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Cshema 2009   Master Energy
Cshema 2009   Master Energy
Cshema 2009   Master Energy
Cshema 2009   Master Energy
Cshema 2009   Master Energy
Cshema 2009   Master Energy
Cshema 2009   Master Energy
Cshema 2009   Master Energy
Cshema 2009   Master Energy
Cshema 2009   Master Energy
Cshema 2009   Master Energy
Cshema 2009   Master Energy
Cshema 2009   Master Energy
Cshema 2009   Master Energy
Cshema 2009   Master Energy
Cshema 2009   Master Energy
Cshema 2009   Master Energy
Cshema 2009   Master Energy
Cshema 2009   Master Energy
Cshema 2009   Master Energy
Cshema 2009   Master Energy
Cshema 2009   Master Energy
Cshema 2009   Master Energy
Cshema 2009   Master Energy
Cshema 2009   Master Energy
Cshema 2009   Master Energy
Cshema 2009   Master Energy
Cshema 2009   Master Energy
Cshema 2009   Master Energy
Cshema 2009   Master Energy
Cshema 2009   Master Energy
Cshema 2009   Master Energy
Cshema 2009   Master Energy
Cshema 2009   Master Energy
Cshema 2009   Master Energy
Cshema 2009   Master Energy
Cshema 2009   Master Energy
Cshema 2009   Master Energy
Cshema 2009   Master Energy
Cshema 2009   Master Energy
Cshema 2009   Master Energy
Cshema 2009   Master Energy
Cshema 2009   Master Energy
Cshema 2009   Master Energy
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Cshema 2009 Master Energy

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  • 1. Energy Efficiency on Campus Balancing Safety & Energy Savings A Summary of Initiatives Marc Gomez, Dick Sun, Joe Rizkallah magomez@uci.edu, dtsun@uci.edu, jar@uci.edu
  • 2. University of California, Irvine Large research university $16M annual utilities budget Lab buildings consume 2/3 of campus energy Many energy initiatives to reduce carbon footprint
  • 3. Campus Energy $avings Challenge Recipe for Success Team Synergy Engineers Safety Management Supportive Users/ Visionary & Researchers Supportive Upper Facility Management Managers Patience
  • 4. Agenda • Lab Building Energy Projects – Centralized Demand Controlled Ventilation – Exhaust Stack Velocity – Low Flow Fume Hoods • Shuttle Bus Fleet Biodiesel Retrofit • Real Time Building Commissioning • Solar Power
  • 5. Centralized Demand Controlled Ventilation This Initiative: Does Centralized Demand Controlled Ventilation (CDCV) Allow Us to Reduce Ventilation Rates and Save Energy Without Compromising Safety?
  • 6. Centralized Demand Controlled Ventilation Lab Ventilation Rates • Recommended range 4 to 12 air changes per hour • Often set at a “constant rate” 24/7 • Usually excessive during low-level process activity or non-occupancy • Explore possibility of “set back” based on lab pollutant concentration
  • 7. Components of Centralized Demand Controlled Ventilation (CDCV) “Creating a Smart Lab”
  • 8. CDCV & Energy $avings Monitor Air Contaminants Reduce air changes per hour (ACH) if no contaminants detected Increase air changes per hour (ACH) when contaminants detected
  • 9. CDCV & Energy $avings Challenge Balance energy savings & safety imiz e Co Witho Max gy mp rom ut Ener s Saf isin g S avin ety g
  • 10. CDCV Effectiveness Study • Controlled spills ‐ 500 ml of acetone • 4 ach ventilation rate • Acetone measurements  with CDCV and handheld  photo‐ionization detector  • CDCV ventilation activation level: 0.5 ppm • CDCV polling interval time: 14‐17 minutes
  • 11. CDCV Study Results - 1 • System effective at sensing most chemicals • Polling time can delay spill detection • Did see a 6,100 cfm air volume reduction over the month study • System payback is 2-5 years
  • 12. CDCV Study Results - 2 • System provides information we don’t normally have: – Contaminant concentrations – Notifies EH&S and Facilities staff • Additional study needed to further test system effectiveness
  • 13. Agenda • Lab Building Energy Projects – Centralized Demand Controlled Ventilation – Exhaust Stack Velocity – Low Flow Fume Hoods • Shuttle Bus Fleet Biodiesel Retrofit • Real Time Building Commissioning • Solar Power
  • 14. Lab Building Exhaust Stack Discharge Energy Reduction Study
  • 15. Exhaust Stack Velocity This Initiative: Can We Reduce Lab Building Exhaust Discharge Rates & Achieve Real Energy Savings Without Compromising Safety?
