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Ch 9 Sec 2 Feudalism
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Ch 9 Sec 2 Feudalism

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World History, Feudalism, Middle Ages

World History, Feudalism, Middle Ages

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    Ch 9 Sec 2 Feudalism Ch 9 Sec 2 Feudalism Presentation Transcript

    • The Crowning of Charlemagne
    • Charlemagne and His World After viewing “Charlemagne and His World,” you should:  Objectives
      • Understand that Charlemagne brought Europe out of the Dark Ages and into the medieval period. 
      • Know that the Carolingian Renaissance was the first of three important renaissance periods in Europe. 
      • Recognize the importance of Charlemagne's contributions to the Europe that exists today.
    •  
    • Charlemagne and His World According to Professor Hodges, what experience may have shaped Charlemagne's desire to reinvent himself as a latter-day Roman emperor? Traveling the old Roman roads in Italy, Charlemagne may have conceived of an empire based on the Roman model.
    • Charlemagne’s Tomb
    • Charlemagne and His World What accomplishments does the Charlemagne Prize honor? The Charlemagne Prize honors accomplishments in fostering a Europe based on shared economic and social values.
    •  
    •  
    • (pages 292–294)
      • Invaders posed a threat to the safety of the people, especially in the absence of a strong central government. 
      • Magyars, Vikings, and Muslims terrorize Europe.
      The Development of Feudalism
      • People began to turn to local landed aristocrats or nobles to protect them. 
    •  
    • Lief Ericson’s Route to America
    • Video: Feudalism – Weak Kings, Strong Nobles
      • This change led to the new political and social system called feudalism . By the 18th century, a man who served a lord militarily was known as a vassal . 
      • Similar systems were found in Japan (samurai & daimyo) and among the Aztec.
      The Development of Feudalism
    •  
    • Video: Medieval Society Hierarchy
      • By the 9th century the land the lord granted to a vassal was known as a fief. 
      • Vassals had political authority in their fiefs. 
      • The number of separate powerful lords and vassals increased; many different people were now responsible for keeping order.
      The Development of Feudalism (pages 292–294) (cont.)
      • Feudalism became complicated. 
      • Kings had vassals who themselves had vassals. 
      • Feudalism came to be characterized by a set of unwritten rules known as the feudal contract. 
    • Feudal System
      • These rules determined the relationship between lord and vassal. 
      • The major obligation of a vassal was military service , about 40 days a year.
      The Development of Feudalism (pages 292–294) (cont.)
    • Video: Castles, Liege and Lords
      • It was called chivalry . 
      • Knights were to defend the Church and defenseless people, treat captives as honored guests, and fight for glory and not material rewards .
      The Nobility of the Middle Ages and Aristocratic Women
      • In the eleventh and twelfth centuries, under the influence of the Church, an ideal of civilized behavior among the nobility evolved. 
      (pages 295–296)