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Native American Dilemma
Native American Dilemma
Native American Dilemma
Native American Dilemma
Native American Dilemma
Native American Dilemma
Native American Dilemma
Native American Dilemma
Native American Dilemma
Native American Dilemma
Native American Dilemma
Native American Dilemma
Native American Dilemma
Native American Dilemma
Native American Dilemma
Native American Dilemma
Native American Dilemma
Native American Dilemma
Native American Dilemma
Native American Dilemma
Native American Dilemma
Native American Dilemma
Native American Dilemma
Native American Dilemma
Native American Dilemma
Native American Dilemma
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Native American Dilemma

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  • 1. The Native American Dilemma Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] A WebQuest for 9th Grade (Social Studies) Designed by Dennis Svaldi [email_address] By Scott Ableman
  • 2. Introduction Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] The tribal chief has called a council of your people. He has had a vision of a people, speaking tongues different than your native brothers. Their skin is like the clouds, and their face covered with fur like the mighty Bear. It is only a matter of time before your tribe encounters them. Friend or foe, man or gods, you are not sure. Do you fight these foreigners, trade them for unknown goods, remain on the ancestral lands of your people, or travel west to avoid them? All have their benefits, all have their costs. What should we do?
  • 3. The Task Student Page Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] The tribal leader has decided to send out different members of your tribe to gather information from other Indian nations. Their encounters with these foreign people will help decide what should be done. The traveling members are: Spiritual leader Warrior Woman Child Trader These members will gather information from other tribes and bring it back so that a council meeting can be called, and a decision made on the future of the tribe. Title
  • 4. The Process Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Step 1: Group sizes will consist of five members. Each member will have to select a different role to take in the tribe. Roles Step 2: Get in the mind set of your character before you begin your research. It is important to look at the information from that persons point of view so that all members will have different information and opinions from the research sites Step 3: Travel to the different sites. You do not have to visit all of them, but use ones that are useful to character’s role in society. Read the sources from your character’s point of view. What do they want, need? What are they losing? What are they gaining? Websites Step 4: Synthesis the information gathered from your research, and create a one page, single spaced paper arguing what you feel is the best decision for the tribe to make. Step 5: After all of your members have shared their information with each other in the tribal council, collaborate your opinions to a single decision. Your decision will be shared in a presentation to the class. The consensus will be given, but all members must speak to why they agree or disagree with the tribes decision.
  • 5. Student Page Back Credits [ Teacher Page ] Spiritual Leader Warrior Woman Child Trader By mharrsch By hartnm1 By jemvla By Mushy's Captures By TRiver
  • 6. Consider the following questions/comments before visiting the websites: Many Native American traditions and religions are tied to their ancestral land. What would it mean to leave it? What is the religious significance of animals? How do these foreign people view Native American traditions, and are their beliefs pressed onto the Native Americans? Roles
  • 7. Consider the following questions/comments before visiting the websites: What are women’s roles in Native American Society? What are the roles of women in the foreigners opinion? How do the foreigners view women? Roles
  • 8. Consider the following questions/comments before visiting the websites: How have others battles faired with the other tribes? How do indians fight in comparison to the foreigners? What are the benefits and costs of allying with the foreigners? Roles
  • 9. Consider the following questions/comments before visiting the websites: What do the foreigners have that can benefit your people? What do they have that can hurt your people? What do the foreigners want from you as a trader? Roles
  • 10. Consider the following questions/comments before visiting the websites: You as a child represent the future of the tribe. Your upbringing has a affect on the outcome of the tribe. What can the foreigners offer you that is better than what your tribe can offer? What will you have to give up in order to be a part of this new culture? Roles
  • 11. Website Student Page Credits [ Teacher Page ] http://www.funsocialstudies.learninghaven.com/articles/natives2.htm http://www.essortment.com/all/huronindians_rjru.htm http://www.essortment.com/all/massachusetindi_rmry.htm http://www.essortment.com/all/historyscalpin_rdrp.htm http://www.historynow.org/06_2007/historian2.html http://www.religioustolerance.org/nataspir1.htm http://womenshistory.about.com/od/nativeamwomen/Native_American_Women_in_History.htm Back It is encouraged to go beyond these sites and find others that will help you in your decision.
