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Social Learning Strategy V2

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This is a presentation I did on October 7th, 2009 for the ASTD Benchmarking Forum. …

This is a presentation I did on October 7th, 2009 for the ASTD Benchmarking Forum.

The topic is Social Learning Strategies, specifically how best to blend these with more traditional formal learning models. This is the first time I publicly presented the ECCO model, an approach that accounts for emergent, collaborative and formal learning needs.

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  • 1. Social Learning
    Strategies, Models, and Roles
    David Wilkins
    Executive Director of Product Marketing at Learn.com
    October 7th, 2009
  • 2. About Dave
    2
    Dave Wilkins
    Executive Director, Product Marketing
    • National speaker at 40+ conferences
    • 3. More than 15 years in the learning space
    • 4. Author of 10+ published articles
    • 5. Visionary behind Firefly and Knowledge Exchange
    Email: david.wilkins@learn.com
    Twitter: @dwilkinsnh
    Facebook, AIM, LinkedIn: dwilkinsnh
    Blog: http://dwilkinsnh.wordpress.com
  • 6. Show of hands
    How many of you have professional contacts outside the company? Outside the country?
    How many of you work on a virtual team where at least one member of your team (including yourself) works in a different office, division, or country?
    How many of you work on teams where decision-making isn’t just top-down, but also bottoms-up and peer-to-peer?
    How many of you rely on Google or other search mechanism to find information to do your jobs every day?
    How many of you still rely on MS documents to share info?
    How many of you still deliver training predominantly through instructor-led training and courses?
  • 7. My networks (images of kids, Dad etc…, Twitter, FB, LinkedIn, Jay Cross)
  • 8. Networks – some market data and stats
  • 9. My social media – blog, Twitter, FB, LinkedIn, SlideShare, delicious, Flickr, YouTube
  • 10. Social Media - stats
  • 11. My story
  • 12. What’s going on here?
    1 : 1
    1 : Many
    Many : Many
    Model
    Time
    1900’s
     1900’s
    2000 
  • 13. A New Model? Inverse Pyramid
    10
    Many : Many
    One : Many
    Jay Cross and Harold Jarche
  • 14. Typing your learning needs
    The Social Enterprise Blog
  • 15. Emergent Initiatives
    To what extent will your business or initiative be dependent on the creation of new ideas, new processes, new products, or new services to drive key performance indicators?
    How much of your team’s intellectual effort will be expended in solving novel challenges or problems?
    How much of your team’s intellectual effort will be spent creating new solutions to existing problems or new problems?
    What percentage of your team’s best practices will need to be based on principles and theory (as opposed to concrete steps and rote processes)?
    What percentage of your best practices will emerge “from the trenches”?
    To what extent will you need to rely on knowledge sharing among diverse groups either within or outside the company walls to drive key performance indicators?
    When you think about a core contributor on your team, how much of his or her expertise is a result of superior synthesis, invention, or sense-making sorts of skills?
    For the majority of your core initiatives, how important is a diversity of perspective or expertise in achieving your project goals or key performance indicators?
    In terms of succession planning and talent identification, what percentage of your existing “experts” and leaders were identified because of the admiration and esteem of peers?
    How often do coordination and issue resolution happen through the ad hoc assembly of networked teams or individuals (versus through formal hierarchies)?
    12
  • 16. Codified Initiatives
    13
    To what extent will your business or initiative dependent on the efficient execution of known best practices or processes to drive key performance indicators?
    How much of your team’s intellectual effort will be spent training on known best practices and processes?
    How much of your team’s intellectual effort will be expended in ensuring adherence to known best practices or processes?
    What percentage of your team’s best practices will need to be based on established steps and rote processes?
    What percentage of your best practices will emerge “from on high” – SME’s, senior leaders, compliance officers etc…?
    To what extent will you rely on efficient execution of homogenous, geographically co-located teams to drive key performance indicators?
    When you think about a core contributor on your team, how much of his or her value is a result of the correct application of accepted processes, rules, or physically repetitive actions?
    For the majority of your core initiatives, how important are a shared perspective and acceptance of authority in driving key performance indicators?
    In terms of succession planning and talent identification, what percentage of your existing “experts” and leaders were identified through longevity, established metrics, or manager opinion?
    How often does coordination and issue resolution happen through existing teams and formal hierarchies?
  • 17. Collaborative Initiatives
    14
    To what extent will your business or initiative be dependent on collaboration to drive key performance indicators? (10%, 20% etc…)
    How much of your team’s execution is dependent on specialized knowledge?
    How much of your team’s execution is dependent on the sharing and coordination of distributed expertise?
    How much of your team’s intellectual effort will be expended in collaborating to develop known best practices or processes?
    What percentage your best practices and domain expertise are known in “pockets” organized by geography, shared interest, or network affiliations?
    What percentage of your best practices will emerge “from group consensus”?
    To what extent is your team organized around common job roles and functions? (Retail or early childhood education would be 90% or more - identical job roles in multiple physical locations.)
    What percentage of the problems faced by your team members are likely faced by other team members in identical job roles?
    When you think about a core contributor on your team, how much of his or her value and influence is a result socially recognized expertise?
    To what extent are key performance indicators driven by socially-validated domain knowledge?
  • 18. Reality? Learning paradigms are blended
    15
    Leadership  Collaborative, Formal, & Emergent
    Software training  Formal & Emergent
    Certification and Compliance training  Formal
    On-boarding  Formal, Collaborative & Emergent
    Customer “training” and “support”  Formal? Emergent? Collaborative?
    Innovation  Emergent & Collaborative
  • 19. How does this map to various interventions?
    *When enabled for all employees
    **When written by SME’s and official experts
  • 20. 17
    Problem
    Results
    Background
    500% ROI in under 6 months
    Weekly and daily use of the system
    Documentation of common issues at marginal cost
    Documentation of specialized knowledge at marginal cost
    Culture of sharing
    All 4400 Ace stores are independently owned and operated by local entrepreneurs, hard-working, passionate business owners who are involved with and, many times, reside in the communities where their stores are. There's a good chance you'll see your local Ace store owner at the grocery store or Little League game.
    Geographically dispersed expertise
    Specialized products and product knowledge across a huge inventory
    Common roles, common needs but no way to capture knowledge
    Constant change and new info sometimes daily
    Independent owners
    A Collaborative Example
  • 21. 18
    Problem
    Results
    Background
    iZone generated 400 ideas and 10,000 contributions
    iZone led to the identification of $3 billion in market opportunities
    iPrize awarded last October to German grad student leading an international team
    Cisco plans to invest $10+ billion in the winning idea
    “We just did three billion-dollar market opportunities without my knowing about it."
    – John ChambersCisco Systems
    Two Initiatives
    iZone
    Internally-facing innovation initiative
    iPrize
    Externally-facing innovation initiative
    Driving innovation to develop new markets and new products
    In 2004, Cisco’s Emerging Technologies Group was charged with building $1B business opportunities from scratch
    An Emergent and Blended Example
  • 22. One example: software rollout
    Blog Posts
    Twitter
    Video
    Advertorials
    Brown Bags
    Contests
    Ask an Expert

