Unit 5: Responsible Organisational Policy Development And Capacity Building
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Unit 5: Responsible Organisational Policy Development And Capacity Building

on

  • 339 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
339
Views on SlideShare
152
Embed Views
187

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
8
Comments
0

3 Embeds 187

http://esrt.vn 143
http://www.esrt.vn 43
https://ilearn.swin.edu.au 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Unit 5: Responsible Organisational Policy Development And Capacity Building Unit 5: Responsible Organisational Policy Development And Capacity Building Presentation Transcript

  • UNIT 5. RESPONSIBLE ORGANISATIONAL POLICY DEVELOPMENT & CAPACITY BUILDING
  • Unit outline Objectives By the end of the unit participants will be able to: • Explain the importance of developing a company code for responsible behaviour of customers • Explain how to develop organisational guidelines & procedures for Responsible Tourism • Explain the meaning and importance of developing organisational policies on sustainability • Define the characteristics of knowledge and awareness raising campaigns • List and explain the types and characteristics of knowledge and dissemination tools • Explain the importance of regular training and coaching programmes on sustainable tourism practices Topics 1. Importance of policies and procedures in tourism 2. Analysing and developing organisational policies in responsible tourism 3. Developing organisational procedures and guidelines in responsible tourism 4. Disseminating policies, procedures and guidelines in responsible tourism 5. Developing a staff training programme to support responsible tourism policy directives
  • TOPIC 1. IMPORTANCE OF POLICIES AND PROCEDURES IN TOURISM UNIT 5. RESPONSIBLE ORGANISATIONAL POLICY DEVELOPMENT & CAPACITY BUILDING View slide
  • The function of company policies in responsible tourism • Links company vision and values to day-to-day operations • Communicate expectations about work performance and boundaries of action • Ensures compliance with relevant laws & regulations and provides a defence against inappropriate actions • Promotes efficiency in operation and reduces need for constant management intervention • Helps achieve sustainable tourism objectives Healthy communities Natural environment Economic vitality SUSTAINABILITY View slide
  • Responsible tourism policies are at the foundation of companies becoming sustainable RESPONSIBLE TOURISM POLICIES Define company sustainability • They establish the goals / targets for intended action that are specific to that company Prioritise issues • They identify the key areas of action Ensure correct action • They make sure actions taken by the company, staff and customers are effective and do not erode sustainability goals Define training requirements • They help identify the areas in which sustainable tourism training can then be implemented
  • Company benefits of having responsible tourism policies • Helps defend a company from legal disputes  • Demonstrates company commitment to maintaining a healthy environment, building a happier society and buoyant local economy thereby enhancing the company brand and improving sales and loyalty • Promotes the support of customers to help the company achieve its sustainability objectives • Fosters stability and consistency in decision-making and operational procedures resulting in fewer operational setbacks • Creates stronger and more competitive tourism destinations that have better environments, happier people and stronger local economies for the long term benefit of business, local residents and tourists
  • The policy development and implementation process for responsible tourism 5. Training and development 4. Communicate and disseminate 3. Develop responsible tourism procedures and guidelines 2. Develop responsible tourism policies 1. Analyse existing sustainability practices PLAN DRAFT, ENDORSE, FINALISE IMPLEMENT
  • TOPIC 2. ANALYSING & DEVELOPING ORGANISATIONAL POLICIES IN RESPONSIBLE TOURISM UNIT 5. RESPONSIBLE ORGANISATIONAL POLICY DEVELOPMENT & CAPACITY BUILDING
  • Analysing sustainability: finding gaps • A company’s sustainability is a result of its actions and inactions as it relates impacts on the environment, local society and local economy • Sustainability gaps are the areas in which a company is not implementing sustainability actions but where actions can be taken • Sustainability gaps confirm a need for a new policy to reinforce sustainability practices or alternatively to amend an existing policy
  • Process for identifying company sustainability gaps and issues 1. Assemble policy development and review team 2. Establish sustainability criteria 3. Research and analyse operational practices 4. Shortlist sustainability needs 5. Research and analyse identified issues
  • Step 1. Assemble policy development and review team • Use existing staff members • Have good knowledge of key operational areas • Have experience or understanding of sustainable tourism • A “policy sponsor” or “leader” should be assigned for overall responsibility / ownership in developing and managing the policy
