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  • For my senior grad I chose to do video production. <br /> <br /> I believe that most people don&#x2019;t know what video production really is. There is much more to it than just shooting the commercial or film or whatever it may be. I want to prove that there is more than that from the actual writing of the script to getting the product in the customer&#x2019;s hands. <br />
  • Which brings me to my thesis that throughout the years video production has burst into something that we see everyday. Whether it is to influence, entertain, or inform there is no movie, television show, or commercial that is seen without going through the process of video production. <br /> <br />
  • I chose to do this topic not because it somehow relates to my life, because it doesn&#x2019;t but I chose it because I wanted to learn something new and have fun while doing it. I came up with this idea after seeing the commercials that you can send in to Doritos or mountain dew and I just wanted to know what they did to get their commercial finished and ready for tv. <br /> <br />
  • So after doing some research I found out that there are three main stages of video production. Pre- production, production and post production. But I also included the distribution stage because I believe it is also important because it is the way that your work gets out there and it&#x2019;s a way to get yourself noticed. So you&#x2019;ll be learning about each stage in detail and what goes into it. <br /> <br />
  • To start of pre production is first. Pre production is the planning stage of your shoot and occurs before the camera starts rolling. In this stage you&#x2019;ll create a storyboard, go through production planning and scout your locations of possible projects. <br /> <br />
  • A storyboard is the first thing you will create. To create a storyboard all you need is a piece of paper, a strong visual sense and a clear idea of what you want to see in every scene. But a very well executed board would include visual representations of each scene and even break down the scene into important dramatic elements. A basic storyboard is set up like a comic book. It has a number of panels of images and below each box is a place to write your dialog or have a description of what is going on during that scene. By having a storyboard in place both the director and the crew will have a better idea of how every shot and sequence will go together. <br /> <br />
  • Production planning is just a big meeting where you find out everything that is going into your project. There are three main things that are going to be discussed during this meeting, budgeting, casting and crew. Budge ting is very important. You need to make sure you have enough money to pay your crew and all the equipment that they are going to need. Along with your crew costs, someone needs to make sure that the location they are shooting at is all paid for and that they have the right to be there by having a permit set in place. Having that done allows time for finding talent. There are many places where you can find talent, like a local mall or a high school but an obvious choice is to go to a local theater, where it may be easier to find potential actors. And last is your crew. A crew can be very beneficial to your project. Depending on the size of the project will determine the size of your crew. Many projects can potentially have over 30 people running around or some may just have one, like in my case. <br />
  • The last thing in pre production is to look for locations. There are ten tips to scout out the perfect location. Know your script, scout at the right time, look at the light, follow the sun, check for power supplies, listen, examine the elements, decide where to set up, get permission, and evaluate the area. By knowing your script you can chose a location that lends itself to the story you want to produce, you shouldn&#x2019;t be limited by the location you chose. Remember that locations are just raw materials. Number two: scout at the right time. Locations can change; there are times in the day where there may be loud traffic noise or any other distraction just because it is a certain time, day, or season. Number three: Look at the light. Generally in homes there is low amounts of light. Fix this by having a window that can let more light in if necessary. Number four: follow the sun. Obviously the sun doesn&#x2019;t shine everywhere at the same time. Pay attention to where certain spots have full sun, partial, or full shade. Number five: check for power supplies basically bringing multiple camera batteries is a good idea. Number six: listen. Silence ensures clean, high-quality sound. Number seven: examine the elements. Sun, rain, wind, snow, hot or cold, can either help or hurt you depending on what you&#x2019;re hoping for. Number eight: decide where to set up: there needs to be plenty of space to set up all the equipment and still have space to capture the shot you had in mind. Number nine: get permission. Easy enough, you need permits to shoot in certain places. Make sure you have them. And last evaluate the area: check cell phone reception, you don&#x2019;t want to get stuck somewhere, quick food stops, and just incase any possible electronic store. <br /> <br />
