Agile learning agile 2010
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Agile learning agile 2010

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This slide deck is about nurturing a learning culture with an agile team. The main ideas are that effective learning is what enables teams to respond to change and deliver exception value. The ...

This slide deck is about nurturing a learning culture with an agile team. The main ideas are that effective learning is what enables teams to respond to change and deliver exception value. The presentation highlights some key

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  • IntroductionLearning about the difference between red and black rings on the stove:Good Things- Immediate feedback- Lasting learning lessonNo so good things Not safe Could have learned with less cost with someone more experiencedRetrospectiveMain Point:Learning is long-term value building deeper capacity to respond to changeMake learning intentionalFocus on both pragmatic and long-term learningAsk questions, have meaningful retrospectives, make it safeTitleChinese symbol for learningLeft symbol means “study” and is comprised of 2 symbols: the top symbol means to accumulate knowledge and the bottom part represents a child in a doorway.Right symbol is for “practice constantly” where the top symbol represents a bird leaving its nest and the bottom symbol implies youth.Learning is ongoing and Art Kleiner suggests this means “mastery of the way of self-improvement”. In the context of agile teams we might say that team learning is the “collective mastery of the way of team improvement”To build learning culture: Open individual and team R brains Understand learning styles Focus on 5 disciplines Understand and apply the Dreyfus stages of skill acquisition Understand and apply the Satir Change Model to understand impact of change and allow time for the radishes to grow. Learning patterns
  • TitleChinese symbol for learningLeft symbol means “study” and is comprised of 2 symbols: the top symbol means to accumulate knowledge and the bottom part represents a child in a doorway.Right symbol is for “practice constantly” where the top symbol represents a bird leaving its nest and the bottom symbol implies youth.Learning is ongoing and Art Kleiner suggests this means “mastery of the way of self-improvement”. In the context of agile teams we might say that team learning is the “collective mastery of the way of team improvement”Main Point:Learning is long-term value building deeper personal and team capacity to respond to changeMake learning intentionalFocus on both pragmatic and long-term learningMake it safe, build trustAsk questions, have meaningful retrospectivesTo build learning culture: Open individual and team R brains Understand learning styles Focus on 5 disciplines Understand and apply the Dreyfus stages of skill acquisition Understand and apply the Satir Change Model to understand impact of change and allow time for the radishes to grow. Learning patterns
  • Ascending fulfillment up Maslow’s hierarchy of needsAscending Dreyfus model of skills acquisitionAdapting to and transcending change
  • Personal masteryDiscipline of personal growth and learning grounded in competence & skillsLiving from a creative rather than a reactive viewpointContinually:clarifying what is important to usLearning how to see reality more clearlyMental modelsShared VisionTeam LearningSystems Thinking
  • Stand upFace each otherFace the person and tell them your 1) name, 2) how many children in your family, and 3) the most challenging thing you faced as a child.If you feel uncomfortable with 3rd question chose something less challenging or passHelps build empathy between team members.Helps people share their strengths, weaknesses and opinions.Gets people vulnerable but is a safe way; separated in time and place.Also people tend to attribute other’s success to their environment and less on their personal strengths; but they attribute failures to other peoples character.We do the opposite for ourselves. “Fundamental attribution error” – social psychology.In this exercise we come to understand each other at more fundamental level.There is more of a chance that empathy and understanding will trump judgment and accusation when interpreting questionable behaviour.Debrief:How did that change how you feel?Did it change your understanding of the other person?Do you now feel more or less safe?DescriptionWhen we are trying to understand and explain what happens in social settings, we tend to view behavior as a particularly significant factor. We then tend to explain behavior in terms of internal disposition, such as personality traits, abilities, motives, etc. as opposed to external situational factors.This can be due to our focus on the person more than their situation, about which we may know very little. We also know little about how they are interpreting the situation.Western culture exacerbates this error, as we emphasize individual freedom and autonomy and are socialized to prefer dispositional factors to situational ones.When we are playing the role of observer, which is largely when we look at others, we make this fundamental attribution error. When we are thinking about ourselves, however, we will tend to make situational attributions.ResearchEdward Jones and Victor Harris (1967) asked people to assess a person’s pro- or anti-Castro feelings given an essay a person had written. Even when the people were told the person had been directed to write pro- or anti- arguments, the people still assumed the author believed what they were writing.ExampleI assume you have not done much today because you are lazy, rather than perhaps tired or lack the right resources.So what?Using itBeware of people blaming you for things outside of your control. Also watch out for people doing it to you. You can make friends and build trust when individuals are blamed by others, by showing that you understand how it is not to do with their personality.DefendingWatch how others make attributions. When they seem to go against the trend and be in your favor, be curious about their motives.