  • 16. Lab Exhaust Diagram Animated Wind Re-Entrainment Exhaust Fan Bypass Damper of Contaminated Air Plenum Supply Fan Duct Balcony Fume Hood
  • 17. Energy Costs and Savings Building Actions Savings Payback Sprague ♦ Do not modify exhaust stack heights 400,000 1.7 years Hall ♦ Install Variable Frequency Drives (VFD) on each fan kW- ♦ Disable or remove the existing bypass dampers hr/year ♦ Set the minimum exhaust flow per stack to 25,000 $48K/year cfm (from 55,000 cfm) Natural ♦ Increase stacks by 4 feet 340,000 3.7 to 5.3 Sciences 1 ♦ Install VFD on fans kW- years ♦ Install wind responsive equipment (consist of two hr/year anemometers and a logic contoller) $41K/year ♦ Reduce exhaust fan flows Biological General Laboratory 510,000 1.6 Years Sciences 3 ♦ Increase stack heights by 5 feet kW- ♦ Reduce flow to 40,000 cfm/stack (from 53,000 cfm) hr/year $61K/year BSL 3 Lab 49,000 5.1 years ♦ Increase stack heights to 4 feet kW- ♦ Reduce flow to 19,000 cfm/stack (from 22,000 cfm) hr/year $6K/year
  • 18. Exhaust Study Results What we learned: • Wind tunnel testing, as it is used in design, is conservative • Field dispersion studies are not performed on new or renovated exhaust systems • Energy savings can be realized • Didn’t find a “one size fits all” solution
  • 19. Agenda • Lab Building Energy Projects – Centralized Demand Controlled Ventilation – Exhaust Stack Velocity – Low Flow Fume Hoods • Shuttle Bus Fleet Biodiesel Retrofit • Real Time Building Commissioning • Solar Power
  • 20. UCI Biodiesel Retrofit Project
  • 21. Project Summary • UC Irvine student supported shuttle bus system carries 1.2 million passengers per year • Goal was not just a cleaner emissions fleet, but to make the fleet essentially carbon- neutral • Converted campus shuttle bus fleet from diesel to 100% biodiesel (B100) fuel • Decrease NOx emissions
  • 22. Biodiesel Study Results Percent Reduction/Increase Diesel to B100 Pollutant Type B100 B100 w/NOx Control Smog forming & NOx +19.5% -28.4% criteria pollutant CO Criteria pollutant -48% -98.7% The other pollutants (PM, HC, SO2, toxic air contaminants – PAHs) were not tested because there is enough published data  available that confirms the other pollutants decrease and/or remain the same when using biodiesel fuels.
  • 23. Conclusion Overall advantages of using biodiesel includes: – Reduces dependence on fossil fuels – Eliminates SO2 because biodiesel does not contain sulfur. – Reduces the emission of particulates, small particles of solid combustion products, by as much as 65 percent (National Biodiesel Board, 2004) – Conversion has reduced annual campus CO2 emissions by approximately 480 tons.1 1Assumes that 100% of fuel consumed is carbon-neutral. Data is based on a national study of effects of biodiesel usage in buses. Life cycle emissions reductions for CO2 from the use of B100 are 78% and 15.7% for B20.
