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Martin Wiegel: How to fail. From Golden Drum 2012
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Martin Wiegel: How to fail. From Golden Drum 2012

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  • This is a 'comms model' employed by Wrigley Mars since more than 2 years ago, also Coca-Cola went with the same philosophy...

    But does this still applies when you don't have the money for competing with such large spenders, or you are a niche?

    The presentation is very nice, still, does not hold the absolute truth.

    Promotion is not king, STORYTELLING IS!!
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  • Randomly got onto this slide share from doing research on Mina Seetharaman... so happy I did! Great stuff here! @MNdesignGal
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  • @tomjohnsonbeta Oh and the evidence of buying behaviour data shows that promotions, BOGOFs are ineffective but addictive. The CEO of one of Germany's largest grocery retailers recently went public with this view, but again the evidence was in the data all along
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  • @tomjohnsonbeta Martin's statements may seem superficially similar to advertising rhetoric of the past, but they are based on evidence of real buying behaviour which contradicts much established marketing practice. This evidence exposes fondly-held notions including 'loyalty', 'segmentation', 'brand positioning' and 'heavy users' as fallacies — dangerous fallacies at that which damage businesses when slavishly applied. Mass media remains important as it's almost always the case that penetration is the vital metric, and narrow targeting misunderstands how brands grow. In terms of creativity the evidence explains and supports the reason why a great deal of highly effective advertising contains no 'message', or any 'message' is irrelevant to its success. Some of Martin's assertions — for example the obligation to charm and entertain — may be familiar but they are not part of modern marketing beliefs and counter to the logic-driven culture of many big marketing organisations. Yes they were espoused in past from intuition. Now it's easy to show hard evidence for why they are correct. Please read Ehrenberg and Barwise who go back over 50 years. Read Byron Sharp if you want a more accessible version of that original work (in particular Sharp's analysis of dangers of social media for brands). Read Martin's presentation if you'd like it boiled down.
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  • @AdrianLangford 'advertising is not vital but incidental'. 'Our task is overcome indifference'. 'Be a part of what interests people.' How is that reversing trad marketing theory? Could have been written at any point in the last 120 years. Only thing the deck argues against is 'engagement' - the (once) hot new theory that did reverse traditional marketing theory (debate if engagement is good/bad/right/wrong...but it's different)
