EFD Strategic Planning Project

  • 869 views
Uploaded on

Plans to help a children's charity in Saigon.

Plans to help a children's charity in Saigon.

More in: Business , Technology
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
869
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1

Actions

Shares
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
3

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. 2008-2010 Strategic Planning Project Education for Development
  • 2. INTRODUCTION Overview of Strategic Planning Process Summary The diagram to the right illustrates a four step approach to strategic planning that guided this research and analysis project. Step 1. Research Into Current Conditions: Situational Analysis The first section of this report describes some of the changes in Vietnamese society and INGO and NGO programming that might drive changes in EFD’s future mission, programming or planning. Step 2. Analysis of EFD Programming: Issues and Opportunities. This section of the report explains the issues and opportunities facing EFD today in light of the situational analysis in step one. Step 3. Long Term Goal Setting. The third step is to update and clarify EFD’s long term goals in all areas of the organization based on steps one and two. The goal-setting exercise has not been completed, though a framework for conducting it is presented in section 3 called “Recommendations.” Step 4. Strategic Plan : The final strategic plan includes the steps necessary to reach the long term programming goals at EFD outlines in step 3. Much of the future planning will be contingent on what programming objectives are set as a part of the work in step 3. Basic planning templates are included in section 4 of this report. Strategic Planning Cycle SUMMARY OF METHOD AND APPROACH Introduction Overview of Planning Process 2. Analysis of EFD Programs – Issues and Opportunities (Fall 2006) 4. Complete EFD Strategic Plan for 2008-2010 (To Come) 1. Review Current Context – Situational Analysis (Fall 2006) 3. Setting Long Term Goals for EFD and Program Areas (Ongoing)
  • 3. INTRODUCTION Contents of This Report
    • Section 1:
    • SITUATIONAL ANALYSIS
    • Secondary research into trends in student enrollment in VN in the last five years.
    • Analysis of different needy groups of children.
    • Programming at education-oriented government, INGO and NGO bodies.
    • Review of organizational needs.
    • Primary research consisting of eighteen interviews with local social service organizations;
    • Section 2:
    • ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES
    • Part 1: Summary of EFD in 2007
    • Part 2: Review of Small Grant Scheme
    • Part 3: Review of SDTC
    • Part 4: Discussion of volunteer program.
    • Section 3:
    • GOALS AND OBJECTIVES FOR EFD
    • EFD Administration
    • SGS
    • STDC
    • Volunteering
    Introduction Report Contents
    • Section 4:
    • STRATEGIC PLAN
    • SGS
    • STDC
    • Volunteering
    • EFD Administration
    Mission A guiding principle in the analysis in this report was that EFD’s mission would remain in place: “ EFD strengthens and empowers local social organizations to enable them to improve and expand their educational service for disadvantaged children…..EFD firmly believes that services for disadvantaged children should be provided by Vietnamese organizations.” (From 2003-2007 strategic plan)
  • 4. Section 1 SITUATIONAL ANALYSIS: EDUCATION IN VIETNAM IN 2006
  • 5. 1. Education In Vietnam In 2006 – Overview Analysis of Trends in Mainstream Education Based on statistics and reports from various international agencies, Vietnam is conducting a large-scale upgrade of its educational system . Every available educational measure in use today - enrollment rates in k-12 or university programs, teacher to student ratios, handicapped access or test scores – is on the increase. This is good news for the majority of chiildern in the country. Chart: Out of School Children in Vietnam Versus Other South and Southeast Asian Countries BUT while these trends are most definitely positive, there is still a very high number of children who are not attending school. Research was done to determine how many are out of school, who they are, why they are not in school, what challenges they face, and what programs are available to help them. Section 1: Situational Analysis Part 1: Trends in Education
  • 6. 1. Trends In School Enrollment, 2000-2005 Pre and Primary School Enrollment Levels, Section 1: Situational Analysis Part 1: Trends in Education BREAK DOWN BY AGE GROUP 1. From Birth to Pre-Primary, Ages 0-2, Nursery School, Population 3.7 million children In the area of early childhood care and education (referred to as ECCE by UNESCO), the VN government has been promoting day care centers to support 2 career families. About 13 percent (481,000) of the children in this age group are in day care centers (CPFC) but the majority of these children stay at home. (No chart) 2. Pre-Primary, Ages 3-5, Kindergarten, Population 4.8 million kids Currently, about 57 percent of the children in this age group (2.1 million) attend kindergarten, leaving about 2.7 million kids out of school at this time. This is not necessarily an indication of exclusion, since many families choose to keep their children at home in the early years. (See chart, note 1 to right.) 3. Primary School Education, Age 6-10, Primary Grades 1-5, Population 8.2 million About 5% of the primary school age children are out of school in Vietnam, or about 410,000. This is much lower than the global average, which is an estimated 18% (115 million) of the primary school age children (between the age of 6 or 7 to 11). (Globally, the five most significant (statistically) factors affecting primary school enrollment are are: age , sex , income , geography (rural vs. urban) and level of mother’s education . See Note 2.) Note 1: The five age groups discussed on this and the next slide are used by UNESCO to track progress on education around the world. The data in the charts is for the years 1999-2005. Vietnam is the lighter bar and Korea is the darker bar. The charts were created using UNESCO’s data base. Note 2. Source: “Children Out of School: Measuring Exclusion from Primary Education,” UNESCO Institute For Statistics, Montreal. An excellent in-depth report on primary education around the world, though does not include pre-primary and secondary school analysis. Pre and Primary School Enrollment Levels (Ages 2-10, Nursery through Grade Four) Population 13 million While it has not been historically common for very young children to go to school, the trend is changing due to the trend of two career families in Vietnam. Hence while less than 50% of children in the pre-primary age group (ages 3-5) are in school, enrollment rates at this age group are increasing. By the time kids reach primary school ages, however, the enrollment rates spike to 90% or higher.
  • 7. 1. Trends In School Enrollment, 2000-2005 Secondary School 5. Higher Secondary – Ages 15-18, Grades 10-12, Population 5.5 million children The drop off in attendance rates is quite dramatic in upper secondary school, where only a little more than 50 percent of children are in school. This translates into about 2.5 million children out of school. The drop off is even sharper when moving into higher education, where only on in ten graduates goes on to university, of a total in the age group of about 8.2 million. (Gross enrollment. Interestingly, the VN Government does not release net enrollment for secondary school. Secondary School (Ages 11-18, Grades 5-12, Population 13 million ) T he enrolment rate for secondary school, ages 11-18, drops off dramatically. Today, 73 % of secondary school aged children are enrolled in school (compared to 89% in primary school.) While secondary school enrollment has improved by leaps and bounds since 1991, when it is was 32 percent, a 27% absentee rates translates into roughly 3.5 million kids out of school in the age range. (About 13 million children in the age range total.) Interestingly, in the secondary school range, there is little difference in dropout rates between girls and boys. (Net enrollment) 4. Lower Secondary -- Ages 11-15, Grades 5-9, Population 7.5 million children The trend of dropout rates increasing as age increases is evident also when a breakout is shown between lower and upper secondary. As the chart to the rights shows, the enrollment rates for children in the 11-15 year old age group begin to dwindle from 90 percent level of primary school. The VCPFC estimates that 11.5 percent of children in this age group are out of school, or about 860,000 . However, the overall trend is positive in the country over the last five years. (Net enrollment) Section 1: Situational Analysis Part 1: Trends in Education
  • 8. 1. Trends In School Enrollment, 2000-2005 Summary
    • Summary
    • Vietnam has comparatively high enrollment rates in primary and lower secondary school .
    • It has comparably low upper secondary school enrollment .
    • In total, of the total 20 million school age children in primary and secondary school, about 3.7 million are out of school.
    Section 1: Situational Analysis Part 1: Trends in Education 9,670,000 --------- 29,700,000 --------- TOTALS 2,500,000 50% 5,500,000 15-18 Upper Secondary 860,000 89% 7,500,000 12-15 Lower Secondary 410,000 95% 8,200,000 6-11 Primary 2,700,000 57% 4,800,000 3-5 Kindergarten 3,200,000 13% 3,700,000 0-2 Nursery Non-Enrolled Enrolled Pop. Ages Grades
  • 9. 2. Educational Exclusion in Vietnam Five Major Groups – Rationale for Analysis
    • 1. Why Spend Time Analyzing the Different Groups of Children in Need of Education?
    • While the preceding analysis shows the numbers of children out of school it does not breakdown the reasons they are out of school. Stating what these reasons are from EFD’s point of view can help the organization gain clarity in steps three and four of the strategic planning process: long term goal setting and the strategic plan itself.
    • For example, if EFD decides that street children are the group it would like to focus on, that would mean creating programs that support shelters and street-based programs. If it is handicapped children, that would mean working with families, the government or NGOs.