  • Step 2. Establish sustainability criteria • Use national sustainability criteria / standards first, e.g. Green Lotus • If none exist or they are inadequate, then examine international criteria • Ensure criteria cover environmental, social, and economic aspects
  • Examples of Green Lotus sustainability criteria A SUSTAINABLE MANAGEMENT A1.4 Availability of annual plan on implementation of social and cultural activities (both inside and outside of the tourist accommodation establishment) A2.2 The staff are trained on cultural and social issues (once a year) B Maximise socio-economic benefits for local society B2.1 Availability of policies on recruiting local people, people from remote regions and less developed economic regions B3.1 Priority in usage of locally made products or local raw materials without exhausting natural resources B5.1 Existence of gender-equality regarding staff employment B5.2 Availability of policies to support female employees (maternity, training, consultation on reproductive health, etc.) C Minimization of adverse impacts on cultural and natural heritage C2.1 Expression of local culture and traditions in the tourist accommodation establishment’s architecture, activities and services it provides C4.1 No catching of wild animals unless that activity aims at conservation purpose and is allowed by the law C4.2 No selling of souvenirs and food made from wild animals and plants protected by law and international protocols D Minimization of negative impacts on the environment D1.1 Purchase of products packaged in bulk (wholesale) in order to reduce packaging and waste D1.16 Energy saving mode is set for computers or computer screens and “energy saving label” put on office equipment D2.4 Utilization of old bed sheet and cloths for other purposes D2.3 Re-usage of toilet paper and soap left-over in guests’ rooms
  • Step 3. Research and analyse operational practices • Use sustainability criteria to evaluate operational practices • Identify which areas are already sustainable and which areas require improvement • Create checklist and rank level of adoption of desired practice
  • Using Green Lotus criteria to create a sustainability checklist SUSTAINABILITY CRITERIA EXISTS IMPLEMENTATION LEVEL (1 low -10 high) A Sustainable A1.4 Availability of annual plan on implementation of social and cultural activities (both inside and outside of the tourist accommodation establishment)  10 A2.2 The staff are trained on cultural and social issues (once a year)  6 B Maximise socio-economic benefits for local society B2.1 Availability of policies on recruiting local people, people from remote regions and less developed economic regions  0 B3.1 Priority in usage of locally made products or local raw materials without exhausting natural resources  0 B5.2 Availability of policies to support female employees (maternity, training, consultation on reproductive health, etc.)  3 C Minimization of adverse impacts on cultural and natural heritage C2.1 Expression of local culture and traditions in the tourist accommodation establishment’s architecture, activities and services it provides  4
  • Step 4. Shortlist sustainability needs • Review results • Discuss in team and agree on key areas in which responsible tourism policies are most needed • Consideration of practicality issues must be considered
  • Step 5. Research and analyse identified issues • Legitimate need • Impact on existing situation • Purpose and goal • Impact of external regulations • Harmony with company direction • Implementation requirements • Existing best practices • Potential challenges to implementation
  • Key components of a policy document COMPONENT DESCRIPTION Headline banner Policy title, date of issue, policy number, page numbers, effective date, “supersedes / substitute?” notifications, office of origin, policy approval authority Policy statement Indicates the purpose of a policy, refers to external regulations or additional policy discussion (if applicable), gives a summary of the importance of its content Applicability Clarifies who the policy applies to as well as consequences for non-compliance Definitions Provides a definition of any technical terms used in the policy document Cognisant office(s) Identifies office(s) to contact in case of need for help with interpretations, resolution of problems and special issues Related policies Exact reference and information about related policies or procedures and guidelines
  • Example of standard policy document Standard policy layout: Name of organisation Title Page x of y pages Issue Date: Insert date Policy statement: Describes the policy purpose and its importance Applicability: Name of relevant departments Definitions: Defining terms Cognisant office(s): Office(s) to contact for information or support on policy Related policies: References other connected policies Name and Title of Authorising Officer Date Signed and dated by the person authorising the procedure.
