playing Music, Pictures, Videos, and Movies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 550 Using Ratings and Playing Favorites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 553 CDs, DVDs, and Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 555 Accessing Shared Libraries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 556 Recording and Watching TV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 556 Setting Up One or More TV Tuners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 557 Recording TV Programs and Series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 561 Watching and Managing Recorded TV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 564 Using an Xbox 360 as a Media Center Extender . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 566Chapter 16: Digital Media for Enthusiasts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 569 Mastering the Zune Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 570 Using Zune to Manage a Digital Media Collection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 575 Ripping CDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578 Editing Album Details, Tags, and Other Metadata . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 579 Creating and Managing Playlists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 581 Connecting a PC to a Home Entertainment System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 583 Connecting Your PC to a TV and External Amplifier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 584 Compensating for Overscan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 585 Managing Remote Controls and Wireless Input Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 587 Integrating an Xbox 360 into a Home Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 589Part 4: Security and NetworkingChapter 17: Security Essentials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 593 Understanding Security Threats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 594 What’s New in Windows 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 598 Monitoring Your Computer’s Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 600 Blocking Intruders with Windows Firewall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 604 Using Windows Firewall in Different Network Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 608 Managing Windows Firewall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 608 Enabling or Disabling Windows Firewall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 609 Allowing Connections Through the Firewall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 611 Restoring Default Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 613 Advanced Tools for Managing Windows Firewall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 614 Staying Secure with Windows Update . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 615 Using Security Software to Block Malware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 617 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    • xiv Table of Contents Choosing an Antivirus Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 619 Setting Up and Using Microsoft Security Essentials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 621 Manually Scanning for Malware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 624 Preventing Unsafe Actions with User Account Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 629 What Triggers UAC Prompts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 630 Dealing with UAC Prompts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 633 Modifying UAC Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 636 Working Around UAC Without Disabling It . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 638Chapter 18: Managing User Accounts, Passwords, and Logons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 641 Introducing Access Control in Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 642 Permissions and Rights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 646 User Accounts and Security Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 646 Learning About Your Own Account with Whoami . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 650 Working with User Accounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 651 Creating a New User Account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 652 Changing Account Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 654 Using the Guest Account for Visitors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 657 Deleting an Account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 657 Effectively Implementing User Accounts on a Shared Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 659 Using Other Account Management Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 661 Setting a Logon Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 663 Creating a Secure Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 664 Setting a Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 664 Recovering from a Lost Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 666 Managing the Logon Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 668 Customizing the Logon Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 670 Bypassing the Logon Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 671 Logging Off, Switching Users, or Locking Your Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 674 Controlling Your Children’s Computer Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 675 Configuring Parental Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 676 Using Other Controls to Keep Your Children Safe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 681Chapter 19: Setting Up a Small Office or Home Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 683 Introducing Windows 7 Networking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 684 What’s New in Windows 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 684 Using Network And Sharing Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 686 Understanding Network Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 687 Configuring Your Network Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 689 Wired or Wireless? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 691 Installing and Configuring a Network Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 693 Making Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 694 Setting Up a Wireless Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 695 Understanding Security for Wireless Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 696 Configuring a Router or Wireless Access Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 697 www.it-ebooks.info
    • Table of Contents xv Connecting to a Wireless Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 702 Setting Up an Ad Hoc Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 708 Connecting Wireless Devices to Your Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 709 Using HomeGroup to Connect Your Computers at Home . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 710 Creating a Homegroup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 710 Joining a Homegroup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 712 Connecting to Windows Home Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 714Chapter 20: Sharing and Managing Network Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 719 Sharing Files, Digital Media, and Printers in a Homegroup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 720 Deciding What to Share—And What Not to Share . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 721 Browsing Shared Folders and Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 726 Streaming Media in a Homegroup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 728 Sharing a Printer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 729 Using HomeGroup with a Domain-Based Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 730 Leaving a Homegroup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 730 Disabling HomeGroup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 731 Sharing Resources with Older Windows Versions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 732 Understanding Sharing and Security Models in Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 732 Configuring Your Network for Sharing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 734 Sharing Files with Public Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 737 Sharing Files and Folders from Any Folder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 738 Using PowerShell Scripts to Manage Shared Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 747 Sharing a Printer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 748 Finding and Using Shared Resources on a Windows Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 750 Working with Mapped Network Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 752 Connecting to a Network Printer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 753Chapter 21: Advanced Windows Networking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 755 Working in a Domain-Based Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 757 Differences in the Logon Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 758 Security Groups and Policy Restrictions in a Domain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 759 Network Profiles in a Domain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 760 Using a Domain-Joined Computer Away from the Domain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 761 Connecting to Another Computer with Remote Desktop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 762 Configuring Your Network for Remote Desktop Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 765 Enabling Inbound Remote Desktop Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 767 Using a Remote Desktop Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770 Connecting Remotely with Windows Live Mesh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 779 Connecting Remotely to a Windows Home Server Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 782 Configuring Your Server and Computers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 783 Making a Remote Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 784 Using a Virtual Private Network for Remote Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 785 Configuring a VPN Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 787 Connecting to a Virtual Private Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 789 Bridging Two Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 790 www.it-ebooks.info
    • xvi Table of ContentsChapter 22: Fixing and Tweaking Your Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 795 Viewing Status in Network And Sharing Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 795 Diagnosing Problems Using Network Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 797 Troubleshooting Network Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 801 Troubleshooting HomeGroup Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 802 Network Troubleshooting Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 804 Troubleshooting TCP/IP Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 806 Maximizing Network Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 813 Changing Network Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 815 Specifying the Order and Connection Properties of Preferred Wi-Fi Networks . . . 815 Renaming Your Workgroup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 817 Renaming Your Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 819 Removing a Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 820 Managing Network Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 821 Setting IP Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 824 Configuring Power Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 827Part 5: Tuning, Tweaking, and TroubleshootingChapter 23: Tuning Up and Monitoring Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 833 Establishing a Performance Baseline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 834 Using the Windows Experience Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 835 Generating a System Health Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 839 Monitoring Performance in Real Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 841 Using Windows Task Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 841 Using Resource Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 847 Basic Strategies for Improving Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 852 Ensuring That You Have Adequate RAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 852 Ensuring That You Have an Adequate Virtual-Memory Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . 856 Tuning and Troubleshooting SuperFetch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 859 Using ReadyBoost to Compensate for a Slow Hard Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 860 Managing Startup Programs and Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 863 Keeping Your Disks Defragmented . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 865 Maintaining Adequate Free Space on Your Disks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 865 Avoiding Tweaks of Dubious Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866 Advanced Performance Analysis Tools and Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 868Chapter 24: Performing Routine Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 871 Introducing Action Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 872 Keeping Your System Secure with Windows Update . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 875 Updating Device Drivers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 879 Using Windows Update Manually . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 879 Removing an Update . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 879 Updating More Than One Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 880 Using PowerShell Scripts to Manage Updates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 881 Checking Disks for Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 881 www.it-ebooks.info