    • Given that there are millions of children who are not currently in mainstream schools, and hundreds of organizations working with these children, it can be helpful to spend time thinking about which group of children and which organizations to support.
    • Grouping children in this way also demonstrates that the specific kind of “education for development” will vary according to the kind of situation the child finds him or herself in.
    Section 1: Situational Analysis Part 2: Educational Exclusion
  • 10. Educational Exclusion in Vietnam Five Major Groups – Definition and Size Section 1: Situational Analysis Part 2: Educational Exclusion
    • 25,000 est.
    • 50,000 est.
    • 500,000.
    • 840,000
    • 2.2 million
    Description Group Five Different Groups of Children Who Would Benefit from Improved Access to Education Definition and Size of Each Group NOTE: ( The CPFC releases the number of children who enter and leave reform school each year ( 2,200 and 1,800 respectively in 2004) but does not disclose the total number of children in reform school. This is an area for further study. How many reform schools are there? Are there any in HCMC? How many children are housed there?) There are an estimated [15,000] sex workers in Vietnam. According to the CPFC there were 1,088 children in prison in 2004.
    • Group 5: ABUSIVE OR INDENTURED LABOR Separated from their families and living or work under extreme conditions (bonded labor, prostitutes, etc)
    The government estimates about 16,000 children are living on the streets, which is probably a low estimate, and there were no data available on migrant children.
    • Group 4 : WITHOUT FAMILY OR SHELTER. Separated from their families and live on the streets to support themselves, or but in migrant status.
    There are about 140,000 orphans in Vietnam (CPFC. The government also estimates about 200,000 children are living in shelters (CPFC). And there are about 200,000 handicapped children living in handicapped shelters mentioned in group 2.
    • Group 3: WITHOUT FAMILY IN SHELTERS Separated from their families and live in shelters, orphanages, half ways houses and reform schools.
    There are about 1.2 million handicapped children in Vietnam, and MOET estimates that about 240,000 handicapped are currently in school which means about 860,000 are out of school. Of these, about 200,000 are living without their families according to the CPFC, and are also included in group 3 below.
    • Group 2: DISABLED OR HANDICAPPED Not in School Because Disabled
    The percentage of the child population that is working and out of school increases with age, and peaks at the end of upper secondary school. This is by far the largest category of children who are not getting an education.
    • Group 1: POOR WITH FAMILY . Working to Support Family and unable to attend school.
  • 11. Addressing the Need for Education Programming and EFD Opportunities
    • Why Spend Time Analyzing the Different Organizations Working On Educational Issues?
    • (Next slide)
    • The preceding slide showed the groups of children that are out of school, but does not make it clear how educational opportunities – and what kinds of opportunities – can help them move forward with their lives.
    • The next two slides show how education plays a role in the development of the children in need, and what EFD’s current programming offerings are and what possible opportunities exist for future work in that area for EFD.
    • The summary slide after that shows how different kinds of organizations work differently in the five sectors of children analyzed above. The chart is similar to a “customer-product-competitor” matrix used in business analysis. In this instance, however, the “customers” are children, the “competitors” are potential project partners, and the “products” are the programs and services offered to children.
    • The purpose of this section is to show where EFD does and not does offer educational opportunities for development, who else is working in that area and hence could be a potential project partner.
    Section 1: Situational Analysis Part 3: Educ. Programming
  • 12. Educational Exclusion in Vietnam General Priorities and EFD’s Current Involvement Section 1: Situational Analysis Part 2: Educ. Programming
    • The shelters receive support from EFD through funding for shelter infrastructure and equipment and training of shelter staff.
    • EFD does some work with schools to improve access for the disabled (e.g. Tri Tri), but the bulk of its work with handicapped children is done through “shelter-based education.” (Next group)
    • EFD offers support to this population indirectly through the IE SGS program, which provides buildings and equipment to schools in poor areas.
    • EFD does not provide financial assistance to the families whose children are working and unable to attend school. If EFD were to have a greater impact in this area, it could use either the “matching donor model” (see Saigon Children’s Charity where donors are matched with kids) or the private partnership model (where businesses or other INGOs provide school tuition.)
    EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMMING How To Meet the Needs of Children in each Area Programming focuses on: + food, housing, health. + basic education (love classes, life skills, English) + referral to schools + family reunification
    • Group 3: Separated from their families and live in shelters, orphanages, half ways houses and reform schools.
    • CPFC
    • INGOs and NGOs
    Programming focuses on: + provide the facilities + transportation + equipment necessary
    • Group 2: Not in School Because Disabled
    • MOLISA SCHOOLS
    • INGOs and NGOs
    Programming for this population focuses on: + funding of school fees; + uniforms; + parent outreach; + building new schools
    • Group 1: Children Working to Support Family
    • ASSISTANCE FROM:
    • MOET SCHOOLS
    • MOLISA SCHOOLS
    • INGOs
    • NGOs
  • 13. Educational Exclusion in Vietnam EFD’s Current Involvement (cont.) Section 1: Situational Analysis Part 2: Educ. Programming
    • The areas of opportunity for EFD and others is to look into using its funding or training capabilities to support those who are working with children in extreme situations – bonded labor, prostitution, or prisons. It could also form partnerships in order to make this happen.
    • Historically, EFD began its work with street children, and continues supporting this kind of education through Cau Han, Thao Dan and other shelters continues to be an area of focus. The major opportunities for EFD at this level are (1) to expand the range of activities that EFD funds at the organizations serving this sector of children, (discussed below); and (2) to expand the number of shelters that EFD supports and funds.
    EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMMING How To Meet the Needs of Children in each Area NOTE: ( The CPFC releases the number of children who enter and leave reform school each year ( 2,200 and 1,800 respectively in 2004) but does not disclose the total number of children in reform school. This is an area for further study. How many reform schools are there? Are there any in HCMC? How many children are housed there?)
    • The major educational priorities at this level are to teach children that they have rights, that there are support systems in the country to help them, and helping them find the people who can help them.
    • Group 5: Separated from their families and living or work under extreme conditions (bonded labor, prostitutes, etc)
    • UNKNOWN
    The major educational priorities: + finding shelter + family reunification + basic life skills (safe sex, drug prevention, health care); + referral to social service organizations
    • Group 4 : Separated from their families and live on the streets to support themselves, or living with their families but in migrant status and unable to attend school.
    • INGOs and NGOs
    • CPFC
  • 14. Addressing the Need for Education Matrix Showing Children/Partners/Services Section 1: Situational Analysis Part 3: Educational Programm.
    • Recruiting
    • Scholarships
    • Job Placement
    • Recruiting
    • Scholarships
    • Job Placement
    • Recruiting
    • Scholarships
    • Job Placement
    • Voc. Training Schools
    • MOET
    • MOLISA
    • NGO/INGO
    • Outreach
    • Street outreach
    • Health Services
    • Life Skills
    • Referral
    • Family Reunif.
    • Shelter
    • Basic services (housing, food, health care)
    • Drug rehab., counseling
    • Love classes
    • School advocacy
    • Vocational Training and Job Placement
    • Provide a place to live
    • Provide training
    • Provide income
    • Love classes (basic education for non-enrolled children)
    • Community and family education
    Shelters
    • Law enforcement
    • Family Reunification (CPFC)
    • Vocational Training (MOLISA)
    • New MOET schools
    • Purchase learning tools
    • Reduce prejudice
    • Reduce School Fees
    • ABE/CLC Classes
    • Parent Education & Awareness
    VN Government (MOET, CPFC, MOLISA)
    • Direct intervention
    • Awareness and child rights
    • Rehabilitation programs
    • Family Reunification
    • Supporting local VN NGOs
    • Fund vocational training
    • Salaries of staff
    • Fund equipment
    • Fund staff training
    • Supporting local VN NGOs
    • Funding new schools
    • Funding learning tools
    • Supporting local VN NGOs ($, training, etc.)
    • Pay Tuition
    • Build Schools
    • Buy Uniforms
    INGOs (Plan Int., UNESCO, UNICEF, WB, etc.)
    • ---
    • ----
    • School enrollment
    • Inclusive education
    • Outreach to families
    Primary and Secondary Schools Street Programs and Referral
    • Health care, life skills, referral,
    Group Four On “Streets”
    • Same as above
    Group One Working Children at home
    • Referral
    Group Two Disabled
    • ---
    Group Five Abusive Labor
    • Health care, life skills, referral,
    Group Three In Shelters or orphanages
  • 15. EFD Partners– Organizational Needs Rationale
    • Why Analyze the Needs of Local NGO Organizations?
    • While the preceding slides show which children are in need, and who is doing what to help, it does not show HOW EFD’s approach to building organizational capability is responding to the changing priorities and needs of project partners . The educational playing field, the rules and regulations promulgated by the government, and most importantly the needs of children are constantly changing.
