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Producing Spoken English Interpretations of Classifer-based Texts
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Producing Spoken English Interpretations of Classifer-based Texts

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Presented to the 2008 USDB Interpreters Winter Workshop

Presented to the 2008 USDB Interpreters Winter Workshop

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  • 1. Producing Spoken English Interpretations of Classifier-based Texts Doug Stringham 2008 USDB Winter Workshop ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 2. What we hope toaccomplish today: ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 3. not learn all the different kinds ofapplications of classifiers in ASL (Dan’s class)Understand basic notional and functionalroles of classifiers in ASL discourseUnderstand how spoken English discoursedeals with notional and functional rolesCreate personal strategies for working withclassifiers in signed textsSet up group terminologies in preparation toProduce interpretation work ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 4. Functional and notional roles of classifiers in ASL discourse ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 5. How/Where do ASLusers use classifiers? ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 6. (1) ASL users use classifiers to(simultaneously) satisfy notional purposes. ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 7. Classifier PredicatesPredicates say something about nouns/nounphrases (‘the boy is sick’; ‘is sick’ is thepredication on the noun); types of CL predicates: whole entity (object as a whole) surface instrumental depth and width extent (amounts or volumes) perimeter-shape on-surface (groups of objects) Valli & Lucas, 2000 ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 8. Base Classifier PhonemesA fist (A, S, T) L thumb + index (L, L!)B flat hand (B, 4) 3 vehicle (3)5 spread hand (5) 0 tapered (O, M)C cupped (C, C!) R crossed fingers (R)E claw (E, E!) V index + middle (V, V!)F “okay” (F, F!) W thumb + pinkie (W, W!)G point (G, D, 1) X hook (X, X!)H index + middle (H, N, U) Y ix/thumb + pinkie (Y, Y!, ILY)I pinkie (I) 8 bent middle (8, 8!)K “chopsticks” (K, P) ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 9. Pronominals ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 10. Subject PronounsPronoun English ASLFirst person singular I PRO.1First person plural we WE, TWO-OF-US, THREE-OF-US…Second person singular you PRO.2 (singular)Second person plural you PRO.2 (plural), TWO-OF- YOU, THREE-OF-YOU…Third person singular he, she, PRO.3-IX, PRO.3-thumb itThird person plural they THEY, TWO-OF-THEM, THREE-OF-THEM(Jeff Pollock, 2007)
  • 11. Object PronounsPronoun English ASLFirst person singular me PRO.1First person plural us WE, TWO-OF-US, THREE-OF-US…Second person singular you PRO.2 (singular)Second person plural you PRO.2 (plural), TWO-OF- YOU, THREE-OF-YOU…Third person singular him, her, PRO.3-IX, PRO.3-thumb itThird person plural them THEM, TWO-OF-THEM, THREE-OF-THEM(Jeff Pollock, 2007)
  • 12. ‘X persons’: CL:{#}not #-OF-US ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 13. Verbs ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 14. ‘put an object up’:(2h)CL:C“raise overhead”(note initial nominal clarification)‘blender movement’:CL:1“spinning {part}”(see SN 16: How things work) ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 15. Adjectival modifers ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 16. ‘big car,’ (2h)CL:L or (2h)CL:C‘small cars froman airplane,’ CL:G“size” ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 17. Adverbial modifiers ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 18. (closely tied toverbal information) ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 19. ‘blender movement’:CL:1“spinning {part}”‘car in and out of traffic’CL:B“car weaving in traffic”(how the car moves)Police story (Martin)CL:B“car weaving in traffic”(CL:Y’“airplane”, how the plane fliesaround; (2h)CL:3, how the cars arepulled over) ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 20. “David Meets The Police”http://teach-asl.blogspot.com/2007/02/asl-storytelling-scary-experience-with.html ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 21. Adpositionals/Locatives ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 22. most commonly perceivedusage of ASL classifiers ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 23. Specificity in ASL locative units is very efficient. ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 24. ASL’s implicit phonology and morphology(pronunciation) allows fornear absolute specificity. ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 25. “New York School f/t Deaf” watch (2h)CL:A‘school and hospital’ ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 26. “Deaf Ninja”watch for multiple locative relationships http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L91KVUXRBq8 ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 27. (2) ASL users useclassifiers to satisfyfunctional purposes. ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 28. not to make ASL “look cool” ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 29. not to make ASL“look more ASL” ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 30. To satisfy/represent pronominal object spatial or conceptualrelationship agreement. ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 31. “New York School f/t Deaf” (spatial and conceptual relationships) ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 32. To satisfy/represent descriptive size andshape specifier (SaSS) descriptions. ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 33. SaSSes themselves don’tfunction as pronominalsDescribe pronominals’/objects’ character, not itsmovement or “objectness”e.g. ‘CL:1’ or ‘CL:V!’ doesn’tindicate its nominal nature ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 34. Why? ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 35. Because ASL employs a topic/commentsyntactical structure, spatial relationshipsand SaSS descriptions must be defined. ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 36. How does spokenEnglish discourse dealwith similar functional/ notional roles? ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 37. Pronominals ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 38. Subject PronounsPronoun English ASLFirst person singular I PRO.1First person plural we WE, TWO-OF-US, THREE-OF-US…Second person singular you PRO.2 (singular)Second person plural you PRO.2 (plural), TWO-OF- YOU, THREE-OF-YOU…Third person singular he, she, PRO.3-IX, PRO.3-thumb itThird person plural they THEY, TWO-OF-THEM, THREE-OF-THEM(Jeff Pollock, 2007)