    • Table of Contents xvii Defragmenting Disks for Better Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 886 Using Disk Defragmenter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 887 Running Disk Defragmenter from a Command Line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 890 Defragmenting Solid-State Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 891 Managing Disk Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 892 Cleaning Up with Disk Cleanup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 892 Strategies for Preserving Space on System Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 896 Conserving Space with NTFS File Compression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 897Chapter 25: Using Advanced System Management Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 899 Viewing System Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 899 Digging Deeper with Dedicated System Information Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 901 Finding and Decoding Information in System Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 902 Exporting System Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 903 Using Microsoft Management Console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 904 Running MMC Consoles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 905 MMC Consoles and User Account Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 906 Running a Console in Author Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 906 Using MMC Consoles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 906 Creating Your Own MMC Consoles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 909 Managing Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 914 Using the Services Console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 914 Starting and Stopping Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 915 Configuring Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 916 Managing Services from Task Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 920 Managing Services with Windows PowerShell Scripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 921 Editing the Registry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 923 Understanding the Structure of the Registry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 923 Registry Data Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 926 Registry Virtualization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 927 Avoiding Registry Mishaps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 928 Backing Up Before You Edit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 928 Browsing and Editing with Registry Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 931 Using .Reg Files to Automate Registry Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 932 Using Group Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 935 Understanding Multiple Local Group Policy Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 936 Using the Local Group Policy Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 940Chapter 26: Deployment and Migration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 949 Expediting Multiple Windows Installations by Installing from a USB Flash Drive . . . . . . . . 950 Creating a Bootable UFD with the Windows 7 USB/DVD Download Tool . . . . . . . . . 951 Creating a Bootable UFD from a Windows 7 Setup DVD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 953 Using Your Bootable UFD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 954 Deploying Windows and Microsoft Office on Several Computers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 956 Introducing the Windows Automated Installation Kit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 957 Introducing the Express Deployment Tool for System Builders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 958 www.it-ebooks.info
    • xviii Table of Contents Migrating User Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 960 Working with Volume Licenses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 961 Activating a Volume License . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 962 Evaluation Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 963Chapter 27: Automating Windows 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 965 Using Task Scheduler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 966 Creating a Task . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 970 Scheduling Tasks with the Schtasks Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 978 Automating Command Sequences with Batch Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 979 Automating Tasks with Windows Script Host . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 980 An Introduction to Windows PowerShell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 980 Starting PowerShell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 982 Personalizing PowerShell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 983 Interacting with PowerShell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 983 Discovering PowerShell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 996 Scripting with PowerShell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 999 Finding Additional PowerShell Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1004Chapter 28: Troubleshooting Windows Errors and Crashes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1007 Reporting Problems and Finding Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1008 Understanding Windows Error Reporting and Privacy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1009 Understanding the Windows Error Reporting Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1010 Setting Windows Error Reporting Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1011 Checking for Solutions to Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1013 Reviewing the Problem History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1014 Using Troubleshooters to Solve Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1016 Using Problem Steps Recorder to Get Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1019 Reviewing Problem Reports with Reliability Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1020 Troubleshooting Hangs and Other Problems with Resource Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1021 Digging Deeper with Event Viewer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1023 Types of Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1024 Understanding the Event Logs Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1026 Viewing Individual Logs and Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1026 Creating a Task to Run When a Specific Event Occurs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1031 Understanding Stop Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1032 Customizing How Windows Handles Stop Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1032 How to Read a Stop Error . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1034 Dealing with Stop Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1036 Analyzing Crash Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1037 Recovering from a Crash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1040 Using Advanced Boot Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1041 Making Repairs with the Windows Recovery Environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1046 www.it-ebooks.info
    • Table of Contents xixPart 6: Windows 7 and PC HardwareChapter 29: Setting Up and Configuring Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1055 Installing a New Plug and Play Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1056 Managing Devices with Devices And Printers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1058 Managing Printers and Print Queues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1061 Installing a Printer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1061 Installing a Non–Plug and Play Printer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1064 Using PowerShell Scripts to Manage Printers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1065 Managing Devices with Device Stage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1067 Managing Devices with Device Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1070 A Crash Course in Device Drivers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1076 Configuring Legacy Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1081 Changing Settings for an Installed Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1082 Adjusting Advanced Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1083 Viewing and Changing Resource Assignments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1086 Managing Installed Drivers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1089 Updating a Device Driver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1090 Rolling Back to a Previous Driver Version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1091 Uninstalling a Driver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1091 Enabling and Disabling Individual Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1094 Decoding Hardware Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1095Chapter 30: Managing Disks and Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1099 The Windows 7 Disk-Management Toolkit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1100 Running Disk Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1100 Managing Disks from the Command Prompt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1102 Setting Up a New Hard Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1107 Installing Windows on a New Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1107 Adding a New Disk to an Existing Windows Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1108 Choosing a File System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1111 Managing Existing Disks and Volumes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1114 Extending a Volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1114 Shrinking a Volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1116 Deleting a Volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1117 Converting a FAT32 Disk to NTFS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1118 Assigning or Changing a Volume Label . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1118 Assigning and Changing Drive Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1119 Mapping a Volume to an NTFS Folder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1119 Checking the Properties and Status of Disks and Volumes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1123 Permanently Wiping All Data from a Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1127 Working with Virtual Hard Disks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1127 Working with Solid State Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1130 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    • xx Table of ContentsChapter 31: Using Pen, Touch, and Voice Input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1133 Enabling and Customizing Pen and Touch Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1134 Calibrating the Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1139 Changing Orientation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1139 Redefining Tablet PC Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1140 Reading, Writing, and Editing with Pen and Touch Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1141 Using Gestures in Windows 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1142 Using the Writing Pad and Touch Keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1145 Using Speech Recognition and Voice Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1148 Tuning and Tweaking Windows Speech Recognition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1148 Controlling a PC with Voice Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1150 Using Speech to Enter and Edit Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1152AppendixesAppendix A: Windows 7 Editions at a Glance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1157 Features Available in All Windows 7 Editions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1158 Windows 7 Starter and Home Basic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1160 Windows 7 Home Premium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1160 Windows 7 Professional . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1162 Windows 7 Ultimate/Enterprise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1163Appendix B: Working with the Command Prompt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1165 Starting and Ending a Command Prompt Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1165 Starting Command Prompt at a Particular Folder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1167 Starting Command Prompt and Running a Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1167 Using AutoRun to Execute Commands When Command Prompt Starts . . . . . . . . . 1168 Using Cmd’s Command-Line Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1169 Using Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1170 Starting Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1171 Using File-Name and Folder-Name Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1171 Using Wildcards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1172 Editing the Command Line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1172 Using Command Symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1174 Pausing or Canceling Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1177 Simplifying Command Entry with Doskey Macros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1177 Using Environment Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1178 Viewing Environment Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1178 Modifying Environment Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1178 Customizing Command Prompt Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1180 Setting the Window Size and Position . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1180 Selecting a Font . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1181 Setting Colors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1182 Setting Other Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1183 www.it-ebooks.info
    • Table of Contents xxiAppendix C: Fixes Included in Windows 7 Service Pack 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1185 Application Compatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1186 Computer Management, Administration, and Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1187 Desktop and Shell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1190 Development Tools, Including .NET Framework and Data Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1193 Hardware and Drivers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1197 International/Localization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1198 Internet Explorer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1199 Multimedia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1202 Networking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1203 Networking: IIS and WebDAV Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1205 Networking: Remote Access, VPN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1207 Offline Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1208 Performance and Reliability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1208 Printing and Scanning Technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1223 Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1224 Setup, Deployment, Backup, and Activation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1227 Sleep/Hibernation and Power Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1227 Startup/Shutdown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1229 Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1230 Time Zone/Daylight Saving Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1231 Windows Media Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1231 Windows Media Player and Related Technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1232 Windows Portable Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1233Appendix D: Windows 7 Certifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1235 Preparing for Certification Exams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1236 Exam 70-680, Configuring Windows 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1237 Exam 70-685, Windows 7 Enterprise Desktop Support Technician . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1239 Exam 70-686, Windows 7 Enterprise Desktop Administrator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1241Appendix E: Some Useful Accessory Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1243 Our Favorite Five . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1243 Calculator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1243 Paint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1244 Snipping Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1245 Character Map and Private Character Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1246 Sticky Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1247 Other Handy Accessories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1248 Windows Fax And Scan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1248 XPS Viewer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1248 Sound Recorder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1249 WordPad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1249 Windows Journal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1249 www.it-ebooks.info
