Cracking the 'Native' Information Experience
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Cracking the 'Native' Information Experience

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Change is constant!...

Change is constant!

..And today, change is happening in schools. Governance boards, administrators, librarians and classroom teachers are combining efforts to resist the conservative status-quo-sustaining nature of our institution and seeking to define and implement a new style of learning – learning 2.0.

For many of our students, change is status-quo. They’ve witnessed an emerging new information environment and have had a hand in shaping its landscape, seamlessly utilizing technologies that define their culture. The outside-the-classroom information experiences of our students are deep, diverse, rich, and compelling — and understanding these information experiences may be a key to achieving more effective and relevant formal learning.

Spend some time with David Warlick, exploring the qualities of the native information experience and observe how they might be — and are being harnessed in classrooms around the world.

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    Cracking the 'Native' Information Experience Cracking the 'Native' Information Experience Document Transcript

    • Millennial Learnersthe Cracking ‘Native’ Information Experience In times of change, Learners inherit the earth, While the learned, Find themselves beautifully equipped, to work in a world, That no longer exists. Eric Hoffer, Reflections on the Human Condition, aph. 32 (1973) Monday, January 10, 2011 1
    • Millennial Learners Cracking the ‘Native’ Information Experience In times of change, Learners inherit the earth, While the learned, Find themselves beautifully equipped, to work in a world, That no longer exists. Eric Hoffer, Reflections on the Human Condition, aph. 32 (1973) Ancillaries - http://davidwarlick.com/handouts Monday, January 10, 2011 2
    • Monday, January 10, 2011 3 While I was still teaching history, my grandparents moved from the house they'd lived in for more than 50 years. Because I was the only teacher in the family, they gave me all of their (ancient) National Geographic Magazines. I am ashamed to admit that as I leafed through those magazines, I had scissors in my hands. I cut those things to pieces -- because I wanted to bring those pictures, maps, and diagrams into my classroom, put them on the wall, and give my learners a chance to learn from them. You see, I taught in an information-scarce learning environment. The methods I used in the classroom were based on information scarcity. The pedagogies I learned in university were based on information scarcity. Today, Flickr, the social photo album site, is receiving more than three million new photos every day. We are now teaching in information- abundant learning environments. One of the most interesting questions in the education field today is, "What are the pedagogies of information-abundant learning environments.
    • What are the pedagogies of Information-Abundant Learning environments? http://flickr.com/ Monday, January 10, 2011 4 [twitter]What are the pedagogies of “Information-Abundant learning environments...[/twitter]
    • Is it that he’s ‣ Smarter ‣ Lives in Silicon Valley ‣ Brain’s wired differently Or is it that ‣ He has no ceiling. Monday, January 10, 2011 5 [twitter]Do today’s child have no ceiling? ..and is this important?[/twitter]
    • It is an information experience that... ‣ Ignores Barriers ‣ Empowers Accomplishment Monday, January 10, 2011 6 Our students play, learn & work within an information environment that Ignores barriers & Empowers accomplishment
    • ‣Networked ‣Digital ‣Abundant ‣Difficult to contain Monday, January 10, 2011 7 Our students play, learn & work within an information environment that Ignores barriers & Empowers accomplishment
    • ..and if their information experience, can’t be walled in, then what does, a school look like to them, When it tries to? Monday, January 10, 2011 8 [twitter]Trying this KeynoteTweet again...[/twitter]
    • ..with customs, modes of expression and social institutions. Culture ..a millennial culture. Monday, January 10, 2011 9
    • Can we harness this culture for learning Without turning our classrooms, libraries and campuses ..into video arcades? ..with customs, modes of expression and social institutions. Culture ..a millennial culture. Monday, January 10, 2011 10
    • Crack? ..this ‘native’ information experience Hack ..into effective & relevant learning experiences Monday, January 10, 2011 11