  • 39. Some English subject pronominal hangups: ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 40. Singular ‘they’:“When I tell a joke, they laugh.” ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 41. gender-neutrality:“That student finished his/their homework.” ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 42. Object PronounsPronoun English ASLFirst person singular me PRO.1First person plural us WE, TWO-OF-US, THREE-OF-US…Second person singular you PRO.2 (singular)Second person plural you PRO.2 (plural), TWO-OF- YOU, THREE-OF-YOU…Third person singular him, her, PRO.3-IX, PRO.3-thumb itThird person plural them THEY, TWO-OF-THEM, THREE-OF-THEM(Jeff Pollock, 2007)
  • 43. Verbs ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 44. Lexically:concrete action words (‘run’, ‘jump,’ ‘sing’) ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 45. Lexically:abstract action words (‘love,’ ‘think,’ ‘grow’) ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 46. Lexically: verbification/verbing(‘Fedex,’ ‘email,’ ‘chair’) ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 47. Modifiers ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 48. Lexically:adjectival lexemes and phrases: ‘small,’ ‘blue,’ ‘oversized,’ ‘bouncing baby boy,’ ‘once in a lifetime’ ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 49. adjectival lexemes may also bepositive, comparative, andsuperlative: ‘rich,’ ‘richer,’‘richest’; ‘beautiful,’ ‘morebeautiful,’ ‘most beautifulspecificity in English adjectivalmodifiers is inefficient(‘deciduous’ vs. ‘evergreen,’‘computer’ vs. ‘laptop’) butlexically rich ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 50. Lexically: manner adverbial lexemes and affixes:‘really,’ ‘very,’ affix ‘ly’ ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 51. Lexically: redefined nominal and verbal lexemes: ‘so,’ ‘much,’ ‘wicked,’‘butt,’ ‘way,’ ‘sick,’ ‘phat’ ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 52. Lexically:redefined interjectory or intensifer lexemes (‘damn,’ ‘f*****g,’) ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 53. Lexically: determiners/articles(‘a,’ ‘the,’ ‘that,’ ‘those’) ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 54. Lexically: nominal/pronominal possessives(‘his,’ ‘yours,’ ‘the girl’s’) ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 55. Lexically: portmanteau (abso-f*****n-lutely,podagogical, funtastic) ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 56. Lexically: -like and -ish affixes(‘rainbow-like,’ ‘five-ish’) ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 57. Tonally: phonemic/morphemic extensions‘be-you-tiful,’ ‘re-hee- heelly,” “that was awwwesome!” ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 58. Tonally:insinuate alternative meaning—sarcasm, feigned interest (‘great,’ ‘uh,’ ‘right’) ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 59. Metaphorically: comparative phrases(‘hot as hell,’ ‘soft as a baby’s bottom’) ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 60. Other modifer types? ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 61. Adpositions/Locatives ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 62. Lexically: prepositionals andprepositional phrases ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 63. time, location, movementtypically always in aprepositional phrase“[preposition] the [object]” ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 64. Samples of English prepositionals: ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 65. before, in front of, on, behind,under, beneath, beside, next to,before, between, on, into, near,through, off, over, upon, across, of, concerning, like, except, about, in, for, without, toward,to, around, by, past, at, against,during, until, throughout, after ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 66. Specificity in Englishprepositional units is inefficient. ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 67. more specificity = more prepositional lexemes ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 68. ‘the ball is next to the glove.’ ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 69. {preposition}‘the ball is next to the glove.’ {prepositional phrase} ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 70. ‘the ball is extremelyclose to the glove, about three inches from thetop of the webbing, not on the right side, but over on the left side.’ ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 71. ‘the ball is extremelyclose to the glove, about three inches from thetop of the webbing, not on the right side, but over on the left side.’ ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 72. Create personalstrategies for working with classifiers in signed texts ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 73. interpretation = “work” ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 74. interpretation ! “me” ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 75. Avoiding judgmental language in interpreter talkEvaluative/judgmental Non-evaluative/-judgmental S/he/you/me The interpret -ation/-er Could have, should have When I saw/heard ____, I I would have... understood it to mean... Clear, good, right/wrong, I saw a pattern; here is more/less, better/worse an/are example(s) that might help illustrate I liked the way... I thought it worked I saw/heard ______; to me that means _______©2001 Betty Colonomos, Bilingual Mediation Center
  • 76. Group text analysis/interpretation of signed classifier-based texts ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 77. Additional Readingsonlineslangdictionary.cometymonline.comen.wikipedia.org/wiki/english_grammarValli, C. & Lucas, C. (2000). “ClassifierPredicates and Locative Verbs” (ch. 7) and“Classifier Predicates and SignerPerspective” (ch. 8). In Linguistics ofAmerican Sign Language. Washington, D.C.:Gallaudet University Press. ©2008 Doug Stringham
  • 78. Thank you.dstringham@gmail.com ©2008 Doug Stringham