  • When pre production is finished you move on to production. Production is the filming stage of your shoot which includes art, audio, cinematography, directing, effects and stunts and lighting. <br /> <br />
  • Art design adds to the overall feel of your video by focusing on the set, costumes, props, and make-up. Make up and costumes or wardrobe go hand in hand. The whole look and style of the video can help tell the story by offering important visual clues about the characters. Sets and props do the same thing. In a set it allows the character to move around and play with some type of prop instead of just standing there. <br /> <br />
  • Microphones are used to get the best audio but the placement of it can be very tricky. You want the highest quality sound without actually seeing the microphone. There are many places you can hid a mic like in a collar of a polo shirt or a t=shirt pocket , you can even hide it in your hair. But you can also get rid of noisy backgrounds and have the dialog come out clear by using ADR. Which stands for automatic dialog replacement. It&#x2019;s also known ad dubbing or looping. There is also Foley, where a sound engineer creates a sound in a scene and just adds it to the film later. <br /> <br />
  • Cinematography teaches you about your camera. Your camera needs care too, meaning it needs to be cleaned with the proper equipment. Camera controls are the buttons on your camera. By knowing what each buttons does make for a better image, camera angels adds to that. There are four different types of angles, eye level, high angle, low angle and reverse. Camera movement teaches you not just to follow you subject, you can zoom in and out, pan in or out and arc you camera for a more interesting shot. With composition it is important to remember the rule of thirds and shot types can be close up, cut-away wide, or many more. All of these allow you to use your camera to its fullest potential while improving the overall production value. <br /> <br />
  • Being a director involves more than yelling action and cut, it involves knowing how to get the best from your cast and crew. When finding talent for their movie they will have to have a casting call and sit through casting tapes. They would have to learn if they wanted to learn how to direct animals if it included any type of animal and the same goes for children, they can&#x2019;t act like they would with a regular adult. Always professional <br />
  • Special effects like green screens, fake blood, fire ad horror can look realistic with the proper tools and techniques. Things like blood effects and horror are easy to grasp. Where as green screens and pyrotechnics are a little more difficult. If using fireworks or fire permits are needed along with a big open space just incase something goes wrong. But it can also be done on the computer with the right software. <br /> <br />
  • There are many different ways to light up your set. Night lighting is where you turn the light of day into the dark of night. This allows you to shoot something in the day without the noise it makes shooting in low light during the night. Noise that you probably don&#x2019;t want in your project. On camera lighting is a light that sits on top of your camera, allowing to add light to a dark shot and outdoor lighting, which requires a little patience. You need to make sure you know the time and place where you want to shoot to get the best outdoor lighting <br /> <br />
  • Postproduction begins when your camera stops rolling. It includes authoring, graphics and compositing, media management, picture editing, and sound editing. <br /> <br />
  • When authoring on a disc it is important to include a menu option to allow the person easy navigation through the disc by links connecting them to the video. While a menu option isn&#x2019;t necessary for online and mobile authoring all three need to go through compression. Compression is used to reduce the file size the video to fit more easily into an available space <br />
  • Graphics and compositing include time remapping and titles. Time remapping is changing the speed of a shot and titles can add professionalism to your work. It also identifies, giving people info on who is talking are what is going on. <br /> <br />
  • In media management you can create a system, which is very important to editing. There are many different types of systems but you have to choose the one that&#x2019;s right for you, that comes with all the feature you need. Software &#x201C;tames your tapes&#x201D; meaning that it can organize your footage and allows you to view it as all. <br /> <br /> <br />
  • Color corrections include correcting white balance, adjusting brightness and contrast, and improving color. Transitions include dissolves/fades or a cut. depending on what is going on in the video one transition may be better than another. <br /> <br />