    • xxii Table of Contents System Management Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1249 Winver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1249 Boot Configuration Data Editor (BCDEdit) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1250 Color Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1250 DirectX Diagnostic Tool (DXDiag) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1250 DOSKey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1250 Historical Curiosities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1251 Edlin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1251 Edit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1251 Debug . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1251 Index to Troubleshooting Topics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1253 Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1255 What do you think of this book? We want to hear from you! Microsoft is interested in hearing your feedback so we can continually improve our books and learning resources for you. To participate in a brief online survey, please visit: www.microsoft.com/learning/booksurvey/ www.it-ebooks.info
    • Foreword to Windows 7 Inside Out Individually and collectively, the three authors who wrote Windows 7 Inside Out have been working with Windows for as long as many of the most senior developers at Microsoft. Ed, Carl, and Craig focus on Windows from a unique perspective—they are experts and enthu- siasts who want to share their expertise and enthusiasm with you. With Windows 7, our development team was dedicated to building a brand new release of the OS while also making sure your investments in hardware and software are effectively brought forward. We took a deliberate approach to building new features, refining existing features, and making sure at every step we were true to our goals of delivering an awesome release of Windows. Ed, Carl, and Craig do an awesome job of providing readers with the ins and outs of the full range of features of Windows 7, which will help you to get the most out of the product. As we engineered Windows 7, we opened a dialog with a broad community of enthusi- asts on our Engineering Windows 7 blog (blogs.msdn.com/b/e7). Through this blog, we discussed the engineering side of building Windows 7—from the bottom up, so to speak. We know that for many, these topics were interesting as Windows 7 was being developed. Through the blog and through all of our forms of learning as we developed Windows 7, we were asked many questions not just about the “how” but about the “why” of features. We offered our insights from the product development perspective. With their unique perspec- tive, few are more qualified to offer further explanations of the ins and outs of Windows 7 than the authors of Windows 7 Inside Out. With Windows 7 now in the hands of customers around the world, our collective interests turn to making the most of Windows 7. I know from 15 years of following the work of Ed, Carl, and Craig that they have the same commitment to delivering real-world advice from a perspective that is grounded in experience and knowledge of how Windows works. Over the years, they’ve met with many teams here in Redmond to talk about Windows and how they can help you, our shared customers and readers, be more productive. I hope you enjoy Windows 7 Inside Out. Steven Sinofsky President, Windows Division Microsoft Corporation xxiii www.it-ebooks.info
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    • Foreword When we began designing Windows 7, we thought a lot about how you use your PC. Our goal was to make your experience simpler, so that you can concentrate on the tasks you’re trying to accomplish. Since we released Windows 7 in 2009, we’ve been gratified by the positive response to our work from hundreds of millions of customers worldwide. We didn’t stop working on launch day, and neither did the authors of Windows 7 Inside Out. We’ve delivered a steady stream of updates to Windows in the past two years, includ- ing Service Pack 1, Internet Explorer 9, and Windows Live Essentials 2011. In this Deluxe Edition, Ed, Carl, and Craig have once again done a thorough job of explain- ing not just how Windows works but why we designed it the way we did. They understand that Windows isn’t just a collection of features—it’s a series of end-to-end experiences. They’ve spent a tremendous amount of time in the Windows community over the past c ­ ouple years learning from you, and they’ve incorporated that learning into this impres- sively expanded edition. The authors of Windows 7 Inside Out have been doing what they do for a long time. They get Windows in a way that few others do. We hope this Deluxe Edition will help you make the most of Windows 7. Julie Larson-Green Corporate Vice President, Windows Experience Microsoft Corporation June 2011 xxv www.it-ebooks.info
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    • Introduction By some measures, Windows 7 sets a new standard for usability. It needs less out-of-the-box tweaking and troubleshooting than any Windows version we’ve ever used. The arrange- ment of folders and files in Windows Explorer, basic system security, User Account Control settings, and numerous other default configuration options are well thought out. Adding a new hardware device typically requires nothing more than just plugging it in, and setting up a network no longer entails invoking supernatural help. Despite all that—or perhaps because of it—we have plenty of good stuff to share with you in this edition of Windows 7 Inside Out. The good news: we don’t need to spend a lot of ink on Windows 7 features that work as expected. That allows us to concentrate on the many capabilities and features that are buried just beneath the surface. We cover the handful of essential tasks—backing up your computer, for example—that aren’t configured automati- cally. We’ve also brought together countless shortcuts, tips, and tricks to help you perform tasks more quickly and with less aggravation. This Deluxe Edition adds several chapters not included in the original edition, giving us the space to dive deeper into media applications, networking, scripting, and deployment of Windows throughout a small organization. Perhaps more important, spread throughout this edition are additional tips and explanations based on many, many hours of poking, probing, and studying Windows 7 in the two years since its release. This book also covers the latest changes to the operating system, notably Service Pack 1, as well as a new version of Internet Explorer and an impressively updated collection of programs in Windows Live Essentials 2011.Who This Book Is For This book offers a well-rounded look at the features most people use in Windows. It serves as an excellent reference for anyone who wants a better understanding of how Windows 7 works. If you’re a Windows expert in training, or if your day job involves IT responsibili- ties, or if you’re the designated computer specialist managing computers and networks in a home or small business, you’ll discover many sections we wrote just for you. And if you consider yourself a Windows enthusiast, well, we hope you’ll find enough fun and interesting tidbits to keep you interested—because, after all, we’re unabashed enthusiasts ourselves. Assumptions About You This book, like others in the Inside Out series, is designed for readers who have some expe- rience with the subject. It touches only briefly on some of the basic topics that you’ll find xxvii www.it-ebooks.info
    • xxviii Introduction covered in more detail elsewhere (for those, we recommend other Microsoft Press titles, such as Windows 7 Step by Step or Windows 7 Plain & Simple). Whether your experience comes from Windows 7 or an earlier version, we expect that you are comfortable finding your way around the desktop, browsing folders with Windows Explorer, launching programs, using copy and paste operations, and finding information in a web browser. We don’t assume that you’re a hardware tinkerer, a hacker, a hardcore gamer, or a code jockey. How This Book Is Organized Part 1, “Getting Started,” describes your initial Windows experiences: installing and con- figuring Windows, working with programs, adding Windows Live Essentials, personalizing Windows to your needs, and using Internet Explorer. Part 2, “File Management,” explains how to organize your folders and files, how to find those files when you need them, and how to back them up to ensure that they’re always available. It also covers the ins and outs of Windows search technologies. Part 3, “Digital Media,” explores the rich media features of Windows 7, including playing, sharing, and syncing media. This edition includes expanded coverage of Windows Media Center and other Microsoft media products, such as the Xbox 360 and the elegant, power- ful Zune software. Part 4, “Security and Networking,” explains how to set up a network so that you can share files, printers, Internet connections, and other resources among all your computers—and how to properly implement security measures so that you can do so safely. Part 5, “Tuning, Tweaking, and Troubleshooting,” covers routine maintenance tasks and explores tools and techniques for measuring and improving your computer’s performance. Other topics include Windows PowerShell scripting, troubleshooting methods, and deploy- ment of Windows to multiple computers. Part 6, “Windows 7 and PC Hardware,” looks at details of the devices on which Windows runs, including setup and configuration, management of hard disk drives, and use of input methods other than the keyboard and mouse (namely, pen, touch, and speech). Part 7 comprises a handful of appendixes that provide reference information, including concise looks at the differences among Windows 7 editions, changes wrought by Service Pack 1, and accessory programs that are part of Windows. www.it-ebooks.info
    • Introduction xxixFeatures and Conventions Used In This Book This book uses special text and design conventions to make it easier for you to find the information you need. Text Conventions Convention Meaning Abbreviated com- For your convenience, this book uses abbreviated commands. For mands for navigat- example, “Click Home, Insert, Insert Cells” means that you should ing the ribbon click the Home tab on the ribbon, then click the Insert button, and finally click the Insert Cells command. Boldface type Boldface indicates text that you type. Initial Capital The first letters of the names of tabs, dialog boxes, dialog box Letters e ­ lements, and commands are capitalized. Example: the Save As dialog box. Italicized type Italicized type indicates new terms. Plus sign (+) in text Keyboard shortcuts are indicated by a plus sign (+) separating key names. For example, Ctrl+Alt+Delete means that you press the Ctrl, Alt, and Delete keys at the same time. Design Conventions INSIDE OUT  T  his statement illustrates an example of an “Inside Out” heading These are the book’s signature tips. In these tips, you get the straight scoop on what’s going on with the software—inside information about why a feature works the way it does. You’ll also find handy workarounds to deal with software problems. Sidebar Sidebars provide helpful hints, timesaving tricks, or alternative procedures related to the task being discussed. www.it-ebooks.info
    • xxx Introduction TROUBLESHOOTING This statement illustrates an example of a “Troubleshooting” problem statement Look for these sidebars to find solutions to common problems you might encounter. Troubleshooting sidebars appear next to related information in the chapters. You can also use “Index to Troubleshooting Topics” at the back of the book to look up problems by topic. Cross-references point you to locations in the book that offer additional information about the topic being discussed. CAUTION ! Cautions identify potential problems that you should look out for when you’re com- pleting a task or that you must address before you can complete a task. Note Notes offer additional information related to the task being discussed. When an example has a related file that is included on the companion CD, this icon appears in the margin. You can use these files to follow along with the book’s examples.About the CD The companion CD that ships with this book contains many resources to help you get the most out of your Inside Out book. If you bought a digital edition of this book, you can enjoy select content from the print edition’s companion CD. Visit http://go.microsoft.com/FWLink/?Linkid=219280 to get your downloadable content. This content is always up-to-date and available to all readers. What’s on the CD Your Inside Out CD includes the following: ●● Complete eBook  Enjoy the entire electronic version of this title. ●● Resources  Reference white papers, user assistance, and product support to help you use and troubleshoot the features of Windows 7. www.it-ebooks.info
    • Introduction xxxi ●● Product Information  Explore the features and capabilities of Windows 7 and learn how other Microsoft products and technologies can help you at work and at home. ●● Tools  Link to tools for PowerShell, application compatibility, IEAK, WAIK, and Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor. ●● Sample Scripts  Discover more than 80 Windows PowerShell scripts you can cus- tomize and use to configure and manage computers running Windows 7. Here is a listing of the scripts arranged by the chapter in which each is introduced: Chapter PowerShell Scripts Chapter PowerShell Scripts 2 DisplayProcessor.ps1 24 Get-MicrosoftUpdates.ps1 Get-OSVersion.ps1 Get-MissingSoftware­ Get-ProcessorArchitecture.ps1 Updates.ps1 Get-WindowsEdition.ps1 Get-PercentFreeSpace.ps1 ListOperatingSystem.ps1 ListFreeSpace.ps1 ScanForSpecificUpdate.ps1 7 Clean-IE.ps1 Start-Defrag.ps1 9 Set-ExplorerCommandBar.ps1 TroubleshootWindows­ 18 AddLocalUserToLocal- Update.ps1 Group.ps1 UninstallMicrosoftUpdate.ps1 BackupFolderToServer.ps1 24 ConfigureSoftwareUpdates­ Change-LocalUser- Schedule.ps1 Password.ps1 DownloadAndInstallMicrosoft- CreateLocalGroup.ps1 Update.ps1 CreateLocalUser.ps1 Get-DefragAnalysis.ps1 EnableDisableUser.ps1 Get-DiskDriveInventory.ps1 FindAdmin.ps1 Get-LogicalDiskInventory.ps1 Get-LocalGroupMembers.ps1 25 acceptPause.ps1 Get-LocalGroups.ps1 AutoServicesNotRunning.ps1 Get-LocalUsers.ps1 ChangeModeThenStart.ps1 Get-SystemRestore- ChangeServiceAccount- Settings.ps1 Logon.ps1 ListUserLastLogon.ps1 CheckServiceThenStart.ps1 LocateDisabledUsers.ps1 CheckServiceThenStop.ps1 LocateLockedOutUsers.ps1 CountRunningServices.ps1 Remove-LocalUserFrom- EvaluateServices.ps1 LocalGroup.ps1 GetMultipleServices.ps1 20 CreateShare.ps1 getServiceStatus.ps1 DeleteShare.ps1 MonitorService.ps1 Get-ShareInfo.ps1 ServiceDependencies.ps1 GetShareAndPermission.ps1 StartMultipleServices.ps1 ListAdminShares.ps1 StopMultipleServices.ps1 23 FindMaxPageFaults.ps1 27 Test-64Bit.ps1 Get-DiskUtilization.ps1 28 CountErrors.ps1 Get-ProcessorInformation.ps1 FindUSBEvents.ps1 Get-ProcessorUtilization.ps1 Get-DiagnosticEventLogs.ps1 GetTopMemory.ps1 GetErrorsFromAllLogFiles.ps1 TroubleshootPerformance.ps1 GetEventLogErrors.ps1 www.it-ebooks.info