  • The InterContinental Hotels Group’s Responsible Tourism Policy Statement Source: InterContinental Hotels Group 2014, http://www.ihgplc.com/index.asp?pageid=920
  • Responsible tourism policy areas Social responsibility Environmental responsibility Economic responsibility
  • Policy areas to meet environmental responsibility Environmental responsibility Energy use Water use Waste management Conservation Sustainable development Others?
  • Example policy statement on energy and water use & issues to consider Policy statement: “[Company Name] is committed to reducing energy and water consumption wherever possible through the active efforts of its staff and customers and through passive means such as the installation of energy- and water-saving devices.” Policy concerns: Use of lights, types of lights, use of air conditioners, heaters and natural ventilation, use of fossil fuels and renewable energy, monitoring and maintenance of electronic equipment, cables, water fixtures and pipes, use of different modes of transport, use of water flow regulation devices, use of rain water, use of grey water, communication and education of staff and customers, monitoring of rates of energy and water use…
  • Policy areas to meet social responsibility in tourism Social responsibility Respecting local culture Community development Safety and security Protecting children Others?
  • Example policy statement on respecting local culture & issues to consider Policy statement: “ [Company Name] is committed to the welfare and health and safety of all its employees and contractors and to delivering socio-culturally responsible products and services to its customers.” Policy concerns: Conduct of staff and guests, participation in local community development projects, sponsorship of local initiatives, monitoring of community projects, reflection of culture in company products, maintenance of cultural authenticity in marketing, existence of occupational health and safety provisions for employees, existence of safety regulations for customers…
  • Policy areas to meet economic responsibility in tourism Economic responsibility Fair trade Responsible employment Supporting local businesses Training and capacity building Others?
  • Example policy statement on supporting the local economy & issues to consider Policy statement: “[Company Name] is committed to achieving economic sustainability in its operation that is founded upon the principles of fair trade and fosters the provision of fair employment and income-earning opportunities for the local community and economy.” Policy concerns: Principles of trade, procurement of local goods and services, staff salary levels, provision of contracts with position descriptions, provision of employment benefits, provision of staff training and capacity building, provision of career advancement opportunities, practice of non-discrimination and gender equality, communication and education of staff and customers, monitoring of salaries and contracts…
  • TOPIC 3. DEVELOPING ORGANISATIONAL PROCEDURES & GUIDELINES IN RESPONSIBLE TOURISM UNIT 5. RESPONSIBLE ORGANISATIONAL POLICY DEVELOPMENT & CAPACITY BUILDING
  • The role of procedures and guidelines Procedures and guidelines provide the detail about how a policy is to be achieved - what will be done, by whom, when, and how. Explain required actions (what) • Provide step-by-step directions explaining how the policy is to be achieved Assign responsibility (who) • Identify the people who are to act Explain method of action (how) • Specify the precise actions required Define timing (when) • State when the actions are to occur and the sequence of events
  • Effective procedures and guidelines… …should be written in plain and simple to understand …use short, familiar words …can include diagrams, flow charts, or even photographs
  • The key components of a procedure document COMPONENT DESCRIPTION Purpose and scope Specifying purpose of procedure, the area covered, exclusions Responsibility for implementation Specifying who will implement the procedure Procedure Listing (or depicting) sequentially exactly what must be done and noting exceptions List of procedures Steps for implementing actions Documentation Listing documents to be used with the procedure and attaching examples of completed documentation, if appropriate Records Listing any records created as a result of using the procedure, where they are stored and for how long Authorisation and date Signed and dated by the person authorising the procedure
  • Name of organisation (If specific to a service stream or unit, name of stream or unit) Title Page x of y pages Issue Number: 1 Issue Date: 10/1999 Purpose and scope Specify purpose of procedure, area covered, exclusions. Responsibility for implementing procedure Specify who will implement the procedure. Procedure List sequentially exactly what must be done, note exceptions. Documentation List documents to be used with the procedure, attach examples of completed documentation, if appropriate. Records List any records created as a result of using the procedure, where they are stored and for how long. Name and Title of Authorising Officer Date Signed and dated by the person authorising the procedure. Example of a procedures document