    • Safely-Made Mistakes Demands Personal Investment Provokes Conversation foundation Responsive Monday, January 10, 2011 12 Responsive Our learners’ outside-the-classroom information experiences are responsive. They are accustomed to receiving feedback on their actions, decisions, and ideas. Video games are an obvious example of how they play and work in an environment that responds to them. If you send your player down the wrong road or through the wrong door, he dies and you have to start again. But there has to be a logical and contextual reason for it. There has to be a basis that the player reasons through to rationalize the death and plan better for the next time through.But it would be a mistake to believe that all of the responsiveness that our learners are accustomed to is immediate – or that immediacy is even the most important element of responsiveness. Many video games fail the player out, not because of a single mistake, but for committing a cascade of mistakes, some of which may have been committed minutes, hours, or days earlier. Even their social networking is responsive, and the comments they receive back are often extended across hours or days.The key to responsiveness is not time-based as much as it is relevance- based. If the response is authentic to what the learner is doing, then the influence on learning is greater. Classroom Examples: Instructional software that provides feedback within a learner identified context Writing assignments submitted as blog entries or wiki pages to be read and responded to by classmates or readers outside the classroome Portfolios, accessible from outside the school environment and available for comment/feedback Various academic (and physical) competitions (website creation, robotics, field day, competitive quizzes) Collaborative work that involves group planning, individual specialization, and a valued deliverableStudent produced learning resources (study guides or even student produced textbooks) Provokes Conversation There is very little that millennials do alone, and it is, to some peoples reckoning, counter intuitive that today’s youngsters are actually more sociable and skilled socially than previous generations. They are together at school, at the ball game, at band camp, at the mall, and at home, through their IM, text messaging, and social networks. They are more like room mates than mere friends. They are constantly engaged with each other and they never say goodbye – because the conversation continues, even when they are no longer physically together or even in the same state. Beyond the availability that they have with each other, through the information and communication technologies (ICT) that they assume to be a part of their experience, many of their activities demand communication. The very nature of Facebook, Beebo, and MySpace is conversation. You are posting your updates to be read and responded to. They comment on their digital walls, upload photos and videos for comment, and discuss their homework through their social networks. Many video games also require conversation. Operated over the Internet, players are encouraged to form themselves into teams or guilds, plan and implement campaigns, form economic cartels, and even push the games into unintended functionality, such as machinima (http://bit.ly/o5lm7). Classroom Examples: Online collaborations across classrooms and even age groupings Ask students to read separate parts of a chapter and then sequence and outline the context as a team Arrange guest speakers either in-class or virtually, but, after a short introduction, have students interview the speaker rather than ask for an extended formal presentation Assign homework that asks students to collaborate through theirsocial networksAsk students from geographically different places to plan, together, virtual field trips through Skype or other video conferencing software Google and what it represents has turned us into a question-asking culture. We love to ask questions at a rate of more than a hundred billion a month, through the top ten search engines.3We ask questions, because we know that the answers are available and often no further away than our pockets. Our demand for high speed access to the answers has increased, even during recession years and among previously reluctant demographics.4 But, for our students, it goes much deeper than posing questions out of curiosity. Consider that many of the video games that they play come without user guides. With a sense of context that they receive from introductory videos and conversations with friends, they find themselves thrust into an alien world with almost no guidance. How do you approach an experience like this? You approach it by asking questions:•What are the goals of this game? •What are the rules? •How can I use the rules to accomplish the goals? The game constantly presents barriers to accomplishment that the player has to question his way around. Classroom Examples:
    • foundation Responsive Monday, January 10, 2011 13 Content is becoming increasingly responsive to our needs. The phone book (left) and digital Sports Illustrated (right) are examples. Each hints at possibilities of fully interactive learning resources -- what follows the textbook as we know it... This relationship becomes even more pronounced when the reader is empowered to create the content and its behavior.
    • foundation Responsive Monday, January 10, 2011 14 But, when the author or programmers work is published and its users can "respond" back, the relationship between author and reader return -- except that it is... Two way and Highly instructive Scratch is a programming language that enables children to write video games and other applications. The process involves math and it immediately assesses, because if there is a mistake, then it doesn't "work."
