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The Media and the Courts
The Media and the Courts
The Media and the Courts
The Media and the Courts
The Media and the Courts
The Media and the Courts
The Media and the Courts
The Media and the Courts
The Media and the Courts
The Media and the Courts
The Media and the Courts
The Media and the Courts
The Media and the Courts
The Media and the Courts
The Media and the Courts
The Media and the Courts
The Media and the Courts
The Media and the Courts
The Media and the Courts
The Media and the Courts
The Media and the Courts
The Media and the Courts
The Media and the Courts
The Media and the Courts
The Media and the Courts
The Media and the Courts
The Media and the Courts
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The Media and the Courts

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COJET Presentation for Pima County Superior Court

COJET Presentation for Pima County Superior Court

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  • Government Online The internet gives citizens new paths to government services and information.
  • Government Online The internet gives citizens new paths to government services and information.
  • Transcript

    1. The Media and the Courts Dave Ricker Community Relations Coordinator Pima County Superior Court
    2. The Media and the Courts <ul><li>&quot;What distinguishes a truly free society from all others is an independent judiciary and a free press.&quot;  -- Edward R. Murrow </li></ul>
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    4. The Media and the Courts <ul><li>The accused has the right to a fair trial free from prejudice due to outside influences. </li></ul><ul><li>Constitution of the United States, Amendment VI: In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the State and district wherein the crime shall have been committed, which district shall have been previously ascertained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, and to have the Assistance of Counsel for his defense. </li></ul>
    5. The Media and the Courts <ul><li>The media and the public have a right of access to our system of justice. </li></ul><ul><li>Constitution of the United States, Amendment I: Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances. </li></ul>
    6. The Media and the Courts <ul><li>► How does a reporter determine what they will or will not cover at the courthouse? </li></ul><ul><li>► What crime stories are of interest to the public? </li></ul><ul><li>► Are court cases other than criminal matters reported on a regular basis? </li></ul><ul><li>► How does the news media go about reporting on these stories? </li></ul>
    7. The Media and the Courts <ul><li>Arizona Supreme Court Rule 122 </li></ul><ul><li>Electronic and still photographic coverage of public judicial proceedings conducted by a judicial officer during sessions of court may be permitted in accordance with the following guidelines: </li></ul><ul><li>(a) No electronic or still photographic coverage of juvenile court proceedings shall be permitted, except that such coverage may be permitted in adoption proceedings for the purpose of memorializing the event, with the agreement of the parties to the proceeding and the court. </li></ul>
    8. The Media and the Courts <ul><li>(b) Electronic and still photographic coverage of public judicial proceedings other than the proceedings specified in paragraph (a) above may be permitted in the discretion of the judge giving due consideration to the following factors: </li></ul><ul><li>(i) The impact of coverage upon the right of any party to a fair trial; </li></ul><ul><li>(ii) The impact of coverage upon the right of privacy of any party or witness; </li></ul><ul><li>(iii) The impact of coverage upon the safety and well-being of any party, witness or juror; </li></ul>
    9. The Media and the Courts <ul><li>(iv) The likelihood that coverage would distract participants or would detract from the dignity of the proceedings; </li></ul><ul><li>(v) The adequacy of the physical facilities of the court for coverage; </li></ul><ul><li>(vi) The timeliness of the request pursuant to subsection (f) of this Rule; and </li></ul><ul><li>(vii) Any other factor affecting the fair administration of justice. </li></ul>
    10. The Media and the Courts <ul><li>(c) The judge may limit or prohibit electronic or still photographic coverage only after making specific, on-the-record findings that there is a likelihood of harm arising from one or more of the above factors that outweighs the benefit to the public of camera coverage. </li></ul>
    11. The Media and the Courts <ul><li>(f) Requests by the media for coverage shall be made to the judge of the particular proceeding sufficiently in advance of the proceeding or portion thereof as not to delay or interfere with it. Unless the judicial proceeding is scheduled on less than three days notice, the request to tape or photograph a proceeding must be made no less than two days in advance of the hearing . The judge shall notify all parties and witnesses of the request. If there is any objection to a request for camera coverage or an order allowing electronic or still photographic coverage, the court shall hold a hearing promptly. </li></ul>
    12. The Media and the Courts <ul><li>Policy No. 1103: Electronic and Photographic Coverage of Public Judicial Proceedings </li></ul><ul><li>Except for juvenile court proceedings, requests for permission for electronic, video, or still photographic coverage of public judicial proceedings shall be made by filing the court’s camera request form with the assigned judicial officer presiding over the proceeding , with a copy to the court’s community relations coordinator. Such requests shall be made no less than two business days before the proceeding sought to be covered. The assigned judge shall determine whether and under what conditions such coverage shall be permitted in accordance with Supreme Court Rule 122. </li></ul>
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    14. The Media and the Courts <ul><li>(n) No more than one television camera and one still camera mounted on a tripod, each with a single camera operator, shall be permitted in the courtroom for coverage at any time while court is in session. The broadcast media shall select a representative to arrange the pooling of media participants. The court shall not participate in the pooling agreement. </li></ul>
    15. The Media and the Courts <ul><li>Meet the American daily newspaper of 2008 (including the newspaper of today). </li></ul><ul><li>It has fewer pages than three years ago , the paper stock is thinner , and the stories are shorter . There is less foreign and national news , less space devoted to science , the arts , features and a range of specialized subjects . Business coverage is either packaged in an increasingly thin stand-alone section or collapsed into another part of the paper . The crossword puzzle has shrunk , the TV listings and stock tables may have disappeared , but coverage of some local issues has strengthened and investigative reporting remain highly valued . </li></ul><ul><li>The newsroom staff producing the paper is also smaller, younger, more tech savvy, and more oriented to serving the demands of both print and the web . The staff also is under greater pressure, has less institutional memory, less knowledge of the community, of how to gather news and the history of individual beats . There are fewer editors to catch mistakes. </li></ul>
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    19. The Media and the Courts <ul><li>The internet gives citizens new paths to government services and information </li></ul><ul><li>► 48% of internet users have looked for information about a public policy or issue online with their local, state or federal government </li></ul><ul><li>► 46% have looked up what services a government agency provides </li></ul><ul><li>► 41% have downloaded government forms </li></ul><ul><li>► 35% have researched official government documents or statistics </li></ul><ul><li>► 33% have renewed a driver’s license or auto registration </li></ul><ul><li>► 30% have gotten recreational or tourist information from a government agency </li></ul>
    20. The Media and the Courts <ul><li>► 25% have gotten advice or information from a government agency about a health or safety issue </li></ul><ul><li>► 23% have gotten information about or applied for government benefits </li></ul><ul><li>► 19% have gotten information about how to apply for a government job </li></ul><ul><li>► 15% have paid a fine, such as a parking ticket </li></ul><ul><li>► 11% have applied for a recreational license, such as a fishing or hunting license </li></ul>
    21. The Media and the Courts The courts blog at the Arizona Daily Star Written by Reporter Kim Smith http://azstarnet.com/news/blogs/courthouse/
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    27. The Media and the Courts <ul><li>Supporting documents and materials available at: http://www.slideshare.net </li></ul><ul><li>Look for content uploaded by David Ricker. </li></ul><ul><li>Thanks for coming and your interest. </li></ul>

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