  • Sound editing is the process of cleaning up your audio, and adding music. Scoring can be looped or custom. You can create your own sounds by using software or recording and editing unique sounds. Using loops you are able you create original music. With sound effects you can create your own foley sounds to add random noises in certain spots. <br /> <br /> <br />
  • <br /> Finally distribution. There are 4 ways to get your stuff noticed, disc distribution, film festivals and contest, four walling and online distribution. <br /> <br />
  • With disc distribution you are able to use duplication houses where it allows you to create copies of your original movie, having the disc identical every time. It&#x2019;s easier than person duplication where you just do it yourself. <br /> <br />
  • You can enter film festivals and contests. Videomaker video contest host a short video contest where you can get your movies out there for people to see and festivals that people can enter are Canned and sundance, <br /> <br />
  • Four walling is a do it yourself term. You find and rent a venue to show you project. <br /> <br />
  • And online distribution allows more people to see your work. Some Internet sharing site include you tube, facebook, google, and twitter. Vidcasting is a new way of sharing . it can help them get a community of viwers by providing specialized content, which can be done through itunes or RSS feeds <br /> <br />
  • For my application I started my own little video production company. In the company I did promos for stephs sgp, did some event shooting, tried (key word tried) making a scripted reality show, editing my projects and distributed them. <br /> <br />
  • So for my company I named it d. tor productions, I thought it was simple and catchy and it just stuck. <br /> <br /> <br />
  • For my first project that I ever did was a promo for stephs sgp which was a documentary on us seniors. Making promos for her was kind of difficult because since I wasn&#x2019;t the one filming it I didn&#x2019;t know what to expect and with steph we never know. But after getting the hang of it I made three promos for her. <br /> <br /> <br />
  • <br />
  • Shooting live events was not as difficult as making promos for steph because when it came to editing it knew what I had already taped. But the live events that I filmed where fashion for food. Where Britt made some clothes and had a fashion show to raise some money for philabundance and the second one I did was mauras special Olympics which was just an overall fun time. <br /> <br /> <br />
  • A day in the life of Brittany Stanish, was by far the most complicated thing. Scheduling conflicts just kept coming up. So when it came to edit it and put it together it just didn&#x2019;t flow the way I wanted it to, so instead I took the clips from the days that I followed her around and put them together in a promo that you would see on tv. <br /> <br />
  • After while editing became fun. I liked to mess around with the speed, slow thigns down and make them speed up again, find new music to put into the project . But at first I couldn&#x2019;t stand it, I didn&#x2019;t like sitting there just looking at what I can and can&#x2019;t use. It did take a long time and sometimes I would just delete what I had and start all over. <br /> <br />
  • But once the video turned out how I would want it, it was time to distribute. I chose online distribution because it was the easiest out of all of them. I believe that I didn&#x2019;t have quite enough for festivals and four walling was just too much since I&#x2019;m not really one to stand up and get attention or anything of that sort. So I posted my videos on facebook and the ning. The ning allows you guys to see them and facebook allows more people form school and other schools to see my projects. <br /> <br />
  • So for my class activity I&#x2019;m going to pass out this paper and its basically your storyboard and on it your going to come up with your own idea for a commercial or anything you want, have your dialog underneath your drawings of what you want going on. <br /> <br />
  • <br />
  • In conclusion throughout my project <br />

Video Production Presentation Video Production Presentation Presentation Transcript

  • Diana Torres
  • Thesis Throughout the years video production has burst into something that we see everyday. Whether it is to influence, entertain, or inform, there is no movie, television show, or commercial that is seen without going through the process of video production.
  • Personal Relevance
  • Stages of Video Production Pre - Production Production Post Production Distribution Videomaker. Videomaker Magazine, 2009. Web. 20 Oct. 2009. <http://videomaker.com>.
  • Pre Production Storyboard Production Planning Scouting Locations Videomaker. Videomaker Magazine, 2009. Web. 20 Oct. 2009. <http://videomaker.com>.
  • Storyboard Videomaker. Videomaker Magazine, 2009. Web. 20 Oct. 2009. <http://videomaker.com>.