    • As a part of this planning process, the question was raised whether EFD would want to revisit its organizational development philosophy in light of the feedback received from project partners (see below). The next slide illustrates the range of organizational activities that EFD could potentially support.
      • At the current time, the EFD organizational development philosophy with the SGS is that “sustainable” benefit can be achieved by purchasing vocational training equipment, educational supplies, building repair and construction and funding of some office equipment.
      • The development philosophy with SDTC is that staff training when decoupled from financing can provide a continuous and more timely source of support to staff than training that is tied to financing, as was done in the past.
    Section 1: Situational Analysis Part 4: NGO Needs Assessment.
  • 16. EFD’s Approach to Capability Building Breakdown by Line Item Section 1: Situational Analysis Part 4: NGO Needs Assessment.
    • YES
    • Industrial Vocational Training Equipment & Machinery
    • SOME
    • SOME
    • YES
    • NO
    • NO
    • NO
    • SOME
    • NO
    • YES
    • NO
    • YES
    • YES
    • NO
    EFD FUNDING?
    • Office Equipment (Photocopiers, computers, furniture)
    • Materials related to vocational training (fabric, cooking supplies, hairdressing supplies)
    • Professional Services (Insurance, Legal, Accounting)
    • Training Costs
    Marketing Fundraising Human Res. Operating Expenses Infrastructure Program Related Expenses Organizational Area
    • Building Construction and Expansion for schools
    • Outreach & Public Relations
    • Fundraising
    • Director and Staff Salaries & Benefits
    • Utilities (Electric, water, gas)
    • Office Rent
    • School fees for children
    • Classroom supplies such as books, pencils, paper, tables, blackboards (for those with onsite teaching programs)
    • Direct expenses for children (food, clothing)
    Line Item
  • 17. EFD Partners– Organizational Needs Prioritizing Organizational Needs
    • Which of the Organizational Needs Should EFD Be Meeting?
    • If the preceding slide is a list of an NGOs most important activities and expenses, the next question is how does EFD choose to support the work of these organizations to achieve their own missions or goals?
    • The first answer to this of course is that EFD does this in three ways: through funding, training and consulting. The follow on question is what should EFD fund, what training should EFD provide, and what kind of consultants should it provide?
    • In Sept. 2006, EFD undertook a series of interviews with 18 local organizations working in the area of education, including 13 EFD project partners, to understand their most pressing organizational needs.
    • The most frequently stated needs were for building expansion and staff training (see table for all results.) Since these are EFD’s two main areas of program focus, these was most likely some bias in the results.
    • Other frequently mentioned organizational needs included market communications to increase awareness of project partner services, marketing of project partners vocational training products, job placement for vocational training students and assistance from volunteer experts in areas such as accounting, organizational development, teaching english, long term planning and computer systems.
    Section 1: Situational Analysis Part 4: NGO Needs Assessment.
  • 18.
    • Infrastructure (8X). At TD, there is the need for more training space, at NT, for more living space, at Cau Han, space to hold students in drop in classes, at Cay Bang for a playground, 15 Mai for long term shelter after graduation from VT or Prim school.
    • Staff training (6x). The kinds of training needed varied from psychology of handicapped, how to work with families on inclusive education, how to market products produced by students, etc.
    • Teaching supplies (4x). Many centers and schools mentioned the need for more teaching supplies, mostly books and audio-visual aids,
    • Outreach (4x) This was mentioned at vocational centers (DELISA-H, Thang Long) and schools working on inclusive education First June, Thang Long.
    • Volunteer assistance (3x) These tended to be in the area of providing planning and marketing skills to the schools or centers, and also included a request for Enligsh teachers (DELISA-C)
    • Marketing assistance. (4X) There four requests for assistance in marketing products produced by children to prospective buyers.
    • Job placement. (3x) There was a wide gap between the reported success rates, with some VT schools placing nearly 100% of their students and some placing hardly any.
    • Other needs mentioned more than once:
      • School Fees. (2x)
      • Basic living costs for students (food, health) (2x)
      • Higher staff and teacher salaries. (2x)
    EFD Partners– Organizational Needs Prioritizing Organizational Needs none Section 1: Situational Analysis Part 4: NGO Needs Assessment. See appendix one for interview notes which provide more detail the interview responses.
  • 19. SITUATIONAL ANALYSIS Summary The analysis in this section aimed to outline the various programming choices that EFD has today. These choices exist at three levels. Section 1: Situational Analysis Part 5: Summary. WHAT KINDS OF ORGANIZATIONAL NEEDS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED? WHICH KINDS OF ORGANIZATIONS SHOULD EFD SUPPORT? WHICH SEGMENT OF DISADVANTAGED CHILD POPULATION SHOULD EFD TARGET?
    • Orphanage, Prison, Reform Schools
    • For further research
    • Vietnamese NGOs:
    • Than Dat, Nhan Tam, Hy Vong, Cau Han, Green Bamboo, etc.
    • Primary and Secondary & Voc. Training Schools
    • Tri Tri, Cay Bang, DELISA schools
    • INGOs
    • (Plan Int., UNESCO, UNICEF, WB, etc.)
    • VN Government
    • (MOET, CPFC, MOLISA)
    • Group 5:
    • Separated from their families and living or work under extreme conditions (bonded labor, prostitutes, etc) (25,000)
    • Group 4 :
    • Separated from their families and live on the streets to support themselves, or living with their families but in migrant status and unable to attend school.
    • Group 3:
    • Separated from their families and live in shelters, orphanages, half ways houses and reform schools.
    • Group 2:
    • Not in School Because Disabled
    • Group 1:
    • Working to Support Family (2.2 million)
    • Marketing
    • Brochures, flyers, websites,
    • Human Res .
    • Salaries, training, recruiting, retention, benefits
    • Operating Expenses
    • Rent, utilities, office costs (mail, copies etc.)
    • Capital Expenditures
    • Buildings (construction and repair),
    • VT equipment
    • Educational Program Related Expenses
    • Teaching supplies, teacher salaries,
    • school fees
  • 20. SITUATIONAL ANALYSIS Summary
    • Child Population
    • The most surprising finding in the analysis of education in Vietnam was the quantity of children still unable to get a full education. By the end of secondary school, half of the children in the country are already out of school, and one in ten make it through university.
    • Another surprising finding was the high number of disabled children, most of whom live at home.
    • In sum, the numbers show that although the education system is being overhauled, there are still many children who fall between the cracks.
    • Organizational Partners
    • The most important finding in the analysis of the organizations working on access to education for children is the wide range of different programming activities currently underway which represent potential joint venture partners to tackle specific issues, or potential recipients of EFD funding, training or consulting.
    • Some of these organizations serve children who are not currently being reached through EFD programming yet remain some of the most vulnerable and disadvantaged. ( Orphanages, reforms schools, INGOs and NGOs working on abusive labor issues, NGOs that are not currently project partners but who work with children.)
    • Focusing on Specific Organizational Needs.
    • While it has been EFD policy to focus on staff training (through SDTC) and funding of capital costs (buildings and machines), the interviews and analysis show that most NGO partners in Vietnam have a need for assistance in all areas of operation . Each organization we interviewed was in a different situation and had different organizational needs.
    • It was true that at almost all of the organizations we spoke with, there was a need for increased outreach, marketing and awareness of their services. Many of the interviewees expressed the sentiment that they would benefit greatly from having more people be aware of what they did and what their needs are.
    Section 1: Situational Analysis Part 5: Summary.
  • 21. SITUATIONAL ANALYSIS Summary
    • Questions for EFD
    • 1. Was there anything learned in the situational analysis in the previous section that would dictate a change in the programming at EFD?
    • 2. Should EFD continue to dedicate the current level of resources to each of its program areas, or does the anlaysis show that there are some areas of high needs which should dictate increasing work in one area over another?
    • 5. Are there other programs EFD should initiate given the situational analysis?
      • For example, the analysis shows how few organizations are working children in bonded labor. How if at all can EFD respond to the needs of this group? Should it be through training professionals who work in this are already (SDTC)? Should it be through providing grants to their organizations (SGS)? Or bringing in foreign experts (Volunteer promotion)?
      • Another example is the high number of disabled children who are not able to attend school. Can EFD partner with other organizations working with handicapped children to expand the reach of services, such as schools, disability advocacy groups or government agencies?
    Section 1: Situational Analysis Part 5: Summary.