    • xxxii Introduction Chapter PowerShell Scripts Chapter PowerShell Scripts 29 FindPrinterDrivers.ps1 30 Get-DiskPerformance.ps1 FindPrinterPorts.ps1 Get-PageFile.ps1 Get-PrinterPorts.ps1 Get-VolumeDirty.ps1 Get-PrintQueueStatistics.ps1 Get-VolumeInventory.ps1 Get-SharedPrinter.ps1 Get-VolumeLabel.ps1 InstallPrinterDriver.ps1 Set-VolumeAutoCheck.ps1 InstallPrinterDriverFull.ps1 Set-VolumeLabel.ps1 ListPrinterDrivers.ps1 ListPrinters.ps1 ListSharedPrintersAddPrint- Connection.ps1 TroubleshootPrinter.ps1 WorkWithPrinters.ps1 System Requirements Following are the minimum system requirements necessary to run the CD: ●● A Pentium 500 megahertz (MHz) or faster processor (Pentium III is recommended as a minimum). ●● Microsoft Windows XP with Service Pack (SP) 3 (32-bit), Windows Vista with SP1 (32-bit or 64-bit), Windows Server 2003 R2 (32-bit or 64-bit) with MSXML 6.0 installed, Windows Server 2008 R2, or Windows 7 (32-bit or 64-bit). ●● At least 24 megabytes (MB) of random access memory (RAM); 512 MB is recommended. ●● A hard drive with at least 527 MB of free space. ●● A CD-ROM or DVD-ROM drive. ●● A mouse or other pointing device. ●● A 1024 x 768 or greater monitor display. Other options required to use all features include the following: ●● A multimedia computer for sound and other multimedia effects. ●● Dial-up or broadband Internet access. ●● Microsoft Internet Explorer 6 or later. www.it-ebooks.info
    • Introduction xxxiiiAcknowledgments If we tried to list all the people who have helped us in one way or another on this project, we’d have to add another 50 pages. So we apologize in advance to those we don’t thank by name. We’d like to acknowledge the tremendous assistance offered for the original edition by Steve Ball, Mark Russino­ ich, Dan Plastina, Gabe Aul, Charlie Owen, Chris Flores, and Jerry v Koh of Microsoft. They are among literally dozens of developers, product managers, and technical professionals at Microsoft who enthusiastically shared their time and their deep knowledge of Windows 7 with us. Our thanks also to their bosses, Jon DeVaan and Steven Sinofsky, for their support in mak- ing those contacts possible. For this edition, our coverage of Internet Explorer benefited greatly from many hours of meetings with Dean Hachamovich and his team. We also owe a big thanks to the countless bloggers, Microsoft MVPs, Windows enthusiasts, and readers who shared their questions and answers with us. The signature feature of this edition is a collection of PowerShell scripts you’ll find sprinkled throughout the book. Those would not exist without the assistance of Ed Wilson, who proved to us why they call him The Scripting Guy. Our production team was led by our longtime collaborator Curt Philips, who somehow makes this grueling process look easier each time. Technical editor Mitch Tulloch brought his own considerable expertise to the task of making sure we got the details right; he also did a fine job putting together the companion CD. We owe a big debt to John Pierce, copy- editor, and Andrea Fox, proofreader, for helping us weed out typos and grammatical errors. Our partners and collaborators at Microsoft Press have been a source of support for many terrific years: this edition would not have been possible without the support of Jeff Koch and the superb logistical talents of project editor Valerie Woolley. Our literary agent and good friend Claudette Moore has provided much encouragement as we’ve all watched the book business transform, provided excellent guidance, talked us down a few times when it was necessary, and continued to make sure that this project came together to everyone’s benefit. Thanks to one and all. Ed Bott, Carl Siechert, and Craig Stinson June 2011 www.it-ebooks.info
    • xxxiv IntroductionSupport and Feedback The following sections provide information on errata, book support, feedback, and contact information. Errata & Support We’ve made every effort to ensure the accuracy of this book and its companion con- tent. Any errors that have been reported since this book was published are listed on our Microsoft Press site at oreilly.com: http://go.microsoft.com/FWLink/?Linkid=220284  If you find an error that is not already listed, you can report it to us through the same page. If you need additional support, email Microsoft Press Book Support at mspinput@microsoft.com. Please note that product support for Microsoft software is not offered through the addresses above. We Want to Hear from You At Microsoft Press, your satisfaction is our top priority, and your feedback our most valu- able asset. Please tell us what you think of this book at http://www.microsoft.com/learning/booksurvey The survey is short, and we read every one of your comments and ideas. Thanks in advance for your input! Stay in Touch Let’s keep the conversation going! We’re on Twitter: http://twitter.com/MicrosoftPress. www.it-ebooks.info
    • PART 1 Getting Started CHAPTER 1 What’s New in Windows 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CHAPTER 2 Installing and Configuring Windows 7 . . . . . . 23 CHAPTER 3 Obtaining Help and Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 CHAPTER 4 Personalizing Windows 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 CHAPTER 5 Adding, Removing, and Managing Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171 CHAPTER 6 Using Internet Explorer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209 CHAPTER 7 Internet Explorer Compatibility, Security, and Privacy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247 CHAPTER 8 Adding Windows Live Programs and Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 279 1 www.it-ebooks.info
    • www.it-ebooks.info
    • C H A AC E H R E P LP T E RT1 I S T E X T What’s New in Windows 7Introducing the Windows 7 Family. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Networking in New Ways. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16Adjusting to the Windows 7 Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Keeping Your PC Speedy and Safe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18Organizing and Finding Files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Using Internet Explorer 9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20Saving, Sharing, and Playing Digital Media. . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Updating to Service Pack 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 W has changed since we wrote the first edition of this book? For starters, PC hat manufacturers have sold hundreds of millions of new desktop and laptop sys- tems running Windows 7. A few tens of millions of people have upgraded to Windows 7 from earlier versions. We’ve had nearly two years’ worth of hands-on experi- ence with Windows 7 ourselves—tweaking, testing, tuning, and occasionally troubleshoot- ing, often in response to questions and comments from our readers. Microsoft has been busy since then as well, releasing new security tools, new digital media software, and significant new releases of Internet Explorer and Windows Live Essentials— not to mention a steady stream of updates to improve the performance, reliability, and security of Windows 7. Oh, and many of those updates and hotfixes have been rolled into the first service pack, which was released in February 2011. What’s in Your Edition? Microsoft offers Windows 7 in several editions, with a mix of features and capabilities intended for different hardware platforms, personal preferences, and business needs. In this book, we focus primarily on the three editions that you are most likely to encoun- ter on new and upgraded PCs—Windows 7 Home Premium, Windows 7 Professional, and Windows 7 Ultimate (which is nearly identical to the Enterprise edition available for large corporate customers). A sidebar box like this one, typically placed at the beginning of each chapter, summarizes the differences in each edition as they relate to the content of that chapter. For a more detailed discussion of the differences between each edition, see Appendix A, “Windows 7 Editions at a Glance.” For recent upgraders, this is the question we hear most often: Is Windows 7 a major upgrade or just a collection of refinements? The answer depends on your starting point. If you’ve been using Windows Vista, the upgrade to Windows 7 should be relatively 3 www.it-ebooks.info
    • 4 Chapter 1  What’s New in Windows 7 straightforward. Windows 7 is built on the same foundation as Windows Vista, so you’ve already sorted out compatibility hassles with programs and devices. After you learn the basics of the revamped Windows 7 desktop and adapt to changes in search and file man-Chapter 1 agement, you should feel right at home. For those who are moving to Windows 7 from Windows XP, the learning curve will be steeper. You’ll find fundamental changes in nearly every aspect of the operating system, and many of the expert techniques that you’ve learned through the years won’t work any longer. Three feature sets that were introduced in Windows Vista will be of particular inter- est to anyone upgrading from Windows XP: ●● Search capabilities are a key part of just about every Windows task. In Windows XP, this capability is available as an add-on that installs a search box on the taskbar. In Windows 7, you’ll find a search box on the Start menu, in the upper right corner of any window or dialog box based on Windows Explorer, and in Control Panel. ●● For anyone obsessed with performance and troubleshooting (we suspect most of our readers fall into this group), Windows 7 includes an impressive set of diagnostic and monitoring tools. Collectively, they offer a level of detail about system events that can be eye-opening and overwhelming. ●● User Account Control was one of the most controversial and misunderstood addi- tions to Windows Vista. This feature has been greatly modified in Windows 7, but anyone upgrading from Windows XP might be surprised by the extra layer of consent dialog boxes required for some common administrative tasks, especially when set- tling in with a new PC. If you’ve upgraded from Windows Vista, you’ll notice changes throughout Windows. In most cases, these refinements fall into the “fit and finish” category. Many of the changes are subtle enough that you might not even notice them at first. Some longstanding Win- dows annoyances are fixed, although others remain. You’ll notice that some everyday tasks require fewer keystrokes and mouse clicks, and we predict you’ll see fewer warnings and notifications as you go about your daily Windows routine. Regardless of where you come from, our goal in this book is to help you navigate through this period of transition as quickly as possible, so that you can unlearn old habits, discover new features, and become comfortable and productive with Windows 7. In this chapter, we take you on a quick tour of noteworthy features and capabilities in Win- dows 7, with appropriate pointers to chapters where you’ll find more detailed information and advice. www.it-ebooks.info
    • Introducing the Windows 7 Family 5 The Missing Pieces Chapter 1 When you upgrade to Windows 7, you might be surprised to find some familiar programs have vanished. The most notable entry on the missing-programs list is an e-mail client or news reader. Likewise, Windows 7 includes only the bare-bones Photo Viewer program. To fill in the gaps, you need to seek out Windows Live Essentials 2011 (w7io.com/20801). This package includes Windows Live Mail, which replaces Outlook Express in Windows XP and Windows Mail from Windows Vista. It also includes Win- dows Live Photo Gallery, Windows Live Messenger, and Windows Live Movie Maker, among other programs. (For more details on Windows Live Essentials, see Chapter 8, “Adding Windows Live Programs and Services.”) The other piece of software you need to add as part of your initial installation of Win- dows 7 is a good antivirus program. You can download a free antivirus program called Microsoft Security Essentials that works well with any edition of Windows 7, or choose from a variety of third-party options. For information on what to look for, see “Using Security Software to Block Malware” on page 617. If you purchase a new PC with Windows 7 already installed, don’t be surprised to find that it already includes Windows Live Essentials 2011 and an antivirus program (often as a feature of an all-in-one security package). As always, if you prefer a different solution you are free to replace the included software with any Windows-compatible alternative.Introducing the Windows 7 Family When you begin to delve into details about how Windows 7 works, the discussion can quickly become complicated. The primary reason for confusion is that the operating system is actually distributed and sold in multiple editions. The lineup of available editions is less complicated than for Windows Vista, but you can still get tripped up if you read about an advanced feature and don’t realize that it’s missing from your edition. How can you tell which Windows 7 edition is installed on your PC? The easiest way is to look at the top of the System window in Control Panel—click System in Control Panel; right-click the Computer icon on the Start menu and then click Properties; click Computer on the Start menu and then click System Properties on the command bar; or use the key- board shortcut Windows logo key+Break. Under the Windows Edition heading, you will see the current installed edition, as shown in Figure 1-1. www.it-ebooks.info
    • 6 Chapter 1  What’s New in Windows 7Chapter 1 Figure 1-1  System in Control Panel shows which Windows 7 edition is installed. It also lets you see whether a service pack has been installed. In this book, we concentrate on the three Windows 7 editions you are most likely to encounter on a mainstream home or business PC: ●● Windows 7 Home Premium  This is the edition you are most likely to find installed on a new PC in the computer section at your local warehouse store or consumer electronics specialist. It includes roughly the same mix of features as its predecessor, Windows Vista Home Premium. ●● Windows 7 Professional  This edition is the successor to Windows Vista Business and incorporates the same features as that operating system, notably advanced net- working features that work with networks based on the Windows Server family. In a noteworthy change, however, Windows 7 Professional is a superset of Home Pre- mium and thus includes all features (including Windows Media Center) found in the lesser edition. ●● Windows 7 Ultimate and Windows 7 Enterprise  These editions are essentially identical, with the names reflecting the sales channel of each: Ultimate is available on retail and original equipment manufacturer (OEM) editions; Enterprise is available as an upgrade only to customers who buy volume licenses of Windows. This edition contains all features found in the Home Premium and Professional editions plus some advanced networking features, BitLocker encryption, and support for multiple lan- guages. The Enterprise edition includes some additional usage rights available in the volume license agreement. www.it-ebooks.info
    • Introducing the Windows 7 Family 7 All of these editions are available in x86 (32-bit) and x64 (64-bit) options. When we wrote the previous edition of this book, 64-bit Windows was still a fairly exotic choice for most Windows users. Within just a few years, thanks in no small measure to the plummeting Chapter 1 price of memory chips, that balance has shifted dramatically. Today, 64-bit Windows 7 is commonly installed on new computers, especially on systems with 4 GB or more of RAM. Note The default settings we describe in this book are those you will see if you perform a clean install of Windows 7 using a shrink-wrapped retail copy. If you purchase a new PC with Windows 7, your settings might be different. Computer manufacturers have the right to customize Windows when they install it on a new system; they can change default settings, customize desktop backgrounds and screen savers, tweak the home page and Favorites list in Internet Explorer, install third-party software, and configure the system so that it uses a different media player or browser than the Windows 7 default settings. In this book, we offer only limited coverage of two specialized Windows 7 editions: ●● Windows 7 Starter  This edition is available for sale only on low-powered hard- ware, such as lightweight “netbooks,” and is limited in its feature set. ●● Windows 7 Home Basic  Although its predecessor was available worldwide as the entry-level edition of Windows Vista, Windows 7 Home Basic is available only in emerging markets and is not authorized for sale in the United States, Western Europe, and the rest of the so-called developed world. It lacks support for the Aero interface and does not include Windows Media Center. We also ignore the handful of variations of standard Windows 7 editions that have been modified to satisfy terms dictated by courts in various parts of the world. We never heard from a single reader who actually used the N or K versions of Windows Vista, which had Windows Media Player removed and were offered for sale in Europe and Korea, respec- tively. Windows 7 offers similar packages, and our experience suggests they have been equally unpopular, if not completely invisible. www.it-ebooks.info
