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Presentation given in the 'Copyright and Technology: Digital Rights Management in the Field' session at Museum Computer Network conference, October 28, 2010.

Presentation given in the 'Copyright and Technology: Digital Rights Management in the Field' session at Museum Computer Network conference, October 28, 2010.

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Mcn 2010 brooklyn_museum_copyright_project_wythe Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Rights transparency The Brooklyn Museum Copyright Project Deborah Wythe MCN 2010 Burtynsky Show November 1, 2010 1
  • 2. Rights transparency The Brooklyn Museum Copyright Project Deborah Wythe MCN 2010 Burtynsky Show November 1, 2010 2
  • 3. Digital Lab Mission: Create, manage, make accessible and preserve digital images documenting the Museum collections, research resources, and activities.
  • 4. Digital Lab Mission: Create, manage, make accessible and preserve digital images documenting the Museum collections, research resources, and activities.
  • 5. Copyright project goals: • Make as much of the collection available as possible • with as few restrictions as possible • as openly as possible • while respecting the rights of the artists
  • 6. Joe Overstreet (American, born 1934). Power Flight, 1971. Acrylic on canvas with metal grommets and white rope, . Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. John de Menil, 72.165. © artist or artist's estate
  • 7. Joe Overstreet (American, born 1934). Power Flight, 1971. Acrylic on canvas with metal grommets and white rope, . Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. John de Menil, 72.165. © artist or artist's estate
  • 8. The “Bird Lady” on brooklynmuseum.org http://bit.ly/busrdM Female Figure, ca. 3500-3400 B.C.E. Terracotta, painted, 11 1/2 x 5 1/2 x 2 1/4 in. (29.2 x 14 x 5.7 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Charles Edwin Wilbour Fund, 07.447.505. Creative Commons-BY-NC
  • 9. http://bit.ly/aYYgUs Holy crow! that's the statue that was seen in Sunday's 1st Episode of the HBO show TrueBlood!! posted by Marlene F. Emmett 12:23 06/16/2009
  • 10. Step 1: understand the law (favorite resources) •Copyright and Cultural Institutions (Hirtle, Hudson, Kenyon) • The Public Domain (Fishman) • Copyright Term and the Public Domain in the United States (Hirtle)
  • 11. . . . and figure out how to apply it within our context • define Object Rights Types (ORTs) • work with TMS administrator to set up controlled vocabulary
  • 12. Set up ORTs inTMS
  • 13. Step 2: classify the art works and assign ORTs • 2D or 3D? • art or “useful object”? • dated? • artist dates? Maintain ORTs over time • review audit trail for relevant changes
  • 14. Step 3: clear legal hurdles • explain mission & goals • propose website text • understand legal counsel’s approach (you may need to explain it later) • review and revise • draft non-exclusive license • recognize and accept risk
  • 15. Step 4: the web interface • TMS data (ORT and rights statement) joins approved text and commentary via programming • boilerplate rights statements serve as placeholders until works cleared (“© artist or artist’s estate”)
  • 16. Step 5: obtain non-exclusive license • research contact information • generate letter and license • follow up • update TMS with rights status and approved rights statement • license now part of acquisitions process
  • 17. The problem: John La Farge (American, 1835-1910). Diadem Mountain at Sunset, Tahiti, 1891. Transparent and opaque watercolor, resin, on paper, 16 3/4 x 22 1/4 in. (42.5 x 56.5 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Frank L. Babbott, 19.80
  • 18. The solution: Interns! Develop a structure and procedure that are endlessly replicable. Martin Johnson Heade (American, 1819-1904). Two Humming Birds: "Copper-tailed Amazili," ca.1865-1875. Oil on canvas, 11 9/16 x 8 7/16 in. (29.3 x 21.5 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Dick S. Ramsay Fund, 64.208
  • 19. Process • research artists on the Web first, then in analog resources • record artists and contacts in an Access database • track activities in Access • use TMS reports and Word templates to generate letters and licenses • letters and licenses routed via staff member for review and continuity
  • 20. Strategize – select your targets • artists with multiple works • artists with works on view • artists included in upcoming shows • low-hanging fruit artists with websites & email contacts, living artists, artists who write to you for any reason • galleries that represent multiple artists
  • 21. Expand: • develop procedures for dealing with orphaned works • develop standards for researching copyright status of individual works • collaborate with staff in other museums to share research and results
  • 22. Results: • 5571 works (21%) by 372 artists (7.5%) cleared • six interns, Jan 2008 – August 2010 120-hour internships, all stayed on past the end date
  • 23. Added benefits
  • 24. Educate • give staff presentations about © • gatekeepers in Editorial and Design make sure that images are cleared • information is readily available in DAMS and online • be ready to answer questions
  • 25. Conclusions and observations • interactions with artists are positive • gallery representatives least likely to grant full non-exclusive license • finding estate contacts is most difficult • reaction to website and blog posts overwhelmingly positive • be willing to take the heat, revise and correct: perfection is not the goal
  • 26. The secret revealed: To insert the © symbol in TMS, type Alt + 0169 Happy end! Jean-Michel Othoniel: The Secret Happy End. [03/--/2010---/--/2---]. Installation view.