  • 12. Evaluation: Presentation Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] CATEGORY 4 3 2 1 Required Elements Student included more information than was required. Student included all information that was required. Student included most information that was required. Student included less information than was required. Knowledge Gained Can clearly explain several ways in which his character "saw" things differently than other characters and can clearly explain why. Can clearly explain several ways in which his character "saw" things differently than other characters. Can clearly explain one way in which his character "saw" things differently than other characters. Cannot explain one way in which his character "saw" things differently than other characters. Role Point-of-view, arguments, and solutions proposed were consistently in character. Point-of-view, arguments, and solutions proposed were often in character. Point-of-view, arguments, and solutions proposed were sometimes in character. Point-of-view, arguments, and solutions proposed were rarely in character.
  • 13. Evaluation: Writing Portion Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] CATEGORY 4 - Above Standards 3 - Meets Standards 2 - Approaching Standards 1 - Below Standards Score Support for Position Includes 3 or more pieces of evidence (facts, statistics, examples, real-life experiences) that support the position statement. The writer anticipates the reader's concerns, biases or arguments and has provided at least 1 counter-argument. Includes 3 or more pieces of evidence (facts, statistics, examples, real-life experiences) that support the position statement. Includes 2 pieces of evidence (facts, statistics, examples, real-life experiences) that support the position statement. Includes 1 or fewer pieces of evidence (facts, statistics, examples, real-life experiences).   Evidence and Examples All of the evidence and examples are specific, relevant and explanations are given that show how each piece of evidence supports the author's position. Most of the evidence and examples are specific, relevant and explanations are given that show how each piece of evidence supports the author's position. At least one of the pieces of evidence and examples is relevant and has an explanation that shows how that piece of evidence supports the author's position. Evidence and examples are NOT relevant AND/OR are not explained.   Grammar & Spelling Author makes no errors in grammar or spelling that distract the reader from the content. Author makes 1-2 errors in grammar or spelling that distract the reader from the content. Author makes 3-4 errors in grammar or spelling that distract the reader from the content. Author makes more than 4 errors in grammar or spelling that distract the reader from the content.  
  • 14. Conclusion Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] You have come to a council decision and told the rest of the tribe what is expected of its people. Times are changing, and they will continue to change. This is only one the beginning… By annieA
  • 15. Credits & References Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] All pictures were found in Flicker By Scott Ableman By TRiver By Mushy's Captures By mharrsch By jemvla By hartnm1 By annieA The websites link to The WebQuest Page Link to The WebQuest Slideshare Group
  • 16. The Native American Dilemma [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page 9 th grade Social Studies Dennis Svaldi [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 17. Introduction (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson was first created to bring technology into the classroom. It allows the kids to take control of their learning. Students are taking part in the dilemma of Native Americans during the time of colonization. They will be placed together into tribal councils to determine what future actions the tribe should make. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 18. Learners (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson is designed for a 9 th grade social studies class. This lesson can be slightly altered to allow for other grades above and below it. If this is being done, consider the amount of sources needed, and the length of the paper and presentation. This project should also be given after students have been introduced to the colonization of America. It is recommended that lectures be given to provide a basic framework that the students can work from Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 19. Curriculum Standards (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page <ul><li>What will students learn as a result of this lesson? Describe the outcomes succinctly. Use the language of existing standards. For example: </li></ul><ul><li>Social Studies Standards Addressed </li></ul><ul><li>3.1 Students know how various societies were affected by contacts and exchanges among diverse peoples. </li></ul><ul><li>3.2 Students understand the history of social organization in various societies. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Through this project, students will also learn the process of research and information synthesis. </li></ul><ul><li>They will learn the value of working in groups and how to bring multiple points of views into a single voice. </li></ul><ul><li>It will also help students with developing an opinion, and supporting that opinion with facts and evidence. </li></ul><ul><li>It will aid students in placing themselves in situations of the past and present, taking a historical outlook at events. </li></ul>Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 20. The Process (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Step 1: Group sizes will consist of five members. Each member will have to select a different role to take in the tribe. Questions are given to each role, but students should not be graded based on these questions. Allow them to ask their own questions and seek their answers. Step 2: Get in the mind set of your character before you begin your research. It is important to look at the information from that persons point of view so that all members will have different information and opinions from the research sites Step 3: Travel to the different sites. You do not have to visit all of them, but use ones that are useful to character’s role in society. Read the sources from your character’s point of view. What do they want, need? What are they losing? What are they gaining? Step 4: Synthesis the information gathered from your research, and create a one page, single spaced paper arguing what you feel is the best decision for the tribe to make. Step 5: After all of your members have shared their information with each other in the tribal council, collaborate your opinions to a single decision. Your decision will be shared in a presentation to the class. The consensus will be given, but all members must speak to why they agree or disagree with the tribes decision.
