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Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 Best Practices

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Welcome to Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 Best Practices, a book that was …

Welcome to Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 Best Practices, a book that was
developed together with the Microsoft Exchange product group to provide
in-depth information about Exchange and best practices based on real-
life
experiences
with the product in use in different environments. Numerous sidebars
are also included that detail experiences from skilled industry professionals
such
as Certified Exchange Masters and Exchange Most Valuable Professionals (MVPs).

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  • 1. www.it-ebooks.info
  • 2. PUBLISHED BYMicrosoft PressA Division of Microsoft CorporationOne Microsoft WayRedmond, Washington 98052-6399Copyright © 2010 by Joel Stidley and Siegfried JagottAll rights reserved. No part of the contents of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by anymeans without the written permission of the publisher.Library of Congress Control Number: 2010929323Printed and bound in the United States of America.1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 WCT 5 4 3 2 1 0A CIP catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library.Microsoft Press books are available through booksellers and distributors worldwide. For further information aboutinternational editions, contact your local Microsoft Corporation office or contact Microsoft Press Internationaldirectly at fax (425) 936-7329. Visit our Web site at www.microsoft.com/mspress. Send comments to mspinput@microsoft.com.Microsoft, Microsoft Press, Access, Active Directory, ActiveSync, Entourage, Excel, Forefront, Hotmail, Hyper-V,InfoPath, Internet Explorer, MS, Outlook, PowerPoint, SharePoint, Silverlight, SmartScreen, SQL Server, Visio, VisualBasic, Visual C++, Windows, Windows Live, Windows Mobile, Windows NT, Windows PowerShell, Windows Server,Windows Vista, and Xbox are either registered trademarks or trademarks of the Microsoft group of companies.Other product and company names mentioned herein may be the trademarks of their respective owners.The example companies, organizations, products, domain names, e-mail addresses, logos, people, places, andevents depicted herein are fictitious. No association with any real company, organization, product, domain name,e-mail address, logo, person, place, or event is intended or should be inferred.This book expresses the author’s views and opinions. The information contained in this book is provided withoutany express, statutory, or implied warranties. Neither the authors, Microsoft Corporation, nor its resellers, ordistributors will be held liable for any damages caused or alleged to be caused either directly or indirectly bythis book.Acquisitions Editor: Martin DelReDevelopmental Editor: Karen SzallProject Editor: Carol VuEditorial Production: Christian Holdener, S4Carlisle Publishing ServicesTechnical Reviewers: Tony Redmond and Scott Schnoll; Technical Review services provided by ContentMaster, a member of CM Group, Ltd.Cover: Tom Draper DesignBody Part No. X17-00144www.it-ebooks.info
  • 3. I dedicate this book to my mum, Johanna, for all the support andlove she gave to me throughout my whole life. Without her effortI would not be where I am today.—Siegfried JagottTo my wife, Andrea. Without her patience, love, and supportI would not be able to take on new and exciting challenges.—Joel Stidleywww.it-ebooks.info
  • 4. www.it-ebooks.info
  • 5. Contents at a GlanceAbout the Sidebars xxiForeword xxviiAcknowledgments xxxiIntroduction xxxvPart I Preparing for Exchange Server 2010Chapter 1 Introducing Exchange ­Server 2010 3Chapter 2 Exchange Deployment Projects 41Chapter 3 Exchange Environmental Considerations 73Part II Designing Exchange Server 2010Chapter 4 Client Access in Exchange 2010 139Chapter 5 Routing and Transport 203Chapter 6 Mailbox Services 259Chapter 7 Edge Transport and ­Messaging Security 297Chapter 8 Automated Message ­Processing,Compliance, and Archiving 345Chapter 9 Unified Messaging 407Chapter 10 Federated Delegation 445Chapter 11 Designing High Availability 477Chapter 12 Backup, Restore, and Disaster Recovery 531Chapter 13 Hardware Planning for Exchange Server 2010 575Part III Upgrading to Exchange Server 2010Chapter 14 Upgrading from Exchange Server 2003and Exchange Server 2007 625www.it-ebooks.info
  • 6. Part IV Deploying and Managing ExchangeServer 2010Chapter 15 Preparing for and Deploying ExchangeServer 2010 679Chapter 16 Managing Exchange 725Chapter 17 Operating and ­Troubleshooting ­Exchange Server 2010 773Index 815www.it-ebooks.info
  • 7. viiWhat do you think of this book? We want to hear from you!Microsoft is interested in hearing your feedback so we can continually improve ourbooks and learning resources for you. To participate in a brief online survey, please visit:microsoft.com/learning/booksurveyContentsAbout the Sidebars xxiForeword xxviiAcknowledgments xxxiIntroduction xxxvPart I Preparing for Exchange Server 2010Chapter 1 Introducing Exchange ­Server 2010 3The History of Exchange Server. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3The Years Before Exchange 4Exchange Server Before Active Directory 5Exchange Server 2000 and 2003 10Exchange Server 2007 and Beyond 13Overview of Exchange Server 2010. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14Management Consoles 14Exchange Server Roles 18Feature Changes from Exchange 2003 and 2007 19Exchange On-Premise versus Exchange Online 22Exchange Server 2010 Service Pack 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24Exchange 2010 Editions and Licensing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28Exchange Server 2010 Editions 28Exchange Server 2010 Client Access Licenses 29Exchange Organizational Health 30Windows PowerShell and Exchange 2010. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31Windows PowerShell Basics 34Scripting 37Additional Resources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40www.it-ebooks.info
  • 8. viii ContentsChapter 2 Exchange Deployment Projects 41Exchange Deployment Project Framework. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42Planning Exchange Deployment Projects. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43Plan 43Deliver 46Operate 66Manage 67Putting a Project Together. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68Case Studies Used in This Book. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68Contoso 68Fabrikam 69Litware 71Additional Resources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72Chapter 3 Exchange Environmental Considerations 73Evaluating Network Topology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74Reviewing Current and Planned Network Topology 74Domain Name System (DNS) 75Internet Protocol (IPv4 and IPv6) 80Understanding Client Load Patterns 83Perimeter Network 85Avoiding Pitfalls by Providing TechnicalRecommendations 87Evaluating and Planning for Active Directory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89How Exchange 2010 Uses Active Directory 89Single versus Multi-Forest Implementation 96Single vs. Multi-Domain Implementation 99Planning Naming Conventions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101Server Name 102Database Availability Group Name 103Database Name 103Active Directory Site Name 104User Names 104www.it-ebooks.info
  • 9. ixContentsPlanning Namespace. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105Namespace Scenarios 105Disjoint Namespace 108Single Label Domains 110Non-contiguous Namespaces 111Planning Certificates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111About Digital Certificates 111Types of Certificates 112Working with Certificates in Exchange 2010 113Planning Exchange Server 2010 Placement. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116Domain Controller and Global Catalog Placement 116Using Exchange Server 2010 on Member Serversor Domain Controllers 117Exchange Server Role Placement 117Planning Network Port Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122Mailbox Server 122Hub and Edge Transport Servers 124Client Access Server 125Unified Messaging Server 126International Considerations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127Multiple Language Support for Exchange 127Time, Time Zone, and Daylight Saving 129Message Format and Encoding 130Mail Client Support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131Microsoft Outlook/Entourage 131Outlook Web App 134IMAP and POP3 Clients 134Additional Resources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134Part II Designing Exchange Server 2010Chapter 4 Client Access in Exchange 2010 139Client Access Server Architecture. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139Client Access Server Features 139Windows Services 141New Features 143www.it-ebooks.info
