Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Selling UX (IXDA Shanghai 2009)
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Saving this for later?

Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime - even offline.

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Selling UX (IXDA Shanghai 2009)

1,396
views

Published on

At some point in your career, you’ll be called upon to sell User Experience (UX) to someone in your organization. You’ve probably already done it. Perhaps you’ll need to justify what you do in an …

At some point in your career, you’ll be called upon to sell User Experience (UX) to someone in your organization. You’ve probably already done it. Perhaps you’ll need to justify what you do in an organization or industry that’s just beginning to adopt UX methods or sell UX to secure your position within an organization or get future projects. So, what do you need to know to help you sell UX? What challenges might you face? In this talk, Daniel Szuc will:

1. Examine what works and what does not work well when selling UX within an organization;
2. Identify barriers you might encounter to the adoption of UX methods in your organization;
3. Discuss how to package and present UX to stakeholders.

Also see: http://designative.info/2009/12/09/event-ixda-shanghai-presents-selling-ux-in-organizations-with-daniel-szuc-december-11th-2009-630pm/comment-page-1/#comment-6037

Published in: Technology, Business

0 Comments
11 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,396
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
11
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Selling UX
  • 2.  
  • 3.  
  • 4.  
  • 5.  
  • 6. Who uses?
  • 7.  
  • 8.  
  • 9.  
  • 10.  
  • 11.  
  • 12. Why?
  • 13. UX culture http://www.google.com/corporate/tenthings.html
  • 14. What just happened?
  • 15. Persuasion
    • Entertaining
    • Connecting
    • Familiar examples
    • … and then UX
  • 16. Good News
  • 17. http://www.usnews.com/features/business/best-careers/best-careers-2008.html Usability/User experience specialist
  • 18. http://www.usnews.com/money/careers/articles/2009/08/28/americas-best-careers-2009.html User experience specialist
  • 19. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/8017178.stm Technology is still hard to use
  • 20. Business of design
  • 21. Lifestyle integration
  • 22. Still not convinced?
  • 23. I just want to have a shower
  • 24.  
  • 25.  
  • 26. We have work to do 
  • 27. Barriers
  • 28. Yikes!
  • 29. UX Language is Ugly
  • 30. UX Speed Bumps
    • Our definitions of UX force us to justify UX
    • We talk ourselves into a defensive position
    • Does it matter what you call it?
  • 31. Barriers
    • Lack of effective communications
      • Results
      • Deliverables
      • Pitching
      • Not listening
  • 32. Cultures
  • 33. Organizations
    • Proposition:
    • Organizations are cultures.
  • 34. What is culture?
    • Culture:
    • The attitudes, values, behaviors, and customs that reflect a group’s approaches to living their lives.
    • Organizational culture:
    • “ The way we work around here”
  • 35. National Culture Organizational Culture Professional Culture Formal Processes Informal Processes Cultures overlap. Regional Culture Organizational Sub-cultures
  • 36. Key Point
    • Each culture we belong to influences our:
    • Attitudes
    • Opinions
    • Motivations
    • Behaviors
  • 37.
    • Engineer-centric
    • Might never have had a UX team.
    • Products created from interesting technology.
    • Territorial about UI.
    • Challenges
    • Tendency to deem a product usable if it is possible to do the task.
    • They rely heavily on their own experience in UI design.
    • They feel they are doing the right thing for the customer, even if they don’t have evidence.
  • 38.
    • Engineer-centric
    • Might never have had a UX team.
    • Products created from interesting technology.
    • Territorial about UI.
    • Design-centric
    • View building applications and websites as a creative endeavor.
    • Primary focus may be creating designs that other designers will like and respect.
    • Challenges
    • Tendency to deem a product usable if it is possible to do the task.
    • They rely heavily on their own experience in UI design.
    • They feel they are doing the right thing for the customer, even if they don’t have evidence.
    • Challenges
    • Define the user experience in terms of aesthetics rather than ease of use.
    • Focus on visuals rather than workflows.
    • Rely heavily on their own instincts about users.
    • Focus only on data that confirms their viewpoints.
  • 39.
    • Engineer-centric
    • Might never have had a UX team.
    • Products created from interesting technology.
    • Territorial about UI.
    • Design-centric
    • View building applications and websites as a creative endeavor.
    • Primary focus may be creating designs that other designers will like and respect.
    • Sales & marketing centric
    • Represented by powerful people who “know” their customers...but don’t know “all” the customers.
    • Challenges
    • Tendency to deem a product usable if it is possible to do the task.
    • They rely heavily on their own experience in UI design.
    • They feel they are doing the right thing for the customer, even if they don’t have evidence.
    • Challenges
    • Define the user experience in terms of aesthetics rather than ease of use.
    • Focus on visuals rather than workflows.
    • Rely heavily on their own instincts about users.
    • Focus only on data that confirms their viewpoints.
    • Challenges
    • Rely heavily on customers' self-report and customer suggestions to assess usability.
    • Disproportionately weight their “biggest” or “loudest” customers.
    • Often overconfident in their ability to “know” what the customer needs.
  • 40. “ Au says the collaboration between designers and engineers is healthy . A lot of the design team's time is spent on setting standards and building a style guide for engineers to ensure a project will really end up looking like a Google product .” http://www.techradar.com/news/internet/google-explains-its-minimalist-design-philosophy-641441
  • 41. Know your target
    • Who is buying & budget allocation (money)
    • Product vision (plan)
    • Invest in Research and Development (money & strategy)
    • Customer care or just “lip service” (empathy)
  • 42. Ripe Organizations
  • 43.  
  • 44. Ripe Organizations
    • “ Culture Patterns” that indicate UX growth
      • Management is using the lingo
      • Hired a Director or VP of UX
      • Usability testing of products is a given
      • Usability Lab in place or being discussed
      • Product managers claim that UX is strategic advantage
    Know people have “bought” UX
  • 45. Maturity
  • 46. http://www.businessweek.com/innovate/content/apr2009/id20090429_083139.htm?campaign_id=rss_innovate
  • 47. http://www.businessweek.com/innovate/content/apr2009/id20090429_083139.htm?campaign_id=rss_innovate Design Maturity
  • 48. Rewards
  • 49.
    • Doing what the boss says
    • Launching on time
    • Playing politics
    • Coding to specification
  • 50. What Sells?
  • 51. Selling Isn’t “Selling” Vegan
  • 52. Selling is Alignment Vegan
  • 53. Sales Kit
    • "Minimum standards" for all UX'ers
    • What is usability, user-centered design, UX
    • Case study – tell a story
    • Share a delightful product experience
    • Sell the team services
    • What else?
  • 54. Sales Goal?
  • 55. Product Success
  • 56. Common language?
  • 57. UX Vision
  • 58. http://www.uie.com/events/uiconf/2007/articles/experience_vision/
  • 59. http://www.google.com/intl/en/corporate/ux.html
  • 60. Where or what do you want to be in 2,5,10 years time?
  • 61. ?
    • User Tester v Designer
    • Closer (issues) v Opener (innovations)
    • Loner v Collaborator
    • Critic v Creator
    • Silo v holistic
  • 62. Be valuable!
  • 63. Constant State of Self Improvement http://www.apogeehk.com/articles/constant_cycle_of_self_improvement.html
    • Read
    • Share your knowledge
    • Contribute to your community
    • Lead
  • 64. Thank You Email - dszuc@apogeehk.com Twitter - @dszuc