  • 22. Section 2 ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR EFD Overview
  • 23. EFD Issues and Opportunities Overview by organizational function Section 2: Issues and Opportunities Part 1: Summary. As a part of the strategic planning process, analysis was done on the issues and opportunities in the programming areas at EFD (SGS and SDTC) and to some degree on the organizational and communication issues and opportunities at EFD, but there was not as much time spent on the fundraising and administrative issues. It was assumed that the programming “dog” would wag the “tail” of support functions listed to the right. Organization Communications Finances
    • Annual Report
    • Newsletter
    • Website
    • Brochures
    • Financial Reporting
    • Fundraising
    • + EFD Vietnam
    • + EFD Belgium
    • + EFD Switzerl.
    • + EFD Netherl.
    Programming
    • Small Grant Scheme
    • SDTC
    • Volunteering
    • Organizational Chart
    • Staffing Needs
    • +Full time
    • + Volunteer
    • Hiring Plans
    Administration
    • Accounting
    • Technology
    • Equipment
    Focus of work to date To come after clarification on goals in previous section
  • 24. Section 2 ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES A. Small Grant Scheme
  • 25. Small Grant Scheme Issues and Opportunities
    • Review of Small Grant Scheme
    • The SGS is a universally appreciated and respected program among the partner organizations. There was unanimous praise for its professionalism, integrity and speed of implementation versus other similar programs.
    • Since inception, 13 grants totaling $122,000 have been invested in partner organizations.
    • The average grant size made to the 13 partners was $9,411.
    • The grants that made up this review were made to
      • (8) vocational training centers,
      • (2) primary schools,
      • (2) combined vocational centers/primary schools center,
      • (1) drop in center.
    Data does not include Dang Tran Con School or Thao Dan Section 2: Issues and Opportunities Small Grant Scheme EFD invests heavily in vocational training centers comparatively little in inclusive education and SBR
  • 26. Breakdown of SGS Funding By partner and activity EFD mostly invests in “hard assets” such as equipment for vocational training and building construction and repair (infrastructure.) The chart below illustrates the relative size of grants made over the life of the program. Section 2: Issues and Opportunities Small Grant Scheme
  • 27. Breakdown of SGS Funding By type of organization and type of line item
    • In order to understand the current approach of the small grant scheme in practice, a more detailed analysis of grants made to date was made. The funding was broken down by in three ways, and the key findings are listed here.
    • Which of the five groups of children in need of access to education discussed above are being funded?
      • The bulk of the small grant scheme funding today goes to children in group one (children living at home but working to support their families) and group two (handicapped children who live with their families). This is a key finding because it shows that although EFD’s historical work has been with street children, today’s SGS is actually meeting the needs mostly of children who live with their families. (See next slide for details of this.)
    • Which kinds of project partners are being funded?
      • The small grant funding is focused at the moment on vocational training centers for children who live at home and commute to the center. These centers accounted for about $60,000 of the total funding of the program. There was relatively little funding to either handicapped or able-bodied shelters , which work with children who lack a home.
    • Which organizational line items are being funded?
      • The breakdown of funding by line item shows that the focus of the SGS is on capital expenditures such as building-related costs, industrial equipment for the training centers, and teaching supplies for the classroom. Much less funding was directed to the human resources, operating expenses, and marketing areas of operation.
    Section 2: Issues and Opportunities Small Grant Scheme
  • 28. Addressing the Need for Education EFD Programming Focus $37,000 $13,000 $1,650 $14,000 $30,000 $13,000 The size of the circle is roughly equivalent to the amount being spent on that item. Section 2: Issues and Opportunities Small Grant Scheme
    • Recruiting
    • Scholarships
    • Job Placement
    • Recruiting
    • Scholarships
    • Job Placement
    • Recruiting
    • Scholarships
    • Job Placement
    Voc. Training Schools
    • ---
    • Street outreach
    • Health Services
    • Life Skills
    • Referral
    • Basic services (housing, food, health care)
    • Drug rehab., counseling
    • Love classes
    • School advocacy
    • Vocational Training and Job Placement
    • Provide a place to live
    • Provide training
    • Provide income
    • Love classes (basic education for non-enrolled children)
    • Community and family education
    Shelters
    • Law enforcement
    • Family Reunification (CPFC)
    • Vocational Training
    • New schools
    • Funding learning tools
    • Public education
    • Reduce School Fees
    • ABE/CLC Classes
    • Parent Education & Awareness
    VN Government (MOET, CPFC, MOLISA)
    • Direct intervention
    • Awareness and child rights
    • Rehabilitation programs
    • Family Reunification
    • Supporting local VN NGOs
    • Fund vocational training
    • Salaries of staff
    • Fund equipment
    • Fund staff training
    • Supporting local VN NGOs
    • Funding new schools
    • Funding learning tools
    • Supporting local VN NGOs ($, training, etc.)
    • Pay Tuition
    • Build Schools
    INGOs (Plan Int., UNESCO, UNICEF, WB, etc.)
    • ---
    • ----
    • Will take children from shelters who can afford fees
    • Inclusive education
    • Outreach to families
    Primary and Secondary Schools Street Programs and Referral
    • Health care, life skills, referral,
    Group Four On “Streets”
    • Same as above
    Group One Working Children
    • Referral
    Group Two Disabled
    • ---
    Group Five Bonded
    • Health care, life skills, referral,
    Group Three In Shelters or orphanages
  • 29. EFD Partners– Organizational Needs A List of Basic Needs $12,000 $3,000 $3,000 $52,000 $3,000 $30,000 $2,000 Section 2: Issues and Opportunities Small Grant Scheme
    • YES
    • Industrial Vocational Training Equipment & Machinery
    • SOME
    • SOME
    • YES
    • NO
    • NO
    • NO
    • SOME
    • NO
    • YES
    • NO
    • YES
    • YES
    • NO
    • Office Equipment (Photocopiers, computers, furniture)
    • Materials related to vocational training (fabric, cooking supplies, hairdressing supplies)
    • Professional Services (Insurance, Legal, Accounting)
    • Training Costs
    Marketing Fundraising Human Res. Operating Expenses Infrastructure Program Related Expenses Organizational Area
    • Building Construction and Expansion for schools
    • Outreach & Public Relations
    • Fundraising
    • Director and Staff Salaries & Benefits
    • Utilities (Electric, water, gas)
    • Office Rent
    • School fees for children
    • Classroom supplies such as books, pencils, paper, tables, blackboards (for those with onsite teaching programs)
    • Direct expenses for children (food, clothing)
    Line Item
  • 30. Breakdown of SGS Funding Background Analysis
    • A breakdown of how SGS funds are invested reveals the following:
    • The SGS supports educational organizations that cater to families (75 percent) more than kids without families (25%).
    • Ninety (90) percent of SGS funding is for either buildings, equipment or supplies.
    • About 80 percent of funding is directed at vocational training, versus about 10 percent for SBR and 10 for Inclusive Education
    Section 2: Issues and Opportunities Small Grant Scheme
  • 31. Section 2: ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES B. Social Development Training Center
  • 32. Social Development Training Center Program Overview EFD decided four years that a stand-alone training center would better serve the needs of its partners, who were not able to receive and finish training fast enough to apply their learning to the projects EFD was financing. It found a partner, Ton Duc Thang University, and together they created a new training in center in HCMC serving the needs of staff members at local social service organizations. Only an idea at the writing of the last four year plan, today the center is serving hundreds of people who are helping thousands of people.
    • Summary of Partnership Agreement
    • EFD currently provides SDTC with:
      • - About $8,000 per year in direct funding from Cortina (until the year 200x);
      • - The labor of EFD project officer and EFD country coordinator and volunteers who manage the training center and teach there;
      • - Professional foreign volunteers who help manage and teach at the center, in areas such as social work, public relations and web design;
      • - Vietnamese volunteer translators and editors;
    • TDT provides SDTC:
      • an office;
      • training space;
      • -the unpaid services of the training centers director, a professor at the university;
      • - a vice director;
      • - a license to operate.