    • 8 Chapter 1  What’s New in Windows 7 Adjusting to the Windows 7 Interface The basic building blocks of the Windows interface have remained unchanged for years,Chapter 1 with only relatively minor tweaks to break the familiar routine. With Windows 7, those familiar pieces get the biggest makeover they’ve had since the turn of the century. In this section, we present a whirlwind tour of the Windows 7 desktop; you’ll find more details (and our exclusive Inside Out advice on how to tweak things to match your preferences) in Chapter 4, “Personalizing Windows 7.” The basic layout of the Windows taskbar is the same as it has been for more than a decade: a Start button on the left side, a clock and some small icons on the opposite side, and room in between for buttons that represent programs. By default, those taskbar buttons are noticeably bigger than the ones you’re accustomed to from earlier Windows versions. They also serve a dual purpose: to start up programs and to switch between running application windows. You can pin program shortcuts to the taskbar so that they’re always available (even when the program they represent isn’t running) and drag buttons left or right to reorder them. When you move your mouse over a taskbar button that represents a running program, the Aero interface shows you a live thumbnail preview of every window associated with that button. Hover the mouse over a preview, and a nifty new feature called Aero Peek hides other windows to show you only the one you’ve highlighted. Move the mouse away from the preview, and Windows restores your desktop. For programs that support lists of recently opened files, you can right-click to display a Jump List, like the one shown in Figure 1-2. You can “pin” frequently used items to this list as well so that they’re always available. If Internet Explorer 9 is installed, you can also create shortcuts to individual websites and pin them to the taskbar. Every Windows user has, at some point in their computing lifetime, watched in horror as the number of icons in the notification area rose to double digits and threatened to over- whelm the rest of the taskbar. In Windows 7, notifications are hidden by default. You can customize individual notifications so that they’re always visible, or click the arrow to the left of the visible icons to reveal and work with the collection of hidden icons. In the Notifica- tion Area Icons dialog box (shown in Figure 1-3), you can adjust each icon’s behavior indi- vidually or use the links at the bottom of the dialog box to globally change the appearance and behavior of this area. www.it-ebooks.info
    • Adjusting to the Windows 7 Interface 9 Chapter 1 Figure 1-2  Jump Lists give you easier access to documents you’ve opened recently. With Internet Explorer 9 installed, you can also pin shortcuts for websites to the taskbar, like the shortcut to Hotmail, the third one from the right. Figure 1-3  Use the Notification Area Icons dialog box to adjust the behavior of every icon in the notification area. www.it-ebooks.info
    • 10 Chapter 1  What’s New in Windows 7 Arguably, personalizing the Windows environment with custom desktop backgrounds, sounds, and screen savers has only a minor impact on productivity. But those tweaks are still psychologically important. In Windows 7, the entire collection of personalization set-Chapter 1 tings is consolidated in a single dialog box, shown in Figure 1-4. Figure 1-4  In Windows 7, all personalization options are consolidated in a single control panel. If you dig deep enough into the many categories under the Personalization heading in Control Panel, you’ll find a large and interesting selection of desktop backgrounds, which can be chained together into sets that refresh automatically at intervals you specify, plus new sound schemes and even an expanded collection of pictures that identify your user account, as shown next. You’ll find our Inside Out advice on how to master the full range of personalization options in Chapter 4. www.it-ebooks.info
    • Organizing and Finding Files 11 Chapter 1 And finally, Windows 7 refines the concept of gadgets. These minimalist programs per- form simple tasks such as displaying a clock or your favorite pictures in a small desktop window, retrieving RSS feeds, or monitoring CPU and network activity. In Windows Vista, gadgets reside by default in the sidebar and have to be dragged manually to the desktop. In Windows 7, gadgets float on the desktop at all times. Although the host process is still Sidebar.exe, the confining sidebar itself is gone, and a simple keyboard shortcut (Windows logo key+G) allows you to temporarily move all running gadgets to the top of the desktop, above any program windows, for easy reference.Organizing and Finding Files Over the years, Windows Explorer has evolved dramatically. In its earliest incarnation, it was a simple file browser to make it easier to traverse hierarchical directories on hard drives without having to use DOS commands. Today, Windows Explorer is a full-featured shell that helps you manage practically every aspect of the operating system. It still functions as a file manager, but old-timers might be surprised to note that drive letters and folder trees are de-emphasized in Windows 7, in favor of a navigation system that emphasizes a new file- organizing feature called libraries. www.it-ebooks.info
    • 12 Chapter 1  What’s New in Windows 7 The concept behind libraries can be confusing, especially if you’re accustomed to navigat- ing through the traditional Windows Explorer folder tree. A library is a virtual folder that contains links to actual folders located on your system or on a network. When you view aChapter 1 library in Windows Explorer, the contents pane displays every file and folder contained in the locations that are a part of that library. You can search this unified view, filter it, or dis- play it using sorting and grouping that is appropriate to the type of data contained in that library. As part of a default installation, Windows 7 sets up four libraries: Documents, Music, Pictures, and Videos. Figure 1-5 shows the Pictures library with one additional local folder added to it. Figure 1-5  Libraries present a unified view of data files stored in multiple locations, allowing you to search, filter, sort, and group the entire collection. The other major change in Windows Explorer is its excellent support for indexed searches, which can seem practically magical when you’re looking for one particular document on a hard drive filled with thousands of files. Windows 7 removes many of the form-based, fill-in-the-blank, “select this check box” search tools that you might have learned to use in Windows XP or Windows Vista. Instead, context-sensitive options in the search box help you refine a search, as the example in Figure 1-6 shows. www.it-ebooks.info
    • Saving, Sharing, and Playing Digital Media 13 Chapter 1 Figure 1-6  Enter free-form text in a search box to filter the contents of a library or folder, and then click to refine the search further using these filters. Mastering Windows Explorer is a crucial stop on the way to becoming a Windows expert. That’s why, in this edition, we devote two full chapters to the topic. Chapter 9, “Organiz- ing Files and Information,” introduces the building blocks of Windows Explorer, includ- ing a detailed discussion of libraries, metadata, and basic search techniques. In Chapter 10, “Using Windows Search,” we document the powerful but sometimes arcane ­ indows W Search syntax and provide examples of its effective use.Saving, Sharing, and Playing Digital Media These days, practically all of the media we consume is digital. Digital cameras have almost completely eliminated film, and more music is downloaded (legally or otherwise) than is sold on CDs. Even movies and TV are increasingly being delivered to your home as a stream of bits rather than on a shiny disc. The natural hub for managing all these media files is a PC. In this book, we cover two full- featured tools included with Windows 7 that allow you to manage, play, and share digital music, movies, and photos: Windows Media Player and Windows Media Center. For this edition, we also add coverage of the Zune software, which provides a slick and modern alternative for managing and playing a music and video collection. Note As we noted earlier in this chapter, some digital media tools previously included as a part of earlier Windows versions are not included with Windows 7. On a clean instal- lation of Windows 7, for example, you can import pictures from a digital camera and view them using Windows Explorer or Windows Photo Viewer. To edit those imported photos, however, you must use Windows Live Photo Gallery (part of Windows Live Essentials 2011) or third-party software. Windows Media Player 12 is the latest incarnation of the core media manager/player pro- gram included in Windows. It’s superficially similar to its predecessors in layout—with a navigation pane on the left side, a contents pane in the center, and tabs on the right for www.it-ebooks.info
    • 14 Chapter 1  What’s New in Windows 7 displaying lists of items to be played, synced, or burned to CD or DVD. Figure 1-7 shows Media Player in operation, with a selection of songs queued up and ready to play.Chapter 1 Figure 1-7  The default three-pane layout of Windows Media Player. Most simple tasks in Windows Media Player work without any customization. If you double- click an album in the library, it begins playing through the default playback device (nor- mally, your PC’s speakers). When you insert a DVD, the player starts, switches to full-screen mode, and begins playing back the movie immediately. What’s new in Windows Media Player 12? The most significant change is one you might not notice immediately: the player now supports playback of additional file types, including standard and high-definition movies recorded on digital cameras and saved in H.264 and AVC formats. If you previously had to install a third-party package such as Apple’s Quick- Time to play back those movies, you’ll be pleasantly surprised to find that you can now play them using Windows Media Player. The other significant new digital-media feature in Windows Media Player 12 is the ability to stream media between devices on a Windows network. After you enable this capability, you can select a remote device (such as the Xbox 360 shown in Figure 1-8) and use the Play To menu to send the contents of a playlist from your Windows 7 PC to that device over the network. www.it-ebooks.info
    • Saving, Sharing, and Playing Digital Media 15 Chapter 1 Figure 1-8  Use the media-streaming capabilities in Windows Media Player 12 to send digital music or movies from a PC to another device over your network. We explain the fundamentals of building, maintaining, and enjoying a library of music and movies in Chapter 13, “Playing and Organizing Digital Media Files.” For step-by-step instructions on how to set up and use media streaming, check out Chapter 14, “Sharing and Syncing Digital Media.” The other major media program in Windows 7 is Windows Media Center. For playing back media files, it shares much of the code from Windows Media Player. (One major capability that Media Center has that is not in Media Player is the ability to record TV from a TV tuner device.) Media Center uses what is known as a 10-foot interface, designed to be used in a living room with a remote control (although it’s quite functional on a laptop or desktop PC as well). For more details about how to build your own media hub, see Chapter 15, “Using Windows Media Center.” For this edition, we’ve added an entirely new chapter for digital media fanatics. In Chapter 16, “Digital Media for Enthusiasts,” we cover the nuts and bolts of using a PC in the living room, how to make best use of an Xbox 360 console on a PC network, how to master the Zune software, and how to manage tags and convert digital media file formats. www.it-ebooks.info
    • 16 Chapter 1  What’s New in Windows 7 Networking in New Ways In Windows Vista, Microsoft introduced the Network And Sharing Center as the one placeChapter 1 to go for most network-related tasks. The concept annoyed some longtime Windows users, who discovered that common network tasks they had learned to accomplish with simple shortcuts in Windows XP now required extra clicks or keystrokes. The Windows 7 Network And Sharing Center (shown in Figure 1-9) gets a usability overhaul designed to reduce clutter and make common tasks easier to find. Figure 1-9  Most common networking tasks are accessible within a click or two of the Network And Sharing Center. If you’re accustomed to networking in Windows XP, you have a lot of catching up to do. In the networking section of this book, we explain how Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) and Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) work together, for example, and how the Link Layer Topology Discovery subsystem helps you build a visual map of your network. Networking changes that are new in Windows 7 include a much-improved interface for connecting to wireless access points. www.it-ebooks.info
    • Networking in New Ways 17 The most significant addition to the networking capabilities in Windows 7 is the Home- Group feature, which allows two or more computers running Windows 7 to share files and printers and stream media without the hassle of managing individual user accounts and Chapter 1 permissions. Figure 1-10 shows the interface for managing shared files in a homegroup. Figure 1-10  The HomeGroup feature offers a simplified interface for sharing files, printers, and digital media between computers running Windows 7. If your network includes computers running earlier versions of Windows, you need to set up shared access by using more traditional techniques. The differences from Windows XP– based networks are profound. You can specify different levels of security for sharing, and on individual files and folders stored on NTFS volumes, you can specify which accounts and groups, if any, are allowed to access those files. Our coverage of Windows 7 networking begins in Chapter 19, “Setting Up a Small Office or Home Network.” www.it-ebooks.info
    • 18 Chapter 1  What’s New in Windows 7 Keeping Your PC Speedy and Safe The secret of remaining happy and productive with Windows, day in and day out, is toChapter 1 ensure that the system runs at peak performance, with no unexplained hangs or crashes to interrupt work or play. We know from talking to Microsoft developers that they made many kernel-level changes that collectively make Windows 7 feel faster than its predecessors. But that still leaves plenty of room for tweaking and, inevitably, troubleshooting. Fortunately, Windows 7 includes excellent tools for helping you monitor performance, diagnose balky programs and hardware, and fix problems when they occur. The most noteworthy addition to the Windows 7 system-management toolkit is the Action Center. It consolidates messages, troubleshooting tools, and basic system-­ anagement m functions in a single location. You can access it from its ever-present icon in the notification area or from the System And Security heading in Control Panel. Figure 1-11 shows a pair of security and maintenance messages, which are color-coded on your screen as red or yellow to indicate the level of importance. Figure 1-11  Click the down arrow to the right of the Security and Maintenance headings to see more messages. www.it-ebooks.info
