Integrating Major Gift & Planned Gift Programs
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Integrating Major Gift & Planned Gift Programs

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Integrate a major gift program and a planned gift program for even greater success.

Integrate a major gift program and a planned gift program for even greater success.

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  • Two sociology researchers wondered the same thing and decided to find out. In their book, “The Seven Faces of Philanthropy,” Russ Alan Prince and Karen Maru File involved twelve fundraising firms in studying the characteristics of 215 charitable donors. All these individuals had discretionary income of more than a million dollars and all had made gifts of at least $50,000. They identified seven types of givers, seven “typologies.”
  • The first group they identified they call Communitarians , who give because “Doing good makes good sense.” These were 26% of givers—the largest group. They are mostly local business owners who find that service on boards and committees of local organizations can be good for business, because it helps them develop relationships … and because it helps the communities in which they do business prosper. The second group are the Devout who believe that “Doing good is God’s will.” It was the next largest group at 21%. Nearly all their giving goes to churches and other religious organizations. The third group is the Investor 15% of those they sampled. The investor believes that “Doing good is good business.” They keep one eye on the cause, and one on tax law, and they appreciate organizations that know how to work with the tax laws to help them reach their objectives. They tend to give broadly. Most giving to community foundations comes from this group.
  • The next group they called the Socialite who believe that “Doing good is fun.” This is 11% of givers. They believe that events that benefit non-profits are an attractive means of supporting them. They enjoy the social network and many of their personal network attends these same events. They tend to avoid the day-to-day operations of non-profits. Few join boards. They tend to support arts and education, and some also support faith-based non-profits. The Altruist believes that “ Doing Good Feels Right”. These are the selfless donors who give out of generosity. Their name is on almost every major donor wall under “A:: Anonymous. They believe it is a moral imperative to give. Like the socialites, they tend not to serve on boards. They just give and go away. They are highly clustered around social causes. We tend to think that most major donors are this way…but they are only 9% of all donors.
  • The Repayer is “doing good in return” for something the institution has done for them. They are constituents first, and donors second. They have personally benefited from the services of an organization and feel a sense of obligation and loyalty in return. This is what hospital and rehabilitation clinics call “grateful patients.” They are 10% of all givers. Finally, there The Dynast , to whom “Doing Good is a Family Tradition.” This is the smallest group at only 8%. They tend to have inherited wealth. Giving has always been a fact of life within their families, and they believe it’s expected of them, but each generations tends to select its own causes, different from that of their parents. While they have been a powerful force in American philanthropy, they are now only 8% of givers.
  • Here are the groups again. Which groups here are likely to give to your station … and why? (Discussion) (There are probably opportunities for everyone except the Devout.)
  • NOTES

Integrating Major Gift & Planned Gift Programs Integrating Major Gift & Planned Gift Programs Presentation Transcript