  • 10. x ContentsPlanning Client Access to Exchange . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158Client Access Services and Physical Architecture 159Client Access High Availability 183Certificates for Client Access Services 187Pulling It All Together 191Additional Resources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202Chapter 5 Routing and Transport 203Exchange Transport Server Architecture. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .203Components of Message Transport 203Message Queues on Transport Servers 208Queue Database 209Transport Server Services 211Delivery Status Notifications 213Message Latency Measurement 215Shadow Redundancy 216Message Throttling 217Back Pressure 218Understanding Transport Agents. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218Default Transport Agents 219Events That Trigger Transport Agents 220Message Routing in Exchange 2010. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222Message Routing within an ExchangeOrganization 222Reviewing and Configuring Message RoutingBetween Active Directory Sites 229Planning Message Routing to the OrganizationPerimeter 238Planning and Configuring Your SMTP Namespace 255TargetAddress Routing 257Additional Resources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258Chapter 6 Mailbox Services 259Introduction to Exchange Server 2010 Mailbox Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259Exchange Mailbox Services Architecture. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 260Database Files 261The Exchange Services 264www.it-ebooks.info
  • 11. xiContentsWhat Is New in Exchange Server 2010. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265Large Mailboxes 265Deleted Item Recovery and Dumpster 2.0 266Discontinuation of Storage Groups 268Performance Improvements 269Exchange Mailbox Services Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 279Determining the Number of Mailboxesfor Each Server 281Determining Where to Host Mailboxes 283Database Maintenance 283Mailbox Limits 286Configuring Deleted Item Recovery Quotas 288Poison Mailbox Detection and Correction 288Client Configuration 290Configuring Public Folders 291Additional Resources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 295Chapter 7 Edge Transport and ­Messaging Security 297Implementing Edge Transport Server. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 297Considering Firewall Ports 298Planning and Configuring Edge Synchronization 299Edge Transport Configurations 304Planning for Anti-Spam. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 313How Exchange 2010 Does Spam Filtering 314How Anti-Spam Updates Work 315Enable Anti-Spam on Hub Transport Servers 318Connection Filtering 318Sender Filtering 321Recipient Filtering 321Sender ID Filtering 322Content Filtering 325Sender Reputation Filtering 329Attachment Filtering 331Anti-Spam Reporting 332www.it-ebooks.info
  • 12. xii ContentsAntivirus Considerations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 334Exchange Server 2010 Antivirus Protection 334Considerations for Deploying an Antivirus Solution 334Using Forefront Protection 2010 for Exchange Server 335Planning for Messaging Security. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 338Implementing Network-Based Security 338Planning for Session-Based Security 339Implementing Client-Based Security 343Additional References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 344Chapter 8 Automated Message ­Processing,Compliance, and Archiving 345Messaging Compliance Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 346Designing and Implementing Messaging Records Management. . . . . . 348Retention Tags and Retention Policies 349Retention Hold 356Managed Folders 357Designing and Implementing Transport Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 361Rules Agents 362Creating Transport Rules 363Designing and Implementing Message Journaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 367Journaling Agent 368Journal Reports 369Journal Rules 370Designing and Implementing Personal Archives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 371Multi-Mailbox Search. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 373Litigation Hold 374Performing a Multi-Mailbox Search 377Designing and Implementing AD RMS Integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 380AD RMS Overview 381AD RMS and Exchange Server 2010 388Designing and Implementing Message Classifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 399Dependencies of Message Classification 402Creating Message Classifications in Exchange Server 2010 402www.it-ebooks.info
  • 13. xiiiContentsConfiguring Message Classificationsfor Outlook 2007 and Outlook 2010 404Assigning Message Classifications with Transport Rules 405Additional Resources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 406Chapter 9 Unified Messaging 407Introduction to Unified Messaging. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408The Basics of Telephony. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 410Types of Telephone Systems 410Types of PBX 411VoIP Gateway Introduction 411Unified Messaging Protocols 412Exchange Unified Messaging Architecture. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 412Unified Messaging Services 414Unified Messaging Folder Structure 415Planning for Unified Messaging. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 415Unified Messaging Servers 416UM Dial Plans 418UM IP Gateways 419UM Hunt Groups 420UM Mailbox Policies 420UM Auto Attendants 421Call Answering Rules 421Deploying Unified Messaging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 423Adding the UM Server Role 423Configuring UM Dial Plans 424Configuring UM IP Gateways 425Configuring UM Hunt Groups 426Configuring UM Mailbox Policies 427Configuring UM Settings 427Configuring Incoming Faxes 428International Considerations of Unified Messaging. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 429Foreign Language Support 430Operating UM in a Multi-language Environment 431www.it-ebooks.info
  • 14. xiv ContentsManaging Unified Messaging. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 432Enabling Mailboxes for Unified Messaging 432UM Reporting 433Testing Unified Messaging Functionality 434Office Communication Server 2007 R2 Integration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 436Integrating OCS 2007 R2 in Exchange 2010 Architecture 437Deploying UM and OCS 2007 R2 Integration 438Deploying Instant Messaging for OWA 441Additional Resources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 444Chapter 10 Federated Delegation 445Introduction to Federated Delegationin Exchange Server 2010 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 445Overview of Federation and Federated Delegation 446Fundamentals and Components of Federated Delegation. . . . . . . . . . . . 448Federation Trust 448Organization Relationships 455Sharing Policies 458Interaction of Permissions, OrganizationRelationships, and Sharing Policies 459Federation Scenarios. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 461Free/Busy Access 461Calendar and Contacts Sharing 463Federating with Online Services 465Troubleshooting Federated Delegation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 467Troubleshooting the Federation Trust 469Troubleshooting Organization Relationships 472Troubleshooting Calendar and Contacts Sharing 474Additional Resources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 475Chapter 11 Designing High Availability 477Achieving High Availability. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 477Measuring Availability 478Exchange 2010 High-Availability Features 479www.it-ebooks.info
  • 15. xvContentsAvailability Planning for Mailbox Servers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 480Continuous Replication 487Designing and Configuring DAGs 495Availability Planning for Client Access Servers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500Client Access Load Balancing and FailoverSolutions 500Availability Planning for Transport Servers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 509Shadow Redundancy 509Planning Cross-site Failovers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 513Cross-site DAG Considerations 513Cross-site Considerations for Client Accessand Transport 514Risk Mitigation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 521Pulling It All Together. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 522Additional Resources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 529Chapter 12 Backup, Restore, and Disaster Recovery 531Changes to Backup and Restore in ExchangeServer 2010. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 531Integrating High Availabilityand Disaster Recovery 532Removal of ESE Streaming APIs for Backup and Restore 533Storage Group Removal 533Database Not Tied to a Specific Mailbox Server 534Using DAGs to Eliminate Traditional Point-in-TimeBackups 534Backup and Disaster Recovery Planning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 534Why Backup Is Done 534Developing Service Levels for Backup and Restore 535Disaster Prevention Strategies 536Testing Your Disaster Recovery Plan 544Performing Backup and Recovery for Non-MailboxServer Roles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 544Client Access Server Backup and Recovery 544Hub Transport Server Backup and Recovery 545www.it-ebooks.info