  • 27. RESOURCES Learn about copyright Copyright and Cultural Institutions: Guidelines for Digitization for U.S. Libraries, Archives, and Museums. Peter B. Hirtle, Emily Hudson, Andrew T. Kenyon E-book (free download): http://ecommons.cornell.edu/bitstream/1813/14142/2/Hirtle- Copyright_final_RGB_lowres-cover1.pdf Print: https://www.createspace.com/3405063 The Public Domain: How to Find & Use Copyright-Free Writings, Music, Art & More. Stephen Fishman Print or e-book: http://www.nolo.com/products/the-public-domain- PUBL.html
  • 28. RESOURCES U.S. Copyright Office, Copyright Information Center http://www.copyright.gov/ Copyright Term and the Public Domain in the United States (Hirtle) http://www.copyright.cornell.edu/resources/publicdomain.cfm Cornell University Copyright Information Center http://www.copyright.cornell.edu/resources/ Columbia University: Copyright Quick Guide http://copyright.columbia.edu/copyright/copyright-in- general/copyright-quickguide/ Fair Use, Center for Social Media, American University http://www.centerforsocialmedia.org/fair-use
  • 29. RESOURCES Rights and Reproductions Information Network http://www.rarin.org/index.php?title=Main_Page VRA Intellectual Property Rights News http://vraiprnews.wordpress.com/ College Art Association: IP resources http://www.collegeart.org/ip/ Copyright Watch: monitors international laws http://www.copyright-watch.org/
  • 30. RESOURCES Was it registered? The Catalog of Copyright Entries, published volumes of copyright registrations and renewals prior to 1978 http://onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu/cce/ Online registration and renewal information, 1978 to present http://www.copyright.gov/records/ Find artist contacts: The WATCH File (Writers, Artists and Their Copyright Holders, University of Texas, Austin) http://tyler.hrc.utexas.edu/index.cfm Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Rights and Restrictions http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/res/rights.html
  • 31. RESOURCES Does a licensing organization control rights? ARS -- Artists Rights Society http://www.arsny.com/ VAGA – Visual Artists and Galleries Association, Inc. http://www.vagarights.com/ Researching artists: MUSIP: Museum IP Yahoo group http://groups.yahoo.com/group/musip/ Social Security Death Index http://ssdi.rootsweb.ancestry.com/ CAA Obituaries http://www.collegeart.org/news/category/obituaries/ International Foundation for Art Research: catalogues raisonnés http://www.ifar.org/cat_rais.php Catalogue Raisonne Association http://www.catalogueraisonne.org/CRSAmemberlist.pdf
  • 32. RESOURCES The Brooklyn Museum copyright project http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/community/blogosphere/bloggers /tag/copyright Working Guidelines for the Copyright Project Little Images, Big Art Copyright is Complicated Doing the Right Thing Deborah Wythe Head of Digital Collections and Services deborah.wythe@brooklynmuseum.org or copyright@brooklynmuseum.org