    • Keeping Your PC Speedy and Safe 19 We cover the ins and outs of Action Center and its companion tools in Chapter 24, “Per- forming Routine Maintenance.” Chapter 1 When you’re trying to troubleshoot problems such as application crashes or hardware fail- ures, it’s useful to have a log of important events. That’s the function of the new Reliability Monitor, shown in Figure 1-12. It plots important system events, such as successful and unsuccessful installations of drivers and software as well as application crashes, on a time- line. By filtering the timeline to a specific day or week, you can identify individual events that might provide important clues to the cause of a problem. Figure 1-12  Reliability Monitor provides a convenient timeline of critical events and changes to your system configuration. Finally, there’s Resource Monitor, which debuted in Windows Vista but has been signifi- cantly enhanced for Windows 7. The amount of technical detail available here—covering CPU load, memory usage (shown in Figure 1-13), disk activity, and network performance— can be overwhelming, at least initially. We explain how to filter the useful information from the noise in “Monitoring Performance in Real Time” on page 841. www.it-ebooks.info
    • 20 Chapter 1  What’s New in Windows 7Chapter 1 Figure 1-13  Resource Monitor displays in-depth information about every major aspect of system performance. Using Internet Explorer 9 Windows 7 includes Internet Explorer 8 as its default program for browsing web pages and displaying HTML-formatted content. Even if you’re new to Windows 7, you’re prob- ably already familiar with the features in Internet Explorer 8, which has been available as an upgrade for Windows XP and Windows Vista since early 2009. In 2011, after a long public beta test, Microsoft released Internet Explorer 9, which is avail- able as an upgrade for Windows Vista and Windows 7. Unless you have a compelling rea- son to continue using Internet Explorer 8, we strongly recommend upgrading. When you do, here’s what you get: ●● Performance  Internet Explorer 9 is able to tap into the graphics processing unit (GPU) on a modern PC and use its considerable horsepower to assist in displaying graphics. Other areas of the browser received extensive attention from developers to improve speed and responsiveness as well. If you thought previous versions of Inter- net Explorer were sluggish, you might be pleasantly surprised by this one. ●● Security  In Windows Vista, Microsoft introduced the concept of Protected Mode browsing, which provides a significant layer of protection from potentially hostile www.it-ebooks.info
    • Using Internet Explorer 9 21 web pages, scripts, and downloads. That architecture is present in Windows 7 as well, along with a host of new security features such as a SmartScreen filter that blocks known sources of dangerous code. Internet Explorer 9 includes a major new set of Chapter 1 Tracking Protection tools that give you fine-grained control over your privacy, as shown in Figure 1-14. Figure 1-14  By adding a Tracking Protection list and enabling it, you can block websites that try to build a profile of you based on your online activities. ●● Usability  What’s most notable about the Internet Explorer 9 interface is what’s missing. The address bar and search box have been combined. Toolbars, menus, and buttons are hidden. The window frame is thinner, and there’s no text at all in the title bar. The overall effect is that the browser recedes into the background, allowing the website itself to take center stage. In addition, you can pin a website to the taskbar and return to that site (or a group of sites) with a single click. ●● Compatibility  Over the years, Internet Explorer has earned its share of brickbats from web designers, who complained that it ignores web standards and requires cus- tom code to handle its many design and layout quirks. By contrast, Internet Explorer 9 was designed to conform to modern web standards. The changes in both Inter- net Explorer 8 and 9 are so sweeping, in fact, that you might experience problems properly displaying pages that were tweaked to display properly in earlier versions www.it-ebooks.info
    • 22 Chapter 1  What’s New in Windows 7 (especially Internet Explorer 6). We explain why formatting glitches occur and list the full range of solutions in “Dealing with Compatibility Issues” on page 248.Chapter 1 Internet Explorer is a large and complex program—so big, in fact, that it deserves two chapters in this edition. If you choose to use it as your default browser, you’ll benefit greatly from a close reading of Chapter 6, “Using Internet Explorer,” and Chapter 7, “Internet Explorer Compatibility, Security, and Privacy.” Updating to Service Pack 1 In February 2011, Microsoft officially released Windows 7 Service Pack 1. This package consolidates previously released updates for system reliability, program compatibility, and security into a single package. For a comprehensive listing of all included updates, see Appendix C, “Fixes Included in Windows 7 Service Pack 1.” For more information about ser- vice packs in general, including links to the latest release for a specific Windows version, see Microsoft’s official Service Pack information page at support.microsoft.com/sp. You don’t need to do anything special to update your system to Service Pack 1. For homes and small businesses, Windows Update handles this task automatically, downloading a rela- tively small update file and installing it as part of your regular update routine. No interven- tion is required on your part. If you’re an IT professional setting up one or more new PCs for the first time, check the installation media you’re using. Packages manufactured after the release of Service Pack 1 should contain the necessary files already integrated into the setup DVD. If you’re using an original Windows 7 disc, you can download the service pack files and “slipstream” them into an installation image for deployment in your organization. See Chapter 26, “Deploy- ment and Migration,” for details. www.it-ebooks.info
    • C H A AC E H R E P LP T E RT2 I S T E X T Installing and Configuring Windows 7Before You Start . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Activating and Validating Windows 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59Setting Up Windows 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 . Transferring Files and Settings from Another Computer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 .Upgrading from Another Windows 7 Edition. . . . . . . . . . 56 Tweaking and Tuning Your Windows Installation. . . . . . . 75Installing and Updating Drivers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 S Windows users never have to deal with the Windows setup program. If you buy ome a new computer with Windows 7 already installed and set up an effective backup routine, you might be able to use it forever without having to do anything more than minor maintenance or, in the worst case, a system recovery. For upgraders, hobbyists, and inveterate tinkerers, however, the Windows 7 setup program is inescapable. Knowing the arcane secrets of upgrades, custom installations, and activation can spell the difference between a smooth-running system and a box of troubles. If you’re upgrading from Windows Vista, many of the skills you’ve learned will transfer directly. If you’re moving to Windows 7 from Windows XP, however, prepare to unlearn nearly every- thing you knew about setup. The image-based installation process in Windows 7 (funda- mentally the same as its Windows Vista counterpart) is faster and much more reliable than its Windows XP equivalent, especially when it comes to upgrades. In this chapter, we’ll explain the subtleties and intricacies of the Windows setup program, explore the workings of the Windows Easy Transfer utility, and show you how to set up a computer with multiple versions of Windows. Our coverage in this chapter focuses primarily on issues surrounding installation of Windows 7 on a single computer. For information about deploying Windows 7 throughout an organiza- tion, see Chapter 26, “Deployment and Migration.” What’s in Your Edition? All the tools and techniques we discuss in this chapter are available in all editions of Windows 7. Some features might be unavailable or have different default settings in Windows editions that have been customized by a computer maker for installation on a new PC. 23 www.it-ebooks.info
    • 24 Chapter 2  Installing and Configuring Windows 7 Before You Start Programs originally written for earlier versions of Windows (including Windows XP and Windows Vista) might not run properly under Windows 7. Likewise, some older hardware devices require drivers that have never been updated for use with Windows 7. The worst possible time to find out about either type of compatibility problem is right after you com- plete a fresh installation of Windows 7, when you try to use a favorite program or device. To spare yourself unnecessary headaches, if the computer on which you plan to install Windows 7 is currently running Windows XP (with Service Pack 2 or later) or any edition ofChapter 2 Windows Vista that you are planning to upgrade, download and run the free Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor first. This tool, available from w7io.com/0201, scans installed programs and devices and produces a report identifying any potential issues you’re likely to confront as part of an upgrade. The purpose of Upgrade Advisor is to identify hardware and software issues that might interfere with your ability to install Windows 7 or programs that might not run properly after the upgrade is complete. Figure 2-1 shows a typical Upgrade Advisor report. Scroll through the entire list to identify any urgent warnings or compatibility issues that require your immediate attention. If this tool identifies any potential problems with drivers or installed software, we recommend that you resolve those issues before continuing. Note that Upgrade Advisor generates two reports: one that applies if you plan to upgrade to a 32-bit version of Windows 7, and one that applies to upgrades to 64-bit Windows 7. Click the tabs at the top of the window to switch between the two reports. INSIDE OUT   Use dynamic updates When you upgrade over an existing Windows version, the setup program offers to check for dynamic updates. If you have an active Internet connection, be sure to take advantage of this option. Dynamic updates can include any or all of the following: critical updates to the setup program itself; improved or new versions of boot-critical drivers for storage, display, and network hardware detected on your system; and com- patibility updates (also known as shims) for programs you’re currently running. Roll- ing these updates in at the beginning of the process increases the likelihood that the Windows 7 setup will run correctly. After completing installation, you’ll still need to connect to Windows Update to download critical updates for Windows and the most recent drivers for detected hardware. www.it-ebooks.info
    • Before You Start 25 Chapter 2 Figure 2-1  Read this upgrade report carefully before continuing with setup. In some cases, you might need to uninstall programs or find new drivers before going any further. Understand the Licensing Issues One important step before you install Windows 7 is ensuring that you purchase the right version. The choices are numerous, and making the wrong selection can mean paying more than you need to or ending up with a version that doesn’t have the features you need or isn’t properly licensed. Before you head to the mall, you need to consider the following: ●● Which edition has the features you need?  Windows is available in six differ- ent editions, ranging from Windows 7 Starter through Windows 7 Ultimate. For a summary of the features in each edition, see Appendix A, “Windows 7 Editions at a Glance.” ●● Should you use the 32-bit or 64-bit version of Windows?  For help with this decision, see the following section, “Know Your Hardware.” ●● Should you purchase a full version or an upgrade?  This choice is dependent entirely on obtaining the appropriate Windows software license, a topic that is widely misunderstood. We try to clarify the choices in the following paragraphs. www.it-ebooks.info
    • 26 Chapter 2  Installing and Configuring Windows 7 Four different types of license are available for Windows 7: ●● OEM  An OEM (original equipment manufacturer) license is one that’s included with a new computer. This license is locked to the computer on which it’s installed. That is, you can’t transfer it to a new computer. ●● Full  A full license is sold at retail and is intended for use on a computer that was not sold with Windows originally. A full license can be transferred to a different com- puter, as long the license is no longer being used on any other computers.Chapter 2 ●● Upgrade  An upgrade license is a discounted copy of Windows that can be installed only on a system that already has an OEM or full license. ●● Volume  Volume licenses are sold in bulk to corporate customers in quantities of five or more at a time. A volume license is available as an upgrade only. Who qualifies for an upgrade or volume license? All editions of Windows XP and Windows Vista qualify you to upgrade. Specifically: ●● Any PC that was purchased with Windows XP or Vista preinstalled (look for the sticker on the side) is qualified. This is true whether the PC came from a large royalty OEM or a system builder. You can install a retail upgrade of Windows 7 on that PC. You cannot, however, use the OEM license from an old PC to upgrade a new PC without Windows installed. ●● Any retail full copy of Windows XP or Windows Vista can serve as the qualifying license as well. If have a full retail copy (not an OEM edition) on an old PC, you can uninstall that copy from the old PC and use it as the baseline full license for the new PC. Older copies of Windows, including Windows 95/98/Me or Windows 2000, do not qualify for upgrade pricing. You also need a full license for the following types of Windows installations: ●● In a virtual machine (except for Windows XP Mode; for details, see “Running Legacy Applications in Windows XP Mode” on page 178) ●● On a Mac or other computer that does not come with Windows preinstalled ●● Dual boot (unless it’s for a brief evaluation during the upgrade process, you need a full license for each installation after the first) www.it-ebooks.info
    • Before You Start 27 Note It’s important to understand that the legal restrictions imposed by license requirements are wholly independent of technical restrictions on installation. For example, the license permits upgrading from Windows XP to Windows 7, but it’s not possible to perform an in-place upgrade; you must perform a custom install. Conversely, it is technically pos- sible to install an upgrade version on an unlicensed computer, but doing so violates the license agreement. Chapter 2 Know Your Hardware Microsoft has published minimum hardware requirements for the retail editions of Win- dows 7 (Home Premium, Professional, and Ultimate). The specifics are listed in Table 2-1. Note that RAM and disk space requirements are slightly higher for 64-bit versions of Windows 7. Table 2-1  Windows 7 Hardware Requirements Component Minimum System Requirement Processor (CPU) 1-GHz or faster, 32-bit (x86) or 64-bit (x64) processor Memory 1 GB RAM (32-bit) 2 GB RAM (64-bit) Graphics processor Support for DirectX 9 graphics with WDDM 1.0 or higher driver Hard disk 16 GB available disk space (32-bit) 20 GB available disk space (64-bit) A DVD or other optical storage device is optional but useful for many tasks. For most every- day tasks, you also need a mouse or other pointing device, a keyboard, audio playback capabilities, and Internet access. In addition, certain Windows 7 features require additional hardware, such as a television tuner card (for viewing and recording television in Windows Media Center). www.it-ebooks.info