    Courses
    Simulations
    Blogs
    Surveys
    Assessments
    Links
    Games

    Simulations
    Games
    Courses
    ILT
    VILT
    Curriculum
    Assessment
    Certification

    Discussion
    Ratings
    Reviews
    Ask an Expert
    FAQ
    Blogs
    Comments
    CoP
    Chat
    Microblogging

    Idea sharing
    Discussions
    Wikis
    Blogs
    Comments
    Brown Bags

    Blogs
    FAQ’s
    Discussions
    Email (Gasp!)
    Microblogging

    Simulations
    Games
    Courses
    ILT
    VILT
    Curriculum
    Assessment
    Certification

    Corp Comm
    Instructor-ledWBT training
    New Best Practices
    Instructor-ledVirtual ClassroomWBT
    Go Live
    Pre-work
    DiscussionRatingsReviews
    Corp CommUpdatesNew informationFAQ’s
    Formal
    Social
    Formal
  • 23. Are you the pipe or the plumber?
    20
  • 24. What do these things have in common?
    21
  • 25. What happened?
    22
    =
    The Big Switch – Nicholas Carr
  • 26. What’s happening?
    23
    =
  • 27. What’s next?
    24
    =
  • 28. What do these companies have in common?
    25
  • 29. Guidepost #1 – News Media
    26
  • 30. Guidepost #2 -- Encyclopedias
    27
  • 31. Guidepost #3 – Cisco, P&G, Eli Lily, Starbucks, Dell
    28
  • 32. Thank you
    David Wilkins
    http://dwilkinsnh.wordpress.com
    dwilkinsnh on Twitter, Facebook etc…

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