  • Stage 1: Late Status QuoThe group is at a familiar place. The performance pattern is consistent. Stable relationships give members a sense of belonging and identity. Members know what to expect, how to react, and how to behave. Stage 2: ResistanceThe group confronts a foreign element that requires a response. Often imported by a small minority seeking change, this element brings the members whose opinions count the most face to face with a crucial issue. A foreign element threatens the stability of familiar power structures. Most members BBresist by denying its validity, avoiding the issue, or blaming someone for causing the problem. These blocking tactics are accompanied by unconscious physical responses, such as shallow breathing and closed posture. Resistance clogs awareness and conceals the desires highlighted by the foreign element. For example, a powerful minority within the marketing department of a tool manufacturer engages a consultant to do a market survey. She finds a disturbing trend: A growing number of clients believe that a competitor is producing superior quality products at a lower price. Middle and upper management vehemently deny the findings and dispute the validity of the survey methods. But after a series of frank discussions with key clients, upper management accepts the findings. They develop a vision for propelling the company into a position as the industry leader in product quality and support. Members in this stage need help opening up, becoming aware, and overcoming the reaction to deny, avoid or blame. Stage 3: ChaosThe group enters the unknown. Relationships shatter: Old expectations may no longer be valid; old reactions may cease to be effective; and old behaviors may not be possible. The loss of belonging and identity triggers anxiousness and vulnerability. On occasion, these feelings may set off nervous disorders such as shaking, dizziness, tics, and rashes. Members may behave uncharacteristically as they revert to childhood survival rules. For instance, a manufacturing company cancels the development of a major new product, reduces the number of employees, and reorganizes. Many of the surviving employees lose their ability to concentrate for much of the day. Desperately seeking new relationships that offer hope, the employees search for different jobs. Both manufacturing yield and product quality takes a nosedive. Managers of groups experiencing chaos should plan for group performance to plummet during this stage. Until the members accept the foreign element, members form only halfhearted relationships with each other. Chaos is the period of erratic performance that mirrors the search for a beneficial relationship to the foreign element. All members in this stage need help focusing on their feelings, acknowledging their fear, and using their support systems. Management needs special help avoiding any attempt to short circuit this stage with magical solutions. The chaos stage is vital to the transformation process. Stage 4: IntegrationThe members discover a transforming idea that shows how the foreign element can benefit them. The group becomes excited. New relationships emerge that offer the opportunity for identity and belonging. With practice, performance improves rapidly. For instance, an experienced accounting group must convert to a new computer system. The group resists the new system fearing it will turn them into novices. But the members eventually discover that skill with this widely used system increases their value in the marketplace. Believing that the change may lead to salary increases or better jobs, the members begin a vigorous conversion to the new system. Awareness of new possibilities enables authorship of new rules that build functional reactions, expectations, and behaviors. Members may feel euphoric and invincible, as the transforming idea may be so powerful that it becomes a panacea. Members in this stage need more support than might be first thought. They can become frustrated when things fail to work perfectly the first time. Although members feel good, they are also afraid that any transformation might mysteriously evaporate disconnecting them from their new relationships and plunging them back into chaos. The members need reassurance and help finding new methods for coping with difficulties. Stage 5: New Status QuoIf the change is well conceived and assimilated, the group and its environment are in better accord and performance stabilizes at a higher level than in the Late Status Quo. A healthy group is calm and alert. Members are centered with more erect posture and deeper breathing. They feel free to observe and communicate what is really happening. A sense of accomplishment and possibility permeates the atmosphere. In this stage, the members continue to need to feel safe so they can practice. Everyone, manager and members, needs to encourage each other to continue exploring the imbalances between the group and its environment so that there is less resistance to change. I've observed groups, after many change cycles, become