    • foundation Responsive Monday, January 10, 2011 15 We've known the power of responsiveness for a long time. We've long tried to capture the immediate gratification of many video games to improve achievement.
    • Traction foundation Responsive Monday, January 10, 2011 16
    • Traction foundation Responsive Monday, January 10, 2011 17 In traditional schooling, the traction points are the text, teach, and bell schedule. These are the hard places that learners could push and pull on to accomplish learning.
    • When do Traction Points become barriers? Monday, January 10, 2011 18
    • Hyperconnected learners find each other for hard places against which they can test and grow their knowledge, ideas, and skills. What are the new traction points? foundation Responsive Monday, January 10, 2011 19 Learning happens when we push off of something or pull toward it. We need a hard place to test our knowledge and ideas against. In the past it was the textbook, teacher, technology, and the bell schedule. [twitter]It takes traction to do anything. It takes traction to learn![/twitter]
    • In 15 years of teaching, I have never seen anything come even CLOSE to motivating students to write - like blogging does. - Mark Ahlness My students are floored when, as they say, “Some random person from Texas commented on my blog.” - Brian McLaughlin I’ve got 6th graders coming in during their lunch and after school to add articles to their blog and respond to their classmates’ articles. - Al Gonzalez Even when they’re out sick, students work on their blogs. - Carol Barsotti Monday, January 10, 2011 20 Students love to write in their blogs, not because of instant gratification, but because of deferred response that is both dependable and relevant. They know that someone is going to "read" their writing, not just "measure" it. [twitter]The responsiveness in blogging is not immediate. It is relevant.[/twitter]
    • In one year the percentage of households earning $20K - $30K with high speed Internet 42% to 53% Households earning < $20K with high speed Internet 25% to 35% Senior citizen households with high speed Internet Provokes Conversation 19% to 30% foundation Responsive Monday, January 10, 2011 21 We all want information in all of its forms -- not just e-mail but we want information that moves, flows, and glows.
    • Finland has become the first country in the world to declare broadband Internet access a legal right. Starting in July, telecommunication companies in the northern European nation will be required to provide all 5.2 million citizens with Internet connection... The country is aiming for ... 100 megabit per second -- for all by 2015. A h m e d , S a e e d . " F a s t I n t e r n e t A c c e s s b e c o m e s a L e g a l R i g h t i n F i n l a n d . " C N N Te c h 1 5 O c t 2 0 0 9 : n . p a g . We b . 1 7 D e c 2 0 1 0 . < h t t p : / / b i t . l y / h Wi R c q> . Provokes Conversation foundation Responsive Monday, January 10, 2011 22 ..by July next year, telecommunications companies will be obliged to provide all Finnish residents with broadband lines that can run at speeds of at least 1 megabit per second. ..100Mb internet access ... available to all Finnish residents by 2015. (Johnson)
    • How much are people actually talking online? Provokes Conversation foundation Responsive http://personalizemedia.com/the-count/ Monday, January 10, 2011 23 [twitter]You can see this little counter at... http://personalizemedia.com/the-count/[/twitter]
    • Monday, January 10, 2011 24 A different species of Learner who communicates through his tenticles...
