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  • 1. Finding Your Voice
    It’s A Matter of Style
  • 2. Your Voice is Unique
    Do you merely see grass or countless summertime memories?
  • 3. Your voice is a unique blend of…
    • Your life experiences
    • 4. How you view the world—humor, sarcasm, irony, optimism, negativity
    • 5. What you choose to draw your audience’s attention to
    • 6. What you find important to share
    • 7. Your word choice
    • 8. How you say what you say (diction)
    • 9. Your syntax
    • 10. How you word your sentences (structure)
  • How Do I find my Voice?
    Your style and voice come from within
    slowdown, still yourself, and listen—“Psst…hey, I’m trying to tell you something over here.”
    Don’t ignore your voice: tap into it.
    Your voice comes from YOU
    Don’t try to write like someone else. It will sound unnatural, stilted.
    Write as honestly as possible.
    What do you really think about that song?
    Your style will emerge naturally.
    Trustthe process.
  • 11. So How does this Apply?
    You’ve summarized, paraphrased, and quoted from your sources. Now what?
    It’s time to hear from you…
    What “big idea” do you think the artist was imparting on the listener?
    How do you think the triggering event changed the political culture in our country?
    Why do you think the song is still relevant today?
    Remember—you chose the song for a reason, now tell us why!
  • 12. Writing Tips
    What can I do to make my writing flow smoothly and come to life?
  • 13. UsEthe 5 senses
    Remember these?
    Sight, sound, touch, smell, and taste
    Why do we need to use the senses in a song analysis?
    The back story of the song is filled with intrigue, mystery, horror, suspense, or the unbelievable. Let the reader experience it firsthand.
    Drop them into the world that spawned the song. Let them feel Ed Gein’s sofa made of human flesh, see Matthew Shepard tied to the fencepost splayed like a scarecrow, taste the blood in Rodney King’s mouth during his brutal beating by the police.
  • 14. What a Difference these Senses Make!
    Without the sense (yawn)
    With the senses (wow!)
    Matthew Shepard was tied to the fencepost, and he looked like a scarecrow to passersby.
    Ed Gein made furniture out of the skin of his victims.
    With life and vitality bludgeoned out of him, Matthew Shepard’s body stood as lifeless as a scarecrow, appearing to passersby as nothing more than a farmer’s attempt to protect his crops against an annoying flock of birds.
    “New leather chair, Ed?” one may have asked innocently, stroking the hide’s smooth, cool texture. Little did anyone know that her name was Mary.
    Which is more visual?
    Can you feel it?
  • 15. Use Diction
    When any old word won't do…
    Words are an author’s tools to shape, color, and mold the richness of the text he/she is creating.
    Choose your words wisely, just as an artist carefully selects his brush and a color from his palette.
  • 16. what does Diction Look like?
    Appeal to emotion with connotative language
    House vs. home, beat vs. torture, scared vs. terrified
    Use active verbs to avoid passive writing
    He was hoping thatno one would smell…
    vs.
    He prayed no one smelled…
    Paint a picture
    use vivid, fresh, original thoughts
    Avoid redundancy
    don’t beat the dead horse
    Use natural words. Technical words jolt the reader.
    Avoid unnecessary words which bog down the sentence, stripping away the immediacy.
    that, so, just
  • 17. Use Syntax
    The words, the order, the flow…
    Don’t bore your reader with the same old line…Vary your sentence structure.
    Instead of…
    Mellencampgrew up in rural Indiana…
    Mellencamphas used his music to draw…
    Mellencamphas been involved in Farm Aid.
    Try…
    Growing up in rural Indiana…
    As a result, Mellencamp has used his music…
    For several years, this song artist has been involved in Farm Aid.
  • 18. Use Conjunctions
    They are your friends!
    Conjunctive Adverbs
    Subordinating Conjunctions
    also, besides, indeed
    likewise, as a result
    furthermore, in addition
    undoubtedly, now, meanwhile, still, nonetheless
    in fact, certainly
    nevertheless, instead,
    however, then, finally
    as long as, so that, since, now that, unless
    rather than, as, if, though, provided
    until, when, even if
    as though, because, whereas, whether
    before, once, if only
  • 19. Changing direction…What about those transitions?
    Why not try those nifty conjunctions you just reviewed?
  • 20. Use Transitions
    Change directions…
    Maybe use those nifty conjunctions?
    Focus on blending the discussion of the song lyrics, song analysis, poetic devices, and literary devices.
    Choose your most powerful points.
    You need not use all of them. Don’t overwhelm the reader.
    Blend them together naturally for maximum impact.
    Example (transitions underlined):
    In her song titled “Scarecrow,” Melissa Etheridge repetitively uses the word “scarecrow” as a metaphor for Matthew Shepard (“Scarecrow,” line12). While scarecrows are harmless, they are feared by predators. Through the use of this metaphor, Etheridge imparts to the listener that an innocent man was feared by his assailants simply for living a lifestyle different from theirs. In addition, Etheridge’s tone suggests…
  • 21. More on Transitioning…
    Today you’re focusing on blending the discussion of the song lyrics, song analysis, poetic devices, and literary devices.
    Choose your most powerful points. You need not use all of them. Don’t overwhelm the reader.
    Blend them together naturally for maximum impact.
    For example: In her song titled “Scarecrow,” Melissa Etheridge repetitively uses the word “scarecrow” as a metaphor for Matthew Shepard (“Scarecrow,” line12). While scarecrows are harmless, they are feared by predators. Through the use of this metaphor, Etheridge imparts to the listener that an innocent man was feared by his assailants simply for living a lifestyle different from theirs. In addition, Etheridge’s tone suggests…
  • 22. It’s Your voice & it’s your choice
    Now, get busy!