  • Example of procedures for reducing waste in the office 1. Paper 1.1 Meeting minutes and nightly reports to be distributed by email only 1.2 Only office paper containing recycled content may be purchased 1.3 Paper is to be recycled by using the paper recycle boxes supplied at each desk 1.4 Paper and cardboard is not to be placed in an office waste bin unless it is soiled or contaminated 1.5 No cardboard, plastic, metals, food or other waste are to be placed in the paper recycle bins 1.6 Paper recycle bins will be emptied nightly by the cleaning contractor 2. Cardboard 2.1 All copy paper boxes are to be kept and reused for file storage 2.2 Other cardboard boxes and material are to be flattened and stacked next to in an area for easy collection by the cleaning contractor 2.3 The cleaning staff are responsible for moving the flattened cardboard to the pickup location nightly 3. Commingled recycling 3.1 Commingled recycling includes glass, plastics, aluminium cans, and cartons 3.2 Recycling bins for glass, plastics and aluminium cans have been placed at various locations throughout the building 3.3 These co-mingle recycle bins are cleared daily by the contract cleaning company 3.4 Co-mingle items are placed into these bins and not into the general waste bins 3.5 The containers should be relatively free of food or liquid and generally rinsed and clean before disposal 4. Ink and toner cartridges 4.1 All computers must have printer set to draft option to reduce ink consumption 4.2 Used printer cartridges are to be placed in the used ink cartridge bin for removal by the cleaning contractor and returned to supplier
  • Purpose of guidelines • Support day-to-day decision-making • Describe best practice based on evidence and standardised actions that are commonly accepted within the industry • Provide detailed instructions on how to undertake more complex procedures
  • Policy A Procedures The relationship between policies, procedures and guidelines Policy A. Policy A Procedures A1 Guidelines A1. A2. A3. A1.1 A1.2 A1.3 A1.4 Policy A Procedures A3 Guidelines A3.1 A3.2 A3.3 A3.4 No guidelines required STOP HERE. Complexprocedureitem Simple procedure Complex procedure item
  • Example: Complex procedure requiring guidelines 1/2 Procedures: 1. A "Personnel Requisition Form" will be completed and the necessary authorisations will be secured prior to the search. 2. An electronic posting of the position will be posted on the Human Resources web site. 3. Appropriate outside advertising will be coordinated by the Human Resources Office, including postings with the veterans organizations, and state unemployment agencies. 4. The hiring department will conduct campus interviews and special effort should be made to consider candidates from under-represented groups. 5. Reference and background checks will be conducted on final candidates whom are being considered for a position with the College. 6. The oral offer of employment by the hiring department should be followed up by a written confirmation. 7. Rejected candidates will be promptly contacted and the communication process should be coordinated with the Human Resources Office. 8. The hiring supervisor will complete a "Status Form" to authorize placing the new employee on the payroll system. The form needs to be sent to the Human Resources Office. 9. Hiring supervisors will complete a performance appraisal for the new staff member within the first 30- 90 days of employment. Early detection of performance problems is very important.
  • Example: Complex procedure requiring guidelines 2/2 Reference: Hiring of Staff - Procedure 3 “Appropriate outside advertising of jobs” 1. Advertise in 1 local and 3 national publications. Accepted local publications include: X, Y, Z. 2. Ensure only positions above Level 3 may be advertised in the print media. Lower level positions require approval from Head of Budget. 3. Ensure placement of recruitment advertisements is conducted by Human Resources Department to ensure recruitment processes are correct, cost-effective, use appropriate media, have proper use of company brand, etc. 4. Ensure advertising cost will not exceed budget amount 5. Ensure job advertisement has: a) Interesting and catchy description that invokes a response to apply and includes benefits of the role and the nature of the work b) A position title that is reflective of the job and kept short c) Bullet points and bold text, grab’ attention and highlight important aspects of the advertisement d) Succinct and specific content with sentence lengths no more than 14-20 words maximum e) Active voice to engage the potential candidate (e.g. “You will be..” and “Ideally you will have..”) f) A minimum of two weeks for applications 6. Etc, etc
  • The key components of a guidelines document COMPONENT DESCRIPTION Subject area Setting up scope the guideline serves for (e.g. defining guidelines for a particular topic) Background analysis Information on the purpose of the guideline Explanation of necessity Introduce positive impacts of a guideline as well as indicate results of not-following the guideline Sequence of steps Summary of steps to implement action overview Steps in detail Steps are broken down into smaller activities, following a logical order for implementing the actions into day-to-day operations.