  • Dana R. Todsen, ACFRE President Todsen & Associates, LLC Integrating Major & Planned Gift Programs into Your Campaign
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  • Integrating Major & Planned Gift Programs into Your Campaign
    • Twelve firms studied the characteristics of 218 charitable donors.
    • Discretionary income >$1 million who had made gifts >$50,000.
    Integrating Major & Planned Gift Programs into Your Campaign
  • The Seven Typologies
    • Communitarians : “Doing good makes good sense.”
      • 26% of givers.
      • Often local business owners.
      • Don’t just give, get involved.
      • Benefit is the network.
    Integrating Major & Planned Gift Programs into Your Campaign
    • Devout : “Doing good is God’s will.”
      • 21% of givers.
      • Give 94% to churches.
    The Seven Typologies Integrating Major & Planned Gift Programs into Your Campaign
    • Investor : “Doing good is good business.”
      • 15% of givers.
      • One eye on the cause, and one on taxes.
      • Give broadly.
    The Seven Typologies Integrating Major & Planned Gift Programs into Your Campaign
  • The Seven Typologies
    • The Socialite : “Doing Good is Fun.”
      • 11% of givers.
      • Enjoy social network.
      • Special events.
      • Not board members.
      • Give to arts and education.
    Integrating Major & Planned Gift Programs into Your Campaign
    • Altruist : “Doing Good Feels Right”
      • 9% of givers.
      • The Selfless Donor.
      • Moral imperative.
      • Tend not to serve on boards.
      • Give more to social causes.
    Integrating Major & Planned Gift Programs into Your Campaign The Seven Typologies
    • The Repayer : “Doing Good in Return”
      • 10% of givers.
      • Constituents first, donors second.
      • Have personally benefited.
      • Feel loyalty, obligation.
      • Give to hospitals, schools .
    The Seven Typologies Integrating Major & Planned Gift Programs into Your Campaign
    • The Dynast : “Doing Good is a Family Tradition”
      • 8% of givers.
      • Inherited wealth.
      • Believe it is expected.
      • Variety of causes; each generation chooses its own.
    The Seven Typologies Integrating Major & Planned Gift Programs into Your Campaign
  • Who will give to you?
  • Philanthropy Based in values Development Uncovers shared values Fund Raising Gives people opportunities to act on their values Kay Sprinkel Grace High Impact Philanthropy Integrating Major & Planned Gift Programs into Your Campaign
  • Transactional Bell Curve Traditional Method Kay Sprinkel Grace High Impact Philanthropy
  • Transformational Infinity Loop Kay Sprinkel Grace High Impact Philanthropy
  • Integrating Major & Planned Gift Programs into Your Campaign
  • Gift Pyramid Planned Gifts Major Gifts Annual Gifts Participation Active Involvement Increasing Commitment Long-term Investment Constituent or predisposed to the cause
  • Three Types of Organizational Gifts: Current/operational tied to calendar 100% asking Capital/project tied to special gifts 50% cultivation 50% asking Planned/ultimate tied to need of the individual 90% cultivation 10% asking Integrating Major & Planned Gift Programs into Your Campaign
  • Integrating Major & Planned Gift Programs into Your Campaign
      • What is a Major Gift?
      • Each organization must define.
      • Best definition: “A stop and think about gift”.
    Integrating Major & Planned Gift Programs into Your Campaign
      • Major and Planned Gifts are Everything?
      • Gift tables are changing.
      • Donors are much more selective.
      • Constituency wants to do what they can.
    Integrating Major & Planned Gift Programs into Your Campaign
      • What is a Gift Table?
      • A standard of giving, the gift table is a concrete mathematical demonstration of the essential importance of major gifts to a successful capital campaign.
      • A tool representing gifts to date.
    Integrating Major & Planned Gift Programs into Your Campaign
    • Why and When Should You Develop a Gift Table?
      • Indicates number and size of gifts needed.
      • Test for leadership gifts needed.
      • Required for a feasibility study.
    Integrating Major & Planned Gift Programs into Your Campaign
    • Why and When Should You Develop a Gift Table?
      • Defines the goals that must be set.
      • Raises donors’ sights.
      • An essential management tool.
      • An evaluation tool.
    Integrating Major & Planned Gift Programs into Your Campaign
    • Who Uses the Gift Table?
      • Staff
      • Volunteers
      • Management
      • Donors
    Integrating Major & Planned Gift Programs into Your Campaign
    • Standard of Giving in a Campaign:
      • Top Gift: 10 - 15% of goal (minimum).
      • Top 12 - 15 Gifts:
        • Equates to 40 - 50% of goal.
      • Next 100 - 150 Gifts:
        • An additional 35 - 40% of goal.
      • Balance of Gifts: 10 - 15% of goal.
    Integrating Major & Planned Gift Programs into Your Campaign
    • Rule of Thirds:
      • One will give nothing.
      • One will give a token gift.
      • One will give what you ask.
    Integrating Major & Planned Gift Programs into Your Campaign
    • Break Down the Campaign into Mini-Campaigns:
      • Advance gifts.
      • Leadership gifts.
      • Major gifts.
    Integrating Major & Planned Gift Programs into Your Campaign
    • What is a Planned Gift?
      • Future gift.
      • Gifts requiring professional assistance:
      • Real Estate
      • Securities
      • Personal Property
      • Gift of assets rather than cash.
      • Estate gift.
      • Gift of accumulated wealth.
    All of the above are major gifts! Integrating Major & Planned Gift Programs into Your Campaign
    • Planned Gifts Are Now More Important to Success:
      • 20 - 25% of goal.
      • Include endowment.
      • Recognize gifts in campaign.
    Integrating Major & Planned Gift Programs into Your Campaign
    • Planned Giving Shouldn’t Be Optional:
      • Enhances your program.
      • Allows you to serve a more sophisticated donor.
      • Provides long-term security.
      • Personal wealth growing rapidly.
    Integrating Major & Planned Gift Programs into Your Campaign
    • Why We Should All Raise PGs
      • May be the only way donor is able to make a major gift.
      • May be the only way donor is comfortable making a major gift.
      • A fundraiser who can’t recognize a PG prospect and close a gift is not doing all he/she can do for their organization.
      • A sustained effort brings a regular major gifts.
    Integrating Major & Planned Gift Programs into Your Campaign
    • “ Planned Gifts that have been recorded for more than 3 years begin to mature at 10% to 12% annually.”
    • Ford-Thompson, 2006
    Integrating Major & Planned Gift Programs into Your Campaign