    • 28 Chapter 2  Installing and Configuring Windows 7 INSIDE OUT   Find the hardware bottlenecks Defining an acceptable level of performance is strictly a matter of personal preference. Some tasks, such as rendering 3D graphics or encoding video files, demand a lot from the CPU and the graphics processing unit and will benefit greatly from a more muscu- lar processor and display adapter. For most everyday activities, including web browsing, sending and receiving e-mail, and creating standard business documents, the speed of the CPU is less critical. If you have a fast hard disk with ample free space and at leastChapter 2 1 GB of memory, you should have no trouble keeping multiple applications running smoothly. If you use large, memory-intensive programs such as Adobe Photoshop, 2 GB of RAM should be considered a bare minimum. Deciding Between 32-Bit and 64-Bit Versions As noted earlier, the hardware requirements for installing and running a 64-bit edition of Windows 7 are slightly steeper. So what’s the benefit of 64-bit? Unlike a 32-bit version, a 64-bit version can efficiently handle more than 4 GB of RAM. This ability (along with copi- ous amounts of RAM) results in better performance when you run several programs at once and when you’re working with extremely large data files. The downside of 64-bit versions is compatibility with older applications and hardware. In general, programs for 32-bit Windows work on a 64-bit system. However, some do not— particularly utilities that work at a low level, such as antivirus programs. In addition, you can’t run 16-bit applications or 32-bit installers with 64-bit Windows. Support for hardware devices can be problematical because 64-bit driver support is nonexistent for many older devices. Before you decide between a 32-bit and a 64-bit version, be sure to check the correspond- ing tabs in the Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor. Upgrade Advisor determines first whether your system is capable of running a 64-bit version of Windows, and it also identifies devices and programs that might be incompatible. Another way to check for 64-bit capability is with a Windows PowerShell script on the com- panion CD, in the Scripts folder. Locate the script named Get-ProcessorArchitecture.ps1, which displays the value X64 when you run it on a computer with a 64-bit processor. www.it-ebooks.info
    • Before You Start 29 Note If you intend to install a 64-bit version of Windows 7, you’ll need to confirm that digi- tally signed drivers are available for all devices you intend to install. This compatibility bar is far more stringent than with 32-bit versions, where you can choose to install drivers that have not been digitally signed by the Windows Hardware Quality Labs. In 64-bit versions of Windows 7, unsigned boot drivers will not load. Chapter 2 Avoiding Software Compatibility Problems When upgrading, be especially vigilant with utility software that works at the system level. If you use a system utility that was originally written for a previous Windows version, it’s prudent to assume that it will require an upgrade to work properly with Windows 7. Most applications that are certified to be compatible with Windows Vista are also compatible with Windows 7, but that is not universally true. For essential programs, it’s important that you verify compatibility first. Which classes of software are most likely to cause problems with an upgrade or a clean installation of Windows 7? Here is a list of likely culprits: ●● Antivirus and antispyware software ●● Software firewalls and other security programs ●● Programs whose feature set includes the capability to burn CDs and DVDs ●● Disk-partitioning utilities and other low-level system maintenance programs As a precaution when upgrading, you should consider disabling or uninstalling antivirus software and other system utilities that might interfere with setup. After setup is complete, reinstall or reenable the programs and then test to be sure that they’re working properly. If Upgrade Advisor identifies any programs as incompatible with Windows 7, we strongly recommend that you uninstall those programs before continuing with the upgrade. Backing Up Data and Settings If you’re planning an upgrade, don’t underestimate Murphy’s Law (most often described as “Anything that can go wrong will go wrong”). Use a reliable backup program or Windows Easy Transfer (described in “Transferring Files and Settings from Another Computer” on page 66) to make a safe copy of important data files before continuing with the upgrade. www.it-ebooks.info
    • 30 Chapter 2  Installing and Configuring Windows 7 Note If you use the Windows XP Backup program on your old computer (or on your current computer if you plan to upgrade) to save data files to a network drive or another disk, be aware that the backup program in Windows 7 uses a different, incompatible format and cannot open or restore files backed up using that earlier format. Microsoft makes available a free program that restores (but cannot create) backups in the .bkf format used by Windows XP For information about the Windows NT Backup Restore Utility for . Windows 7 and links to download the appropriate version for your system, visit sup-Chapter 2 port article 974674 (w7io.com/974674). If you own a software utility that can create an image copy of your existing system volume, this is an excellent strategy. Some hard-disk upgrade packages sold at retail outlets include this sort of tool; Norton Ghost (w7io.com/0202) and Acronis True Image (w7io.com/0203) are highly regarded examples of third-party imaging tools. A disk image stored on an external hard disk is excellent protection against data disasters. Setting Up Windows 7 As we mentioned briefly at the beginning of this chapter, the setup program in Windows 7 is based on the architecture introduced with Windows Vista and is unlike its Windows XP predecessor. The reengineered process is specifically designed to run very quickly, with an absolute minimum of attention required from you. In this section, we’ll explain the ins and outs of the most common scenarios you’ll confront when installing or upgrading Win- dows 7 on a single PC. We assume that you have a bootable DVD containing a full copy of Windows 7, suitable for use in a clean installation or upgrade. Note Windows 7 is sold in a variety of packages, and not all are covered in the scenarios we discuss here. For a discussion of the different types of licenses and installation media available to you, see “Activating and Validating Windows 7” on page 59. As part of the setup process, you need to make a series of relatively simple but important decisions: ●● Which Windows 7 edition do you want to install?  The edition you choose will normally be the version you purchased; however, retail copies of the Windows 7 DVD contain program code for all three Windows editions available through the retail www.it-ebooks.info
    • Setting Up Windows 7 31 channel—Home Premium, Professional, and Ultimate—as well as the Home Basic and Starter editions, which are not intended for installation by end users. As we explain later in this section, you can install and run any of these editions for up to 30 days without entering a product key or activating your copy of Windows 7. ●● Do you want to perform a custom installation or an upgrade?  A custom instal- lation starts from scratch; you need to reinstall your programs and re-create or trans- fer settings from another system. An upgrade retains installed programs and settings, at the risk of creating some compatibility issues. Chapter 2 ●● Do you need to adjust the layout of the system disk?  The Windows 7 installa- tion program includes disk-management tools that you can use to create, delete, for- mat, and extend (but not shrink) partitions on hard disks installed in your computer. Knowing how these tools work can save you a significant amount of time when set- ting up Windows. ●● Do you want to install Windows 7 alongside another operating system?  If you want to set up a dual-boot (or multiboot) system, you’ll need to understand how different startup files work so that you can manage your startup options effectively. Understanding these details is especially important if you plan to use Windows 7 and Windows XP in a dual-boot configuration. If the system on which you plan to install Windows 7 is already running Windows XP, Win- dows Vista, or Windows 7, you can start the setup program from within Windows. As an alternative, you can start the system from the installation media. Depending on which option you choose, you’ll notice some important differences. If you run setup from within Windows ●● You can upgrade Windows Vista (SP1 or later), provided that the new Windows 7 edi- tion is the same as or higher than the Windows Vista edition. For details about sup- ported upgrade paths, see “Upgrading a Previous Windows Version” on page 46. ●● You can reinstall Windows 7. (You can also use this option to upgrade from one edition of Windows 7 to a more advanced edition; however, the Windows Anytime Upgrade option, described later in this chapter, is far preferable.) ●● You cannot run the 64-bit setup program on a PC running a 32-bit version of Win- dows, or vice versa. ●● You can run the Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor from an option on the startup screen. ●● You cannot perform an in-place upgrade of Windows XP. www.it-ebooks.info
    • 32 Chapter 2  Installing and Configuring Windows 7 ●● You can install Windows 7 on the same volume as an existing Windows version. (You’ll find step-by-step instructions in the following section.) ●● You cannot make any changes to the layout of a disk; you must use existing parti- tions, and the setup program will not recognize or use unallocated space on an attached hard drive. If you boot from the Windows 7 DVD ●● You cannot upgrade an existing Windows version. Your only option is a custom install.Chapter 2 ●● You can delete existing partitions, create new partitions, extend an existing disk par- tition to unallocated space, or designate a block of unallocated space as the setup location. ●● You can install Windows 7 on the same volume as an existing Windows version. Performing a Clean Installation The simplest (and best, in most cases) setup scenario of all is installing Windows 7 in a newly created partition on a system that does not currently have any version of Windows installed. This is the case if you start with a brand-new hard disk, or if you wipe out a parti- tion that contains an existing version of Windows. The safest way to embark on a clean installation is to boot from the Windows 7 DVD. Insert the Windows 7 DVD, and restart your computer. Watch for a boot prompt; typically, you need to press a key to boot from the DVD. After the setup process begins, you can follow the instructions as outlined in this section. TROUBLESHOOTING You get a Boot Manager error when you boot from the Windows 7 DVD If you boot from a DVD for a 64-bit version of Windows on a computer that isn’t capa- ble of using a 64-bit operating system, you’ll see a Windows Boot Manager error. Install Windows using the media for a 32-bit version instead. www.it-ebooks.info
    • Setting Up Windows 7 33 TROUBLESHOOTING You can’t boot from the Windows 7 DVD For a bootable CD or DVD to work properly, you must set the boot order in the BIOS so that the drive appears ahead of the hard disk drive and any other bootable media; we recommend setting the DVD drive as the first boot device, followed by the hard disk, floppy disk (if present), and any other bootable devices in whichever order you prefer. The boot options available for every computer are different, as is the technique for accessing the BIOS setup program. During boot, watch for a message that tells you which key to press for setup. If you’re lucky, the BIOS setup program on your computer Chapter 2 includes a Boot section where you can specify the order of boot devices; if this option isn’t immediately apparent, look for a page or tab called Advanced CMOS Settings or something similar. What if your computer lacks the capability to boot from a DVD drive? This problem is most likely to affect you if you’re trying to install Windows 7 on a notebook computer that doesn’t include an integrated DVD drive, or if the DVD drive in an existing system is damaged. Try one of the following alternatives to work around the problem (you’ll need temporary access to a computer with a functioning DVD drive to complete any of these steps): ●● Copy the DVD files to a folder on your hard disk, and run the setup program from that location. ●● Copy the DVD files to a partition on an external hard disk, set that partition as active, and boot from the external drive. This option might require adjusting the order of boot devices in your system BIOS. ●● Copy the DVD files to a USB flash drive, and run setup from that location. The drive must have enough space to accommodate all installation files (2.5 GB for 32-bit, 3.2 GB for 64-bit). The procedure for preparing the flash drive to be a bootable device is cumbersome but straightforward. Step-by-step instructions are in this blog post by Microsoft’s Jeff Alexander: w7io.com/0204. ●● On another computer, use a full-featured DVD-burning program such as Nero (w7io.com/0205) or Roxio Creator (w7io.com/0206) to copy the Windows 7 DVD to an ISO image file. Then install an ISO image-mounting program such as Vir- tual CloneDrive (w7io.com/0207) or Daemon Tools (w7io.com/0208), and point it at the ISO file you created. The mounted image file appears as a DVD drive in the Computer window, and you can run the setup program from that virtual drive. Any of the preceding options allow you to upgrade the current Windows installation or to install a clean copy on a separate volume or on the same volume, alongside the current copy of Windows. You must boot from a removable storage device (an exter- nal hard drive or USB flash drive) if you want to delete the current partition on which W ­ indows is installed and install a clean copy in that location. www.it-ebooks.info
    • 34 Chapter 2  Installing and Configuring Windows 7 When you boot from the Windows 7 DVD, your first stop is a pair of screens that allow you to set up the installation language and choose your language preferences for Windows itself. These should normally be the same and typically match the Windows version you purchased. After you accept the license agreement, you’ll reach the Which Type Of Installa- tion Do You Want dialog box shown here:Chapter 2 Because you booted from the DVD, the Upgrade option does not work, although it appears to be available (if you try to select it, you’ll get an error message). Click the Custom (Advanced) option to continue with a clean installation. The Where Do You Want To Install Windows dialog box, shown in Figure 2-2, lists all physical disks, partitions, and unallocated space. In this example, we assume that you’re using a freshly formatted disk with no existing parti- tions and that you want to use all unallocated space as your system drive. For alternative scenarios involving multiple partitions or changes to existing partitions, see “Setup and Your Hard Disk” on page 42. www.it-ebooks.info
    • Setting Up Windows 7 35 Chapter 2 Figure 2-2  In this simple scenario, with a single physical disk that does not contain any partitions, you can click Next to create a partition and install Windows using the entire physical drive. TROUBLESHOOTING Setup doesn’t detect your hard disk The Windows 7 DVD includes drivers for most commonly used IDE and SATA disk con- trollers. If you have an older PC or an unusual disk configuration, the setup program might not recognize your disk controller. In that case, you’ll be prompted to provide a driver when you reach the Where Do You Want To Install Windows dialog box. For 32-bit (x86) versions of Windows 7, you should be able to supply a driver that is com- patible with Windows Vista or Windows 7 on a USB flash drive, on a floppy disk, or on a CD or DVD. For the last option mentioned, remove the Windows 7 DVD and insert the disc containing the storage driver; after the driver loads successfully, remove the disc and reinsert the Windows 7 DVD. www.it-ebooks.info