  • 16. xvi ContentsUnified Messaging Server Backup and Recovery 546Edge Transport Server Backup and Recovery 547Performing Backup and Recovery for MailboxServer Roles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 548Volume ShadowCopy Service 549Using Windows Server Backup 551Using Advanced Backup Solutions 558Dial Tone Recovery 561Using the Recovery Database 562Recover an Exchange Server 564Backup and Recovery of Public Folders 566Operating Without Traditional Point-in-Time Backups. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 567Using Lagged Database Copies 568Backups and Log File Truncation 573Reasons for Traditional Point-in-Time Backups 574Additional Resources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 574Chapter 13 Hardware Planning for Exchange Server 2010 575Sizing and Planning Exchange Hardware. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 575Exchange Scalability 576The Sizing Process 576Profiling 577Sizing Tools 581Preproduction Verification 595Sizing Guidelines. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 602Processor Type 602Processor Scalability 602Processor Guidelines 603Processor Ratio Guidelines 604Memory 605Network Configuration 606Domain Controllers 606Hub and Edge Transport Roles 607Client Access Server Role 609Mailbox Role 610www.it-ebooks.info
  • 17. xviiContentsUnified Messaging Role 618Multiple Role Server 618Designing Virtualization for Exchange 2010 Servers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 619Virtualization Support 619Additional Resources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 622Part III Upgrading to Exchange Server 2010Chapter 14 Upgrading from Exchange Server 2003and Exchange Server 2007 625Designing Upgrade and Coexistence Strategies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 626Discontinued and De-emphasized Functionalityin Exchange Server 2010 628Useful Tools for an Upgrade. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 633Exchange Server Deployment Assistant 633Exchange Best Practices Analyzer 634Exchange Pre-Deployment Analyzer 634Exchange Server Remote Connectivity Analyzer 636Upgrading from and Coexisting with ExchangeServer 2003. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 636Preparing the Environment 637Deploying Exchange Server 2010 Computers 641Upgrading Outlook and Remote Access Functionality 642Upgrading Message Connectivity From ExchangeServer 2003 649Coexistence for Management 651Planning and Implementing Mailbox Movesand Coexistence 653Planning Public Folder Access and Migration 660Removing Legacy Exchange Servers 662Upgrading from and Coexisting with ExchangeServer 2007. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 664Upgrading Exchange Server 2007 Computers to SP2 666Preparing Active Directory After ApplyingExchange Server 2007 SP2 666Deploying Exchange Server 2010 Computers 666www.it-ebooks.info
  • 18. xviii ContentsUpgrading Client Access Services 666Upgrading Message ConnectivityFrom Exchange Server 2007 667Planning Mailbox Moves and Coexistence 672Planning Continuous Replication Migration 672Planning Unified Messaging Migration 673Removing Exchange Server 2007 Computers 674Additional Resources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 675Part IV Deploying and Managing ExchangeServer 2010Chapter 15 Preparing for and Deploying ExchangeServer 2010 679The Exchange Server 2010 Deployment Process. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 680Exchange and Active Directory Domain Services 680Preparing for an Exchange Deployment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 684Prepare AD DS and Domains 685Checking Exchange Environment Health 687Deploying Exchange 2010. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 701Automating Exchange Server Installations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 720Additional Resources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 723Chapter 16 Managing Exchange 725Exchange 2010 Permissions Model. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 725Active Directory Groups of Exchange 725The Role-Based Access Control Permission Model 726Active Directory Split Permissions 736Managing Exchange Recipients. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 738Managing Mail-Enabled Users and Mailboxes 739Managing Contacts 744Managing Groups 745Managing Resources 749Moving Mailboxes 753www.it-ebooks.info
  • 19. xixContentsImporting and Exporting Mailboxes 756Automating Administration 758Managing Other Exchange Objects. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 761Managing Address Policies 761Managing Address Lists 763Managing Details Templates 766Managing Outlook Web App Themes 767Managing Public Folders 768Additional Resources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 772Chapter 17 Operating and ­Troubleshooting ­Exchange Server 2010 773Microsoft Operations Framework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 773Problem vs. Incident Management 774Trending and Capacity Planning 774Troubleshooting Methodology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 776Define the Scope 776Collect the Data 776Correlate the Data 777Rank the Causes 778Work the Solutions 778Return to Operating State 778Feedback Loop 779Monitoring Exchange Server 2010. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 779Performance Monitor 780System Center Operations Manager 2007 R2 788Troubleshooting Tools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 792Identifying and Resolving Performance Problems 792Identifying and Resolving Mail Flow Issues 795Identifying and Resolving Exchange Server Issues 803PowerShell Troubleshooting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 812Additional Resources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 813Index 815www.it-ebooks.info
  • 20. What do you think of this book? We want to hear from you!Microsoft is interested in hearing your feedback so we can continually improve ourbooks and learning resources for you. To participate in a brief online survey, please visit:microsoft.com/learning/booksurveywww.it-ebooks.info
  • 21. xxiAbout the SidebarsThis book includes sidebars that provide you with real-world experience and­insights from Microsoft Exchange product group members as well as wellknown Exchange subject matter experts. Each sidebar covers a specific topic ofexpertise and reflects the opinion of the sidebar contributor, not necessarily theopinion of Microsoft or the authors of this book.Sidebars in this book are categorized into the following distinguishing sidebarelements:n Notes from the Field  Insights and experiences from Microsoft­consultants, technical support professionals, partners, and early adoptercustomers.n Inside Track  Insider information or tips from Microsoft program­managers, technical product managers, developers, and testers.n Lessons Learned  Examples of things that did not go well or what notto do. Learn from others so that you don’t repeat their mistakes.n Trade-Offs  Best practices are rarely absolute. We point out key­decisions that you should be weighing.Chapter 1Notes from the Field: “Exchange 4.0 Beta: Codename Touchdown”by ­Andreas Essing����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 5Notes from the Field: “Migrating from Microsoft Mail 3.5to Exchange 4.0” by Gary A. Cooper��������������������������������������������������������������� 5Notes from the Field: “The Release of Exchange 4.0 as Experiencedin ­Germany” by Lars Riehn������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 7Notes from the Field: “When OWA Was Invented”by Tony Redmond����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 9Notes from the Field: “Right-Click in Exchange System Manager”by Tony Redmond��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 11Notes from the Field: “Europe’s Issues with Exchange Online”by Manfred Kornagel��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 23Inside Track: “Windows PowerShell 2.0 Best Practices”by Ed Wilson �����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������38www.it-ebooks.info