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  • 1. HOW TO + (NOT)FAILWIEDEN+KENNEDY AMSTERDAM
  • 2. OR:
  • 3. WHY THERE ISNO AUDIENCE FOR WHAT WE MAKE
  • 4. AND WHY THAT TRUTH WILL SET USFREE
  • 5. THIS IS THELANGUAGE OFMARKETING...
  • 6. ‘AUDIENCE’
  • 7. ‘FANS’
  • 8. ‘COMMITMENT’
  • 9. ‘RELATIONSHIPS’
  • 10. ‘ENGAGEMENT’
  • 11. ‘LOVE’
  • 12. IT’S THE LANGUAGE OF CONSUMERSGIVING A SHIT
  • 13. ALL RHETORIC NOEVIDENCE
  • 14. SOIF YOU WANT TO FAIL DO THIS...
  • 15. ASSUME THAT PEOPLE CAREABOUT BRANDS
  • 16. ASSUME THAT PEOPLE WANT TO HAVE ARELATIONSHIP WITH YOUR BRAND
  • 17. ASSUME THAT YOUR FANS ARE YOUR MOSTVALUABLE CONSUMER
  • 18. ASSUME THAT EVERYONE WANTS TOPARTICIPATE
  • 19. ASSUME THAT PEOPLEWILL FIND YOUR CONTENT
  • 20. ASSUME THAT DEPTHIS MORE IMPORTANT THAN BREADTH
  • 21. WHAT?
  • 22. MOST PEOPLEDON’T CARE THAT MUCHABOUT BRANDS
  • 23. “Welcome to the Domestos Germ buster app. Play the germ buster game to destroy those ‘menacing nasties’ that lurk in your home and learn about the benefits of Domestos over thin bleach.”
  • 24. MOST PEOPLEDON’T KNOW MUCH ABOUT THE BRAND THEY BUY
  • 25. 50% OF ALL KNOWLEDGE ABOUT A BRAND IS HELD BY JUST 20% OF ITS BUYERSSOURCE: JENNI ROMANUIK, BYRON SHARP: ‘WHERE KNOWLEDGE OF YOUR BRAND RESIDES: THE PARETO SHARE OF BRAND KNOWLEDGE’, REPORT 44 FOR CORPORATE SPONSORS, 2008, EHRENBERG-BASS INSTITUTE FOR MARKETING SCIENCE
  • 26. 80% OF A BRAND’S BUYERS KNOW A LITTLE OR NOTHING ABOUT THAT BRANDSOURCE: JENNI ROMANUIK, BYRON SHARP: ‘WHERE KNOWLEDGE OF YOUR BRAND RESIDES: THE PARETO SHARE OF BRAND KNOWLEDGE’, REPORT 44 FOR CORPORATE SPONSORS, 2008, EHRENBERG-BASS INSTITUTE FOR MARKETING SCIENCE
  • 27. “ ALMOST EVERY APP BUILT FOR A BRAND ON FACEBOOK HAS PRACTICALLY NO USAGE... HEAVY, ‘IMMERSIVE’ EXPERIENCES ARE NOT HOW PEOPLE ENGAGE AND INTERACT WITH BRANDS... HEAVYWEIGHT EXPERIENCES WILL FAIL BECAUSE THEY DON’T MAP TO REAL LIFE.” PAUL ADAMS, GLOBAL HEAD OF BRAND DESIGN AT FACEBOOK
  • 28. 0.5% PROPORTION OF FANS TALKING ABOUT A BRAND ON FACEBOOKSOURCE: KAREN NELSON-FIELD & JENNIFER TAYLOR, ‘FACEBOOK FANS: A FAN FOR LIFE?’, ADMAP, MAY 2012
  • 29. PEOPLE DON’T HAVEA RELATIONSHIP WITH YOUR BRAND
  • 30. THE VAST MAJORITY OF CONSUMERSHAVE MULTIPLE PARTNERS
  • 31. 72% OF PEPSI DRINKERS ALSO DRINK COCA-COLASOURCE: TNS IMPULSE PANEL (UK)
  • 32. ‘YOUR CONSUMERS’ ARE JUSTSOMEBODY ELSE’S CONSUMERS WHO OCCASIONALLY BUY YOU
  • 33. HUMAN RELATIONSHIPS DEMAND MASSIVE PROCESSING POWER
  • 34. 100 BILLION NEURONSWITH ROUGHLY ONE MILLION BILLION CONNECTIONS EACH FIRING AT 10 TIMES PER SECOND
  • 35. RELATIONSHIPSARE A MATTER OF LIFEANDDEATH
  • 36. PEOPLE WITH STRONG SOCIAL NETWORKS LIVE LONGERSOURCE: GILES, GLONEK, LUSZCZ, ANDREWS, ‘EFFECT OF SOCIAL NETWORKS ON 10 YEAR SURVIVAL IN VERY OLD AUSTRALIANS: THE AUSTRALIAN LONGITUDINAL STUDY OF AGING’, J EPIDEMIOL COMMUNITY HEALTH 2005;59:574-579
  • 37. COMPARED WITHHUMAN RELATIONSHIPS BRAND RELATIONSHIPS ARE THIN