    • SDTC itself now has:
      • -A project officer;
      • Procedures in place for scheduled and tailored training
      • A track record of success
      • $14,000 in funds;
      • -Brand name and network;
    Section 2: Issues and Opportunities SDTC
  • 33. Social Development Training Center Programming Scheduled Trainings and Tailor-Made Trainings: Since its founding SDTC has offered 20 scheduled trainings and 17 tailor-made trainings. Note: This list is a best guess of courses offered, and should not be used in communications materials until confirmed. Section 2: Issues and Opportunities SDTC Scheduled Trainings Tailored Trainings Triangle in ‘05 HR Management For Triangle in ‘05 Marketing Triangle, AA VN, GFS in ’05 For Oxfam in ’06 Gen F Sw in ’06 For U.N. in ’06 TdH in ‘06 For STC-S in ’06 For TdH in ’05, ’06’ For TdH in ’05, ’06’ Yes Comm. Skills - Kids/Families General Management Yes Monitoring for Results Yes Yes Yes Project Management Yes Strategy Planning Yes Supervisory Management Yes People Management Yes Basic Org. Dev. Yes Communication Skills Yes Yes Life Skills for Adolescents Yes Yes Yes Fundraising and Public Relations NGO Management Yes (2x) Counseling Skills Yes Psych. Of Disadv. Children Yes Introduction to Social Work (2) Yes Introduction to Social Work (1) Child Psychology and Counseling Yes Children’s Rights Yes Yes Recruitment Methods Yes Yes Child Psychology (same as below?) Yes 2004 Yes 2005 2006 Yes Yes Project Proposal Writing Volunteer Involvement
  • 34. Social Development Training Center Financial Review A financial analysis of SDTC revealed that while the courses themselves are starting to break even or even make money. It also showed that the operating costs are considerably lower than the annual grant funding, resulting in a significant surplus. The cash available provides a solid financial base, but raises two questions: (1) What future growth plans will this cash support? (2) If there are no future growth plans, is the grant funding excessively high at the moment? _____________________ NOTES 1. The organization currently has a $14,000 surplus (See note below); 2. Scheduled trainings at SDTC can not be relied on to create a profit, and on average operate at about break even; 3. The EFD policy of adding in an administrative to tailored trainings is helping SDTC’s financial situation; 4. The large tailor made Terre des Hommes training in 2006 will generate a significant fee for SDTC; 5. There was a large expense on equipment in 2005 which was for a computer and computer projector; Note: This is based on the reported inflows and outflows of SDTC annual and quarterly reports available on EFD’s server, and on known funding amounts from Cortina. The actual cash balance should be verified by a review of SDTC bank statements. Section 2: Issues and Opportunities SDTC
  • 35. Social Development Training Center Organizational Review While EFD and TDT have made significant progress building programming and creating a solid financial base, SDTC has yet to develop into a stand alone organization. SDTC is run by three different organizations working together. While this results in a very efficient use of resources, and keeps overhead down, the fact that the leaders of the organization are all working on a part time or volunteer basis means that it has been hard to build a stand alone entity. The chart below shows which activities SDTC is “outsourcing” to its “parent” organizations and which it is doing itself.
    • STAFF
    • EFD Country Coordinator EFD Project Officer EFD Volunteers
    • DUTIES
    • Educational Programming
    • Curriculum Development - Needs Assessment - Tailored Training Course - Course Instruction
    • 2. Fundraising 3. Public Relations 4. Strategic Planning
    TON DUC THANG STAFF Director Vice Director DUTIES Work with TDT Needs assessment Training Course Budgeting A more detailed organizational analysis was done to understand the current needs of SDTC and to brainstorm potential ideas to contribute to its growth. This is available at the end of this section. Section 2: Issues and Opportunities SDTC Director Educational Programming Fundraising Administration Office Management Accounting Course Logistics
  • 36. Social Development Training Center Program Review VISION “SDTC aims to be the leading training and consulting centre in South Vietnam for the social development sector, focusing in particular on organizations and departments working with/for disadvantaged children.” MISSION “To offer relevant, high quality and affordable services, both in training and consultancy, to staff working in the social development sector, with a specific focus on organizations and departments working with/for disadvantaged children, in order to achieve greater positive impact of their professional efforts.” Summary of SDTC Strategic Plan (for details of plan, see SDTC strategic plan, available at EFD) With this situation in mind, EFD and TDT jointly created a strategic plan to build up the organizational infrastructure at SDTC, which laid the specific steps necessary to grow. While the plan had all the ingredients of a successful approach to capacity building, the implementation of the plan has “fallen between the cracks” of EFD, TDT, and SDTC, meaning that at the present time there are not plans to make the necessary steps to build the organization. The next step, then, is for both EFD and SDTC to revisit the strategic plan, gain consensus on its goals, and begin to implement its recommendations. Section 2: Issues and Opportunities SDTC Goal 1. To develop a good reputation and to be known as an organisation that delivers high quality and relevant services that are accessible to all target customers; Goal 5. To play a central role in a network of national and international organisations and individuals that foster the advancement of Social Work and Development in Viet Nam and the region; Strategic Goals Goal 3. To secure a stable funding base in order to ensure the ongoing development of SDTC Goal 4. To equip and maintain facilities and human resources to the highest standards Goal 2. To take a leading position in Viet Nam in introducing new methods and topics to the area of Social Work and Development
  • 37. Social Development Training Center Preliminary OD Analysis The following analysis was done to gain a better understanding of roles and responsibilities at SDTC. The first column represents either an existing position or one that exists in practice but has not been added to the organization chart. The other columns represent possible issues and ways to solve them for each of these areas. Section 2: Issues and Opportunities SDTC Whether or not EFD wants to continue to manage the education function at SDTC, it is in both organizations best interest to create a position of education and training manager, and create a job description. If in the future EFD wants to reduce its role, it will be able to hire someone for the position. If it wants to keep the role in-house, it can do that as well, but the creating a position can create organizational clarity and transparency. Like the role of director, it is being performed by the same five people. No one has this title right now.
    • Tracking of key topic areas in the social service sector for potential course development.
    • Recruitment and development of SDTC instructors.
    • Is a content area expert in at least one of SDTC three main content areas (see above.) and provides classroom instruction for some courses.
    • Oversees course quality, monitoring and evaluation.
    • Leads Annual needs assessment and develops deep understanding of needs HCMC social service organizations.
    • Introduces innovative teaching methods into SDTC courses.
    2. Manager of Training and Education It will be very hard for SDTC’s to meet its long in the long term without a full time director, and EFD’s first priority should be to either appoint the current part time director into a full time position or if find a full-time director and fund his salary. The typical job responsibilities of a director are split among five people - three at EFD and two at TDT. Various
    • Oversight of all activities of training center.
    • Head of fundraising activities.
    • Works closely with Advisory Board
    • Provides direction on training operations.
    • Starts new program areas at SDTC.
    • Oversees administration.
    • Learns continually about local NGO staff
    1. Director of SDTC: Holder of Title Hypothetical Job Description (There are not currently actual job desriptions) Major Opportunity/ Recommendation Major Issues KEY ROLES
  • 38. Social Development Training Center Preliminary OD Analysis Section 2: Issues and Opportunities SDTC Freeing up Houng’s time to help with the educational programming is high on EFD’s priority list. Mr Huong does not have time to do much of this work and needs an assistant. The work is being done by Mr. Houng although his title is Project Officer.
    • Answers phone;
    • Mails letters;
    • Photocopies;
    • Administrative help for course delivery.
    6. Assistant Office Manager Mr. Huong is part office manager and part program support and does not have enough time to manage the office. The work is being done by Mr. Houng although his title is Project Officer.
    • Manages office activities such as phones, copying, mail.
    • Able to provide administrative support for:
    • Training programs
    • Fundraising
    • Marketing and PR
    • Accounting
    4. Administration Manager. The creation of an advisory board could create numerous dividends for SDTC at a relatively low cost to both EFD and TDT. The lack of an advisory board means that SDTC is missing a source of on-going support in all areas of the organization: programming, fundraising, organizational development There is no advisory board at the moment.
    • An influential person in the social development sector: educator, NGO or INGO staff, government official, business leaders.
    • Able to provides guidance on key strategic issues.
    • Helps create opportunities for the center by networking within Vietnam
    3. Advisory Board (unpaid) Holder of Title Hypothetical Job Description (There are not currently actual job desriptions) Major Opportunity Major Issues KEY ROLES
  • 39. Social Development Training Center Preliminary OD Analysis Section 2: Issues and Opportunities SDTC Lack of a clear strategy for the future makes it difficult to create exciting and attention grabbing communications materials. The work is being done by Mr. Houng although his title is Project Officer.
    • Has experience in the field of social development, mid-career education or business marketing or all three.
    • Works with head of educational programming to sell tailored program.
    • Designs, writes and publishes annual report.
    • Head of public relations.
    • Places ads, creates flyers and brochures.
    • Can be done by director in short term
    Head of Marketing and PR EFD could create a director of fundraising at SDTC, and still continue to provide EFD funds. IN fact, at the current time, it would have to raise funds to pay for the fundraiser, though the fundraiser could pay for him/herself eventually. Fundraising responsibility resides with EFD and the funds also come from EFD. Work is being done by EFD.
    • Responsible for projecting financial needs of SDTC and raising necessary funds.
    • Has a background in development sector fundraising.
    • Knowledgeable about grant proposal writing.
    • Can be done by director in short term
    Head of Fundraising Hiring a part time professional accountant would also free up time for Mr. Huoung to work on educational programming. Lack of professionally trained accountant at SDTC/EFD has been an issue since there are not professional reports at the moment. The work is being done by Mr. Houng although his title is Project Officer.
    • -Has professional training in accounting.