  • Production Planning • Budgeting • Crew costs • Location permit and fees • Casting • Finding talent for videos • Crew • Decoding your crew Stinson, Jim. “Production Planning.” The Videomaker Guide to Video Production. By Videomaker Magazine Editors. Burlington: Focal Press-Elsevier, 2007. 126-38. Print.
  • Locations • Know your script • Scout at the right time • Look at the light “The Secret to • Follow the sun Set Success? • Check for power supplies Location, • Listen Location, • Examine the elements Location!” • Decide where to set up (Fisher) • Get permission Videomaker. Videomaker Magazine, 2009. Web. 20 Oct. 2009. • Evaluate the area      <http://videomaker.com>.
  • Production Art Audio Cinematography Directing Effects and Stunts Lighting "Video Production - Part 2 - The Production Stage." Reelso: The Online Video http://www.reelseo.com/ video-production-2/>.
  • Art Make- up Costumes Sets and Props Argy, Stephanie. “Selling an Image.” American Cinematographer Nov. 1999: 86-99. SIRS Renaissance. Web. 7 Nov. 2009.
  • Audio • Microphones • Placement • Sound Design • ADR • Foley “Video Production - Part 2 - The Production Stage.” Reelso: The Online Video Marketer’s Guide. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2010. <http://www.reelseo.com/production-2/>.Video Production Tips: Digital Video for Fun and Profit. N.p., n.d. Web. 3 Mar. 2010. Videomaker. Videomaker Magazine, 2009. Web. 20 Oct. 2009.  <http://videomaker.com>.
  • Cinematography • Camcorder Care • Camcorder Controls • Camera Angles • Camera Movement • Composition • Shot Types Videomaker. Videomaker Magazine, 2009. Web. 20 Oct. 2009. <http://videomaker.com>.
  • Directing Argy, Stephanie. “Selling an Image.” American Cinematographer Nov. 1999: 86-99. SIRS Renaissance. Web. 7 Nov. 2009. Videomaker. Videomaker Magazine, 2009. Web. 20 Oct. 2009.  <http://videomaker.com>.
  • Effects and Stunts Blood Effects Green Screen Horror Pyrotechnics Sterritt, David. “Art in Motion.” Christian Science Monitor 21 July 2000: n.p. SIRS Renaissance. Web. 7 Nov. 2009. Videomaker. Videomaker Magazine, 2009. Web. 20 Oct. 2009. <http://videomaker.com>.
  • Lighting • Night lighting • On-Camera • Outdoor Videomaker. Videomaker Magazine, 2009. Web. 20 Oct. 2009.  <http://videomaker.com>.
  • Post Production Authoring Graphics and Compositing Media Management Picture Editing Sound Editing Videomaker. Videomaker Magazine, 2009. Web. 20 Oct. 2009.   <http://videomaker.com>.
  • Authoring • Disc • Online and Mobile Videomaker. Videomaker Magazine, 2009. Web. 20 Oct. 2009.  <http://videomaker.com>.
  • Graphics and Compositing • Time Remapping • Titles Videomaker. Videomaker Magazine, 2009. Web. 20 Oct. 2009.      <http://videomaker.com>.
  • Media Management • Creating a system • Software Videomaker. Videomaker Magazine, 2009. Web. 20 Oct. 2009.      <http://videomaker.com>.
  • Picture Editing Text Transitions Color Correction “Video Production - Part 3 - Post Production & Editing.” Reelso: The Video Marketer’s Guide. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2010. <http://www.reelseo.com/post-production-editing/>
  • Sound Editing • Scoring • Looped/created • Custom • Sound Effects “Video Production - Part 3 - Post Production & Editing.” Reelso: The Video Marketer’s Guide. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2010. <http://www.reelseo.com/post-production-editing/>.