    • ‣ Grade 2 students from Westglen School Visited Fort Edmonton. ‣ Returned & researched modes of transportation of the time. ‣ Using MS Paint they made an image of one of the modes. ‣ Grade 4 students from J.A. Fife School visited Fort Edmonton. ‣ Used MS Paint to draw a background for the grade 2 drawings. ‣ Hired grade 10s in a hypermedia class to animate the pictures. Ft. Edmonton Provokes Conversation foundation Responsive Monday, January 10, 2011 25 The objective of the work was learning about prairie life in 19th century Alberta by producing graphic illustrations of how they traveled. The nature of the work was conversation/collaboration. Conversation and collaboration are not easy, and the deep and productive collaborations necessary in a technology-rich, information-driven, and increasingly global environment is especially hard. The students' collaboration was handicapped by asking them to communicate through classroom walls, school campuses, and through age differences. The students were challenged to be resourceful. [twitter]You can see all of the animations here - http://fortedmonton.jasperplace.ca/[/twitter]
    • Provokes Conversation foundation Responsive Monday, January 10, 2011 26 I used that setting on my camera that take multiple shots, and this is the only one that came out nearly clear. I’ve seen it before, but, out of curiosity, I Twitpic’ed it this morning to see if anyone knew what it was. Here’s what I learned. There is a Civil War memorial near Fredericksburg, VA that is a twenty foot high stone pyramid. It was built in the 1890’s by a railroad company to commemorate the Confederate victory there in 1862. It is right next to the auto-train tracks. It’s far away from where the National Park Service wants you to look at it, across a ditch and the railroad tracks. It might be possible to get closer to it, but I have never tried. I think Amtrak has a fence up and the pyramid is either on Amtrak or private land.1 This information was contributed to RoadsideAmerica.com by Willie Zaza in June of 2001. Someone else added this later. It’s known officially as Meade’s Pyramid. It stands 23 feet tall, is built of granite, and was erected in 1898 by the Confederate Memorial Literary Society, who originally just wanted a sign. The railroad vetoed that idea, so the Society built a 17-ton pyramid. What I find interesting is that I learned of this, in less than ten minutes, by way of Jo Fothergill, from her home, in New Zealand. Who says learning has changed!
    • Total Searches of the Top Ten Search Engines 2008 -- 80 Billion / Month 2009 --113 Billion / Month 150 Million Questions an Hour! Provokes Conversation foundation Responsive Monday, January 10, 2011 27
    • How do you approach an experience like this? Provokes Conversation foundation Responsive Monday, January 10, 2011 28 Many of today’s video games come without a users guide. Players learn to play the game by getting in and pushing and pulling on the hard places so that they can learn the goals, the rules, and how to work the rules to accomplish the goals.
    • They Ask Questions ‣ What are the goals? ‣ What are the rules? ‣ How do I use the rules to Provokes Conversation accomplish the goals? foundation Responsive Monday, January 10, 2011 29
    • Make a wanted poster about one of the Renaissance or Reformation leaders (names drawn from a hat): 1. Poster MUST be on an 8 1/2 X 11 sheet of paper. (10 points) OF 2. Mug shot - We need to know what they look like! (10 points) RO -P 3. First and Last name of your historical figure. (5 points) ON S TI NT 4.Birth Date and Year of Death. (5 points) UE ME Q SI GN 5. What country were they born in and where did they do their work? (10 points) HE AS T 6. What are they famous (wanted) for? 5-8 complete sentences, in your own words, for full credit. (30 points) 7. A fact that you found interesting OR a quote by the person. (10 points) 8.Print out or photocopy of your sources with info highlighted. (15 points) 9. Your name on the bottom right corner. (5 points) Monday, January 10, 2011 30 This should not be, in any way, construed as an indictment of rubric-style assessment. However, we should be cautious, in our use of all forms of assessment, that we do not damage learning for the sake of assessing teaching.
    • Provokes Conversation foundation Responsive Monday, January 10, 2011 31 What kind of barriers might I plant for my students to question themselves around? How am I paying attention to those questions, at the same time that I am asking...?
    • So, does grammar matter? Provokes Conversation foundation Responsive Monday, January 10, 2011 32
    • Demands Personal Investment Provokes Conversation foundation Responsive Monday, January 10, 2011 33 An important part of our learners outside-the-classroom information experiences is based on identity. It may be a building of their own identity, experimenting with alternate identities, or it may be the cultivation of fantasy identities. Ian Fogarty, a Biology and Physics teacher in New Brunswick, doesn't ask his students to use their lab manuals. His students write their own. One team wanted their lab manual to be interactive, so they paid a classmate to program the flash, in return for chocolate milk.
