Exercise No 4 How To Label Intravenous Fluid

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Exercise No 4 How To Label Intravenous Fluid

  1. 1. Name: RAFAEL, DUNE VIENIS KAREN N.Year & Section: BS-Pharmacy 4A<br />Group No.: _____________________Date Started: November 09, 2009<br />Date Submitted: November 23, 2009<br />Exercise No. 4<br />HOW TO LABEL INTRAVENOUS FLUID<br />Objectives:<br />To label intravenous in a correct manner,<br />To enumerate the necessary information needed in the proper labeling of intravenous fluids, and<br />To know the aseptic procedures done when intravenous fluid has incorporations ordered.<br />Data Output:<br />The output of this exercise is printed in separate paper after the conclusion.<br />Answers to Questions:<br />What are the necessary information needed in the proper labeling of IVF?<br />Every IV fluid container must contain a label. The label provides important information that you must examine before administering the fluid to a patient. This information includes<br />• Type of IV fluid (by name and by type of solutes contained within).<br />• Amount of IV fluid (expressed in milliliters or “mL”).<br />• Expiration date.<br />What is the proper schedule in changing IVF tubings?<br />The IV tubing, including piggyback tubing and stopcocks, is replaced no more frequently than at 72-hour intervals, unless clinically indicated. Tubing used to infuse blood, blood products, or lipid emulsions is replaced within 24 hours of initiation (Bennington, 2005).<br />In cases of incorporation which are lesser or greater than stock dose, how are these changes made?<br />In any properly administered intravenous admixture program, all basic fluids (large-volume solutions), additives (already in solution or extemporaneously constituted), and calculations must be carefully checked against the medication orders. If the incorporation is lesser or greater than the stock dose, an interval should done before incorporation.<br />What are the aseptic procedures done when IVF has incorporations ordered?<br />Proper hand washing is an aseptic technique done when IVF has incorporations ordered. Disinfection of the injection port of the vial and the ampule before breaking and aspirating the right dose should also be done. The cover of the administration set is also removed, maintain sterility and the drug is aseptically incorporated into the airway aseptically. The airway should be recapped afterwards (IVTeam Phils Hub, 2008).<br />What are the protective measures if IVF are incorporated with Methycobal, Neurobion and Nipride?<br />Methycobal – Methycobal is susceptible to photolysis. It should be used promptly after the package is opened, and caution should be taken so as not to expose the ampoules to direct light. <br />Neurobion – Should be protected from exposure to light.<br />Nipride – Should be protected from exposure to light.<br />Conclusion:<br />Every IV fluid container must contain a label. The label provides important information that you must examine before administering the fluid to a patient. This information includes the type of IV fluid (by name and by type of solutes contained within), amount of IV fluid (expressed in milliliters or “mL”), and the expiration date. The IV tubing, including piggyback tubing and stopcocks, is replaced no more frequently than at 72-hour intervals, unless clinically indicated. Tubing used to infuse blood, blood products, or lipid emulsions is replaced within 24 hours of initiation. Aseptic procedures should be done in order to prevent microbiological contamination of the incorporation of drugs in intravenous fluid. Some drugs for incorporation require special protective measures such as protection from light. Proper handling and storage of such drugs should always be done in order to preserve the integrity of the drug.<br />Bibliography<br /> BIBLIOGRAPHY Bennington, L. K. (2005, 02 29). Intravenous tubing and dressing change. Retrieved 11 18, 2009, from Find Articles.com: http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_gGENH/is_20050229/ai_2699003422/IVTeam Phils Hub. (2008, September 25). Incorporation of Drug Into IVF Bottle or Bag. Retrieved November 22, 2009, from Scribd.com: http://www.scribd.com/doc/6217565/Incorporation-of-Drug-Into-IVF-Bottle-or-BagMIMS Philippines. (2009). Methycobal amp. Retrieved November 22, 2009, from MIMS.com: http://www.mims.com/Page.aspx?menuid=mng&name=Methycobal+amp&h=methycobal&CTRY=PH&searchstring=Methycobal+ampRxMed. (2009, January 15). Nipride. Retrieved November 22, 2009, from RxMed.com: http://www.rxmed.com/b.main/b2.pharmaceutical/b2.1.monographs/CPS-%20Monographs/CPS-%20(General%20Monographs-%20N)/NIPRIDE.html<br />

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