  • Example of a guidelines document Standard guidelines layout: Name of organisation (If specific to a service stream or unit, name of stream or unit) Title of guidelines Page x of y pages Issue Date: 10/1999 Subject area Specify purpose of guideline, the procedure and policy it relates to and exclusions (if any). Background analysis Specify who will implement the guidelines and the scope of the guidelines. Objectives Explain why the guidelines are necessary. Steps List sequentially exactly what must be done, noting any exceptions. Associated documents List documents to be used with the guidelines (such as the policy document and procedures document), attach examples of completed documentation, if appropriate.
  • TOPIC 4. DISSEMINATING POLICIES, PROCEDURES AND GUIDELINES IN RESPONSIBLE TOURISM UNIT 5. RESPONSIBLE ORGANISATIONAL POLICY DEVELOPMENT & CAPACITY BUILDING
  • How to disseminate? Meetings and workshops Website Email Posters Newsletter, brochures & flyers
  • What to disseminate? Full copy •The original policy / procedures / guidelines in full Purpose •Importance about why the policy / procedure / guideline is needed Background •Explanation of comprehensive development process adopted Target audience •Indication about who the policy / procedure / guideline affects Benefits •What the direct and indirect benefits of adoption will be Implementation plan •What the company will do next to instigate the policy / procedures / guidelines Further information •Where to obtain further information (or from who) and how
  • Dissemination through meetings and workshops • Gather relevant staff together to communicate a new or amended policy • Pros: – In-depth explanation – Direct delivery (cannot be put off or ignored, e.g. email) – Opportunities for employees to ask questions for clarification – Results in greater commitment towards action – Low cost • Cons: – Time intensive for participants and presenter – Effectiveness dependent on presenter’s communication skills – 100% attendance not assured
  • Dissemination through newsletters, brochures and flyers • Inform staff and others about the new or amended policy through the organisation newsletter • Pros: – Can be supported by images and illustrations – Can be passed on to other stakeholders – Can be read whenever convenient • Cons: – Relatively less detailed explanation – 100% readership not assured – Readers less likely to follow-up if they need clarification on the policy – Time intensive to write – Less likely to gain widespread commitment towards action – Relatively high cost
  • Dissemination through websites • Create a section in the company website or intranet to communicate responsible tourism policies and actions • Pros: – Relatively quick and easy to develop – Accessible 24 hours / day – Can be linked to other web resources – Can have in-depth explanation – Can be supported by images and illustrations – Link can be viewed by all stakeholders – Relatively inexpensive • Cons: – 100% readership not assured – Readers less likely to follow-up if they need clarification on the policy – Less likely to gain widespread commitment towards action
  • Dissemination by email • Create a section in the company website or intranet to communicate responsible tourism policies and actions • Pros: – Direct delivery to target audience – Relatively quick and easy to develop – Accessible 24 hours / day – Can be linked to web resources – Can be forwarded to other stakeholders – Highly inexpensive • Cons: – Less conducive for in-depth explanations – Doesn’t support images / illustrations well – 100% readership not assured – Readers less likely to follow-up if they need clarification on the policy – Less likely to gain widespread commitment
  • Dissemination through posters • Colourful posters that can be placed on the wall in relevant workplace areas is an ideal way to disseminate procedures and guidelines directly where the actions take place • Pros: – Direct delivery to target audience and relevant place of action – Supports images / illustrations well – Acts as a reminder and reinforces constant commitment • Cons: – Relatively time consuming to develop – Not conducive for in-depth explanations – Cannot be linked to web resources – Cannot be forwarded to other stakeholders – Readers less likely to follow-up if they need clarification on the policy
  • Principles of effective awareness messages •Speak directly to the key audience; language should be direct and reflective of the audience; use images, illustrations, diagrams and colour to bring information to life Grab attention •Messages should not only deal with business matters but explain the importance at a human level Cater to the heart & the head •Urge audience to not just read or become aware about an issue but to take the next step and become active participants of change. Call to action •Motivate the audience to implement action by communicating benefits that are clear, direct and relevant to the audience Communicate benefits •Messages should be consistent to reinforce their principles and generate greater trust from the audience in the management’s policy direction Convey a consistent message