learning organizations–they learn how to cope with change. The members of these organizations are not threatened or anxious about the types of situations that they used to experience as foreign element. Instead, these situations excite and motivate them. For example, the customer services group of a computer manufacturer learns to adapt their repair policies and techniques to any new product. Supporting a new computer system used to scare the group but not anymore. Management communicates and reinforces the vision of seamless new product support. Some members influence the design of support features for the new products. Other members plan and teach training courses. All members provide feedback to improve the process. Postscript: Coping With ChangeVirginia Satir's Change Model describes the change patterns she saw during therapy with families. In my experience, the patterns she describes occur with any group of people when confronted by change. I use this model to select how to help a group make a successful transformation from an Old Status Quo to a New Status Quo. Table 1 summarizes my suggestions on how to help during each stage of the change model: StageDescriptionHow to Help1 Late Status Quo Encourage people to seek improvement information and concepts from outside the group. 2 Resistance Help people to open up, become aware, and overcome the reaction to deny, avoid or blame. 3 Chaos Help build a safe environment that enables people to focus on their feelings, acknowledge their fear, and use their support systems. Help management avoid any attempt to short circuit this stage with magical solutions. 4 Integration Offer reassurance and help finding new methods for coping with difficulties. 5 New Status Quo Help people feel safe so they can practice. Table 1. Actions for each stage that will help a group change more quickly and effectively. The actions in Table 1 will help people cope. Actions that inhibit coping retards an organization's ability to make core changes. These organization are resisting the fundamental foreign element of change. But organizations that create a safe environment where people are encouraged to cope increase their capacity for change and are much more able to respond effectively to whatever challenges are thrown their way. http://wiki.systemsthinking.net/Systemsthinking/SatirChangeModel.htmlSystemsThinking.nethomeaboutpublicationswikicopyrightSatirChangeModelSystemEffectiveness depends on how a system trades off the many pressures it experiences. Some pressures are environmental, some are cultural and some come from interactions with other systems. Before getting into any human or cultural specific issues, we may want some mathematical framework for organizational and cultural models. Expressing system effectiveness in terms of density, approximating it as changing continuously over time and trying differential equations for describing patterns in system effectiveness seems a reasonable first approach. And perhaps we find some possibly (re)useful measurements for those non-clouded bubbles in a DiagramOfEffects and for grounding anticipated YaDaYa problems? The Virginia Satir Change Model focuses not just on systems of people but also on individual people, making it a robust model, safe for NetworkFlowMath. This page was created from experiences and learnings in Satir Systems programmeshttp://www.satirsystems.com/ and on the job. Copyright for the model remains with the Satir Institute of the Southeast. Late status quo describes a fairly stable system (individual or group) where occurrences are predictable, familiar and comfortable. This may mean things are working reasonably well, or it may mean that there are familiar solutions (better or worse) for common problems. For members, it does represent some level of success. While the system at this stage is balanced, different parts of the system pay different prices to maintain this balance. This can be compared to the role played by some children who keep a family stable by acting out or repressing their feelings in particular ways. And, like with children, the impact of this maintenance on any particular part of the system may be indicated by the unhealthy symptoms revealed in it's functioning. In an organizational context, late status quo generally refers to a system where things have stayed the same for a long time. Members of the system know 'what to do' and 'how to do it' and understand where they fit. They may or may not be satisfied with their place and activities, but they are comfortable. Depending on the specific circumstances, attitudes may range from general acceptance, to boredom (yah, I know how to do all that ...) to frustration and complaining (blaming and placating as people find ways to get things done in a dysfunctional system). Some people may be looking for changes. Either from within or without, a foreign element that was not a part of the status quo appears, and threatens to shake up the status quo. In an organizational context, a foreign element can be generated internally, inspired