  • Distribution Disc Distribution Film Festivals and Contests Four - Walling Online Distribution Videomaker. Videomaker Magazine, 2009. Web. 20 Oct. 2009.  <http://videomaker.com>. Argy, Stephanie. “Selling an Image.” American Cinematographer Nov. 1999: 86-99. SIRS Renaissance. Web. 7 Nov. 2009.
  • Disc Distribution • Duplication Houses • Personal Duplication Videomaker. Videomaker Magazine, 2009. Web. 20 Oct. 2009.   <http://videomaker.com>.
  • Film Festivals and Contests • Contests • Videomaker Video contest • Festivals • Cannes • Sundance Videomaker. Videomaker Magazine, 2009. Web. 20 Oct. 2009. <http://videomaker.com>. "Sundance Twentyten ." Sundance Festival 2010. N.p., n.d. Web. 3 Apr. 2010.      <http://festival.sundance.org/2010/>.
  • Four-Walling DO IT YOURSELF DO IT YOURSELF Videomaker. Videomaker Magazine, 2009. Web. 20 Oct. 2009.     <http://videomaker.com>.
  • Online Distribution • Internet sharing sites • Vidcasting Videomaker. Videomaker Magazine, 2009. Web. 20 Oct. 2009.   <http://videomaker.com>.
  • Application Starting My Own Company My First Project Shooting Live Events “A Day in the Life” Editing Distribution
  • D.TOR PRODUCTIONS
  • Stephanie Tasia Taylor Presents: WE GET IT POPPIN’
  • Shooting Live Events Fashion For Food Special Olympics
  • of Day in the life... A Brittany Stanish
  • E D I T I N G
  • Distribution
  • CLASS ACTIVITY
  • Works Cited Argy, Stephanie. “Selling an Image.” American Cinematographer Nov. 1999: 86-99. SIRS Renaissance. Web. 7 Nov. 2009. Cobo, Leila. “Music for Your Eyes.” Miami Herald 6 May 2000: 1E-2E . SIRS Renaissance. Web. 7 Nov. 2009. Millerson, Gerald, and Jim Owens. “Chapter 1: Overview of Video Production .” Video Production Handbook. 4th ed. Burlington: Focal Press- Elsevier, 2008. 1-10. Barnes & Noble. Web. 1 Nov. 2009. <http://search2.barnesandnoble.com//?ean=9780240520803>. Gerald O’Kelley, Jeff. “How to Start a Video Production Company .” eHow: How to do Just About Everything. N.p., n.d. Web. 9 Jan. 2010. <http://www.ehow.com/_5448454_start-video- production-company.html>. Oppenheimer, Robin. “Video Installation.” Afterimage Mar.-Apr. 2007: 14-8 . SIRS Renaissance. Web. 20 Oct. 2009. Sterritt, David. “Art in Motion.” Christian Science Monitor 21 July 2000: n.p. SIRS Renaissance. Web. 7 Nov. 2009. Stinson, Jim. “Production Planning.” The Videomaker Guide to Video Production. By Videomaker Magazine Editors. Burlington: Focal Press-Elsevier, 2007. 126-38. Print. "Sundance Twentyten ." Sundance Festival 2010. N.p., n.d. Web. 3 Apr. 2010. <http://festival.sundance.org/2010/>. Videomaker. Videomaker Magazine, 2009. Web. 20 Oct. 2009. <http://videomaker.com>. technology changing constantly, .“Video Production - Part 1 - Pre Production.” Reelso: The Video Marketer’s Guide. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2010. <http://www.reelseo.com/post-production-editing/>. “Video Production - Part 3 - Post Production & Editing.” Reelso: The Video Marketer’s Guide. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2010. <http://www.reelseo.com/post-production- editing/>. “Video Production - Part 2 - The Production Stage.” Reelso: The Online Video Marketer’s Guide. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2010. <http://www.reelseo.com/production-2/ >.Video Production Tips: Digital Video for Fun and Profit. N.p., n.d. Web. 3 Mar. 2010.
  • In Conclusion...