Inspiring Trust Through Customer Satisfaction Surveys Gabe Soumakian Devin Vodicka John White
The Four Elements of Trust <ul><li>Consistency </li></ul><ul><li>Compassion </li></ul><ul><li>Competence </li></ul><ul><li...
Trust in Schools <ul><li>Schools with high levels of trust were three times more likely to improve in reading and mathemat...
Principals and Trust <ul><li>Where teachers have high levels of trust for the principal: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Teachers ha...
Build Trust by Soliciting Feedback <ul><li>Openness to feedback demonstrates compassion, receptive communication, and resp...
Survey Tools <ul><li>Zoomerang </li></ul><ul><li>Twitter Polls </li></ul><ul><li>Google Forms </li></ul><ul><li>Poll Every...
Success Stories
Challenges to Trust <ul><li>How do we balance the need for improvements in efficiency with the need for adaptive transform...
Additional Resources <ul><li>Devin  Vodicka’s  Trust Bookmarks </li></ul><ul><li>Burbank USD Customer Satisfaction Survey ...
 
 
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Building Trust Through Customer Surveys

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Presented at Lead 3.0 in Santa Clara (2010). Co-presented by Gabe Soumakian, John White, and Devin Vodicka.

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Building Trust Through Customer Surveys

  1. 1. Inspiring Trust Through Customer Satisfaction Surveys Gabe Soumakian Devin Vodicka John White
  2. 2. The Four Elements of Trust <ul><li>Consistency </li></ul><ul><li>Compassion </li></ul><ul><li>Competence </li></ul><ul><li>Communication </li></ul><ul><li>Originally Published in Principal Leadership , November 2006 </li></ul>
  3. 3. Trust in Schools <ul><li>Schools with high levels of trust were three times more likely to improve in reading and mathematics than schools with low trust. </li></ul><ul><li>Schools with consistently low levels of trust showed little or no improvement in student achievement. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Bryk & Schneder, 2002 </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Principals and Trust <ul><li>Where teachers have high levels of trust for the principal: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Teachers had higher levels of citizenship behavior </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Tschannen-Moran & Hoy, 2000 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>These schools were associated with higher rates of student achievement even after controlling for poverty and race </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Goddard & Tschannen-Moran, 2005 </li></ul></ul></ul>
  5. 5. Build Trust by Soliciting Feedback <ul><li>Openness to feedback demonstrates compassion, receptive communication, and responsiveness leads to improved competence </li></ul>
  6. 6. Survey Tools <ul><li>Zoomerang </li></ul><ul><li>Twitter Polls </li></ul><ul><li>Google Forms </li></ul><ul><li>Poll Everywhere </li></ul>
  7. 7. Success Stories
  8. 8. Challenges to Trust <ul><li>How do we balance the need for improvements in efficiency with the need for adaptive transformation? </li></ul><ul><li>How will we know if we’r e making progress? </li></ul><ul><li>What can we and what will we do differently, right now, to accelerate improvements in Adult for the benefit of students? </li></ul>
  9. 9. Additional Resources <ul><li>Devin Vodicka’s Trust Bookmarks </li></ul><ul><li>Burbank USD Customer Satisfaction Survey </li></ul>

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