  • 21. Resources (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page <ul><li>Necessary resources </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Student access to the web </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Teacher must have knowledge to aid students in interpretation or understanding of recourses found on Native American culture and history </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide a printed copy of the Webquest so that students have the requirements and expectations with them. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Possible websites, but not limited to these: websites </li></ul><ul><li>(Important: Use lecture time to support information students will find, and provide additional information that students can use. </li></ul>Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 22. Evaluation (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion CATEGORY 4 - Above Standards 3 - Meets Standards 2 - Approaching Standards 1 - Below Standards Score Support for Position Includes 3 or more pieces of evidence (facts, statistics, examples, real-life experiences) that support the position statement. The writer anticipates the reader's concerns, biases or arguments and has provided at least 1 counter-argument. Includes 3 or more pieces of evidence (facts, statistics, examples, real-life experiences) that support the position statement. Includes 2 pieces of evidence (facts, statistics, examples, real-life experiences) that support the position statement. Includes 1 or fewer pieces of evidence (facts, statistics, examples, real-life experiences).   Evidence and Examples All of the evidence and examples are specific, relevant and explanations are given that show how each piece of evidence supports the author's position. Most of the evidence and examples are specific, relevant and explanations are given that show how each piece of evidence supports the author's position. At least one of the pieces of evidence and examples is relevant and has an explanation that shows how that piece of evidence supports the author's position. Evidence and examples are NOT relevant AND/OR are not explained.   Grammar & Spelling Author makes no errors in grammar or spelling that distract the reader from the content. Author makes 1-2 errors in grammar or spelling that distract the reader from the content. Author makes 3-4 errors in grammar or spelling that distract the reader from the content. Author makes more than 4 errors in grammar or spelling that distract the reader from the content.  
  • 23. Evaluation (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion CATEGORY 4 3 2 1 Required Elements Student included more information than was required. Student included all information that was required. Student included most information that was required. Student included less information than was required. Knowledge Gained Can clearly explain several ways in which his character &quot;saw&quot; things differently than other characters and can clearly explain why. Can clearly explain several ways in which his character &quot;saw&quot; things differently than other characters. Can clearly explain one way in which his character &quot;saw&quot; things differently than other characters. Cannot explain one way in which his character &quot;saw&quot; things differently than other characters. Role Point-of-view, arguments, and solutions proposed were consistently in character. Point-of-view, arguments, and solutions proposed were often in character. Point-of-view, arguments, and solutions proposed were sometimes in character. Point-of-view, arguments, and solutions proposed were rarely in character.
  • 24. Teacher Script (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Lectures should accompany the project, but the project in itself should be student driven. It may be necessary to remind students how to use the internet, and also talk about the validity of certain websites. This is a good time to talk about secondary sources and primary sources and the worth of both. One walk through of the WebQuest is recommended so that the students understand how to use it. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 25. Conclusion (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Make sure that the point is made that Native American history is a fluid subject. It continues today, and the students should be encouraged to continue their self driven, educational success beyond what is taught to them in the classroom. Point out what the students have learned. Not the facts they have obtained but the skills they have learned to obtain those facts. Example: Researching, Cooperation, Group Collaboration, Team Work, Opinion Making, Factual Support Tactics Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 26. Credits & References (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Include a link back to The WebQuest Page and The WebQuest Slideshare Group so that others can acquire the latest version of this template and training materials. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Flickr Pictures By Scott Ableman By TRiver By Mushy's Captures By mharrsch By jemvla By hartnm1 By annieA

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