by the desire to improve. This desire can come from management or from participants on the operational level; the change can be mandated or voluntary. How such desires are substantiated by which stakeholder how, will greatly affect a systems reaction to the foreign element, although in both cases there are reactions. In the case of an unwanted, unexpected or mandated change the people within the organization (or other system) may try a number of strategies to neutralize the impact of the this alien element. The system may reject and expel the foreign element; members may ignore it or use delaying tactics; they may try to encapsulate the foreign element within the "normal" ways of handling things to make it part of the current state; or they may try to find a scapegoat to attack and blame. When mandated sequences of events are experienced a couple of times on the operational level, trust levels of its people in management being able to lead goes down quickly and people anticipate more on potential future management blaming instead of the by management desired changes. Whatever happens, people do learn to anticipate effectively! :-) If the foreign element (or its backers) is sufficiently powerful and persistent to create a critical mass of discomfort, the organization enters into chaos. From the Merriam Webster Dictionary: chaos is a state of things in which chance is supreme; it is a state of utter confusion; a confused mass or mixture. In this state, the system is disarranged; predictions no longer valid, expectations are not fulfilled; things seem to be totally out of control. People/systems may react to chaos in a number of different ways: by engaging in random behavior; by seeking stability at any cost, and trying to revert to earlier patterns of behavior' or by searching for magical, sweeping solutions -- anything to re-establish some form of normalcy. It is very easy to get stuck in chaos: If you see chaos as some "death" of the Old Status Quo ... For more detailed "stuckness" we can use the following four preliminary stages of death identified by Elizabeth Kubler Ross: denial, bargaining, anger, or depression that individuals can get stuck in. When trying to manufacture the transforming idea as opposed to being aware and fully present during chaos. Obtaining and firing the latest silver bullet is a distracting temptation, one that needs to be avoided. Taoists say, "My barn having burned to the ground, I can now see the moon". If you try to avoid or control it. Then you will prolong it. Best seems to be relax, enjoy the ride, try a bite here of something new here, and of some there. Be like Alice, relax, have fun, enjoy and wait for the transforming idea. The transforming idea is the out-of-the-box idea that brings a system out of chaos (sometimes only for a short while ;-). A transforming idea is like an "Aha Erlebnis", inspiration, a sudden awareness of and understanding of new possibilities. Now that we have keys, what remains is finding the doors and actualizing this transformation. Entering the practicing stage, the system begins to try out the new possibilities. This can be likened to birth or to a honeymoon. It seems aaall problems have been resolved and things will be wonderful, and we're all very excited. At the same time, systems entering this stage are like children that are trying things for the first time -- somewhat uncertain, needing time to learn and grow into the new state. And, with time, by the system practicing new ways of doing things, some effects begin to appear in substance. In an organization, this is the time when people are learning to use a new tool or work according to a new process or tasks within a new structure. This is usually a period of reduced productivity -- performance and outcomes may actually be worse than prior to the change. There are many factors that can lead to rejection of the change and return to chaos: Reactions of managers who expect to see results of the new 'whatever' immediately A culture in which people are afraid to seem less than fully competent and where admitting mistakes is not acceptable Time and schedule pressures inhibiting the learning process ... Name it and it can take you back! During integration benefits of the new models become apparent and are experienced as useful. Gradually a new status quo is formed. What began as an idea becomes a normal state of affairs. And, for a while, things will continue to get better ... until we encounter a new foreign element. Yeeehaaa! Recent changesEdit this pageSearch: Last edited on 28/02/2005 by i238068.upc-i.chello.nlContact the site administrator: admin
  • Players pass an imaginary ball around to each other, however, all players must fail miserably to catch the ball. Everyone in the circle cheers and shouts words of encouragement to support the player who failed to catch the ball.This all about getting teams to support each other and have fun working together, even in failure.From Todd CharronDebrief:What happened?Kinesthetic.Safety building:Being vulnerableAlways say yes!