    • Tracks income and expenses.
    • -Prepares quarterly and annual reports.
    Finance and Accounting Holder of Title Hypothetical Job Description (There are not currently actual job desriptions) Major Opportunity Major Issues KEY ROLES
  • 40. Social Development Training Center Preliminary OD Analysis Summary of OD Analysis The foregoing analysis was done to illustrate one possible way that SDTC could develop its organization, though there are many other approaches that could work as well. Therefore, they are not to be taken as a prescription, but rather as a framework for future work in this area, and possible for discussions among the various people involved in running the center. The “job description” section can be expanded into actual job descriptions with more detail at a later time if these are the positions that EFD, TDT and SDTC choose to create. Section 2: Issues and Opportunities SDTC A goal for the current director is to add a research capability. For future consideration Research Director Included in latest strategic plan. For future consideration Consulting Director Holder of Title Hypothetical Job Description (There are not currently actual job desriptions) Major Opportunity Major Issues KEY ROLES
  • 41. Section 2: ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES B. Volunteerism
  • 42. Volunteer Promotion Issues and Opportunities EFD is viewed by many as an expert in the the area of volunteerism in Vietnam. In addition to being very well connected with numerous local and international organizations, EFD also has considerable expertise and experience in managing successful volunteer projects. Because of its strong history of volunteerism, and its on-going activities today, EFD is contacted by potential volunteers, other INGOs, NGOs, and others who are interested in volunteering, getting a volunteer, or learning more about how to manage volunteers. It has a “volunteer manager” on staff (Nguyen Thi Thu Thuy) who oversees the comings and going of volunteers in their various capacities, and which is a considerable portion of her job. The budget analysis (above) reveals that the amount of staff time and overhead for volunteerism is almost as much for the SDTC. EFD has a large and active volunteer corps consisting of foreigner volunteers, Vietnamese nationals, and overseas volunteers working in their home country. As a part of this planning process, the question has come up whether EFD could create a third program area to help manage and communicate its volunteer programs more clearly. This section of the report looks into the question. VOLUNTEER-RELATED ACTIVITIES AT EFD 1. Managing Foreign Volunteers Who Work at EFD -Typically in an area of need at EFD or one of its partners, these volunteers stay for a period of anywhere from three months to a year. 2.Placing Foreign Volunteers at Project Partners - Usually in conjunction with work being done at EFD. 3. Recruiting and Managing Vietnamese Volunteer Translators - Translations done at meetings, trainings and for editorial work. 4. Recruiting and Managing Vietnamese Volunteers for Office Support - Work done in the EFD office. 5. Working with on line volunteers. - Around the world. 6. Offering training in volunteer management. - At SDTC. 7. Sponsoring the first annual (highly successful!!) “Volunteer Day” with UN Volunteer program. Section 5: Volunteer Promotion Issues and Opportunities
  • 43. Volunteer Promotion Issues and Opportunities Section 5: Volunteer Promotion Issues and Opportunities 1. 2. 3. -Continue to promote IVD?
    • If EFD is promoting volunteerism, should it not also be promoting volunteers at local NGOs?
    IVD was a big success. Recent newsletter on Volunteers. Manual for NGOs Promoting Volunteerism -UNV Grant Project -Volunteer manual -IVD Day -Newsletter 1. 2. 3. - Is the SDTC course a possible venue for finding placement opportunities for volunteers?
    • Attendance and pricing.
    Annual course on volunteerism. Educating on Managing Volunteers -Through SDTC 1. 2. 3. EFD has a large network of VN translators Vietnamese Volunteer Translators 1. 2. 3. Promote with Partners? Is EFD over-using or under-using foreign volunteers at project partners? -Fit between vol. and org. -Language barrier. -Pre-screening. -Length of stay. Two foreign volunteers working at project partners. Foreign Volunteer Placement at Project Partners 1. 2. 3. Would the EFD organization itself benefit from more (or less) foreign volunteers?
    • Volunteer turnover.
    • Attracting new volunteers
    Currently four foreign volunteers working at EFD. Foreign Volunteer Placement at EFD Actions in the 2007-2010 Time Period. Opportunities Key Issues EFD’s Involvement Today ROLES
  • 44. Volunteer Promotion Issues and Opportunities New Volunteer Initiative? Section 5: Volunteer Promotion Issues and Opportunities 1. 2. 3. Alumni. Could foreign EFD volunteers continue to be involved on-line after leaving ? On-Line Volunteers 1. 2. 3. Any changes to this program? Seems to be working HIGH Vietnamese Volunteer Administrative Support -EFD Office PLACING VIETNAMESE VOLUNTEERS EFD Plans in the 2007-2010 Time Period. Questions Key Issues EFD’s Involvement Today ROLES 1. 2. 3. What would be required to create a team of VN local volunteers? Is their interest on the side of local VN professionals? EFD is not involved in this area but could be in the future. Vietnamese Professional Volunteers Recruiting and placing VN professionals with local partner organizations. (Marketing, accounting, fundraising, organizational design, etc.)
  • 45. Section 2: ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES Part C: + Organizational Development + Finances + Communications
  • 46. Issues and Opportunities Organizational Development The EFD organization is quite fluid and changeable. It has a spirit of caring and energetic participation by all involved, which is its strength. It also has a regular influx of expert volunteers who bring new ideas and enthusiasm. It is in the process of deciding to what extent it would benefit from the implementation of more stable management systems both in program areas in administrative functions. Section 2: Issues and Opportunities Organizational Development Organizational Chart – Feb. 2007 VN Country Coordinator Ruth Frans ADMINISTRATION Office Manager Huynh Nhu Accountant Hoang Linh VOLUNTEERS (Foreign) PR and Fundraising Dan Enbysk Website Design Luis Gomez Strategic Planning PROGRAM AREA MANAGERs SDTC Project Officer Nguyen Thuy SGS Program Officer TO BE FILLED Volunteer Promotion Nguyen Thuy Social Work Training Consultant Renee Rivera
  • 47. Issues and Opportunities Organizational Development Organization and Culture Issues + EFD is in the process of building internal management systems to support its long term growth. + EFD delivers so many services with such a small staff and such little funding and as a result spreads its resources over many activities. A fair question is whether resources could be spent in a more focused way to increase their impact. + The distance between the administrative council in Europe and the CC in Vietnam, and the amount of authority vested in the council, makes it difficult at times for the CC to make important decisions “on the ground in Vietnam.” Opportunities + The small staff EFD has in place today is exceptionally capable and highly committed to the mission of the organization. + EFD has a very good reputation among NGOs in Vietnam and can be the basis of future growth + Both SGS and SDTC could be greatly expanded, and the EFD organization itself could grow to support these programs. + The rise of a cadre of professionally trained Vietnamese nationals has increased the pool of potential staff hires and hence the ability of EFD itself to grow. “ MORE TO COME HERE” Section 2: Issues and Opportunities Organizational Development
  • 48. Issues and Opportunities Financial Note: This chart includes labor by the EFD volunteers who receive a salary, but does not include estimates for volunteers who contribute significant time and expertise but are not compensated. Based on an analysis of the 2006 budget, it is clear that EFD delivers an enormous amount of benefit to its partners while running a very “tight” financial ship. Salaries and overhead were allocated across three program areas, as shown in the chart to the right. In the SGS area, total salaries plus allocated overhead equaled about $12,000, with which the organization over saw numerous grant projects and solicited many more. At SDTC, with about $14,000 in salaries and overhead, EFD delivered [12] trainings that affected hundreds of people in dozens of organizations, developed new courses, and offered tailored trainings to project partners. In volunteerism, with about $11,000 in salaries and overhead, EFD manages a large network of local and international volunteers. Considering the size of EFD’s budget (about $40,000 per year in operating expenses plus $80,000 in grant funding to other organizations), the impact it is having in its target group of beneficiaries is remarkably high. By any measure, EFD is making excellent use the funds and other resources at its disposal. Section 2: Issues and Opportunities Finances and Budgeting
  • 49. Issues and Opportunities Communications Section 2: Issues and Opportunities Communications The communications strategy of EFD will be driven by the programming goals, as in the past. Gaining clarity on the long term goals of each of the program areas (next section of this report) will help shape the annual report, newsletter, website and brochures that EFD produces.
    • Which Line Items?
    • Buildings
    • Equipment
    • Training
    • Consultants
    • Salaries (??)
    • Rent (??)
    • Which Programs do we support?
    • Vocational training.
    • Street based referral.
    • Inclusive education.
    • Community awareness.
    • Staff training.
    • ETC
    • Which Organizations?
    • Shelters
    • Vocational Training Centers
    • Schools Working with Disadvantaged
    • Orphanages
    • Half-way Houses
    • ETC
    • Which Types of Children are we trying to reach?
