Gamification, Personalisation, Brand Loyalty and Profitable CSR in an OMNI WOrld

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Gamification is still a very embryonic and poorly understood phenomenon which I believe will have to shift away from the current focus on extrinsic motivators such as points, badges and leaderboards into strategies which develop intrinsic motivation based on self-management and an ability to take control of and responsibility for personal lifestyle. If the radio interview I heard yesterday about the pressure on GPs is anything to go by, retailers and suppliers involved in delivering lifestyle related products and services will play a vital role in shaping the future health of the nation in ways which leverage CSR to increase not only brand image but also long term profitability.

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Gamification, Personalisation, Brand Loyalty and Profitable CSR in an OMNI WOrld

  1. 1. Gamification, Personalisation, Brand Loyalty and Profitable CSR in an OMNI World Personalised Incentives Over a decade ago I was listening to Radio 4 in my car when I heard an interview with the newly appointed Govt. E-Envoy, Alex Allan, talking about his mission to encourage small businesses in the UK to use the potential of the internet in order to compete in a global economy. To illustrate his point, he spoke about how Amazon was able to deliver the same kind of personalised service to its customers as he used to receive in his local record shop where they knew him and his music preferences and would suggest new releases he might like. Surprisingly for a politician, he volunteered his email address at the end of the interview and the next day (around 7:00 am on a Saturday morning) I took advantage of his generosity and sent him an email about the Govt funded project called ComKnet (Community Commerce and Knowledge Network) that I had initiated in my rural community in Leicestershire. The substance of my message to him was that, whilst I agreed with his argument about the merits of the internet and Amazon’s personalised e-commerce strategy, he should not forget that every Amazon purchase is potentially a lost sale to the local community’s retailers. My email went on to describe how the ComKnet project was designed to help local communities use web and other technologies to support intra-community trading and knowledge transfer. I was somewhat
  2. 2. staggered and mightily impressed when I received a personal reply from him within an hour, leading to an invitation to visit him in Downing Street to record an interview for the ComKNet project. Alex Allan ComKnet Interview Shot The Comknet Video is still accessible on YouTube at :- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8hm4AkNbTlM Today, I buy all my DVDs and many other items through Amazon, not because of their personalised prompting, but because of the convenience, availability, accessibility and reliability of their service. Although I have never been a loyalty card devotee, I have recently become aware of how the retail sector are increasingly using the same personalisation strategies to support their Omni marketing strategies and I am now a regular user of my Tesco Clubcard and have even changed my bank from HSBC to Nationwide because of the loyalty incentives they offer. In Tesco’s case, I use the vouchers I receive and recognise the fact that these voucher offers are personalised to me based on my previous purchases linked to the ClubCard. I have also noticed that Nationwide ATMs remember my typical previous cash withdrawal patterns and use that to assist my new transactions. Loyalty cards and the adoption of personalisation of Point of Sale activities are a good example of the gamification strategies supporting brand development and marketing. My activities and work with Gamification and Enabling Technologies lead me to predict that this combination of game mechanics/methodologies/psychologies and rapidly maturing digital technologies such as the internet of things, big data analytics and cloud computing will result in an increasing number of strategic win-win partnerships and a focus on profitable Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) as a differentiator in an Omni World.
  3. 3. Tesco’s Health and Wellbeing App A good example of this trend is Tesco’s health and wellbeing application and support for Diabetes UK which brings together a number of disciplines and stakeholders to deliver products and services that use gamification strategies for societal benefits and link Tesco’s brand to worthwhile causes as well as potentially providing incentives at point of sale to influence lifestyles. Points, Badges and Leaderboards
  4. 4. Gamification is still a very embryonic and poorly understood phenomenon which I believe will have to shift away from the current focus on extrinsic motivators such as points, badges and leaderboards into strategies which develop intrinsic motivation based on self-management and an ability to take control of and responsibility for personal lifestyle. If the radio interview I heard yesterday about the pressure on GPs is anything to go by, retailers and suppliers involved in delivering lifestyle related products and services will play a vital role in shaping the future health of the nation in ways which leverage CSR to increase not only brand image but also long term profitability. David Wortley FRSA GAETSS www.gaetss.com

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