  • Accept & explore resistanceReasonable self disclosure – show our own failingsBuild trustCompetenceReliabilityForthrightnessMutual RegardAllow opting outTakes time
  • For instance in meetings try to incorporate some of each:Allow everyone a chance to speak and listen Capture ideas on cards, flip charts, stickies, etc Have people move cards – eg. affinity map
  • Visual learning is a teaching and learning style in which ideas, concepts, data and other information are associated with images and techniques. It is one of the three basic types of learning styles that also includes kinesthetic learning and auditory learning.Visual learners also prosper when shown graphs,graphic organizers, such as webs, concept maps and idea maps, plots, and illustrations such as stack plots and Venn plots, are some of the techniques used in visual learning to enhance thinking and learning skills.Auditory learning is a learning style in which a person learns through listening. They may struggle to understand a chapter they've read, but then experience a full understanding as they listen to the class lecture. An auditory learner may benefit by using the speech recognition tool available on many PCs.Kinesthetic learning is a teaching and learning style in which learning takes place by the student actually carrying out a physical activity, rather than listening to a lecture or merely watching a demonstration. Some people are visual learners, some kinesthetic learners, and some are auditory learners. Students associated with this predominant learning style are thought to be natural discovery learners; they have realizations through doing, as opposed to having thought first before initiating action. The evidence on kinesthetic learners benefiting from specialized instruction or targeted materials appears mixed, because the diagnosis of learning preference is itself problematic. However researchers on both sides of the debate agree that there is data showing "that a teaching strategy based on a ‘programmed learning sequence’ and designed to favour visually- and tactilely-oriented students increased attainment for all students in the experimental group." Other studies also show that mixed modality presentations, for instance using both auditory and visual techniques, improve results for subjects across the board.[1]Kinesthetic learning is when someone learns things from doing or being part of them. They make up about 15% of the population and struggle to pick things up by reading/ listening to things. Many people mistake themselves for kinesthetic/ tactile learners because they have not used the full variety of learning options, which means they cannot find the right learning state for them. The kinesthetic learner usually does well in things such as chemistry experiments, sporting activities, and acting. They also may listen to music while learning or studying. It is common for kinesthetic learners to focus on two different things at the same time. They will remember things by going back in their minds to what their body was doing. They also have very high hand-eye co-ordination and very quick receptors. They use phrases such as "I can see myself doing that" and "It's starting to come alive".For instance in meetings try to incorporate some of each:It is partly about reaching everyone in their learning style. But it is also about building deeper learning through neural connections. Stimulating the various brain cortexes provides more neural connections and enhances the learning.Allow everyone a chance to speak and listen Capture ideas on cards, flip charts, stickies, etc Have people move cards – eg. affinity map
  • Jill Bolte Taylor: stroke of insight Expansive right brain view, euphoric – did not feel limits of her body and felt at peace and connected with the world around her living more in the right brain is a choice – movement towards team rather than individualLeftLogical Sequential   Rational Analytical Objective Looks at parts LanguageRightRandom Intuitive Holistic Synthesizing Subjective Looks at wholes Spatial
  • Jill Bolte Taylor: stroke of insight Expansive right brain view, euphoric – did not feel limits of her body and felt at peace and connected with the world around her living more in the right brain is a choice – movement towards team rather than individualLeftLogical Sequential   Rational Analytical Objective Looks at parts LanguageRightRandom Intuitive Holistic Synthesizing Subjective Looks at wholes Spatial
  • Build the largest neural network possible.Engage the visual, auditory and kinesthetic cortex
  • Jill Bolte Taylor: stroke of insight Expansive right brain view, euphoric – did not feel limits of her body and felt at peace and connected with the world around her living more in the right brain is a choice – movement towards team rather than individual
  • Concrete allows wider deeper neural connections to be forged.Allows learner to anticipate abstract and make it their own.