  • 22. xxii About the SidebarsChapter 2Notes from the Field: “Gathering Business Requirements”by John P. Glynn�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������50Notes from the Field: “Assessing a Current Exchange Deployment”by Joseph Cirillo������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 53Notes from the Field: “Escalations” by John P. Glynn ������������������������������������� 61Chapter 3Notes from the Field: “DNS Dynamic Updates” by John P. Glynn����������������� 76Notes from the Field: “Identifying Current Client Load”by Andy Schan���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������83Notes from the Field: “Additional Beneficial Server Settings”by Joe Cirillo�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������87Inside Track: “How to Safely Extend the Schema” by Ross Smith IV������������� 91Notes from the Field: “Planning a Forest Design” by AndrewEhrensing�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������99Notes from the Field: “A Disjoint Namespace Example”by Carsten ­Allendoerfer���������������������������������������������������������������������������������110Notes from the Field: “Planning Exchange Server Rolesand Placement” by Joe Cirillo�����������������������������������������������������������������������120Notes from the Field: “Consider Outlook RPC encryption”by Ross Smith IV���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������133Chapter 4Inside Track: “BlackBerry and Performance Impacts”by Robin Thomas �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������153Inside Track: “Service Connection Points and AutoDiscover”by Greg ­Taylor�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������162Notes from the Field: “Redirecting OWA URLs in Exchange 2010”by Brian Desmond �����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������169Inside Track: “ExternalURLs” by Greg Taylor���������������������������������������������������172Inside Track: “Client Access Server Array Names” by Greg Taylor���������������175Notes from the Field: “Client Access Server Sizing Tips”by Andrew ­Ehrensing�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������179www.it-ebooks.info
  • 23. xxiiiAbout the Sidebars xxiiiChapter 5Inside Track: “Troubleshooting Submission Queue”by Charlie Chung �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������205Notes from the Field: “Disable TLS for Hub to Hub Transport­Communication” by Andy Schan�����������������������������������������������������������������224Notes from the Field: “A Practical Way to Define Site Link Costs”by ­Brian Day���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������231Notes from the Field: “Using Exchange Costs on IP Site Links”by Ulf ­Hansen�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������233Inside Track: “Scoping Send Connectors Correctly”by Todd Luttinen���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������239Inside Track: “Configuring a Failover Scenario with MX Records”by Ross Smith IV���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������240Notes from the Field: “Configuring Relaying in ExchangeServer 2010” by Christian Schindler�������������������������������������������������������������247Chapter 6Notes from the Field: “Choosing a Disk Technology”by Steve ­McIntyre�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������270Notes from the Field: “Segregating Database and Transaction Logs”by Thierry Demorre ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������280Notes from the Field: “How Many Mailboxes Should be Createdon a Server?” by Thierry Demorre���������������������������������������������������������������282Notes from the Field: “Appropriately Sizing Mailboxes”by Thierry ­Demorre ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������287Chapter 7Notes from the Field: “Edge Transport Role and Forefront TMG”by Henrik Walther�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������299Notes from the Field: “Make Sure Edge and Hub AuthenticateCorrectly” by Christian Schindler�����������������������������������������������������������������311Lessons Learned: “Anti-Spam with Forefront Protection 2010for Exchange” by Alexander Nikolayev�������������������������������������������������������316Notes from the Field: “Create a Transport Rule to Process SCLs”by ­Andreas Bode���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������328Notes from the Field: “Custom Agent Log Analyzer” by Jon Webster�������333www.it-ebooks.info
  • 24. xxiv About the SidebarsChapter 8Inside Track: “Successfully Implementing Messaging Compliance­Technologies” by Ed Banti�����������������������������������������������������������������������������347Notes from the Field: “Journaling and Distribution Lists”by Thierry ­Demorre ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������370Inside Track: “Simplifying the End-User Experience with Message­Classifications” by Ed Banti���������������������������������������������������������������������������401Chapter 9Inside Track: “Behind the Scenes of Unified Messaging”by Ankur Kothari���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������409Inside Track: “Voicemail Preview and CPU Scalability”by Ankur ­Kothari���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������417Inside Track: “Languages for Voicemail Preview”by Ankur Kothari���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������429Notes from the Field: “Changing Language for Voice Mail”by Korneel ­Bullens�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������431Notes from the Field: “OCS 2007 R2 Integration: Extension Numbers”by Korneel Bullens�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������437Notes from the Field: “Unified Messaging Transitioningand Extension ­Dialing” by Gary A. Cooper�������������������������������������������������440Chapter 10Inside Track: “Cross-Org Free/Busy Access with Outlook 2007Clients” by Matthias Leibmann���������������������������������������������������������������������462Inside Track: “Federation Trust and the Federated OrganizationIdentifier for Cross-Premises Scenarios” by Matthias Leibmann�����������466Lessons Learned: “Federated Delegation and Pre-Authenticationwith ­Microsoft ISA Server and Forefront Threat ManagementGateway (TMG)” by Devin L. Ganger�����������������������������������������������������������467Lessons Learned: “Troubleshooting Certificate RollingUsing Exchange Server 2010 Federation” by Gary A. Cooper�����������������471www.it-ebooks.info
  • 25. xxvAbout the SidebarsChapter 11Notes from the Field: “Exchange High Availability Improvements”by Colin Lee�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������483Notes from the Field: “JBOD Impact on Operationsand Risk Discussion” by Arno Zwegers�������������������������������������������������������498Notes from the Field: “Client Access Namespace and the Impactto High Availability and Site Resiliency” by Gary A. Cooper�������������������514Chapter 12Notes from the Field: “Backup Pains” by Colin Lee ���������������������������������������535Notes from the Field: “The Missing Folder Informationof Single Item ­Recovery” by Jon Webster���������������������������������������������������542Lessons Learned: “Backup and Restore Options Dependon Organization Size” by Colin Lee�������������������������������������������������������������548Notes from the Field: “DPM 2010 vs. Lagged Copies”by Todd ­Hawkins���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������560Notes from the Field: “An Exchange 2010 ImplementationWithout ­Traditional Point-in-Time Backups” by Sascha Schmatz����������568Chapter 13Notes from the Field: “Profiling Foreign Mail Systems”by Jeffrey ­Rosen ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������580Notes from the Field: “Mailbox Server Storage I/O Configuration”by Arno Zwegers���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������615Notes from the Field: “Virtualization—It’s Complicated!”by Erik Gustafson �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������620Trade-Offs: “Exchange Virtualization—Choosing a Strategy”by Jeff ­Mealiffe�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������621Chapter 14Inside Track: “Seamless Coexistence with the Legacy URL”by Kristian Andaker ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������643Notes from the Field: “Optimizing Message Routing in anExchange Server 2003 and Exchange Server 2010 Environment”by Markus Bellmann��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������649www.it-ebooks.info