    • Children at home and working.
    • Children at home and handicapped.
    • Children in shelters.
    • Children on the streets.
    • Children in extremely dangerous situations.
    • ETC
    EXAMPLE: SMALL GRANT SCHEME Many of the issues the SGS currently is faced with can be solved with improved communications about what it does and does not fund, even if the funding restrictions are kept in place and no additional categories are added. To facilitate the development of such materials, it is useful to list out what the potential types of funding recipients are.
  • 50. Section 3: SETTING LONG TERM GOALS Three Program Areas
  • 51. Setting Long Term Goals Overview by organizational function Section 3: Long Term Goals Part 1: Summary. As a part of the strategic planning process, some discussion took place about setting goals in each of the functional areas of the EFD organization. This slide, repeated from above, shows where the work was done. Organization Communications Finances
    • Annual Report
    • Newsletter
    • Website
    • Brochures
    • Financial Reporting
    • Fundraising
    • + EFD Vietnam
    • + EFD Belgium
    • + EFD Switzerl.
    • + EFD Netherl.
    Programming
    • Small Grant Scheme
    • SDTC
    • Volunteering
    • Organizational Chart
    • Staffing Needs
    • +Full time
    • + Volunteer
    • Hiring Plans
    Administration
    • Accounting
    • Technology
    • Equipment
    Focus of work to date To come after clarification on goals in previous section
  • 52. SGS Goal Setting Recommendations
    • Expand from Vocational Training To VT and Job Placement VTE has been EFD’s biggest funding area. The majority of funding goes to non-residential centers and funds the purchase of new equipment. It was clear at almost all of the VT centers that we visited though that the next stage for the SGS VTE program is to help students make the transition from job training to employment. This would mean making grants for job placement programs, marketing of products and services the students are producing in school (hairdressing, dolls, motorbike repair), as well as public relations and communications about the students and their readiness for employment.
    • Clarify Inclusive Education Program Goals The use of the term “inclusive education” can be confusing to some applicants because it implies a broad range of services but in actuality, as offered through the SGS, covers a relatively small number of expenses. EFD is not currently set up to fund most of the activities that are commonly referred to as Inclusive Education, such as school fees. It raises the question as to expand the activities funded or use a term that more specifically describes the SGS IE offerings.
    • Expand Street Based Referral Area to Include Shelters One SBR grant (to Cau Han) has had a large impact on the organization and the children. Support for SBR programs reaches children in much need. In addition to the many referral programs in the city, there are also programs run out of shelters that provide street-based referral that are an area of future support.
    • Expand funding to organizations that support children who lack contact with their families. As shown in the analysis above, there is currently a bias in the SGS towards funding training centers that serve children who live with their families but don’t go to school. Much less funding is going towards organizations that support children who live on the streets or are in otherwise extreme situations because they are separated from their families. There is an opportunity for EFD to increase funding to the shelters who work with this at-risk population. It is conceivable that EFD could add a fourth type of SGS funding besides VTE, IE and SBR, something to the effect of “Shelter-Based Education.” Given that the most disadvantaged children are those without families, and who live in shelters, orphanages, or on the street, it is worth considering a proactive approach to reaching out to these kinds of organizations.
    • Increase the types of programs the SGS funds . One of the issues with the way that the SGS is set up is that it funds programs (VT, IE and SBR) rather than organizations. It can be difficult for potential partners to fit their programming activities into the way the EFD defines programs. Furthermore, there are many other programs areas at the various social service organizations the SGS supports which are helping children get an education…..
    Section 3: Small Grant Scheme Long Term Goals
  • 53. SGS Goal Setting Recommendations (Continued)
    • (Continued from previous page) ….and which are not either SBR, IE or VT. For these reasons, it could be useful to reposition the SGS as a more open ended program, as a funding source for projects that can be shown to improve access to education for the most disadvantaged children, even if they are not VT, SBR or IE. Some consideration could also be given to abandoning the three program areas altogether.
    • 4. Expand the kinds of organizational “line items” the SGS funds. With about 90 percent of funds going to either buildings, equipment or supplies, there is room for expansion into other organizational areas. There is some confusion among project partners why EFD has funding restriction on certain basic needs, especially given that these needs are paid for quite often by other INGOs. For example, staff salaries are not funded because of the fear of staff turnover, but staff training is funded, even though the same risk exists. EFD funds operating costs at SDTC but not at partners.
    • 5. Seek Private Sector Partnerships.
    • If EFD continues to believe that its mission is in facilities and equipment and not in staff salaries or operating costs, then it could consider forming partnerships with either private sector or INGO organizations who have as a part of their mission to support these areas. Many of the foreign companies working in HCMC today are in search of opportunities to contribute to the development of the “social sector.”
    • 6. Updating communications materials and taking a more proactive approach to soliciting proposals
    • Given the 3.7 million children out of school, and the hundreds of social service organizations that could theoretically qualify for grants from EFD, it would make sense to take steps to increase awareness of the SGS within HCMC, as there is most certainly unmet demand for the type of funding EFD provides. EFD could aim to increase its $50,000 per year funding levels today to $100,000 by 2010. While much has been written about the SGS in various EFD publications, potential project partners would benefit from more user-friendly and explanatory materials. (At least the ones available in English.) This would include a clear description, as laid out on the next slide, of all the kinds of activities that could possibly be funded, the kinds of children EFD wants to reach, the kinds of organizations EFD wants to work with and the kinds of line items EFD funds. A coordinated communications program would have similar detailed explanation on the website, on flyers for distribution at EFD local events, and in the annual report.
    • 7. Longer term, larger grants.
    • The SGS conducts its funding in relatively small grants for a short period of time over a large number of organizations. Most grants are probably 15-20 percent of the recipients annual budget and last about two years. It is conceivable that EFD would want to also enter into arrangements with partners that involve a larger percentage of their annual budget over a longer period of time. (E.g., Saigon Children’s Charity and Thang Long School.) Would such an arrangement be a more productive and ultimately effective use of donor funding? As a way of trying to fing out, EFD could run a pilot of such an arrangement, if such a donor were willing, and such a partner, that would see what the benefits of longer term funding agreements are.
    Section 3: Small Grant Scheme Long Term Goals
  • 54. SDTC Goal Setting Recommendations Section 3: SDTC Long Term Goals
    • GOAL SETTING AT SDTC
    • A BIG PROJECT. While EFD has a long history of delivery programs to existing project partners, the SDTC presents a new challenge: creating a new, independent, stand-alone organization and doing so with a joint venture partner. This is a very large challenge, for an INGO to create an NGO from the ground up!
    • DIFFICULT IN BUIDLING CONSENSUS. However, discussions with staff from both EFD and TDT (the project partner) revealed that at the moment there is not a shared vision on a number of key issues about SDTC. Some of the lack of consensus seems to be related to fundamentally different visions, and some of it to the need to improve communications, and some of it to the need for a full-time director at SDTC to take leadership.
      • A FULL TIME DIRECTOR? The training center will not meet its strategic objectives without the presence of an active, full-time director. While the training center continues to exist thanks to the work of numerous experts and volunteers, there is not clarity about what is ultimately responsible for the success of the center, about which of the strategic options to pursue and how to achieve them, or who in general is vested with the authority and given the responsibility to make important decisions. Also, there is a lack of consensus on whether or not to have a full-time director , and if the current arrangement of having a part-time director is sufficient. All of this has contributed to a certain loss of momentum at the level of organizational development.
      • STAND ALONE OR HYBRID ORGANIZATION? In the future, SDTC could choose one of two options. Under Option A, SDTC becomes an independent organization, and gradually reduces its dependence on EFD by raising funds, hiring staff and installing leadership. (As laid out in the strategic plan). Under Option B, SDTC continues to run as a program of EFD and to some degree TDT, and significant change will not be required. However, because of the lack of consensus at the current time about what the future of the organization will be, and because of EFD’s high involvement in running day-to-day operations, which of these two options to pursue has yet to be firmly addressed.
    • 3.
  • 55. SDTC Goal Setting Recommendations (cont.) Section 3 SDTC Long Term Goals
    • SOME OF THE CURRENT CHALLENGES AT SDTC (cont.)
    • 2. LACK OF CONSENSUS (continued from previous slide)
      • SOURCES OF FUNDING? For the time being, the annual grant from EFD’s donors is adequate to cover the operations expenses of the training center, however, if the center is going to develop into a stand alone entity, then supplemental funding sources will be necessary. There are a number of questions to consider in this regard.
          • Who will provide additional funding?
          • What activities or positions will they fund?
          • Who will take the lead in raising those funds, EFD or TDT?
          • How much if any control will EFD and TDT have to relinquish to bring in other funding sources?