  • Lead with the concreteTowards vs awayLead with the R BrainBecomes a puzzle for people to reach abstract insight – they are more engagedBuild the large
  • Naresh; to move from Shu to Ha: may mean switching mastersBeginner's MindYou don’t have to be Ri to teach to ShuBest teachers may not be best performers: skills sufficient to build respect and trustDifferent techniques needed at different points.Shu (守:“protect”, “obey”) — traditional wisdom — learning fundamentals, techniques, heuristics, proverbsHa (破: “detach”, “digress”) — breaking with tradition — finding exceptions to traditional wisdom, reflecting on their truth, finding new ways, techniques, and proverbsRi (離:“leave”, “separate”) — transcendence — there are no techniques or proverbs, all moves are natural
  • Plato imagines a group of people who have lived chained in a cave all of their lives, facing a blank wall. The people watch shadows projected on the wall by things passing in front of a fire behind them, and begin to ascribe forms to these shadows. According to Plato, the shadows are as close as the prisoners get to seeing reality. He then explains how the philosopher is like a prisoner who is freed from the cave and comes to understand that the shadows on the wall are not constitutive of reality at all, as he can perceive the true form of reality rather than the mere shadows seen by the prisoners.http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Teaching%203/83/233/24%20%20
  • Dialogvs discussion- We want to build a deeper understandingDavid BohmphysistDialogSuspect their assumptionsRegard each other as colleagues -> willingness! Especially with members with which you disagreeFacilitator who holds the context - takes discussions from discussion back to dialogue - “what if the opposite were true?”Leads to free-flow of information through a group.
  • Objective, Reflective, Interpretive and Decisional.
  • Using the recipe of what did we do well, what did not go so well, what are we going to do.
  • In your hands – Phil Geldart, Eagles Flight; www.eaglesflight.com“Teachers are architects building concepts and ideas into the minds of their listeners”.Communication: “You are going to learn to fly”Training: “I will not let you fly until you sit in a simulator and fly it successfully”.Teaching: “I will teach you to fly and to understand the principles. We’ll work together to learn how it’s done and how it works”.ArchitectWhat is the goal?Describe the finished product. How will it look?What is the reason for the task? Provide understanding of the big picture.Teach only one thing at a timeWhat point will you teach first?When will this point be completed?How will you know when this point has been learned?FoundationListen, make notes and understand. What are their key thoughts?What background informatioin do they need to know before you begin?Summarize without any detail the key points they will learn shortly?Check progress. How do you plan to check progress regularly?Teach only one thing at a time:
  • PromiscuousR Brain Navigator
  • Initial trainingSimulationsGamesKatas
  • Planning SessionsDemosBrown bagsStudy groupsEtudesRoad trips
  • Brown bagsStudy groupsEtudesKatasRoad trips
  • Big Visible ChartsInformation RadiatorsIn Your Spacee-Forum, team wikiPractice Fields
  • “Gleeful calamity”"Success is in the doing and failures are celebrated and analyzed. Problems become puzzles and obstacles disappear“"Nothing ever turns out as planned ... ever“"Decoration of the unfinished project is a kind of conceptual incubation. From these interludes come deep insights and amazing new approaches"

Agile learning agile 2010 Agile learning agile 2010 Presentation Transcript

  • Learning is key to agile success
    nurturing a learning culture on your agile team
    Declan Whelan
  • Learning
    study
    accumulate
    knowledge
    bird leaving
    nest
    child in
    doorway
    youth
    practice continuously
  • Learning
    I know algebra
    I know Lucy
  • Culture
    “How we do things around here in order to succeed.”