  • 26. xxvi About the SidebarsNotes from the Field: “Moving Mailboxes from ExchangeServer 2003 to Exchange Server 2010” by Nicolai Wagner���������������������659Lessons Learned: “Invalid Categories Set on Public Folder Items”by Markus Bellmann��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������661Chapter 15Notes from the Field: “Installing Only Minimum Prerequisites”by Andy Schan�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������702Inside Track: “Exchange Server 2010 Install Differences”by Paul ­Wimmer���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������706Notes from the Field: “Considerations for Local Securityof Exchange ­Servers” by Erick Szewczyk�����������������������������������������������������719Notes from the Field: “Performing Exchange Server 2010Unattended ­Deployments” by Paul Wimmer�������������������������������������������720Chapter 16Notes from the Field: “Noticeable Improvements with RBAC”by Brian Day���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������727Notes from the Field: “Restricting Permissions Using CustomRole Groups” by Ulf Hansen�������������������������������������������������������������������������734Notes from the Field: “User and Mailbox Provisioning”by Andy Schan�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������760Chapter 17Notes from the Field: “Exchange Perfmon” by Andy Schan�������������������������783Notes from the Field: “Creating a Report of PerformanceData” by ­Alessandro Goncalves �������������������������������������������������������������������785Notes from the Field: “Exchange and Hyper-V CPU Utilization­Troubleshooting” by Alessandro Goncalves�����������������������������������������������786Notes from the Field: “Consider Active DirectoryReplication Delays in ­Exchange 2010 Troubleshooting”by Markus Bellmann��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������787Notes from the Field: “PowerShell Scripts” by Joe Cirillo �����������������������������807www.it-ebooks.info
  • 27. xxviixxviiForewordEvery day we rely more and more on electronic mail to handle our mostbasic communication needs. Our reliance leads us to require dependability.To ensure an efficient transition from an older system to Exchange 2010, youmust determine how to integrate a myriad of systems. Your users will demand­compatibility and high levels of uptime, and managers will demand lower costsin terms of servers and storage. I have spent 15 years at Microsoft ­working withteams to enhance the end-user experience. I’ve never been as excited aboutthe work we’ve done as I am now with the release of Exchange 2010. With­Exchange 2010, our development team was dedicated to building a brand-new­release that effectively took a deliberate approach to building new features,­refining existing features, and making sure at every step that we stayed trueto our goals of ­delivering an awesome release of Exchange. The breadth anddepth of the technologies Microsoft Exchange 2010 finally delivers is ­astounding.­Exchange 2010 provides new features such as Exchange Control Panel (ECP),­Domain on the Middle Tier (DoMT), High Availability (HA), and Role-Based AccessControl (RBAC). Federated sharing, archiving, and lower storage cost options areknocking down barriers that have traditionally stopped customers from ­deployingor meeting user needs. Any one of the features I just mentioned would be­interesting on its own, but the combination is truly compelling.Exchange is easy to install, but to get the most out of it you need to explorethe many features and capabilities that more than 20 million lines of code bringto it. You want to understand the software in detail, and the authors of this bookhave the ­experience to show you all of the features and components. The authorshave done an awesome job getting the details right and have taken great carein ­bringing you what I think is the best book on the subject. Recently there hasbeen talk about books like this being out of date as soon as they go to press, orthat getting information from the Internet is the new way to learn. To this I say,“Nonsense!” With this book, you will gain from the authors’ vast experience witha topic that is vast in scope. How did the authors get such in-depth, detailedexperience with a product released in November of 2009? That level of detail—including best practices for deployment—requires time and teamwork, and that iswhere the Technology Adoption Program (TAP) comes into play.Microsoft’s Technology Adoption Program is designed to validate new­versions of Exchange by having customers test and run production deploymentsof ­pre-release builds of the next version of Exchange. This gives participantsthe ­opportunity to provide real-time design feedback to the Exchange ­productwww.it-ebooks.info
  • 28. xxviii Foreword­development team. Microsoft deployed the first production Exchange 2010server on April 16, 2007, and in January of 2008 released bits to TAP ­customersand ­partners for review. Shortly thereafter, the authors and other customerswere ­running Exchange 2010 in their production deployments. When Microsoftofficially shipped Exchange 2010 on November 9, 2009, TAP partners had alreadydeployed more than 200,000 mailboxes into production! Through this preliminaryprocess, the authors participated in every step of the final design, gaining valuableexperience with each TAP release for deployment. During this TAP deploymentphase, all TAPs work together with Microsoft to find the best product and bestways to deploy. Here is what one TAP had to say about this process:“We have learned a lot through this process, and not only aboutExchange 2010. By interacting with other TAP members and theproduct group on a daily basis we have been able to remove theblinders we sometimes wear from administering the same systemday in and day out. This has allowed us to ­consider alternateapproaches we could take to improve our system ­overall andto identify where some of our own shortcomings are. I’ve seenthings posted I’ve never even thought of before and hope thatour contributions have done the same . . .”Individually and collectively the authors who wrote this book have been­working with Exchange 2010 for as long as many senior developers at Microsoft.They have done an awesome job of providing readers with the ins and outs ofthe full range of features of Exchange 2010, which will help you get the mostout of the product. Exchange administrators will find the experienced, hands-on­approach of this book invaluable in designing and deploying Exchange 2010.You wouldn’t want a book that only skimmed and introduced new features.­Fortunately for you, this book is based on the experience of years of successfuldeployments in complex environments and a teamwork approach to the finaldesign process. Microsoft and TAPs have built a product that we are truly proudof, and this book brings you the right way to walk through it. This book definitelybelongs on the shelf of every serious Exchange administrator and IT manager.David EspinozaSenior Program Manager, Exchange Ship TeamMicrosoft CorporationMay 2010www.it-ebooks.info
  • 29. xxixxxixForewordIlove the idea of a best practice book. The initial challenge is to capture the­knowledge of real-life designs and deployments that underpin best ­practice. Thenext challenge is to validate that the claimed best practice is actually ­valuable.The final challenge is to focus on a best practice that has enduring value ratherthan the tenets that flame into existence sparked by a notion of ­someone ata ­conference or other event and expire just as quickly when ­everyone ­realizes thatthe ­proposition being advanced isn’t such a good idea after all. Active ­Directory­designs for Exchange are an example of best practice that has changed since 1999.The initial designs for large corporations all seemed to favor the “­minimal root­domain and geographic sub-domains” design at a time when we ­assumed thata domain was a security boundary and that it was good to ­segment ­administrationacross ­sub-domains. Of course, at that time we were ­influenced by PC LANnetworks and couldn’t quite comprehend how ­Active ­Directory would evolve to­accommodate the range of design options that are available and in use today. Ofcourse, saying what best practice is for Active ­Directory is another question. Theanswer is that there is no best practice, but there are solid guiding principles thatany designer needs to understand and respect before deployment.I think the same is true for Exchange Server. Best practice is transient andchanges from version to version. It also changes over the lifetime of a versionas the Exchange community comes to grips with the product and understandsthe strengths and weaknesses of the software. Microsoft also contributes tothe ­evolution of best practice by publishing a wealth of information through­Microsoft TechNet and other sites, including the Exchange development group’sblog. Microsoft also changes best practice as they issue roll-up updates andservice packs to address product flaws and sometimes even introduce new­functionality (and maybe reinforce the old adage that no one should ever deploya Microsoft server application until the first service pack is available).Even though I regard best practice as transient, I still think that it is possibleto set out solid guiding principles that help system designers and administratorsto figure out how to make Exchange work for their organization. Well-organizedbooks like this render a great service to the Exchange community by laying outExchange 2010 in a practical manner that’s based on insight and experience. Iguess this could be called best practice, and that’s certainly what the title says,but I prefer to think of the knowledge contained here as the guiding principlesthat every administrator should be acquainted with before deploying Exchange.You won’t find a magic bullet here, nor will you find a recipe that you can simplyadopt for a deployment. Instead, the chapters unfold to deliver a comprehensivewww.it-ebooks.info