  • TOPIC 5. DEVELOPING A STAFF TRAINING PROGRAMME TO SUPPORT RESPONSIBLE TOURISM POLICY DIRECTIVES UNIT 5. RESPONSIBLE ORGANISATIONAL POLICY DEVELOPMENT & CAPACITY BUILDING
  • Importance of staff training to achieve responsible tourism policy goals • Introduces new required activities and reinforces existing activities • Instils performance expectations and standards and better ensures consistency • Provides practical “hands-on” learning • Provides opportunities for staff to ask questions and feel comfortable with actions required • Increases employee motivation and adoption
  • Common types of capacity building used by companies to train staff • Provision of access to repositories of information and electronic and print resources • Provision of company guidelines and manuals • Consultation such as coaching / mentoring • Co-ordinating alliances and observing real best practice case studies • Workplace training
  • Developing an effective workplace training programme using A-D-D-I-E • ADDIE is a popular generic 5-step framework used to develop courses • ADDIE is the basis of most of today’s Instructional Systems Design (ISD) methodologies • ADDIE helps ensure learning does not occur in a haphazard way • ADDIE is designed to ensure: – learners will achieve the goals of the course; – learner needs are properly considered; – effective and relevant training materials are designed and developed; and – effectiveness of the training program may be evaluated with specific, measurable outcomes.
  • The ADDIE approach to training programme creation Design Develop Implement Evaluate Analyse Learning problem Goals and objectives Audience’s needs Existing knowledge Learning environment Constraints Delivery options Project timeline Instructional Design Strategy Delivery method Training structure and duration Evaluation methodology Create prototype Develop training materials Desktop review Run training pilot Training schedule Print and prepare training material Prepare trainers Notify learners Launch training Collect training evaluation data Review training effectiveness Assess project performance Report performance results
  • Step 1. Analysis • Learner profile: Age group, level of experience, education background, cultural elements, gender • Job analysis: Tasks and skills of job relevant to the responsible tourism policy or procedure • Training models: Training models, teaching methods, learning environment, training duration • Design and development decisions: Responsible person/s for designing training plan, instructional materials, writing content, delivering training.
  • Step 2. Design • Source training providers: In-house or external? Develop selection criteria and recruit. • Develop training of trainers’ strategy: How will training be implemented? How many trainers? Is training of trainers required? How will it work? • Develop training plan: Course name, training model, group size, course duration, target audience, goal and objectives, structure, learning content, assessment strategy, teaching style • Develop templates for training materials: Presentation, hand-outs, and other training material templates
  • Using active learning approaches in training APPROACH DESCRIPTION Discussion A meeting specifically called to discuss the policy and/or procedures. Increases participation and allows different perspectives on a topic. Group activities Small-group problem-solving or collaborative learning activities that relate to the policy or procedure/s Multimedia Audio-visual presentations (e.g. videos, audio tape, overheads) or use of computers and the internet to help disseminate information on the policy and / or procedures Physical activities Movement and / or manipulation of materials Quiz Can be fun and interactive. Can be held after training has been provided to reinforce learning. Individual problem- solving Learning activities that are undertaken by individual staff members Role plays, simulations & demonstrations Learners are required to act out a situation to demonstrate their understanding of the procedure/s Guest speaker Inviting a guest speaker who has a good reputation or considerable knowledge in the topic area. Site visits Taking trainees on a visit to a local place of interest to provide practical examples and case studies of principles in practice.
  • Step 3. Development • Develop training content for the trainer and learners such as: – Delegate manuals, workbooks or hand-outs – Trainer guides – Presentations (e.g. PowerPoint) – Resources and teaching aids (e.g. marketing material, equipment for demonstrations, video clips, posters etc).
