The Numbers Matter: Taking Measure of Green Jobs

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The Numbers Matter: Taking Measure of Green Jobs

  1. 1. The numbers ma,er.  Taking measure of green jobs.  Presented by Katrina Mitchell, Green Ci4es, Green Jobs  team member,  at the 2009 Minnesota CERTs Conference  February 11, 2009 
  2. 2.  quot;We've also got to do more to create the green jobs that are  jobs of the future. My energy plan will put $150 billion over  10 years into establishing a green energy sector that will  5 million new jobs  create up to   over the next two decades.”  ‐ President Barack Obama 
  3. 3. 17% increase in US renewable energy from 2002-20061 “In 2006 renewable energy and energy 8.5 efficiency technologies generated million new jobs, nearly $970 billion in revenue, and more than $100 billion in industry profits.”2 “…45 occupations employing more than 14 million people across the country can be boosted through investments in green measures.”3 “4.2 million green jobs by 2038.”3
  4. 4. What is a “Green” Job?  “Well‐paid, career‐track jobs that  contribute directly to preserving or  enhancing environmental quality”.4 
  5. 5. What numbers are important for  economic development?  1.  What proporVon of the jobs in this subsector are  manufacturing posiVons?   2.  How well does the current workforce saVsfy this  subsector’s workforce requirements?  3.  How many jobs per 1,000 square feet of facility space  does this subsector house, on average?   4.  What is the median age of firms in this subsector?  5.  How many new jobs have been created in the last three  years by this subsector?  6.  How much do these manufacturing jobs pay? 
  6. 6. Where are the numbers from?  •  Bureau of Labor StaVsVcs (BLS) industry and  occupaVonal data by North American Industry  ClassificaVon System (NAICS)  –  Not green specific  –  Wages, occupaVonal structure  •  Dun & Bradstreet’s Million Dollar Database  –  Green specific  –  Facility size, employees per facility, annual sales 
  7. 7. What did we find? 
  8. 8. OccupaVonal Structure 
  9. 9. Job Density  Number of workers / 1000 sq. feet 
  10. 10. Median Firm Age  Product Profit Cycle  Research and Development  Product Launch  Mass ProducVon  AutomaVon 
  11. 11. New Job CreaVon 
  12. 12. Median Wages  Green Building Products Median Hourly Wages for Production Occupations $20 $18 Living Wage $16 Median Hourly Wage (2006) $14 $12 National $10 $8 $6 $4 Minneapolis Saint Paul $2 Predicted $0 Wage Structural Metal Wood Products Wood Products HVAC Controls Insulation Clay and Lighting HVAC Cement Masonry Windows - Adhesives Paints and Doors Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics 2006
  13. 13. Are all green jobs good jobs?  Family supporVng wages differ by locaVon  and family size 
  14. 14. The data isn’t perfect…  •  NAICS categories do not map exactly onto green products.  •  The producVon of green products and tradiVonal products in  the same industry might require different workforce  composiVon and different skills.  •  Firms may manufacture both green products and tradiVonal  products. There’s no way to separate out how many people  and how much space is allocated to green manufacturing.  •  Many firms are startups or in emerging technology and work  may be substanVally in R&D and not yet in manufacturing.  R&D requires a completely different skill set. 
  15. 15. Resources  •  quot;High Road or Low Road? Job Quality in the New Green  Economyquot; ‐ Good Jobs First Green Jobs Report 2009  •  Green CiVes, Green Jobs Report  •  Economic Policy InsVtute ‐ Basic Family Budget Calculator 

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