  • 30. xxx Forewordguide to Exchange 2010 in an informative and easy-to-follow manner. Even better,because this book was written well after Exchange 2010 was released, it doesn’tsuffer from the “must be first to market” syndrome that afflicts so many technicalbooks and leads to guesses and inaccuracies because the book’s content is basedon beta code. And as we all know, beta code isn’t necessarily what is delivered tocustomers.I’ve enjoyed reading this book and I think it will be valuable to anyone whowants to get to know Exchange 2010. Use it to establish your own foundation butdon’t forget that best practice evolves over time so be prepared to evolve yourown knowledge by keeping up to date with developments.Tony RedmondExchange MVPMay 2010www.it-ebooks.info
  • 31. xxxixxxiAcknowledgmentsWe wanted this book to be something special, something that reflects ourpassion and dedication to Microsoft Exchange. Our goal was to writea book for Exchange geeks by Exchange geeks. We also didn’t want to write­something that fell short of our expectations. To accomplish this lofty goal werequired input, assistance, and support from a long list of people. This may soundlike an award acceptance speech, but it is true. Although only two authors arenamed on the cover of this book, without a dedicated group of contributors,reviewers, and supporters this book would not exist.First, we want to thank Stanley Riemer for believing in the project and helpingget us the project approved and started. We regret not being able to work withyou on this book and we hope to be able to work with you again soon. We alsowould like to thank Andy Schan and Jeffrey Rosen for being able to fill the voidthat Stanley left on our project. Without their assistance the project would havenever been completed.Many other people assisted during this project, but a few people in ­particularfrom the Exchange product group stand out for their support, patience,and insight—especially as changes were made to the product: Kristian Andaker,Ed Banti, Matthias Leibmann, Alexander Nikolayev, Greg Taylor, Paul Wimmer,Gary Cooper, and Brian Desmond.In addition to these people, we also want to thank the following teamsand companies for their dedicated support and input: everyone on the MicrosoftExchange 2010 TAP List, Siemens Workplace Architecture Team, the Exchange­administrators at Axel Springer Media AG, and the supportive people at the­Microsoft Enterprise Engineering Center in Redmond.The three most critical pieces of a successful technical book are its ­technical­accuracy, its grammatical accuracy, and the support of its editing staff. For­technical accuracy, we were fortunate to have had two of the most thoroughand knowledgeable people in the Exchange server ecosystem to provide technicalguidance for the book: Tony Redmond and Scott Schnoll. They provided candidreviews that helped improve the content both technically and logistically. Thisis a better book thanks to each of them. We also want to thank David Espinozaand Tony Redmond for their kind words and the keen insight they providedin the Foreword for this book.www.it-ebooks.info
  • 32. xxxii AcknowledgmentsAlthough it may be shocking to hear, we as authors do not have perfect­grammar, and one of our pet peeves is reading a book with blatant ­grammaticalerrors. Thankfully, we had Becka McKay to help ensure that the book’s­grammatical excellence met the highest standards. She was able to mold oursometimes narrowly focused word choices and improved not only the way thebook sounds but also its accuracy and clarity.The support we received from the editorial staff at Microsoft Press has beenunmatched by any of our previous experiences. This book started with Martin DelRe,the acquisitions editor, bootstrapping the project about a year and a half priorto its publication. This happened during the final throes of the Exchange 2010development process, yet he was still able to wrangle some key players in theExchange product group to help out. This is a testament both to Martin’s ­abilityto get things done as well as to the product group’s willingness to assist on thisproject. Shortly after we got started, Karen Szall, the book’s developmental editor,was brought on board. She was critical in helping shape the look and feel of thebook, and she also answered our unending barrage of questions and encouragedus to start writing. After Karen provided the momentum, we had the privilegeof working with Carol Vu, the book’s project editor. Carol was able to keep trackof multiple versions of each chapter, deadlines whooshing by, and a variety ofother forms of drama all without breaking a sweat. A lesser project editor wouldhave had a panic attack long ago. We’d also like to thank Christian Holdener for­managing this seemingly unending project and Maureen Johnson for being ableto sift through the pages and pages of technojargon to make an index that isactually useful to our readers.We want to extend special thanks to the Exchange product group membersand Exchange experts who spend long hours of their free time reading ourdraft chapters to make sure we produced the highest-quality content possible.We gratefully salute the following people who were part of the review process:­Alessandro Goncalves, Alexander Nikolayev, Andrew Sullivan, Ankur Kothari,Arno Zwegers, Charlie Chung, Christian Schindler, Colin Lee, Dave Chomas,David ­Espinoza, Ed Banti, Erik Szewczyk, Evan Dodds, Gary Cooper, Greg ­Taylor,­Henrik Walther, Ilse Van Criekinge, Joe Cirillo, John Glynn, Kamal Janardhan,­Korneel ­Bullens, Kristian Andåker, Kumar Venkateswar, Matthias Leibmann,Nagesh ­Mahadev, Paul Wimmer, Ross Smith IV, Steve McIntyre, Thierry Demorre,Tim McMichael, Todd Hawkins, Todd Luttinen, and Yesim Koman.Finally, we would like to thank all of the sidebar contributors; these peoplereally helped add a more comprehensive view of the subject and added depth tomany topics. We’re proud of the number of practical sidebars in the book, and ourthanks go to their creators: Alessandro Goncalves, Alexander Nikolayev, AndreasBode, Andreas Essing, Andrew Ehrensing, Ankur Kothari, Arno Zwegers, Brian Day,www.it-ebooks.info
  • 33. xxxiiixxxiiiAcknowledgmentsBrian Desmond, Carsten Allendoerfer, Charlie Chung, Christian ­Schindler,Colin Lee, Devin L. Ganger, Ed Banti, Ed Wilson, Erick Szewczyk, Gary A. Cooper,Greg Taylor, Henrik Walther, Jeff Mealiffe, Joe Cirillo, John P. Glynn, Jon ­Webster,­Korneel Bullens, Kristian Andaker, Lars Riehn, Manfred Kornagel, Markus ­Bellmann,Matthias Leibmann, Nicolai Wagner, Paul Wimmer, Robin Thomas, Ross Smith IV,Sascha Schmatz, Steve McIntyre, Thierry Demorre, Todd Hawkins, Todd Luttinen,Tony Redmond, and Ulf Hansen.We thank you for taking the time to read our book; we hope that everyone’seffort comes across and that you find the book both interesting and beneficial.www.it-ebooks.info
  • 34. www.it-ebooks.info
  • 35. xxxvIntroductionWelcome to Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 Best Practices, a book that wasdeveloped together with the Microsoft Exchange product group to ­providein-depth information about Exchange and best practices based on ­real-life­experiences with the product in use in different environments. Numerous sidebarsare also included that detail experiences from skilled industry ­professionals suchas Certified Exchange Masters and Exchange Most Valuable Professionals (MVPs).Note  The book is largely based on the original version of Exchange Server2010 released in October 2009 together with information about the changes thatyou can expect in Service Pack 1. Because Service Pack 1 was not yet releasedwhen the book was finished, we based our experience in the book on informationavailable from the Microsoft Exchange product group and on a pre-release buildof Service Pack 1. To make sure we only cover features that will be in the releaseof Service Pack 1, we addressed only the most notable changes.In November of 2008 Joel was updating an Exchange 2007 book when the twoof us began chatting about writing a book on Exchange 2010. Having worked onseveral books already, we did not want to write the usual “click-here-and-do-this”type of Exchange book. We wanted to do something special, something that­reflected our passion for and dedication to Exchange. The idea of working ­togetheralong with the Microsoft Exchange 2010 product group to produce a book thatcould document years of experience from so many knowledgeable people thrilledall of us.From beginning to end, this book took about 17 months to complete, and tooka great deal of effort by a lot of hard-working and intelligent people. We hopethat this effort comes across to you and that you find this book a worthwhile partof your Exchange library.Who Is This Book For?Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 Best Practices is for experienced ­Messaging­architects, Exchange administrators, support professionals, and engineers,­especially those who are working in medium to large enterprise ­organizationsand also have at least one year of experience in administering, deploying,­managing, monitoring, upgrading, migrating, and designing Exchange Server.www.it-ebooks.info