  • Step 4. Implementation • Train trainers (if required) • Select, invite and register beneficiaries • Deliver training • Assess trainees • Conduct post-training evaluations
  • Step 5. Evaluation • Evaluate effectiveness of course, content, training material and delivery, and impact of the course on the learner to ensure capacity is built • Evaluation can be: – Via feedback from beneficiaries (e.g. questionnaire or post-course discussion) – Through trainer observation or other members of management who attended the piloting of the course • Course impact can be evaluated via pre- and post-tests and normal monitoring and reporting processes within the context of the job
  • Example: Hotel training plan for protection of children in tourism workshop 1/3 TRAINING PLAN [Company Name] policy and procedures training in child protection TIME The workshop is planned for 4 hours – with a mix of classroom and practical activities. Schedule is shown below in the training plan OBJECTIVES By the end of the learning program, the learner will be able to: Understand the basics issues and impacts of child labour and sexual exploitation Understand the role and responsibility of staff in child protection Apply techniques to identify potential child protection violations and to react appropriately TRAINING MODEL Class room based training using high impact learning methods which include power point slides, flashcards, case studies, role plays and quiz Optional field trip to experience responsible tourism practices in one destination. VENUE BRIEF Training room with sufficient space, tables, chairs and facilities to accommodate a group of 30 learners with a trainer RESOURCES Presentation pack (Presenter or Powerpoint); Trainee Guide and checklists A1 paper (flip chart) & markers Flash cards Video clips of child protection situations Case study hand-outs on child protection situations CONTENT See following table
  • Example: Hotel training plan for protection of children in tourism workshop 2/3 CHILD PROTECTION TRAINING PROGRAMME CONTENT Topic Title Duration Topic 1 Understanding issues of child labour and sexual exploitation in tourism 30 minutes Topic 2 Preventing child protection violations 60 minutes Topic 3 Identifying child protection violations 60 minutes Topic 4 Reporting child protection violations 30 minutes Topic 5 Protecting children in emergencies 60 minutes
  • Example: Hotel training plan for protection of children in tourism workshop 3/3 Topic 3: Identifying child protection violations (60 minutes) Learning outcomes: By the end of this session, trainees should understand the importance of child protection in tourism, be able to identify violations in child protection and apply correct reporting and emergency response strategies. TEACHINGMETHODS / LEARNING ACTIVITIES TIMING RESOURCES 1. Introduction Aims, outcomes, key content, assessment etc Welcome participants to the workshop – introduce yourself, review the aims and outcomes, explain the schedule / content. Explain the assessment requirements and how this will take place, and the award of the certification of participation Deal with any practical arrangements – phones, washrooms, breaks, smoking etc Introduction to workshop and session (5 minutes) Computer with Powerpoint presentation Projector White board or flip chart; Markers; Flash cards of situations of child violation and non- violation situations Case study hand-outs of situations involving potential violations of child protection Video clips of potential child protection violations 2. Warm-up activity What do you understand by child exploitation? Why is child protection important in tourism? Discussion: Have you ever witnessed exploitation of a child? What did you feel? How did you react? Do you think you helped solve the problem? What more could you have done? Put key points onto flipchart Warm-up activity (5 minutes) 3. Presentation What are the rights of children? What is meant by a violation in child protection? Types of child protection violations: (i) Labour (ii) Sexual exploitation Impacts of child protection violations How to identify a child protection violation Presentation on identifying child protection violations (15 minutes) 4. Case study Learners split into small groups and read a case study of a situation involving a potential child protection violation and discuss the steps they would follow in order to further confirm if a violation of child protection has been made. Groups present their case study and explanation of recommendations back to the class. Demonstration (10 minutes) 5. Practice Short video clips are shown of situations involving potential child protection violations and pauses the video after each clip to ask participants to explain what they saw and heard which makes them believe there could be a violation in child protection and the further steps they would take to confirm if there has been a violation or not. Practice session – identifying child protection violations (15 minutes) 6. Review Review of main points of session and answer any questions Note assessment requirements Review (10 minutes)
  • Xin trân trọng cảm ơn! Thank you!