  • 24. Agenda • Lab Building Energy Projects – Centralized Demand Controlled Ventilation – Exhaust Stack Velocity – Low Flow High Efficiency Fume Hoods • Shuttle Bus Fleet Biodiesel Retrofit • Real Time Building Commissioning • Solar Power
  • 25. Low Flow / High Efficiency Fume Hoods • Cal/OSHA requirement of 100 FPM capture velocity • Other 49 States do not have this requirement and can use low flow fume hoods • UCI is working with Cal/ OSHA to complete a study showing that low flow fume hoods provide equivalent protection as traditional hoods at 100 FPM
  • 26. EH&S Partnerships for success! • UC - Irvine EH&S Department • The Henry Samueli School of Engineering • Cal / OSHA • Tom Smith & James Fraley, Consultants • Fisher Hamilton – Fume Hood Donation • Labconco – Fume Hood Donation • Lab Crafters – Fume Hood Donation • Kewaunee – Fume Hood Donation
  • 27. Low Flow Fume Hood Study Methodology & Results • ASHRAE 110 Containment Test • Human As Mannequin (HAM) • Real world conditions – Loaded hood – Cross drafts – Walk‐bys
  • 28. Highest Average Concentration for Tracer Gas Tests: Maximum 5-minute average tracer gas concentrations per condition
  • 29. Low Fume Hood Study Conclusion • Study showed that low flow fume hoods operating at 70 -80 FPM do provide equivalent protection to conventional hoods at an 18 inch sash height
  • 30. Agenda • Lab Building Energy Projects – Centralized Demand Controlled Ventilation – Exhaust Stack Velocity – Low Flow Fume Hoods • Shuttle Bus Fleet Biodiesel Retrofit • Real Time Building Commissioning • Solar Power
  • 31. Real Time Building Commissioning Building Sqft Cost Engineering Unit 3 122,470 $50,404,000 Social & Behavioral Sciences Building 116,143 $40,743,180 Humanities Building 74,919 $28,997,000 Medical Education Building 66,906 $30,018,007 Steinhaus Hall Exterior Renovation 112,857 $4,620,000 Arts Building 59,492 $33,764,007 UCI MC Clinical Laboratory Replacement Building 48,000 $32,813,000 New University Hospital Shell Space Completion/Site 63,695 $96,625,000 Improvements Stem Cell Research Center Building 100,635 $46,257,931 Law School Library 21,800 $1,974,845
  • 32. Real Time Building Commissioning • Energy savings can be significant when systems are operating at peak. • Design and Construction Services, Facilities Management, and EH&S are consistently challenged with systems performance once the user moves in. • Post occupancy survey.
  • 33. Real Time Building Commissioning Working toward making this program happen on campus – Developed a Lab Design guide to survey the renovation and building of lab space • Given to contractors in the “SCHEMATIC DESIGN” phase of a project – Established buy-in from D&CS and FM on approach
  • 34. Real Time Building Commissioning Follow up Systems – Team of EH&S, D&CS & FM personnel with the appropriate knowledge – Create a timeline after move in – Create an agreement between EH&S, FM and D&CS as to who fixes/pays for issues
  • 35. Real Time Building Commissioning • Study Croul Hall, Cal IT2, and other new buildings that have issues after move in • Create a report that outlines the potential energy savings and maintenance issues
  • 36. Agenda • Lab Building Energy Projects – Centralized Demand Controlled Ventilation – Exhaust Stack Velocity – Low Flow Fume Hoods • Shuttle Bus Fleet Biodiesel Retrofit • Real Time Building Commissioning • Solar Power
  • 37. Solar Power • UCI has partnered with So-Cal Edison to install solar panels on our south facing buildings • Presently over 9 buildings generating over 900 KW DC, currently more being installed! • No cost to the university • University to take ownership after 5 years
  • 38. EH&S Workload Challenge This energy efficiency movement has increased our calls and our involvement with building practices related to energy efficiency and customer service in a challenging budget year
  • 39. EH&S Workload Challenge • Indoor Air Quality calls – Odors • Indoor Air Quality calls ‐ Temperature • Water Temperature calls • Group presentations on building changes • Solar power array calls on health effects • Shrinking staff to handle the above
  • 40. Energy Efficiency on Campus Balancing Safety & Energy Savings A Summary of Initiatives Questions? Marc Gomez, Dick Sun, Joe Rizkallah magomez@uci.edu, dtsun@uci.edu, jar@uci.edu

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