  • 36. xxxvi IntroductionIT professionals who work in smaller companies also will benefit from the­recommendations and sidebars presented in this book as well as many of the tipsand tricks.To get the most benefit from this book, prior to reading it you should at leastbe able to do the following:n Design and deploy an Exchange messaging enterprise according to­business requirements.n Understand Active Directory concepts, especially how sites and servicesprovide its essential structure.n Understand the Windows permission model.n Have good experience with the networking protocol TCP/IP v4and the messaging protocol SMTP.n Understand Windows PKI infrastructures and digital certificates.You should also understand the basics of Exchange Server 2010, ­includingthe differences between each of the Exchange server roles (experience gainedwith Exchange 2007 is valuable here), and you should have experience with ­usingthe Exchange Management Console (EMC) and the Exchange ­ManagementShell (EMS). The book does not focus on the “how to” and thus does not­include ­step-by-step guides for each and every setting. This book builds on the­knowledge and experience needed to successfully pass the Microsoft ­70-663exam, Pro: Designing and Deploying Messaging Solutions with Microsoft­Exchange Server 2010.The target audience for Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 Best Practicesis ­interested in insights and in looking beyond the common administrativetasks performed in Exchange 2010 as well as those who want to unveil the full­functionality of the product.This book is a 300-level technical book; however, the planning and­managing chapter will also be very useful to IT managers seeking guidanceon ­understanding technical concepts for managing Exchange projects.How Is This Book Organized?This book is organized into four parts:n Part I: Preparing for Exchange Server 2010n Part II: Designing Exchange Server 2010n Part III: Upgrading to Exchange 2010n Part IV: Deploying and Managing Exchange Server 2010www.it-ebooks.info
  • 37. xxxviiIntroductionThe first part of this book consists of three chapters that focus on ­preparingyour organization for Exchange Server 2010. Chapter 1, “Introducing ExchangeServer 2010,” provides an introduction to Exchange Server 2010, including­high-level information about Exchange and Windows PowerShell. Chapter 2,­“Exchange Deployment Projects,” provides a project-oriented approach to­Exchange Server implementation as well as information about the imaginarycompany scenarios that are used throughout the book. Chapter 3, “ExchangeEnvironmental Considerations,” then provides information about other areas,such as Active Directory, that you need to consider to have a successful Exchangeimplementation.The second part of this book considers areas that are required for ­designingan Exchange Server 2010 implementation. In Chapter 4, “Client Access in ­Exchange2010,” you learn about the Client Access Server role of Exchange 2010. Chapter 5,“Routing and Transport,” explains how message routing works and how you planfor the Hub Transport server role. Chapter 6, “Mailbox ­Services,” ­considers theMailbox server role and explains the database changes ­introduced in ­Exchange2010. Chapter 7, “Edge Transport and Messaging ­Security,” ­considers the ­detailsof the Edge Transport server role and, in addition to ­discussing ­messaging­security, also covers antivirus and anti-spam functionality. ­Chapter 8, ­“Automated­Message Processing, Compliance, and Archiving,” covers the ­Exchange ­complianceand archiving features and also explains how you can perform automated­message processing. Chapter 9, “Unified Messaging,” ­explains Exchange ­Unified­Messaging or how to access your mailbox using voice as well as OCS 2007 R2­interoperability with Exchange. Chapter 10, “Federated ­Sharing,” describes howto connect two Exchange Organizations using Federated ­Sharing. ­Chapter 11,­“Designing High Availability,” introduces you to the concept of ­Database­Availability Groups (DAGs) and how DAGs can be implemented to provide highavailability for your ­messaging service as well discussing other availability ­aspectssuch as network load balancing. Chapter 12, “Backup, Restore, and Disaster­Recovery,” takes you through backing up and restoring your Exchange servers,databases, and features to mitigate the need for restores. Chapter 13, “HardwarePlanning for Exchange Server 2010,” concludes the design part of this book byproviding guidance about hardware planning for your Exchange servers.The third part of this book consists of Chapter 14, “Transitioning from­Exchange 2003 and Exchange 2007,” which considers how you can approachthe upgrade of your existing Exchange 2003 or Exchange 2007 installationto ­Exchange Server 2010 and what important factors you need to consider­beforehand.The fourth part of this book considers deploying and managing ExchangeServer 2010. Chapter 15, “Preparing for and Deploying Exchange Server 2010,”www.it-ebooks.info
  • 38. xxxviii Introductiondescribes how to prepare Active Directory and the servers for Exchange 2010,how you check your environment to make sure all Exchange requirements arecovered, and how you install Exchange 2010 both manually and automatically.Chapter 16, “Managing Exchange,” discusses how to manage Exchange Server2010. Finally, Chapter 17, “Operating and Troubleshooting Exchange Server 2010,”provides information about operating and troubleshooting your Exchange 2010server environment.How to Read This BookThis book is written as a reference, and each chapter was written to stand on itsown, so you do not need to read the chapters in order—you can jump betweenthe chapters that interest you. However, we’d like to point out some chapters thatprovide an excellent start and are used for other areas in the book as well.Almost every chapter in the book uses sample scenarios that are introducedin detail in Chapter 2. These fictional scenarios are used as real-world examplesand to provide illustrations of how the ideas presented in a chapter could beimplemented in practice. Chapter 3 provides the basis for reading about Exchangeenvironmental areas such as networks, operating systems, and certificates. Westrongly recommend reading these chapters—they also provide an excellent­overview and best practices around the topic you might want to investigate.What This Book Is NotIn Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 Best Practices, we assume that you have a goodunderstanding of Exchange Server 2010 and Windows PowerShell 2.0. For thisreason, this book does not teach the basics of every feature nor does it includea how-to section for common administrative tasks.This book is also not a preparation guide for Exam 70-662: TS: ­Microsoft­Exchange Server 2010, Configuring, or Exam 70-663: Pro: Designing and­Deploying Messaging Solutions with Microsoft Exchange Server 2010, eventhough when you apply the knowledge and experience covered in this book,it will help you to pass these exams.In general, the book does not include detailed steps for every configurationsetting but tries to provide a foundation so that you can make your own decisionsfor what would be optimal in your environment. It does not dictate one specificway to configure Exchange 2010; instead, it provides the options available andthe factors that should influence your decisions. Thus this book is not a guidefor how to configure your Exchange servers; it is meant to improve your already­configured environment or help you add new features such as Unified Messaging.www.it-ebooks.info
  • 39. xxxixIntroductionSystem RequirementsThis book is designed to be used with the following Exchange 2010 softwarerequirements:n Windows Server 2008 or Windows Server 2008 R2n 1 GB of RAMn x64 architecture-based computer with Intel or AMD processor that­supports 64 bitn 1.2 GB of available disk spacen Display monitor capable of 800 × 600 resolutionThe following list details the minimum system requirements needed to runthe content in the book’s companion Web site:n Windows XP with the latest service pack installed and the latest updatesfrom Microsoft Update Servicen Display monitor capable of 1024 × 768 resolutionn CD-ROM driven Microsoft Mouse or compatible pointing deviceThe Companion Web SiteThis book features a companion Web site that makes available additional­information to you such as job aids, quick reference guides, and additional­Exchange 2010 resources. We have included these elements to help you ­plan andmanage your Exchange 2010 organization and apply the book’s ­recommendedbest practices. The companion Web site includes the following:n Job Aids  Additional documents on most of the chapters that help you tocollect and structure your work through the book.n Quick Reference Guides  Such as the Exchange 2010 Best­Practices Quick Reference Guide, which is an overview of all bestpractice ­recommendations in the book, and the Exchange 2010­Additional ­Reference Guide, a collection of all Internet links referencedin the book.n TechNet Exchange 2010 Resources  Additional links that might beuseful when reading the book.You can download these files from the companion Web site, located athttp://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=193963.www.it-ebooks.info
