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Thanksgiving:  the Rest of the Story
Thanksgiving:  the Rest of the Story
Thanksgiving:  the Rest of the Story
Thanksgiving:  the Rest of the Story
Thanksgiving:  the Rest of the Story
Thanksgiving:  the Rest of the Story
Thanksgiving:  the Rest of the Story
Thanksgiving:  the Rest of the Story
Thanksgiving:  the Rest of the Story
Thanksgiving:  the Rest of the Story
Thanksgiving:  the Rest of the Story
Thanksgiving:  the Rest of the Story
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Thanksgiving: the Rest of the Story

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In school, we learn about Thanksgiving at the third grade level. Teachers make it sound like a fairy tale about pilgrims with buckles on the hats and peaceful natives who greet them with open arms. …

In school, we learn about Thanksgiving at the third grade level. Teachers make it sound like a fairy tale about pilgrims with buckles on the hats and peaceful natives who greet them with open arms.

But there is a lot more to the history of Thanksgiving that we never learn. In this presentation, I present historical facts about the holiday to help us understand what the world was like in 1620 and what motivated a group of "pilgrims" to embark on a dangerous one-way voyage across the North Atlantic.

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Transcript

  • 1. Why Thanksgiving? Thanksgiving November 28, 2013 David W. Humphrey Information source: Wikipedia
  • 2. Why Thanksgiving? In school, they teach us the 3rd grade version of Thanksgiving. Now it’s time for the rest of the story…
  • 3. The World in 1620 In England • Church = state • Religious unrest in England and persecution of dissenters • Puritans were members of the Church, but sought to reform it (settled Boston in 1629) • Separatists believed Church of England was corrupt and wanted to worship separately • Some separatists fled to Leyden (NL) for religious freedom In the New World • Jamestowne settlement (Virginia) 1607 • New Amsterdam (Dutch) 1609 1603: King James I of England King James VI of Scots Claimed King of France
  • 4. What motivated the Pilgrims? Why colonize the New World? • Separatists first emigrate to Leyden (NL) for religious tolerance, but worry about future of their settlement. • 1618: Petition the King for a “patent” to settle “northern Virginia” - mouth of Hudson River close to tolerant Dutch settlements. • 1620: Virginia Company, “merchant adventurers” finance voyage and new settlement with the goal of finding and importing gold, silver, animal skins to England.
  • 5. The Journey to the New World London investors finance the 1620 voyage • May: Speedwell sails with Separatists from Leyden to South Hampton, joined there by investors and London recruits on Mayflower • Speedwell abandoned in Plymouth, England due to leaks • August: Mayflower continues alone with 35 Separatists & 67 non-Separatist Londoners • Remaining Separatists return to Leyden Destination: Mouth of the Hudson River
  • 6. Why Plymouth? Landing in the New World • November 11: Anchor in Provincetown (Cape Cod) • December: Continue to mainland, land at Plymouth Rock • Decision to remain here instead of continuing to Hudson River • Aboard ship signing of the Mayflower Compact – legal structure for Plymouth Colony until 1691 1630 Provincetown Barrington Kennedys
  • 7. “Plimouth” Plantation Establishing the colony • Mayflower remains through first winter. Colonists sleep aboard while Common House is built. • February 1621: Horrible conditions. Half the colony (50 people) dies of sickness or starvation. • April 1621: Mayflower returns to England with small cargo of beaver skins and sassafras.
  • 8. “Plimouth” Plantation Meeting the natives • Occasional contact with friendly natives, but also attacks. • February 1621: Samoset, Englishspeaking native, walks into settlement with words of “welcome!” • Gradually more contact to Squanto, Massasoit, chief of Wampanoag tribe • Alliance of settlers with Wampanoag against other tribes (Narragansett)
  • 9. The First Thanksgiving First successes • Summer 1621: successful harvest • November: Fortune arrives with 35 new settlers • Massasoit’s visit with 90 men coincides with colony’s harvest feast First Thanksgiving attended by 53 settlers and 90 natives! “And besids water foule, ther was great store of wild Turkies, of which they took many…” -- William Bradford
  • 10. Aftermath The colony grows • 1622: Additional settlers arrive on the Anne and Little James • 1623: Most of original Leyden congregation makes it to Plymouth • 1624: 180 settlers in Plymouth, 32 houses plus Common House • 1668: Thanksgiving becomes an annual festival in the colonies • 1789: George Washington proclaims first nation Thanksgiving celebration • 1863: President Abraham Lincoln establishes Thanksgiving as national holiday Plimoth Village
  • 11. Happy Thanksgiving!
  • 12. Thanksgiving Glossary Plimouth Plantation Nauset The Mayflower The Speedwell Miles Standish Massasoit Pilgrim Fathers Plymouth Rock Plymouth Rock Narragansett William Bradford Samoset The Separatists Sagamore New Amsterdam “Adventure” capital Jamestowne Provincetown The Mayflower Compact Thievish Harbor King James I Bermuda Stephen Hopkins Wampanoag Squanto

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