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What is an MLE? Community presentation

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Slides used to support community presentations around the nature, purpose and potential of modern learning environments.

Slides used to support community presentations around the nature, purpose and potential of modern learning environments.

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  • 1. MLE community presentation What’s all this about a modern learning environment?
  • 2. SOME BIG QUESTIONS… •  What aspirations do you have for your children? •  What skills, knowledge, qualities will they require/ •  What role school school play in this?
  • 3. WHAT IS IMPORTANT TO LEARN…? Using language, symbols and text Relating to others Thinking Participating and contributingManaging self
  • 4. HOW IS IT IMPORTANT TO LEARN? Student autonomy and initiative accepted and encouraged. Students engage in dialogue with teacher and each other Higher level thinking is encouraged Class uses raw data, primary sources, physical and interactive materials. Knowledge and ideas emerge only from a situation in which learners have to draw them out of experiences that have meaning and importance to them. Teacher asks open- ended questions and allows wait time for response Students are engaged in experiences that challenge hypotheses John Dewey – Constructivist Pedagogy, 1916
  • 5. WHERE DOES LEARNING TAKE PLACE? At home At my friend’s house At the library At school
  • 6. WHO DO I LEARN WITH? With friends in a group At the computer On my own in a quiet place With my teacher
  • 7. UBIQUITY
  • 8. •  Picture here of iphone dispenser at the airport
  • 9. CHALLENGE Have we grasped how significantly student access to technology has changed their expectations as learners?
  • 10. Agency
  • 11. AGENCY •  “The power to act” •  “Sense of ownership” •  “Executing and controlling one’s own actions” •  “Self-efficacy” •  “Personalisation”
  • 12. CHALLENGES •  Do our learners have to adapt to our way of doing things, or do we adapt to theirs? •  Are we focused on delivery – or learning experience?
  • 13. >1 Billion (100 billion connections) >500 Million >150 Million >14 million articles >6 Billion images Sources from service providers and also http://econsultancy.com 3.5 Billion views/day 70 hours/minute >400 Million Steve  Wheeler,  University  of  Plymouth,  2013   >170 Million(55 million posts per day) SOCIAL MEDIA USE IN 2013
  • 14. Remember this? Desks in rows Learning in unison Teacher desk prominent Blackboard as focus of attention Poor light, ventilation Copy, read, absorb, rote…
  • 15. AN EXPANDING VIEW OF LEARNING… The current education act and policy is focused almost exclusively on this quadrant
  • 16. A NEW WAY OF THINKING… •  Cave: for private concentration. •  Camp fire: group process. •  Watering hole: encounters and impulses. •  Sandpit: experimentation and practical work. •  Mountaintop: presentation of progress and discoveries. Source: Prakash Nair
  • 17. CAVES: PRIVATE CONTEMPLATION
  • 18. CAVES: PRIVATE CONTEMPLATION
  • 19. CAVES: PRIVATE CONTEMPLATION
  • 20. CAMPFIRE: GROUP PROCESSES
  • 21. CAMPFIRE: GROUP PROCESSES
  • 22. WATERING HOLE: ENCOUNTERS AND IMPULSES
  • 23. WATERING HOLE: ENCOUNTERS AND IMPULSES
  • 24. WATERING HOLE: ENCOUNTERS AND IMPULSES
  • 25. WATERING HOLE: ENCOUNTERS AND IMPULSES
  • 26. SANDPIT: EXPERIMENTATION
  • 27. SANDPIT: EXPERIMENTATION
  • 28. SANDPIT: EXPERIMENTATION
  • 29. MOUNTAINTOP: PRESENTATION
  • 30. MOUNTAINTOP: PRESENTATION
  • 31. CHALLENGES •  How adequately do our learning spaces cater for the type of learning we are wanting our children to experience? •  Do our current spaces work against the things we’re trying to achieve?
  • 32. SCHOOL SPATIAL TYPOLOGIES tradi;onal  school  plan   separate  classrooms   opening  off  corridors   large,  open   undifferen;ated   space   separate   classrooms   linked  to  shared   central  space   mul;-­‐op;on  space   made  up  of  many  diverse,   discrete  but  connected   spaces  /  seDngs   SCHOOL SPATIAL TYPOLOGIES Source: Mary Featherstone
  • 33. Source: Mary Featherstone
  • 34. duration of activities? documentation of activities? what furniture, equipment, resources? what services are required? what surfaces are required?what floor, levels area? ambience, climate control? degree of enclosure? Source: Mary Featherstone
  • 35. Derek Wenmoth Email: derek@core-ed.org Blog: http://blog.core-ed.org/derek Skype: <dwenmoth>

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