    • Demands Personal Investment Provokes Conversation foundation Responsive Monday, January 10, 2011 34 Students post their class notes in the classroom blog each day, collaboratively producing a study guide for the class. Responsible learning...
    • What is the purpose of School? The purpose of school.. ..is to not get caught being wrong! - High School Student Safely-Made Mistakes Demands Personal Investment Provokes Conversation foundation Responsive Monday, January 10, 2011 35
    • Are we becoming more playful? http://bit.ly/ffrVSv Safely-Made Mistakes Demands Personal Investment Provokes Conversation foundation foundation Responsive Monday, January 10, 2011 36 [twitter]ImprovEverywhere videos can be found here: http://bit.ly/ffrVSv [/twitter]
    • Second largest Web Site on the Internet Since Aug 2008, #2 Search Engine January 2009 15 hrs of video uploaded per minute March 2010 15 hrs of video uploaded per minute Oct 2010 500 million pageviews Safely-Made Mistakes Demands Personal Investment Provokes Conversation foundation Responsive Monday, January 10, 2011 37 [twitter] Top 1000 web sites, monthly report - http://bit.ly/ePvbXL[/twitter] Of all YouTube Views & out of a 24 hour Day < 100 : 29.59% 7.1 hrs 100-500 : 23.03% 5.5 hrs 500-1,000 : 9.43% 2.2 hrs 1,000-10,000: 24.81% 5.9 hrs 10,000-100,000 : 2.69% 40 min 100,000-500,000 : 1.73% 5 min > 1,000,000 : 0.33% 4 min Karbasfrooshan, Ashkan. “Context is King: How Videos Are Found and Consumed Online.” TechCrunch. 30 Jan 2010. Web. 23 Aug 2010. <http://wp.me/pNaxW-AsV>.
    • Can learning be more Safely-Made Mistakes playful? Demands Personal Investment Provokes Conversation foundation Responsive Monday, January 10, 2011 38
    • DIY Safely-Made Mistakes Demands Personal Investment Provokes Conversation foundation Responsive Monday, January 10, 2011 39
    • Tinkering "The bricoleur resembles the painter who stands back between brushstrokes, looks at the canvas, and only after this contemplation, decides what to do next." -- Sherry Turkle Safely-Made Mistakes Demands Personal Investment Provokes Conversation foundation Responsive Monday, January 10, 2011 40
    • How can I make the learning experience “talk back” to the learners? foundation Responsive Monday, January 10, 2011 41
    • How might the learning experience sidestep critical information; requiring learners to need, search for, invent, and exchange knowledge? Provokes Conversation foundation Responsive Monday, January 10, 2011 42
    • How can the learning experience Demands Personal inspire value in Investment learners’ work? Provokes Conversation foundation Responsive Monday, January 10, 2011 43
    • How am I daring my learners to Safely-Made Mistakes make “Mistakes” that can Demands Personal Investment feed the learning dialog? Provokes Conversation foundation Responsive Monday, January 10, 2011 44
    • Our Business? Making our children future-ready Being education today ..is not so much about what It’s what you you’ve been can teach taught! yourself... Monday, January 10, 2011 45
    • Our Business? Making our children future-ready ..it’s not what you can be It’s what you trained to do! can resourcefully accomplish. Monday, January 10, 2011 46
    • Our Business? Making our children future-ready ..it’s not just the It’s the team shoulders you you can move up the field can stand on. with -- to reach the joy of something brand new... Monday, January 10, 2011 47
    • Our Business? Making our children future-ready It’s not a “Race to the Top!” It is joyfully masting... The Future Monday, January 10, 2011 48
    • Surprise Me! ..and sometimes that can be as simple.. Monday, January 10, 2011 49
    • Thank You! David Warlick Handouts: http://davidwarlick.com/ handouts/ Safely-Made Mistakes Demands Personal Investment Provokes Conversation foundation Responsive Monday, January 10, 2011 50