    • PROGRAMMING ISSUES. A full assessment of the SDTC curriculum, how it is meeting the needs of its participants, course quality and delivery are beyond the scope of this report. However, based on an outsider’s view, programming today is an area of strength at SDTC. Nonetheless, a few issues surfaced worth mentioning.
      • In addition to not having a full-time director, SDTC does not have a director of educational programming. While the various team members (EFD PO, SDTC PO, EFD CC and EFD volunteers) are currently able to coordinate their work in such to act together as a manager of education, it would benefit SDTC itself to have such a position created - even if the existing team were to continue to serve as de factor educational managers.
      • Training for the social sector is becoming more popular and an increasing number of organizations are offering training today in HCMC and Hanoi. This will make it more important for SDTC to find a niche within the training sector (in terms of courses offered) and also to develop a solid organization and funding base to provide for the future.
      • The tailored training courses continue to earn a significant return for SDTC and EFD and TDT staff have targeted this area for continued marketing and growth.
      • An on-going issue is the pricing of courses to allow SDTC to cover costs and also include as many people as possible who can not otherwise afford. It would be useful to conduct an in-depth study of pricing and create a plan that provides an equitable solution.
  • 56. Volunteer Promotion Goals Recommendations There are already in existence today volunteer organizations for “foreign” volunteers that do an excellent job of bringing non-Vietnamese professionals to the country. However, a topic for discussion has been whether EFD could create and manage a volunteer management program that would be based in Vietnam, recruiting local and overseas Vietnamese who would be able to provide assistance to project partners.
    • BENEFITS OF PROPOSED CHANGES
      • The analysis of the how many children remain out of school today in VN (3.7 million) shows that there remain many opportunities for volunteers to be of assistance working with the country’s children, and many ways that volunteers can help both EFD and its project partners.
      • The project partner interviews showed that there is a strong demand for professional volunteers, as well as for other kinds of support such as teaching English or simply playing with children. Native speakers of Vietnamese would have fewer language and cultural barriers.
      • There are growing numbers of local Vietnamese professionals – and overseas Vietnamese- from the private sector (business, legal, medicine) who volunteer, but there are perhaps just as many who would like to and have not found a vehicle to do so.
      • The success of the EFD-managed “volunteer day” was a large success, bringing together many organizations and people in Vietnam, and is something that could be built
      • In general, volunteerism as a program fits well with EFD’s other two areas: funding and training, in that providing on site assistance can supplement the funding and training being done at project partners.
    Section 3: Volunteer Promotion Long Term Goals
  • 57. Volunteer Promotion Goals Recommendations Increasing Visibility of the Volunteer Promotion Activities 1. Create a Professional Resource Center. Consider consolidating EFD’s many volunteer projects into a program area, and offering services to local NGOs such as legal, accounting, planning, organizational, research, fundraising, computer, and so on. 2. Vietnamese Professionals. Consider, as a part of this new program area, creating a new volunteer project which would involve recruiting VN national to work at the professional resource center in areas of need at project partners. Speaking the language, and having their network of local professionals, could have a major impact on EFD project partners. Section 3: Volunteer Promotion Long Term Goals
  • 58. Section 4: STRATEGIC PLAN Planning Template and Preliminary Plan
  • 59. Outline of Strategic Plan Section 4: Strategic Planning Part 1: Summary. The end result of the planning process would be an action plan for each of the following activities. The focus of this report is on programming issues, the left hand column. The remainder of the plan would cover the other issues listed to the right but are not discussed at this point. Organization Communications Fundraising
    • Annual Report
    • Newsletter
    • Website
    • Brochures
    • EFD Vietnam
    • EFD Belgium
    • EFD Switzerland
    • EFD Netherlands
    Programming
    • Small Grant Scheme
    • SDTC
    • Volunteering
    • Staffing Needs
      • Full time
      • Volunteer
    • Hiring Plans
    Administration
    • EFD Vietnam
    • EFD Belgium
    • EFD Switzerland
    • EFD Netherlands
    Focus of work to date To come after clarification on goals in previous section
  • 60. SGS Strategic Plan Preliminary Section 4: Strategic Planning SGS Below are some preliminary ideas designed to supplement the existing SDTC strategy. Using the foregoing analyses (programmatic, financial, and organizational), the following action steps could be possible. Actual sequencing (indicated by years in the right hand columns) will happen at a later time. Content to come Retain new country coordinator ORGANIZATION PROGRAM AREAS A. Inclusive Education B. Vocational Training 2009 2010 2008 2007 C. Street Based Referral
  • 61. SGS Strategic Plan Preliminary Section 4: Strategic Planning SGS Below are some preliminary ideas designed to supplement the existing SDTC strategy. Using the foregoing analyses (programmatic, financial, and organizational), the following action steps could be possible. Actual sequencing (indicated by years in the right hand columns) will happen at a later time. Content to come COMMUNICATIONS FUNDRAISING ADMINISTRATION 2009 2010 2008 2007
  • 62. SDTC Strategic Plan Preliminary Recommendations Section 4: Strategic Planning SDTC Below are some preliminary ideas designed to supplement the existing SDTC strategy. Using the foregoing analyses (programmatic, financial, and organizational), the following action steps could be possible. Actual sequencing (indicated by years in the right hand columns) will happen at a later time. A. Leadership and Strategy Schedule a series of meetings between TDT and EFD to gain consensus on future direction of SDTC, such as whether to add a consulting or research capability, where funding will come from, and what EFD’s and TDT’s respective roles will be. Expand the job title of the director’s position as described in the organizational development section below, and seek to fill the position with a motivated individual. Make discussions on new course development a part of the annual management cycle at SDTC. Continually seek out new topic areas for SDTC, based on the needs of children and local organizations. (Drama therapy, living values, etc.) B. Program Area: Scheduled Training Design, print and distribute a course catalog Revise pricing policy to open courses to organizations who can’t afford them. Create a certain number or percent of places in each course for scholarships. Create a position at SDTC called “Manager of Training,” to be filled for the present by EFD staff (as it currently is) Write job descriptions for all positions at SDTC. [Director, vice director, manager of training, office manager.] 2009 2010 2008 2007 C. Organizational Development
  • 63. SDTC Strategic Plan Summary of Strategy 2006-2010 Period Section 4: Strategic Planning SDTC Create clear objectives for in-coming accounting VSO volunteer such that SDTC develops a professional accounting system. C. Program Area: Tailored Trainings Consider a more proactive approach to promoting and selling the tailored training capability. Continue to streamline and standardize EFD’s response to in-coming inquiries about tailored trainings, cost estimates for course development and other processes. . Develop and distribute a brochure for SDTC tailored training program. F. Marketing and Public Relations E. Fundraising Hire an administrative assistant for the SDTC office, paid for from funds currently saved at SDTC. D. Administration 2009 2010 2008 2007 2006 G. Other Create an on-line knowledge center with course related information
  • 64. Concluding Thoughts Next Steps Section 4: Strategic Planning Conclusions
    • SUMMARY
    • One of the strengths of EFD is that is a learning organization and changes and adjusts to conditions by listening to project partners, making changes, and being creative in its programming.
    • On the other hand, the changing situation on the ground in Vietnam and with project partners has opened up questions about whether EFD programming should be adjusted to address these changes.
    • In particular, both the SDTC and SGS would benefit from a “vision” statement about what the programs will look like in five years.
      • The SGS : Who are the target child beneficiaries? Who are the target organizations? How much total funding per year will be provided? Will the list of line items funded be expanded? Etc.
      • SDTC: Is SDTC going to become a stand-alone organization or will programming continue to come out of EFD? Will there be research and consulting program areas? Will EFD and TDT develop a long term plan covering programming, organization, funding or will it continue to move ahead year to year? Etc.
      • VOLUNTEERISM: Will volunteer promotion become a program area?
    • Providing clarity on these questions will prove to be a valuable intermediate step and help give shape to the series of steps that will ultimately make up the strategic plan (step 4).
    Strategic Planning Cycle 2. Analysis of EFD Programs – Issues and Opportunities (Fall 2006) 4. Complete EFD Strategic Plan for 2008-2010 (To Come) 1. Review Current Context – Situational Analysis (Fall 2006) 3. Setting Long Term Goals for EFD and Program Areas (Ongoing)
  • 65. THANK YOU! This report was made possible by the input of numerous project partners (names listed in appendix), by the patient explanations of EFD country coordinator and staff (Ruth Frans, Nguyen Thuy, Hoang Linh, Mr. Duc and Mr. Huong from SDTC) , and by EFD volunteers (Renee Rivera, Dan Enbysk, Luis Gomez), and by the support of translators Hoang Truc and Huynh Nhu of EFD. The report was written by Dun Gifford, Jr., [email_address] , www.dgifford.com , .
  • 66.
    • Appendices
    • Interview Notes
    • List of Data Sources