  • 38. “MOST OF US GO THROUGH LIFE FINDING IT HARD ENOUGH TO HAVEGOOD RELATIONSHIPS WITH THE REAL PEOPLE IN OUR LIFE LET ALONE ALL THE BRANDS WE BUY.” BRUCE MCCOLL, GLOBAL CMO, MARS
  • 39. WHAT’S LOVEGOT TO DO WITH IT?
  • 40. YOUR FANS ARE NOT YOUR MOSTVALUABLE CONSUMER
  • 41. THIS IS 000’s of HHs buying FRUCTIS 12300 9225 6150 3075 0 1x 2x 3x 4x 5x 6x 7x 8x 9x ANNUAL PURCHASE FREQUENCYSOURCE: NIELSEN
  • 42. THIS IS WHAT IT NEEDS TO DO TO LOOK 000’s of HHs buying LIKE PANTENE 12300 9225 6150 3075 0 1x 2x 3x 4x 5x 6x 7x 8x 9x ANNUAL PURCHASE FREQUENCYSOURCE: NIELSEN
  • 43. 000’s of HHs buying 12300 9225 FANS 6150 3075 0 1x 2x 3x 4x 5x 6x 7x 8x 9x ANNUAL PURCHASE FREQUENCYSOURCE: NIELSEN
  • 44. YOUR BRAND’S HEALTH DEPENDS ONLOTS PEOPLE WHO DON’T KNOW YOU WELLDON’T THINK OF YOU MUCH AND DON’T BUY YOU OFTEN IF AT ALL
  • 45. THESE CONSUMERS GENERATEPUBLICITY NOT REVENUE
  • 46. DISTINGUISH BETWEEN ACTORS AND THETHE AUDIENCE
  • 47. MOST PEOPLE DON’T WANT TOPARTICIPATE
  • 48. PASSIVECONSUMPTION IS NOT DEAD
  • 49. 6.4bn hrs. Aggregate consumption year to May 2011 182m hrs. Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn TVSOURCE: DELOITTE/BARB AND UKCOM/NIELSEN, UK
  • 50. OF 200 BRANDS STUDIED ONLY ONE SHOWED A LEVEL OF ENGAGEMENT OVER 2%source: Karen Nelson-Field & Jennifer Taylor, ‘Facebook fans: A fan for life?’, Admap, May 2012
  • 51. PEOPLE’S DIGITAL PARTICIPATION ISWITH EACH OTHER
  • 52. 20% 60% 17% PASSIVE EASY INTENSE 44% INITIATION FRIENDS, FAMILY & PHOTOS TV, ENTERTAINMENT & LIFESTYLESOURCE: BBC
  • 53. JUST BECAUSE PEOPLE ARE PARTICIPATING WITHEACH OTHER DOESN’T MEAN THEY WILL PARTICIPATE WITH BRANDS
  • 54. MASSREACTION MATTERS MORE THAN MASSPARTICIPATION
  • 55. PEOPLEWILL NOT FIND YOURCONTENT
  • 56. 1 IN 1,000,000 ODDS OF A PERSON VIEWING YOUR CONTENT ON YOUTUBESOURCE: WISTIA.COM
  • 57. 0.9% AVERAGE CLICK THROUGH RATESOURCE: ADVERTISING RESEARCH FOUNDATION
  • 58. 4,875 PIECES OF CONTENT THE AVERAGE FACEBOOK USER RECEIVES EVERY DAYSOURCE: FACEBOOK
  • 59. OVERLOOKED CONTENTSOURCE: YOUTUBE
  • 60. UNTIL PUBLICIZEDSOURCE: YOUTUBE
  • 61. DEPTH IS NOTMORE IMPORTANT THANBREADTH
  • 62. BRANDS DEPEND ONBIG, BROAD POPULATIONS 12300 9225 6150 3075 0 1x 2x 3x 4x 5x 6x 7x 8x 9x ANNUAL PURCHASE FREQUENCY
  • 63. THE BIG DIFFERENCE BETWEEN BIG AND SMALL BRANDS IS NOT HOW MUCH LOYALTY THEY GETBUT HOW MANY PEOPLE BUY THEM
  • 64. ‘ENGAGEMENT’ HASN’T REPLACEDREACH
  • 65. SO...
  • 66. MUCH OF WHAT WE MAKE IS NOT VITAL BUT TRIVIAL
  • 67. MUCH OF WHAT WE MAKE IS NOT VITAL BUTINCIDENTAL
  • 68. INCIDENTAL TO THIS:
  • 69. ORDINARY AWFUL AWESOME EVERYDAYLIFE
  • 70. THERE ISNO AUDIENCE FOR WHAT WE MAKE
  • 71. OUR TASK IS NOTNURTURING ENTHUSIASM BUT OVERCOMINGINDIFFERENCE
  • 72. THIS SHOULDINSPIRE NOTDEPRESS US
  • 73. ALL CREATIVITY DEMANDSRESISTANCE
  • 74. AND OVERCOMINGINDIFFERENCE DEMANDSAWESOME
  • 75. BE PART OF WHATINTERESTS PEOPLE
  • 76. GIVEMORE THAN YOU TAKE
  • 77. TAKE A POSITION DON’T JUST HAVE‘A POSITIONING’
  • 78. “JUST MOVE ME, DUDE” DAN WIEDEN
  • 79. + @mweigelmartin.weigel@wk.com wkamst.com

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