    Schneider, 1994
  • Culture
  • Learning Culture
    and learn
    “How we do things around here in order to succeed.”
    v
  • Learning Organization
    “ … where people continually expand their capacity to create the results they truly desire, where new and expansive patterns of thinking are nurtured, where collective aspiration is set free, and where people are continually learning to learntogether”
    Peter Senge
    The Fifth Discipline
  • Learning Organization
  • Personal History Exercise
    Face your partner and tell them:
    1. Your name
    2. How many children in your family
    3. A difficult or challenging thing you faced as a child
  • Behaviour
    B = f(p,e)
    Esther Derby, 1994
    Person
    Environment
  • FundamentalAttribution Error
    Bperceived = f(P,e)
  • Responding to Change
  • Satir Change Model
    Learning
    Source: http://www.stevenmsmith.com/my-articles/article/the-satir-change-model.html
  • Change
    Value
    Response
  • What is Your Purpose?
    True North
    Project Charter
    Team Working Agreement
  • Loser Ball
  • Virginia Satir
    “Feelings of worth can flourish only in an atmosphere where individual differences are appreciated, mistakes are tolerated, communication is open, and rules are flexible - the kind of atmosphere that is found in a nurturing family.”
  • Individual Safety
    Build Safety
    • “invite” participation
    • anonymous participation
    • provide alternatives
    • lean towards the less powerful
  • Seeing is Believing
    Find a partner at your table
    Each of you describe a product to your partner using only words
    • Draw a picture of your product
    • Describe the product again using the picture and words
  • Accommodate Learning Styles
    Auditory
    Kinesthetic
    Visual
  • How do We Learn?
    Auditory
    Kinesthetic
    Visual
  • X
    L Brain R Brain
  • L Brain R Brain
    IDEA
  • Brain Map
  • Neural Circuits
  • L Brain R Brain
    IDEA
  • Lead with the Concrete
  • Personal Learning
    Books
    Conferences
    Mindmaps
    Reading – SQ3R
    Survey, Question, Read, Recite, Review
  • Personal Learning
  • JohnnyWhoop
  • Beginner’s Mind
    “In the beginner's mind there are many possibilities, in the expert's mind there are few.”
    Shunryu Suzuki
  • Shu Ha Ri
    Following
    Breaking Away
    Fluent
    Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shuhari
  • Draw a Hand in 45 seconds
    http://www.thiagi.com/pfp/IE4H/august2005.html#99Seconds
  • Plato’s Cave
  • Discussion
    Dialog
  • Team Learning
  • Team Learning
  • Team Communication
    ORID
    ORID questions
    Active listening
    Open ended questions
  • Retrospective Format
    • Set the stage
    • Gather data
    • Generate insights
    • Decide what to do
    • Close
  • Diverge & Converge
    Source: Chris Corrigan blog: http://chriscorrigan.com/parkinglot/?p=1265
  • An answer is
    an invitation
    to stop learning
    Jean Tabaka
  • Coach
    Source: (2009) Rachel Davies, Liz Sedley
  • Teach
    “Teachers are architects building concepts and ideas into the minds of their listeners”
    Phil Geldart, Eagles Flight
    Source: Phil Geldhart, “In Your Hands”
  • Pairing
  • Create Practice Fields
  • Create Learning Sessions
    Brown bags
    Study groups
    Etudes
    Katas
    Road trips
  • Create Learning Times
    Schedule slack
    Gold cards
    Lunch & learns
  • Learning Workspace
  • Tinkering School
    http://www.ted.com/talks/gever_tulley_s_tinkering_school_in_action.html
  • “Our tendency is to be interested in something that is growing in the garden, not in the bare soil itself.
    But if you want to have a good harvest, the most important thing is to make the soil rich and cultivate it well.”
    Shunryu Suzuki