    • 36 Chapter 2  Installing and Configuring Windows 7 TROUBLESHOOTING During setup, some peripherals don’t work properly Check your system BIOS. An outdated BIOS can cause problems with disk partitioning, power management, peripheral configuration, and other crucial low-level functions. To find out whether an update is available, check with the manufacturer of your computer or its motherboard. For “white label” PCs, which are built by small system builders from standard parts, identifying the BIOS and tracking down the appropriate source for updates isn’t always easy; you’ll find detailed information at the indispensable (and thoroughly independent) Wim’s BIOS (wimsbios.com).Chapter 2 INSIDE OUT   It’s OK to share a partition Thanks to the radically revised setup architecture introduced in Windows Vista and also used in Windows 7, you can safely discard one of the basic tenets that have governed installation decisions since the beginning of the Windows era. You want to point Win- dows 7 setup to a partition on which another version of Windows is already installed? As long as you have sufficient free disk space and you don’t plan to use the copy of Windows on that volume any more, go right ahead. When you choose to do a clean installation in this nondestructive configuration, Windows 7 setup moves the old Win- dows, Program Files, and user profile folders (Documents And Settings for Windows XP , Users for Windows Vista or Windows 7) to a folder named Windows.old. Why would you want to do this? Let’s say you currently have a system that has a single disk with a single partition and plenty of free disk space. You want to start fresh with a clean installation, but you have lots of valuable data and you don’t want to lose any of it. Performing a nondestructive clean installation gives you the fresh start you’re looking for, with your data files safely ensconced in the Windows.old folder. You can no longer start up your old Windows installation, but you can copy any of the saved files from that folder to your new user profile whenever you’re ready. (In addition, all the device drivers from your previous installation are available for your use; you’ll find them in Windows.oldWindowsSystem32DriverStoreFileRepository.) Why is this option acceptable now? In Windows XP and earlier versions, the operation of the setup program invariably involved some commingling of files in the old and new Windows installations. Those unwanted system files and leftovers from previously installed programs defeated the purpose of doing a clean installation. But the image- based Windows setup used by Windows Vista and Windows 7 quarantines your old files and allows you to do a truly clean installation of your new operating system. www.it-ebooks.info
    • Setting Up Windows 7 37 After you select the disk location where you want to install Windows 7, setup proceeds automatically, copying files and configuring hardware devices with no further input required from you. The Installing Windows dialog box provides a progress bar to indicate how close to completion you are. After the technical portion of a clean installation is com- plete, you need to fill in some basic information and set some essential systemwide options: 1. Choose a user name and a computer name.  The user name you enter here becomes the first user account, which is a member of the Administrators group. Setup suggests a default computer name by removing any spaces and tacking the “-PC” suffix to the user name you enter. You’re free to replace the autogenerated Chapter 2 name with a more descriptive name if you prefer. www.it-ebooks.info
    • 38 Chapter 2  Installing and Configuring Windows 7 2. Set a password for your user account.  Although you’re not required to assign a password to this account, we strongly recommend you do so.Chapter 2 Note When you perform a clean installation of Windows 7, entering a password is optional. However, if you choose to enter a password, you must enter something in the Type A Password Hint box. The password hint reduces the likelihood that you’ll one day forget your password and be locked out of your own computer. This unfortunate situation is exacerbated because the Administrator account is disabled by default in Windows 7, so you can’t use it as a back door into your computer. If you’re confident about your ability to recall your password and you don’t want to offer any clues to a would-be intruder, enter a nonsense word or phrase (or just a single punctuation mark) here. For more information, see “Set- ting a Logon Password” on page 663. www.it-ebooks.info
    • Setting Up Windows 7 39 3. Enter your Windows product key.  You can enter the product key included with your purchased copy, or you can bypass this dialog box and install Windows without entering a product key. (For more details on these options, see “Activating and Validating Windows 7” on page 59.) 4. Select Automatic Update settings.  For most people, the first option, Use Recommended Settings, is the correct one. Chapter 2 www.it-ebooks.info
    • 40 Chapter 2  Installing and Configuring Windows 7 5. Review your time and date settings.  A clean installation of Windows 7 from U.S. English media sets the time zone to Pacific (U.S. and Canada), with Daylight Saving Time enabled. Changing the time zone does not change the time displayed. After selecting your time zone, check the date and time carefully. Incorrect values in any of the settings on this page can cause complications later.Chapter 2 6. Set up your network.  If you’re installing Windows 7 on a notebook with a supported wireless adapter, you might be prompted to enter a security passphrase for your wireless access point before you reach the dialog box shown next. The network location setting determines basic network security, including firewall settings and sharing options. On most home or small business networks connected to the Internet through a router, you can safely select the Home Network or Work Network option. Click Public Network if your computer is directly connected to a cable or DSL modem (that is, with no router or gateway appliance separating your computer from the modem) or if you connect to the Internet by means of a dial-up modem. If you choose Home Network, the next dialog box allows you to create or join a homegroup. www.it-ebooks.info
    • Setting Up Windows 7 41 Chapter 2 For more details about your network options, see Chapter 19, “Setting Up a Small Office or Home Network.” After completing the final step in this process, setup takes you to a logon screen. INSIDE OUT   Perform a clean installation with upgrade media A common misconception about installing Windows is that you must use a full version of Windows to perform a clean install; this is false. If you already have a qualifying ver- sion of Windows (in short, Windows XP or Windows Vista; for details, see “Understand the Licensing Issues” on page 25), you can use an upgrade version. In fact, many legiti- mate upgrade paths (for example, from any version of Windows XP) require a clean installation, but they do not require you to purchase a full version of Windows. Before you begin the installation, we strongly encourage you to back up your data and settings by using Windows Easy Transfer. Although the installation process can retain your existing files in the Windows.old folder, Windows Easy Transfer provides a method that is much more convenient and comprehensive. For details, see “Transferring Files and Settings from Another Computer” on page 66. Then, after you complete the installa- tion, use Windows Easy Transfer to restore your data. www.it-ebooks.info
    • 42 Chapter 2  Installing and Configuring Windows 7 To install Windows 7, simply boot from the upgrade DVD (or other media, such as a bootable USB flash drive), and then follow the remaining steps as described on the pre- ceding pages. If you get an Invalid Product Key error when you enter the product key (step 3), proceed without entering a product key. After setup finishes (including down- loading updates and rebooting as required), open the Start menu and type activate. Select Activate Windows, enter your product key, and after a few moments you should see an Activation Was Successful message. If activation fails for some reason, you can use the following workaround:Chapter 2 1. Open an elevated Command Prompt window. To do that, click the Start button and type cmd. Press Ctrl+Shift+Enter to run Cmd.exe as an administrator. Click Yes in the User Account Control dialog box that appears. 2. At the command prompt, type slmgr /ipk productkey, where productkey is your 25-character upgrade product key. Include the hyphens that separate each group of five characters. This command installs the product key. 3. Click OK in the dialog box that appears, and then enter slmgr /ato at the command prompt. This command activates Windows. 4. To check the activation and license status, at the command prompt type slmgr /dli (for a summary report) or slmgr /dlv (for a detailed report). Setup and Your Hard Disk In the previous section, we described the steps for a clean installation on the simplest of all PC configurations: a single hard disk, containing a single partition to be used as the system drive. Out in the real world, especially among Windows enthusiasts, we know that disk con- figurations are often much more complex. On most desktop PCs and on some notebooks, you can connect multiple physical disk drives. You can choose to install Windows 7 to a volume on any IDE or SATA drive (includ- ing eSATA drives, which attach to the system via an external cable but appear to Windows as an ordinary internal drive). You cannot, however, install Windows to an external drive connected via USB or IEEE 1394 (FireWire). www.it-ebooks.info
    • Setting Up Windows 7 43 INSIDE OUT   What’s that mysterious 100-MB partition? If you install Windows 7 on a clean disk with no existing partitions, it creates a System Reserved partition of 100 MB at the beginning of the disk and uses the remainder of the unallocated space to create your system drive. That small partition isn’t assigned a drive letter, so you won’t even know it exists unless you look in the Disk Management console (as shown here) or use DiskPart or a similar low-level utility to inspect the disk structure. Chapter 2 This system partition, new in Windows 7, serves three functions. First, it holds the Boot Manager code and the Boot Configuration Database (which we explain in more detail in “Understanding and Managing the Windows 7 Startup Process” on page 50). Second, it provides a safe location for recovery tools. (For more information, see “Making Repairs with the Windows Recovery Environment” on page 1046.) And third, it reserves space for the startup files required by the BitLocker Drive Encryption feature (which we discuss in “Encrypting Information” on page 418). Multiboot capabilities and Windows Recovery Environment can be implemented with- out this System Reserved partition, but BitLocker requires it. Because the clean-install process creates the partition, you won’t have to repartition your system drive (a genu- inely tedious process) if you ever decide to encrypt your system drive using BitLocker. With a new hard disk or an existing one, you might have any of several good reasons to tinker with disk partitions. You might prefer to segregate your operating system files from your data files by placing them on separate volumes, for example, or you might be plan- ning to set up a dual-boot or multiboot system. In any event, it’s always easier to make partitioning decisions before setup than it is to resize and rearrange volumes after they’re in use. For a full inventory of all disk-management tools and techniques available in Windows 7, see Chapter 30, “Managing Disks and Drives.” To make adjustments to existing disk partitions, boot from the Windows 7 DVD (or a bootable hard drive or USB flash drive) and run through Windows setup until you reach the Where Do You Want To Install Windows dialog box, shown earlier in Figure 2-2. Click Drive www.it-ebooks.info
    • 44 Chapter 2  Installing and Configuring Windows 7 Options (Advanced) to expand the collection of tools below the list of disks and partitions, as shown in Figure 2-3.Chapter 2 Figure 2-3  Use the disk-management tools in this phase of the Windows 7 setup process to manage disk partitions for more efficient data storage and multiboot configurations. You can accomplish any of the following tasks here: ●● Select an existing partition or unallocated space on which to install Win- dows 7  Setup is simple if you already created and formatted an empty partition in preparation for setting up Windows, or if you plan to install Windows 7 on an exist- ing partition that currently contains data or programs but no operating system, or if you want to use unallocated space on an existing disk without disturbing the existing partition scheme. Select the partition or unallocated space, and click Next. ●● Delete an existing partition  Select a partition, and then click Delete. This option is useful if you want to perform a clean installation on a drive that currently contains an earlier version of Windows. Because this operation deletes data irretrievably, you must respond to an “Are you sure?” confirmation request. After deleting the partition, you can select the unallocated space as the destination for your Windows 7 installa- tion or create a new partition. Be sure to back up any data files before choosing this option. www.it-ebooks.info
    • Setting Up Windows 7 45 ●● Create a new partition from unallocated space  Select a block of unallocated space on a new drive or on an existing drive after deleting partitions, and click New to set up a partition in that space. Chapter 2 By default, the setup program offers to use all unallocated space on the current disk. You can specify a smaller partition size if you want to subdivide the disk into mul- tiple drives. If you have a 1,500-GB drive, for example, you might choose to create a small partition on which to install Windows and use the remaining space to create a second volume with its own drive letter on which to store data files such as music, pictures, documents, and recorded TV. ●● Extend an existing partition by using unallocated space  If you want to upgrade an existing copy of Windows and you’re not happy with your existing partition scheme, you can use the Extend option to add unallocated space to any partition. If you originally set up a 60-GB notebook hard drive with a 10-GB partition for Win- dows XP and set aside the remaining 50 GB for data files, you might be unable to upgrade to Windows 7 because your system drive doesn’t meet the requirement of at least 15 GB of free space. The solution? First, back up your data files to an external drive. Then delete the data partition, select the partition you want to make larger, and click Extend. Choose the total size of the extended partition in the Size box (the default is to use all available unallocated space), and click Apply. You can now restore your backed-up data files and continue with Windows setup. INSIDE OUT   Use labels to tell volumes apart In both the Disk Management console and the disk-management tools available via Windows setup, it can be confusing to tell which partition is which. Confusion, in this case, can have drastic consequences if you inadvertently wipe out a drive full of data instead of writing over an unwanted installation of Windows. One good way to reduce the risk of this sort of accident is to label drives well. In Figure 2-3, for instance, you can see at a glance that the second partition on Disk 0 contains a current installation of Windows 7 Ultimate x86 and that the smaller partition on Disk 1 is empty. www.it-ebooks.info
    • 46 Chapter 2  Installing and Configuring Windows 7 Alert observers will no doubt notice that one option is missing from that list. Unfortunately, the setup program does not allow you to shrink an existing disk partition to create unal- located space on which to install a fresh copy of Windows 7. The option to shrink a volume is available from the Disk Management console after Windows 7 is installed, but if you