  • 40. xl IntroductionFull documentation of the contents and structure of the companion Web sitecan be found in the Readme.txt file in the download.Support for This BookEvery effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of this book. As correctionsor changes are collected, they will be added to a Microsoft Knowledge Basearticle accessible via the Microsoft Help and Support site. Microsoft Press provides­support for books, including instructions for finding Knowledge Base articles,at the following Web site: http://www.microsoft.com/learning/support/books/.If you have questions regarding the book that are not answered by visiting thesite above or viewing a Knowledge Base article, send them to Microsoft Press viae-mail to mspinput@microsoft.com. Please note that Microsoft software productsupport is not offered through these addresses.We Want to Hear from YouWe welcome your feedback about this book. Please share your commentsand ideas via the following short survey: http://www.microsoft.com/learning/booksurvey. Your participation will help Microsoft Press create books that bettermeet your needs and your standards.Note  We hope that you will give us detailed feedback via our survey. Ifyou have questions about our publishing program, upcoming titles, or­Microsoft Press in general, we encourage you to interact with us via ­Twitterat http://twitter.com/MicrosoftPress. For support issues, use only the ­e-mail­address shown above.www.it-ebooks.info
  • 41. Part IPreparingfor ExchangeServer 2010Chapter 1 Introducing Exchange Server 2010  3Chapter 2 Exchange Deployment Projects  41Chapter 3 Exchange Environmental Considerations  73www.it-ebooks.info
  • 42. www.it-ebooks.info
  • 43. 3C H A P T E R 1Introducing Exchange­Server 2010n The History of Exchange Server  3n Overview of Exchange Server 2010  14n Exchange Server 2010 Service Pack 1  24n Exchange 2010 Editions and Licensing  28n Windows PowerShell and Exchange 2010  31This chapter introduces you to Exchange Server 2010, the most successful messagingsystem available today. Because Exchange 2010 is now the third generation of thismessaging product, you will read about what happened in the previous versions andwhy—in addition to developing new features and functionality—certain ­functionalitywas abandoned because of changes and evolving customer demands that occurredover time in the IT landscape.The overview section introduces several tools that you need to use to manage­Exchange 2010, provides an overview of the Exchange server roles, describes the­functionality that has been removed, the options that exist to mitigate now defunctfunctionality, and the difference between Exchange On-Premise and Exchange Online.This book includes functionality available only with Exchange 2010 Service Pack 1(SP1), so a section will provide you with an overview of the changes that have been­introduced by SP1 and in what chapters you can read detailed information about them.Understanding Exchange 2010 editions and licensing, which is important for­planning your organization’s license requirements, is also described, and a WindowsPowerShell 2.0 introduction with some useful cmdlets you need to remember while­reading this book completes the chapter.The History of Exchange ServerExchange Server has been in use since 1996, but it did not start with the productyou know today. Exchange Server has changed and evolved quite a lot to reflectthe change in IT since its introduction. In Exchange’s early days, hard disk space waswww.it-ebooks.info
  • 44. 4 CHAPTER 1 Introducing Exchange ­Server 2010­expensive—thus, single-instance storage was implemented in the Exchange store. Today harddisk space is cheap and a different technological focus is important.Throughout the years many Exchange versions have been released, and Table 1-1 providesan overview of all versions from the first release to Exchange 2010.Table 1-1  Exchange Versions OverviewVersion Code name(s) Release Date (RTM) GenerationExchange 4.0Exchange 5.0Exchange 5.5Spitfire (early 1990’s),­Mercury, Touchdown—Osmium or OzMarch 31, 1996February 27, 1997November 5, 1997First generationExchange 2000Exchange 2003Platinum or PtExchange.Net,Titanium or TiJuly 31, 2000June 30, 2003Second generationExchange 2007Exchange 2010E12E14December 8, 2006October 8, 2009Third generationThe Years Before ExchangeIn the early 1990s, many messaging systems were on the market. Messaging systems favoredby large companies, such as Siemens’s MailX, Digital Equipment’s ALL-IN-1, IBM PROFS, andPC LAN-based systems such as Lotus Notes, Lotus cc:Mail, and Novell GroupWise. The twostandard protocol standards in messaging were X.400 and the Internet standard SMTP. Backthen, X.400 was more common; SMTP was only gaining popularity because of the growth ofthe Internet community.With Microsoft Mail, Microsoft offered a file-based messaging system that stored all­messages in a file share where users accessed their mailboxes using the LAN. A Microsoft Mailserver installation was called a Post Office and it needed a Message Transfer Agent (MTA) tobe able to send messages between Microsoft Mail Post Offices. Limited versions of MicrosoftMail were also included in Windows 95 and Windows NT 4.0 that excluded the ability to routemessages between Post Offices.Microsoft Mail made its initial appearance in 1988. At that time, its network stack was­designed for AppleTalk Networks. The last version, Microsoft Mail v3.5, included a ­multitaskingMTA and was only released because the release of Exchange Server was ­delayed.Do you know why the Messaging Application Programming Interface (MAPI) was­developed? The problem was that at the time, Microsoft used different messaging systems:Internally they used their Xenix Mail System and externally they sold Microsoft Mail. Thusthere was a need to develop a protocol to connect different messaging systems to eachother, and thus MAPI was born. MAPI is actually an API, but many people refer to MAPI asa ­protocol the very same way as they refer to POP3. You can find more information aboutMAPI at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MAPI.www.it-ebooks.info
  • 45. The History of Exchange Server CHAPTER 1 5Notes from the FieldExchange 4.0 Beta: Codename TouchdownAndreas EssingDirector Microsoft Services, Siemens AG, GermanyIhad the first contact with Touchdown (project name of Exchange) in 1994. Duringthat time, we were actually working on getting a “Microsoft consulting business”within SIETEC Consulting (a subsidiary of Siemens Nixdorf) up and running. Thisapproach was not very successful until Microsoft delivered Exchange after two yearsof waiting.Between 1994 and 1996 we had several opportunities to test the software, ­startingwith TR 2 (the second test release of Touchdown). I remember one phone callfrom a Microsoft representative who proudly told me that a message could bedelivered between two Exchange servers. We had computers with 32 MB of mainmemory, Windows NT 3.1 Server, and the Exchange client running on Windows NT­Workstation or on Windows for Workgroups 3.11. I still remember the Public folderChess Application, an example of how to create an e-mail application using Exchange.In late 1996, we also had the chance to test the Exchange Web Connector (deliveredon two diskettes). This was the first time we could access the mailbox via a browser.Outlook was still in development, and the Exchange product group was not veryconvinced by Outlook, which was developed by the Office product group at Microsoft.Exchange Server Before Active DirectoryThe first generation of Exchange Servers had their own Directory Service integrated in theproduct and did not use a directory service provided with the operating system, such as­Active Directory. Exchange 4.0, 5.0, and 5.5 formed this Exchange generation.Notes from the FieldMigrating from Microsoft Mail 3.5 to Exchange 4.0Gary A. CooperSenior Systems Architect, Horizons Consulting Inc., United StatesIbegan working with Exchange 4.0 early in the beta cycle (I don’t recall the­specific ­version) at a customer organization. We had moved much of their­organization ­globally to Microsoft Mail (from nine other e-mail systems) and had tested­Exchange 4.0 in a lab environment for months. However, we did have a significant issuewww.it-ebooks.info
  • 46. 6 CHAPTER 1 Introducing Exchange ­Server 2010(otherw